The Lumley Autograph by Susan Fenimore Cooper

and accents (used by the author for some foreign words, and in a few quotations) have been ignored. A few missing periods and quotation marks have been silently inserted. {A brief introduction to “The Lumley Autograph.”: {“The Lumley Autograph” was inspired, as Susan’s introductory note states, by the constant stream of letters received by her

Female Suffrage by Susan Fenimore CooperA Letter to the Christian Women of America

Project an article arguing AGAINST the right of women to vote–an article written by a woman? {There are two reasons for doing so. The first is that Susan Fenimore Cooper (1813-1894) was no ordinary woman. She was educated in Europe and extremely well read; she was the daughter and literary assistant of James Fenimore Cooper,

Elinor Wyllys by Susan Fenimore CooperOr, the Young Folk of Longbridge

{This e-text was prepared from the first edition of Susan Fenimore Cooper’s “Elinor Wyllys: or, The Young Folk of Longbridge” (Philadelphia: Carey and Hart, 1846). “Elinor Wyllys” was also published in England (London: Richard Bentley, 1845), but has otherwise not been reprinted. {Text and note are by Hugh C. MacDougall (jfcooper@wpe.com). Notes are enclosed in

Elinor Wyllys by Susan Fenimore CooperOr, the Young Folk of Longbridge

{This e-text was prepared from the first edition of Susan Fenimore Cooper’s “Elinor Wyllys: or, The Young Folk of Longbridge” (Philadelphia: Carey and Hart, 1846). “Elinor Wyllys” was also published in England (London: Richard Bentley, 1845), but has otherwise not been reprinted. {Text and note are by Hugh C. MacDougall (jfcooper@wpe.com). Notes are enclosed in
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