The Aspern Papers, by Henry James

The text is that of the first American book edition, Macmillan and Co., 1888. THE ASPERN PAPERS I I had taken Mrs. Prest into my confidence; in truth without her I should have made but little advance, for the fruitful idea in the whole business dropped from her friendly lips. It was she who invented

The American by Henry James

Prepared by Pauline J. Iacono The American by Henry James 1877 CHAPTER I On a brilliant day in May, in the year 1868, a gentleman was reclining at his ease on the great circular divan which at that period occupied the centre of the Salon Carre, in the Museum of the Louvre. This commodious ottoman

The Ambassadors by Henry James

New York Edition (1909). Prepared by Richard D. Hathaway Proofread by Julia P. DeRanek Volume I Preface Nothing is more easy than to state the subject of “The Ambassadors,” which first appeared in twelve numbers of _The North American Review_ (1903) and was published as a whole the same year. The situation involved is gathered

The Altar of the Dead by Henry James

Transcribed from the 1916 Martin Secker edition by David Price, email ccx074@coventry.ac.uk THE ALTAR OF THE DEAD CHAPTER I. He had a mortal dislike, poor Stransom, to lean anniversaries, and loved them still less when they made a pretence of a figure. Celebrations and suppressions were equally painful to him, and but one of the

Some Short Stories by Henry James

This etext was scanned by David Price, email ccx074@coventry.ac.uk from the 1922 Macmillan and Co. edition. Proofing was by David, Marc Davis and Andy McLauchlan. SOME SHORT STORIES BY HENRY JAMES Contents: Brooksmith The Real Thing The Story of It Flickerbridge Mrs. Medwin BROOKSMITH We are scattered now, the friends of the late Mr. Oliver

Sir Dominick Ferrand by Henry James

This etext was scanned by David Price, email ccx074@coventry.ac.uk, from the 1893 Macmillan and Co. edition. Proofing was by Nina Hall, Mohua Sen, Bridie, Francine Smith and David. Sir Dominick Ferrand by Henry James “There are several objections to it, but I’ll take it if you’ll alter it,” Mr. Locket’s rather curt note had said;

Roderick Hudson, by Henry James

RODERICK HUDSON by HENRY JAMES CONTENTS I. Rowland II. Roderick III. Rome IV. Experience V. Christina VI. Frascati VII. St. Cecilia’s VIII. Provocation IX. Mary Garland X. The Cavaliere XI. Mrs. Hudson XII. The Princess Casamassima XIII. Switzerland CHAPTER I. Rowland Mallet had made his arrangements to sail for Europe on the first of September,

Confidence by Henry James

CONFIDENCE by HENRY JAMES CHAPTER I It was in the early days of April; Bernard Longueville had been spending the winter in Rome. He had travelled northward with the consciousness of several social duties that appealed to him from the further side of the Alps, but he was under the charm of the Italian spring,

Pandora by Henry James

This etext was scanned by David Price, email ccx074@coventry.ac.uk from the 1922 Macmillan and Co. edition. Proofing was by David, Jeremy Kwock and Uzma G. PANDORA by Henry James CHAPTER I It has long been the custom of the North German Lloyd steamers, which convey passengers from Bremen to New York, to anchor for several

Nona Vincent by Henry James

This etext was scanned by David Price, email ccx074@coventry.ac.uk, from the 1893 Macmillan and Co. edition. Proofing was by Nina Hall, Mohua Sen, Bridie, Francine Smith and David. Nona Vincent by Henry James CHAPTER I. “I wondered whether you wouldn’t read it to me,” said Mrs. Alsager, as they lingered a little near the fire

Italian Hours by Henry James

This etext was prepared by Richard Farris (rf7211@hotmail.com), and proofread by the online team at Distributed Proofreaders. ITALIAN HOURS BY HENRY JAMES PUBLISHED NOVEMBER 1909 PREFACE The chapters of which this volume is composed have with few exceptions already been collected, and were then associated with others commemorative of other impressions of (no very extensive)

In the Cage by Henry James

This etext was prepared by David Price ccx074@coventry.ac.uk, from the 1919 Martin Secker. In the Cage CHAPTER I It had occurred to her early that in her position–that of a young person spending, in framed and wired confinement, the life of a guinea-pig or a magpie–she should know a great many persons without their recognising