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The Writings of Abraham Lincoln, v6 by Abraham Lincoln

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Department through the Provost-Marshal-General's office, by special
letters.

I further proclaim that all volunteers received under this call, as
well as all others not heretofore credited, shall be duly credited
and deducted from the quotas established for the next draft.

I further proclaim that if any State shall fail to raise the quota
assigned to it by the War Department under this call, then a draft
for the deficiency in said quota shall be made in said State, or in
the districts of said State, for their due proportion of said quota,
and the said draft shall commence on the 5th day of January, 1864.

And I further proclaim that nothing in this proclamation shall
interfere with existing orders, or with those which may be issued for
the present draft in the States where it is now in progress, or where
it has not yet been commenced.

The quotas of the States and districts will be assigned by the War
Department through the Provost-Marshal-General's office, due regard
being had for the men heretofore furnished, whether by volunteering
or drafting; and the recruiting will be conducted in accordance with
such instructions as have been or may be issued by that department.

In issuing this proclamation, I address myself not only to the
governors of the several States, but also to the good and loyal
people thereof, invoking them to lend their cheerful, willing, and
effective aid to the measures thus adopted, with a view to reinforce
our victorious army now in the field, and bring our needful military
operations to a prosperous end, thus closing forever the fountains of
sedition and civil war.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal
of the United States to be affixed.....................

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.
By the President:
WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL FOSTER.

WAR DEPARTMENT, WASHINGTON, D.C., October 17, 1863.

MAJOR-GENERAL FOSTER, Port Monroe, Va.:

It would be useless for Mrs. Dr. Wright to come here. The subject is
a very painful one, but the case is settled.

A. LINCOLN.

TELEGRAM TO W. B. THOMAS

EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON, D.C., OCTOBER 17, 1863

HON. WILLIAM B. THOMAS, Philadelphia, Pa.

I am grateful for your offer of 100,000 men, but as at present
advised I do not consider that Washington is in danger, or that there
is any emergency requiring 60 or 90 days men.

A. LINCOLN.

TELEGRAM TO J. WILLIAMS AND N. G. TAYLOR.

WAR DEPARTMENT, October 17, 1863.

JOHN WILLIAMS AND N G. TAYLOR, Knoxville, Tenn.:

You do not estimate the holding of East Tennessee more highly than I
do. There is no absolute purpose of withdrawing our forces from it,
and only a contingent one to withdraw them temporarily for the
purpose of not losing the position permanently. I am in great hope
of not finding it necessary to withdraw them at all, particularly if
you raise new troops rapidly for us there.

A. LINCOLN.

TELEGRAM TO T. C. DURANT.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON CITY, October 18, 1863.

T. C. DURANT, New York:

As I do with others, so I will try to see you when you come.

A. LINCOLN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL W. S. ROSECRANS.

WAR DEPARTMENT, October 19, 1863.9. A.M.

MAJOR-GENERAL ROSECRANS, Chattanooga, Tenn:

There has been no battle recently at Bull Run. I suppose what you
have heard a rumor of was not a general battle, but an "affair" at
Bristow Station on the railroad, a few miles beyond Manassas Junction
toward the Rappahannock, on Wednesday, the 14th. It began by an
attack of the enemy upon General Warren, and ended in the enemy being
repulsed with a loss of four cannon and from four to seven hundred
prisoners.

A. LINCOLN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL R. C. SCHENCK.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON, October 21, 1863.2.45

MAJOR-GENERAL SCHENCK, Baltimore, Md.:

A delegation is here saying that our armed colored troops are at
many, if not all, the landings on the Patuxent River, and by their
presence with arms in their hands are frightening quiet people and
producing great confusion. Have they been sent there by any order,
and if so, for what reason?

A. LINCOLN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL R. C. SCHENCK.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON, October 22, 1863.1.30 P.M.

MAJOR-GENERAL SCHENCK, Baltimore, Md.:

Please come over here. The fact of one of our officers being killed
on the Patuxent is a specimen of what I would avoid. It seems to me
we could send white men to recruit better than to send negroes and
thus inaugurate homicides on punctilio.

Please come over.

A. LINCOLN.

TO GENERAL H. W. HALLECK.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON,
October 24, 1863.

MAJOR-GENERAL HALLECK:

Taking all our information together, I think it probable that Ewell's
corps has started for East Tennessee by way of Abingdon, marching
last Monday, say from Meade's front directly to the railroad at
Charlottesville.

First, the object of Lee's recent movement against Meade; his
destruction of the Alexandria and Orange Railroad, and subsequent
withdrawal without more motive, not otherwise apparent, would be
explained by this hypothesis.

Secondly, the direct statement of Sharpe's men that Ewell has gone to
Tennessee.

Thirdly, the Irishman's [Northern Spy in Richmond] statement that he
has not gone through Richmond, and his further statement of an appeal
made to the people at Richmond to go and protect their salt, which
could only refer to the works near Abingdon.

Fourthly, Graham's statement from Martinsburg that Imboden is in
retreat for Harrisonburg. This last matches with the idea that Lee
has retained his cavalry, sending Imboden and perhaps other scraps to
join Ewell. Upon this probability what is to be done?

If you have a plan matured, I have nothing to say. If you have not,
then I suggest that, with all possible expedition, the Army of the
Potomac get ready to attack Lee, and that in the meantime a raid
shall, at all hazards, break the railroad at or near Lynchburg.

Yours truly,

A. LINCOLN.

TO E. B. WASHBURNE.

(Private and Confidential.)

EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON,
October 26, 1863.

HON. E. B. WASHBURNE.

MY DEAR SIR:--Yours of the 12th has been in my hands several days.
Inclosed I send the leave of absence for your brother, in as good
form as I think I can safely put it. Without knowing whether he
would accept it. I have tendered the collectorship at Portland,
Maine, to your other brother, the governor.

Thanks to both you and our friend Campbell for your kind words and
intentions. A second term would be a great honor and a great labor,
which, together, perhaps I would not decline if tendered.

Yours truly,

A. LINCOLN.

TO SECRETARY CHASE.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON,
October 26, 1863.

HON. SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

MY DEAR SIR:--The writer of the accompanying letter is one of Mrs.
Lincoln's numerous cousins. He is a grandson of "Milliken's Bend,"
near Vicksburg--that is, a grandson of the man who gave name to
Milliken's Bend. His father was a brother to MRS. Lincoln's mother.
I know not a thing about his loyalty beyond what he says. Supposing
he is loyal, can any of his requests be granted, and if any, which of
them?

Yours truly,

A. LINCOLN.

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