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The World's Best Poetry -- Volume 10 by Various

Part 2 out of 10

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People, The
State-craft

Possession
Contentment
Discontent
Expectation
Love's Unity

Poverty
Adversity
Charity
Comfort
Fortune
Good
Gratitude
Ingratitude
Wealth

Power
Authority
State-craft

Praise
Compliment
Flattery
People, The

Prayer
Aspiration
God

Preaching
Clergy
Creed
Ecclesiasticism
Instruction
Oratory
Speech
Theology

Present, The
Eternity
Memory
Past
Time
To-morrow

Pride
Conceit
Fool
Vanity

Progress
Ambition
Man

Promise
Fidelity
Sincerity

Quarrel
Anger
Jealousy

Rain
Cloud
Rainbow
Seasons
Storm

Rainbow
Cloud
Rain
Sky

Reading
Authorship
Books
Learning
Philosophy
Poetry

Reasons
Argument
Oratory
Speech

Regret
Doubt
Melancholy
Memory
Past, The
Remorse

Religion
Creed
Doubt
Faith
God
Hope
Truth
Theology

Remorse
Conscience
Memory
Regret
Sin
Temptation

Reputation
Fame
Name
Praise
Scandal

Resignation
Adversity
Comfort
Grief
Sorrow

Resolution
Adventure
Constancy
Courage
Fidelity
Success

Rest
Heaven
Labor
Night
Sleep

Retribution
Conscience
Crime
Passion

Revenge
Anger
Hate
Passion

Rod, The
Boy
School

Romance
Imagination
Poet, The
Poetry
Reading

Royalty
Authority
People, The
Power
War

Rural Life
See under _Nature_

Sabbath
Bell
Church
Rest

Satire

Scandal
Fame
Name
Reputation

School
Boy
Instruction
Rod, The
Youth

Science
Mind
Philosophy
Thought

Scold
Anger
Quarrel
Temper

Sculpture
Art

Sea
Adventure
Ship
Storm
Wind

Seasons
Flowers
Nature
Spring
Summer
Autumn
Winter

Secret
Conversation
Friendship
Silence

Shame
Fame
Name
Reputation
Scandal

Ship
Sea
Storm
Wind

Sigh
Love's Pains
Melancholy
Speech

Silence
Conversation
Evening
Night
Summer

Sin
Conscience
Crime
Remorse
Retribution
Temptation

Sincerity
Fidelity
Innocence
Truth

Sky
Cloud
Day
Moon
Night
Seasons
Star
Storm

Sleep
Death
Night
Rest

Smile
Merriment
Sigh

Society
Conversation
Friendship
Home
Hospitality
Scandal
Speech

Soldier
Battle
Courage
Heroism
Resolution
War

Solitude
Night
Society

Sorrow
Adversity
Comfort
Consolation
Grief
Loss
Patience

Soul
Duty
Fault
Immortality
Life
Thought

Speech
Argument
Conversation
Oratory
Silence
Society

Spirits
Apparition
Ghosts
Vision

Stage, The
Oratory
Speech

Star
Evening
Night
Sky

State-craft
Greatness
Power
Royalty
Tyranny

Stealing
Law
Sin
Temptation

Storm
Cloud
Rain
Ship
Wind

Success
Deeds
Fortune
Loss
Resolution
Wealth

Suicide
Adversity
Courage
Cowardice

Sun
Cloud
Day
Summer
Sky

Suspicion
Jealousy

Sympathy
Friendship
Love's Arts
Mercy
Pity

Table, The
Conversation
Home
Hospitality

Taste
Art
Criticism
Perfection

Tear
Grief
Pity
Sorrow

Temper
Anger
Quarrel
Scold

Temptation
Conscience
Sin

Theology
Church
Clergy
Ecclesiasticism
Preaching
Religion

Thought
Argument
Mind
Philosophy
Reading
Science

Time
Death
Eternity
Fame
Life
Past, The
Present, The

Tobacco
Taste

To-morrow
Eternity
Past, The
Present, The
Time

Treason
Deceit
Royalty
State-craft

Tree
Nature
Spring
Summer
Autumn
Winter

Trifle
Deeds
Habit
Life
Quarrel

Truth
Constancy
Faith
Fidelity
Sincerity

Tyranny
Authority
Politics
Power

Vanity
Conceit
Dress
Flattery
Pride

Variety
Order
Taste

Virtue
Constancy
Courage
Fidelity
Good
Humility
Innocence
Nobility
Patience
Soul
Truth

Visions
Angel
Apparition
Ghost
Imagination
Spirits

War
Adventure
Battle
Courage
Heroism
Resolution
Soldier

Waters
Angling
Fish
Sea
Brook
Falls
Lake
River

Wealth
Adversity
Loss
Opportunity
Poverty
Success

Wife
Fidelity
Love's Unity
Woman

Wind
Air
Rain
Sea
Seasons
Ship
Storm

Wine
Adversity
Drink
Table, The

Wisdom
Knowledge
Learning
Mind
Nature
Reading
Thought

Woman
Beauty
Blush
Constancy
Fidelity
Inconstancy
Love
Matrimony
Wife

Youth
Advice
Boy
Childhood
Hope
Pleasure
School
Success
Time

Zeal
Action
Deeds
Resolution

LIST OF AUTHORS QUOTED.

AUTHORS QUOTED.

* * * * *

ADAMS, JOHN QUINCY America, 1767-1848
ADDISON, JOSEPH England, 1672-1719
AKENSIDE, MARK England, 1721-1770
AKERS, ELIZABETH (ALLEN, ELIZABETH AKERS) America, 1832-
ALDRICH, THOMAS BAILEY America, 1836-
ALGER, REV. WILLIAM R. America, 1823-
ALLEN, ELIZABETH AKERS (See AKERS, ELIZABETH)
ALLINGHAM, WILLIAM Ireland, about 1828-1889
ANGELO BUONAROTTI, MICHAEL Italy, 1474-1563
ARMSTRONG, JOHN, M.D. England, 1709-1779
ARNOLD, SIR EDWIN England, 1832-1903
ARNOLD, GEORGE America, 1834-1865
ARNOLD, MATTHEW England, 1822-1888

BAILEY, PHILIP JAMES England, 1816-
BAILLIE, JOANNA Scotland, 1764-1851
BALL, REV. JOHN England, d. 1381
BARBAULD, ANNA LETITIA England, 1743-1825
BARON, ROBERT England, about 1630-1680
BARRETT, EATON STANNARD Ireland, 1785-1820
BASSE, WILLIAM England,
BATES, LEWIS J. America, 1832-
BAXTER, REV. RICHARD England, 1615-1691
BAYLEY, THOMAS HAYNES England, 1797-1839
BEATTIE, JAMES Scotland, 1735-1803
BEAUMONT, FRANCIS England, 1585-1615
BEAUMONT AND FLETCHER (See BEAUMONT, FRANCIS,
and FLETCHER, JOHN)
BEDDOME, BENJAMIN England, published 1787
BELLINGHAUSEN, VON MUeNCH Germany,
BERKELEY, BISHOP GEORGE Ireland, 1684-1753
BERRY, DOROTHY
BICKERSTAFF, ISAAC Ireland, about 1735-1805
BLACKER, COLONEL WILLIAM Ireland, 1777-1855
BLACKIE, JOHN STUART Scotland, 1809-1895
BLACKMORE, SIR RICHARD England, 1650-1729
BLAIR, REV. ROBERT Scotland, 1699-1746
BLANCHARD, LAMAN England, 1803-1845
BLOOMFIELD, ROBERT England, 1766-1823

BONAR, HORATIUS, D.D. Scotland, 1808-1890
BOOTH, BERNARD England, 1681-1733
BOWRING, EDGAR ALFRED England, 1826-
BOWRING, SIR JOHN England, 1792-1872
BRADLEY, MARY E America, 1835--
BRADSTREET, ANNE England, 1613-1672
BRADY, REV. NICHOLAS Ireland, 1659-1728
BRAINARD, JOHN GARDINER CALKINS America, 1796-1828
BRETON, NICHOLAS England, 1535-1624
BRIDGES, ROBERT SEYMOUR, M.D. England, 1844-
BROOKS, HENRY Ireland, 1706-1783
BROOKS, BISHOP PHILLIPS America, 1835-1896
BROWN, REV. JOHN England, 1715-1756
BROWN, TOM England, 1650-1704
BROWNE, SIR THOMAS England, 1605-1682
BROWNE, WILLIAM England, 1590-1645
BROWNING, ELIZABETH BARRETT England, 1805-1861
BROWNING, ROBERT England, 1812-1889
BRYANT, WILLIAM CULLEN America, 1794-1878
BRYDGES, SIR SAMUEL England, 1762-1837
BUCHANAN, ROBERT England, 1841-
BULWER-LYTTON, EDWARD, LORD England, 1805-1873
BURNS, ROBERT Scotland,1759-1796
BUNYAN, JOHN England, 1628-1688
BURTON, JOHN England, 1773-1822
BURTON, ROBERT England, 1576-1640
BUTLER, SAMUEL England, 1612-1680
BYROM, JOHN England, 1691-1763
BYRON, GEORGE GORDON, LORD England, 1788-1824

CAMPBELL, THOMAS England, 1777-1844
CANNING, GEORGE England, 1770-1827
CAREW, THOMAS England, 1589-1639
CAREY, HENRY England, 1700-1743
CARLETON, WILL America, 1845-
CARNEY, JULIA A America,
CARPENTER, JOSEPH E. America, 1813-
CASWELL, EDWARD England, 1814-
CHANNING, WILLIAM ELLERY America, 1818-1901
CHAPMAN, GEORGE England, 1557-1634
CHAUCER, GEOFFREY England. 1328-1400
CHESTERFIELD, EARL OF England, 1694-1773
CHURCHILL, CHARLES England, 1731-1764
CIBBER, COLLEY England, 1671-1757
CLARE, JOHN England, 1793-1864
COLERIDGE, HARTLEY England, 1796-1849
COLERIDGE, SAMUEL TAYLOR England, 1722-1834
COLES, ABRAHAM, M.D. America, 1813-1881
COLLINS, WILLIAM England, 1720-1756
COOKE, ROSE TERRY America, 1827-1892
CONGREVE, WILLIAM England, 1670-1729
COOK, ELIZA England, 1817-1889
COWLEY, ABRAHAM England, 1618-1667
COWPER, WILLIAM England, 1731-1800
CRABBE, GEORGE England, 1754-1832
CRAIK, DINA M. MULOCK England, 1826-1887
CRANCH, CHRISTOPHER PEARSE America, 1813-1892
CROLY, GEORGE England, 1785-1804
CROSS, MARIAN EVANS LEWES (_George Eliot_) England, 1819-1880

DABORNE, ROBERT England, 1590-1660
DANIEL, SAMUEL England, 1562-1619
DANTE ALIGHIERI Italy, 1265-1321
DARWIN, ERASMUS England, 1731-1802
DAVENANT, SIR WILLIAM England, 1605-1668
DAVIES, SIR JOHN England, 1570-1626
DEFOE, DANIEL England, 1661-1731
DEKKER, THOMAS England, about 1580-1639
DELAUNE, HENRY England, XVII. Century
DENHAM, SIR JOHN England, 1615-1668
DE STAEL, MADAME ANNE L.G. NECKAR,
France, 1766-1817
DE VESE, SIR AUBREY Ireland, 1788-1846
DICKINSON, EMILY America, 1830-1886
DICKINSON, JOHN America, 1732-1808
DILLON, WENTWORTH Ireland, 1633-1684
DISRAELI, ISAAC England, 1766-1848
DOANE, BISHOP GEORGE WASHINGTON America, 1794-1851
DOBBIN, REV. ORLANDO THOMAS Ireland,
DODDRIDGE, PHILIP, D.D. England, 1702-1751
DONNE, DR. JOHN England, 1573-1631
DORR, JULIA C.R. America, 1825-
DOW, LORENZO America, 1777-1834
DOWDNEY, SARAH England,
DRAYTON, MICHAEL England, 1563-1631
DRYDEN, JOHN England, 1631-1700
DWIGHT, TIMOTHY America, 1752-1817
DYER, JOHN England, 1700-1758

EASTMAN, ELAINE GOODALE America, 1863-
EDWIN, JOHN England, 1749-1794
ELIOT, GEORGE (See CROSS, MARIAN EVANS LEWES)
ELIZABETH, QUEEN England, 1533-1603
ELLIOTT, EBENEZER England, 1781-1849
ELLIOTT. JANE England, 1727-1805
EMERSON, RALPH WALDO America, 1803-1882
ENGLISH, THOMAS DUNN America, 1819-1902
EVERETT, DAVID America, 1769-1813

GRIMOALD, NICHOLAS England, d. about 1563
GUINEY, LOUISE IMOGEN America, 1861-

HABINGTON, WILLIAM England, 1605-1645
HAFIZ, MOHAMMED SHEMS-ED-DIN Persia, about 1300-1388
HALLECK, FITZ-GREENE America, 1790-1867
HALPINE, CHARLES GRAHAM (_Miles O'Reilly_) Ireland, 1829-1869

HARRINGTON, SIR JOHN England, 1561-1612
HARNEY, WILLIAM WALKER America, 1881-
HARVEY, GABRIEL England, about 1545-1630
HATHAWAY, BENJAMIN America, XIX. Century
HAWKER, REV. ROBERT STEPHEN England, 1753-1827
HAYNE, PAUL HAMILTON America, 1831-1886
HEBER, BISHOP REGINALD England, 1783-1826
HEGGE, ROBERT England,
HEINE, HEINRICH Germany, 1800-1856
HEMANS, MRS. FELICIA DOROTHEA England, 1794-1835
HERBERT, REV. GEORGE England, 1593-1632
HERRICK, REV. ROBERT England, 1591-1674
HERVEY, THOMAS KIBBLE England, 1804-1859
HEYWOOD, JOHN England, about 1500-1565
HEYWOOD, THOMAS England, d. 1649
HIGGONS, BEVIL England, 1670-1735
HILL, AARON England, 1685-1750
HOGG, JAMES Scotland, 1772-1835
HOLIDAY, REV. BARTEN England, 1593-1661
HOLMES, OLIVER WENDELL America, 1809-1894
HOME, JOHN England, 1722-1808
HOMER Greece, uncertain, between 1000 and 700 B.C.
HOOD, THOMAS England, 1798-1845
HOPKINSON, JOSEPH America, 1770-1842
HORACE (QUINTUS HORATIUS FLACCUS), Italy, 65-8 B.C.
HORNE, RICHARD HENRY HENGIST England, 1807-1884
HOUGHTON, LORD. (See MILNES, R.M.)
HOVEY, RICHARD America, 1864-1900
HOW, WILLIAM WALSHAM England, 1832-
HOWARD, SIR ROBERT England, 1626-1698
HOWIIT, MARY England, 1800-1888
HUDSON, MRS. M. CLEMMER AMES America, 1839-1884
HUGO, VICTOR MARIE France, 1802-1885
HUNT, SIR A. England,
HUNT, [JAMES HENRY] LEIGH England, 1784-1859
HURDIS, JAMES England, 1763-1801

INGELOW, JEAN England, 1830-1897

JEFFREYS, CHARLES England, 1807-1865
JEFFREYS, GEORGE England, 1678-1755
JOHNSON, CHARLES England, 1679-1748
JOHNSON, DR. SAMUEL England, 1709-1784
JONES, SIR WILLIAM England, 1746-1794
JONSON, BEN England, 1574-1637
JUVENAL (DECIMUS JUNTOS JUVENALIS) Italy, 40-125

KEATS, JOHN England, 1796-1821
KEBLE, JOHN England, 1789-1866
KELLY, REV. THOMAS Ireland, 1769-1855
KENNY, JAMES Ireland, 1780-1849
KING, WILLIAM England, 1663-1712
KINGSLEY, REV. CHARLES England, 1819-1875
KNOLLES, RICHARD England, about 1545-1610
KOeRNER, KARL THEODOR Germany, 1791-1813
KRUMMACHER, FRIEDRICH ADOLPH Germany, 1767-1845

LAMB, CHARLES England, 1775-1834
LANSDOWNE, LORD (See GRANVILLE, GEORGE)
LANDON, LETITIA E. England, 1802-1839
LANIER, SIDNEY America, 1842-1881
LAROOM, LUCY America, 1826-1893
LEE, NATHANIEL England, 1658-1691
LEIGH, HENRY S. England, 1837-1883
LEMON, MARK England, 1809-1870
LILLY, J. (See LYLY, JOHN.)
LINLEY, GEORGE England, 1798-1865
LLOYD, ROBERT England, 1733-1764
LOCKER-LAMPSON, FREDERICK England, 1821-
LONGFELLOW, HENRY WADSWORTH America, 1807-1882
LONGFELLOW, REV. SAMUEL America, 1819-1892
LOVELACE, COLONEL RICHARD England, 1618-1658
LOVELL, MARIA England,
LOWELL, JAMES RUSSELL America, 1819-1891
LYLY, JOHN England, 1553-1606
LYTTELTON, GEORGE, LORD England, 1709-1773
LYTTON, E. ROBERT BULWER, LORD
(_Owen Meredith_) England, 1831-1891
MACKAY, CHARLES Scotland, 1814-1889
MADDEN, REV. SAMUEL Ireland, 1687-1765
MALLET. DAVID England, 1700-1765
MANNERS, LORD JOHN England, 1721-1770
MARLOWE, CHRISTOPHER England, 1564-1593
MARVELL, ANDREW England, 1620-1678
MASSEY, GERALD England, 1828-1894
MASSINGER, PHILIP England, 1584-1640
MATURIN, CHARLES ROBERT Ireland, 1782-1824
MAY, THOMAS England, 1595-1650
MELEAGER, Gadara, Palestine (Greek) I. Century B.C.
MEREDITH, LOUISE A England, 1812-
MEREDITH, OWEN (See LYTTON, LORD)
MERRICK, REV. JAMES England, 1720-1769
MILES, REV. JAMES WARLEY America, 1818-1875
MILLER, CINCINNATUS HEINE
(_Joaquin Miller_) America, 1841-
MILMAN, REV. HENRY HART England, 1791-1868
MILNES, RICHARD MONCKTON (LORD HOUGHTON) England. 1809-1885
MILTON, JOHN England. 1608-1674
MONTAGU, LADY MARY WORTLEY England, 1690-1762
MONTGOMERY, JAMES Scotland, 1771-1854
MONTGOMERY, REV. ROBERT England, 1807-1855
MOORE, EDWARD England, 1712-1757
MOORE, THOMAS Ireland, 1779-1852
MORE, HANNAH England, 1745-1833
MORELL, REV. THOMAS England, 1703-1784
MORSE, JAMES HERBERT America, 1841-
NABBES, THOMAS England, 1600-1641
NEW ENGLAND PRIMER America. 1691-
NEWTON, JOHN England, 1725-1807
NORRIS. JOHN England, 1657-1711
NORTON. CAROLINE E.S. (LADY STIRLING-MAXWELL) England, 1808-1877

OBERHOLTZER, SARAH L. America,
O'DONOGHUE, NANNIE L., MRS. POWER, Ireland, began writing 1881
OLD BALLADS Ireland,
OLDMIXON, JOHN England, 1673-1742
O'REILLY, JOHN BOYLE Ireland, 1844--America, 1890
ORRERY, ROGER BOYLE, EARL OF Ireland, 1621-1679
OSGOOD, FRANCES SARGENT America, 1811-1850
OTWAY, THOMAS England, 1651-1685
OVERBURY, SIR THOMAS England, 1581-1613
OVID (PUBLIUS OVIDIUS NASO) Italy, 43 B.C.-18 A.D.
OWEN, DR. JOHN England, 1616-1683

PARDOE, JULIA England, 1806-1862
PARNELL, THOMAS Ireland, 1679-1717
PEACOCK, THOMAS LOVE England, 1785-1866
PEELE, GEORGE England, about 1558-1598
PERCIVAL, JAMES GATES America, 1795-1856
PERCY, BISHOP THOMAS England, 1729-1811
PETRARCH (FRANCISCO PETRARCA) Italy, 1304-1374
PHILLIPS, CATHARINE England, 1631-1664
PLAYFORD, JOHN England, 1613-1693
POLLOK, ROBERT Scotland, 1798-1827
POMFRET, JOHN England, 1667-1703
POOR ROBIN'S ALMANACK England, 1695
POPE, ALEXANDER England, 1688-1744
PORTEUS, BISHOP BEILBY England, 1731-1808
PRAED, WINTHROP MACKWORTH England, 1802-1839
PRESTON, MARGARET JUNKIN America, 1838-1897
PRIOR, MATTHEW England, 1664-1721
PROCTER, ADELAIDE ANNE England, 1825-1864
PROCTER, BRYAN WALLER (_Barry Cornwall_) England, 1787-1874

QUARLES, FRANCIS England, 1592-1644

RABELAIS, FRANCOIS France, about 1495-1553
RADCLIFFE, MRS., ANN WARD England, 1764-1823
RALEIGH, SIR WALTER England, 1552-1618
RANDOLPH, THOMAS England, 1605-1635
RAYMOND, ROBERT RAIKES America, 1814-1889
RAYMOND, ROSSITER WORTHINGTON America, 1840-
READ, THOMAS BUCHANAN America, 1822-1872
RILEY, JAMES WHITCOMB America, 1852-
ROBERTS, CHARLES GEORGE DOUGLAS Canada, 1860-
ROCHE, JAMES JEFFREY Ireland, 1847-
ROCHESTER, JOHN WILMOT, EARL OF England, 1647-1680
ROGERS, SAMUEL England, 1762-1855
ROSCOE, MRS. HENRY England,
ROSCOMMON, EARL OF England, 1633-1684
ROSSETTI, CHRISTINA G England, 1830-1894
ROSSETTI, DANTE GABRIEL England, 1828-1882
ROUSSEAU, JEAN JACQUES Switzerland, 1712-1778
ROWE, NICHOLAS England, 1673-1718
RUTTER, JOHN England,

SAVAGE, RICHARD England, 1698-1743
SAXE, JOHN GODFREY America, 1816-1887
SCHILLER, JOHANN C. FRIEDRICH VON Germany, 1759-1805
SCOTT, SIR WALTER Scotland, 1771-1832
SEDLEY, SIR CHARLES England, 1639-1701
SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM England, 1551-1616
SHEFFIELD, JOHN, DUKE OF BUCKINGHAMSHIRE England, 1646-1721
SHELLEY, PERCY BYSSHE England, 1792-1822
SHENSTONE, WILLIAM England, 1714-1763
SHERIDAN, RICHARD BRINSLEY England, 1751-1810
SHILLABER, BENJAMIN PENHALLOW America, 1814-1890
SHIRLEY, JAMES England, 1596-1666
SIDNEY, SIR PHILIP England, 1554-1586
SIMONIDES Island of Ceos, Greece, 556-468 B.C.
SMITH, ALEXANDER Scotland, 1830-1867
SMITH, ELIZABETH OAKES America, 1806-
SMITH, HORACE England, 1780-1849
SMITH, JAMES England, 1775-1889
SOMERVILLE, WILLIAM C England, 1692-1742
SOUTHERNE, THOMAS England, 1660-1746
SOUTHEY, ROBERT England, 1774-1843
SPENSER, EDMUND England, 1553-1599
SPRAGUE, CHARLES America, 1791-1875
SPOFFORD, HARRIET PRESCOTT America, 1835-
SPROAT, ELIZA L. America,
STEDMAN, EDMUND CLARENCE America, 1833-
STERNHOLD, THOMAS England, about 1549
STEVENSON, ROBERT LOUIS England, 1850-1895
STILLINGFLEET, BENJAMIN England, 1700-1771
STODDARD, RICHARD HENRY America, 1825-1903
STORY, JOSEPH America, 1779-1845
STORY, WILLIAM WETMORE America, 1819-1895
STOWE, HARRIET BEECHER America, 1812-1890
SUCKLING, SIR JOHN England, 1609-1641
SWIFT, JONATHAN England, 1667-1745

TAPPAN, REV. WILLIAM BINGHAM America, 1794-1844
TATE, NAHUM Ireland, 1652-1715
TATE AND BRADY. (See TATE, NAHUM,
and BRADY, NICHOLAS.)
TAYLOR, BAYARD America, 1825-1878
TAYLOR, SIR HENRY England, 1800-1886
TAYLOR, JANE England, 1783-1824
TENNYSON, ALFRED, LORD England, 1809-1892
THACKERAY, WILLIAM MAKEPEACE England, 1811-1863
THAXTER, CELIA LAIGHTON America, 1835-1894
THOMAS, FREDERICK WILLIAM America, 1808-1866
THOMPSON, FRANCIS England, about 1861-
THOMSON, JAMES England, 1700-1748
TICKELL, THOMAS England, 1686-1740
TIGHE, MRS. MARY Ireland, 1773-1810
TOBIN, JOHN England, 1770-1804
TOURNEUR, CYRIL England, about 1600
TRUMBULL, JOHN America, 1750-1831
TUCKERMAN, HENRY THEODORE America, 1813-1871
TURNER, CHARLES TENNYSON England, 1808-1879
TUPPER, MARTIN FARQUHAR England, 1810-1889
TUSSER, THOMAS England, about 1515-1580
VAUGHAN, HENRY, M.D. Wales, 1621-1695
WADE, J.A. England, 1800-1875
WALLACE, JOHN AIKMAN.
WALLACE, WILLIAM ROSS America, 1819-1881
WALLER, EDMUND England, 1605-1687
WARNER, ANNA B. America, XIX. Century
WARTON, THOMAS England, 1728-1790
WATSON, WILLIAM England, 1858-
WATTS, ALARIC ATTILA England, 1797-1864
WATTS, ISAAC, D.D. England, 1674-1748
WEBB, CHARLES HENRY America, 1834-
WEBSTER, DANIEL America, 1782-1852
WEBSTER, JOHN England, about 1580-1662
WELSH, CHARLES England, 1850-
WESLEY, REV. CHARLES England, 1708-1788
WESTMACOTT, CHARLES M. England, 1788-1868
WHITE, HENRY KIRKE England, 1785-1806
WHITEHEAD, PAUL England, 1710-1774
WHITMAN, SARAH HELEN POWER America, 1803-1878
WHITMAN, WALT America, 1819-1892
WHITTIER, JOHN GREENLEAF America, 1807-1892
WILDE, RICHARD HENRY Ireland, 1789-1847
WILLIS, NATHANIEL PARKER America, 1806-1867
WINTER, WILLIAM America, 1836-
WITHER, GEORGE England, 1588-1667
WOLCOTT, DR. JOHN (_Peter Pindar_) England, 1738-1819
WOLFE, REV. CHARLES Ireland, 1791-1823
WOOLSEY, SARAH CHAUNCEY (_Susan Coolidge_) America, about 1845-

WOOLSON, CONSTANCE FENIMORE America, 1848-1894
WORDSWORTH, WILLIAM England, 1770-1850
WOTTON, SIR HENRY England, 1568-1639
WROTHER, MISS England,
YALDEN, REV. THOMAS England, 1671-1736
YOUNG. DR. EDWARD England, 1684-1765
YOUNG, SIR JOHN England,

TABLE OF CONTENTS.

INTRODUCTORY ESSAY:
"AFTER ALL, WHAT IS POETRY?"
By _John Raymond Howard_

PREFACE.

INDEX OF TOPICS, WITH CROSS-REFERENCES

LIST OF AUTHORS QUOTED

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

POETICAL QUOTATIONS

GENERAL INDEX OF AUTHORS AND TITLES

GENERAL INDEX OF FIRST LINES AND TITLES

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

ALEXANDER POPE _Frontispiece_
_After photograph from a portrait_.

JOHN GODFREY SAXE
_After a photograph from life_.

JOHN DRYDEN
_From an engraving after a painting by Hudson,
in Trinity College, Cambridge, England_.

SAMUEL, BUTLER
_After an engraving from contemporary portrait_.

JAMES RUSSELL LOWELL
_From an etching after a life-photograph_.

VICTOR MARIE HUGO
_After a life-photograph of Walery, Paris_,

POETICAL QUOTATIONS

"_Next to the originator of a good sentence is the first quoter of
it.... We are as much informed of a writer's genius by what he selects
as by what he originates_."--R.W. EMERSON.

From "QUOTATION AND ORIGINALITY."

ABSENCE.

'T is said that absence conquers love;
But oh! believe it not.
I've tried, alas! its power to prove,
But thou art not forgot.
_Absence Conquers Love_. F.W. THOMAS.

Absence makes the heart grow fonder;
Isle of Beauty, fare thee well!
_Isle of Beauty_. T.H. BAYLY.

Though absent, present in desires they be;
Our souls much further than our eyes can see.
_Sonnet_. M. DRAYTON.

There's not a wind but whispers of thy name.
_Mirandola_. B.W. PROCTER.

Short absence hurt him more,
And made his wound far greater than before;
Absence not long enough to root out quite
All love, increases love at second sight.
_Henry II_. T. MAY.

How like a winter hath my absence been
From thee, the pleasure of the fleeting year!
What freezings have I felt, what dark days seen!
What old December's bareness everywhere.
_Sonnet XCVII_. SHAKESPEARE.

Days of absence, sad and dreary,
Clothed in sorrow's dark array,--
Days of absence, I am weary;
She I love is far away.
_Days of Absence_, J.J. ROUSSEAU.

Love reckons hours for months, and days for years;
And every little absence is an age.
_Amphictrion_. J. DRYDEN.

What! keep a week away? Seven days and nights?
Eightscore eight hours? And lovers' absent hours
More tedious than the dial eightscore times?
O, weary reckoning!
_Othello. Act_ iii. _Sc_. 4. SHAKESPEARE.

Long did his wife,
Suckling her babe, her only one, look out
The way he went at parting,--but he came not!
_Italy_. S. ROGERS.

With what a deep devotedness of woe
I wept thy absence--o'er and o'er again
Thinking of thee, still thee, till thought grew pain,
And memory, like a drop that, night and day
Falls cold and ceaseless, wore my heart away!
_Lalla Rookh: Veiled Prophet of Khorassan_. T. MOORE.

Condemned whole years in absence to deplore,
And image charms he must behold no more.
_Eloise to Abelard_. A. POPE.

ACTION.

The flighty purpose never is o'ertook,
Unless the deed go with it.
_Macbeth, Act_. iv. _Sc_. 1. SHAKESPEARE.

If our virtues
Did not go forth of us, 't were all alike
As if we had them not. Spirits are not finely touched,
But to fine issues; nor Nature never lends
The smallest scruple of her excellence.
But, like a thrifty goddess, she determines
Herself the glory of a creditor--
Both thanks and use.
_Measure for Measure, Act_ i. _Sc_. 1. SHAKESPEARE.

We must not stint
Our necessary actions, in the fear
To cope malicious censurers.
_King Henry VIII., Act_ i. _Sc_. 2. SHAKESPEARE.

That light we see is burning in my hall.
How far that little candle throws his beams!
So shines a good deed in a naughty world.
_Merchant of Venice, Act_ v. _Sc_. 1. SHAKESPEARE.

Our acts our angels are, or good or ill.
Our fatal shadows that walk by us still.
_An Honest Man's Fortune_. J. FLETCHER.

ADMIRATION.

She is pretty to walk with,
And witty to talk with,
And pleasant, too, to think on.
_Brennoralt, Act_ ii. SIR J. SUCKLING.

But from the hoop's bewitching round,
Her very shoe has power to wound.
_Fables: The Spider and the Bee_. E. MOORE.

That eagle's fate and mine are one.
Which, on the shaft that made him die,
Espied a feather of his own,
Wherewith he wont to soar so high.
_To a Lady singing a Song of his Composing_. E. WALLER.

See, how she leans her cheek upon her hand!
O, that I were a glove upon that hand,
That I might touch that cheek!
_Romeo and Juliet, Act_ ii. _Sc_. 2. SHAKESPEARE.

The light that lies
In woman's eyes.
_The time I've lost in Wooing_. T. MOORE.

Is she not more than painting can express,
Or youthful poets fancy when they love?
_The Fair Penitent, Act_ iii. _Sc_. 1. N. ROWE.

O, thou art fairer than the evening air
Clad in the beauty of a thousand stars.
_Faustus_. C. MARLOWE.

The dimple that thy chin contains has beauty in its round
That never has been fathomed yet by myriad thoughts profound.
_Odes, CXLIII_. HAFIZ.

Beauty stands
In the admiration only of weak minds
Led captive. Cease to admire, and all her plumes
Fall flat and shrink into a trivial toy,
At every sudden slighting quite abashed.
_Paradise Regained, Bk. II_. MILTON.

ADORNMENT.

The ornament of beauty is suspect,
A crow that flies in heaven's sweetest air.
_Sonnet LXX_. SHAKESPEARE.

A native grace
Sat fair-proportioned in her polished limbs,
Veiled in a simple robe their best attire.
Beyond the pomp of dress; for loveliness
Needs not the foreign aid of ornament,
But is, when unadorned, adorned the most.
_The Seasons: Autumn_. J. THOMSON.

She's adorned
Amply that in her husband's eye looks lovely,--
The truest mirror that an honest wife
Can see her beauty in.
_The Honeymoon, Act iii. Sc. 4_. J. TOBIN.

Terrible he rode alone,
With his Yemen sword for aid;
Ornament it carried none,
But the notches on the blade.
_The Death Feud. An Arab War Song.
Anonymous Translation_.

ADVENTURE.

Naught venture, naught have.
_Five Hundred Points of Good Husbandry. October's
Abstract_. T. TUSSER.

We must take the current when it serves,
Or lose our ventures.
_Julius Caesar, Act iv. Sc. 3_. SHAKESPEARE.

Fierce warres, and faithful loves shall moralize my song.
_Faerie Queene, Bk. I. Proem_. E. SPENSER.

Send danger from the east unto the west,
So honor cross it from the north to south,
And let them grapple: O! the blood more stirs
To rouse a lion than to start a hare!

* * * * *

By Heaven, methinks, it were an easy leap,
To pluck bright honor from the pale-faced moon,
Or dive into the bottom of the deep,
Where fathom-line could never touch the ground,
And pluck up drowned honor by the locks.
_K. Henry IV., Pt. I. Act i. Sc. 3_. SHAKESPEARE.

A wild dedication of yourselves
To unpathed waters, undreamed shores.
_Winter's Tale, Act_ iv. _Sc_. 3. SHAKESPEARE.

ADVERSITY.

Sweet are the uses of adversity,
Which, like the toad, ugly and venomous,
Wears yet a precious jewel in his head.
_As You Like It, Act_ i. _Sc_. 3. SHAKESPEARE.

Calamity is man's true touchstone.
_Four Plays in One: The Triumph of Honor, Sc_. 1.
BEAUMONT AND FLETCHER.

More safe I sing with mortal voice, unchanged
To hoarse or mute, though fallen on evil days,
On evil days though fallen, and evil tongues.
_Paradise Lost, Bk. VII_. MILTON.

Tho' losses and crosses
Be lessons right severe,
There's wit there, ye'll get there,
Ye'll find nae otherwhere.
_Epistle to Davie_. R. BURNS.

By adversity are wrought
The greatest work of admiration,
And all the fair examples of renown
Out of distress and misery are grown.
_On the Earl of Southampton_. S. DANIEL.

Aromatic plants bestow
No spicy fragrance while they grow;
But crushed or trodden to the ground,
Diffuse their balmy sweets around.
_The Captivity, Act_ i. O. GOLDSMITH.

The Good are better made by Ill,
As odors crushed are sweeter still.
_Jacqueline_. S. ROGERS.

Daughter of Jove, relentless power,
Thou tamer of the human breast.
Whose iron scourge and torturing hour
The bad affright, afflict the best!
_Hymn to Adversity_. T. GRAY.

'T is better to be lowly born,
And range with humble livers in content.
Than to be perked up in a glistering grief,
And wear a golden sorrow.
_King Henry VIII., Act_ ii. _Sc_. 3. SHAKESPEARE.

As if Misfortune made the throne her seat,
And none could be unhappy but the great.
_The Fair Penitent: Prologue_. N. ROWE.

None think the great unhappy, but the great.
_Love of Fame, Satire I_. DR. E. YOUNG.

My pride fell with my fortunes.
_As You Like It, Act i. Sc. 2_. SHAKESPEARE.

We have seen better days.
_Timon of Athens, Act iv. Sc. 2_. SHAKESPEARE.

If ever you have looked on better days;
If ever been where bells have knolled to church.
_As You Like It, Act ii. Sc. 7_. SHAKESPEARE.

O, who can hold a fire in his hand
By thinking on the frosty Caucasus?
Or cloy the hungry edge of appetite
By bare imagination of a feast?
Or wallow naked in December snow,
By thinking on fantastic Summer's heat?
O, no! the apprehension of the good
Gives but the greater feeling to the worse.
_King Richard II., Act i. Sc. 2_. SHAKESPEARE.

A poor, infirm, weak, and despised old man.
_King Lear, Act iii. Sc. 2_. SHAKESPEARE.

Eating the bitter bread of banishment.
_King Richard II., Act iii. Sc. 1_. SHAKESPEARE.

For sufferance is the badge of all our tribe.
_Merchant of Venice, Act i. Sc. 8_. SHAKESPEARE.

Lord of himself,--that heritage of woe!
_Lara, Canto I_. LORD BYRON.

Lord of thy presence, and no land beside.
_King John, Act i. Sc. 1_. SHAKESPEARE.

Heaven is not always angry when he strikes,
But most chastises those whom most he likes.
_Verses to his Friend under Affliction_. J. POMFRET.

As sunshine, broken in the rill,
Though turned astray, is sunshine still.
_Fire Worshippers_. T. MOORE.

On Fortune's cap we are not the very button.
_Hamlet, Act ii. Sc. 2_. SHAKESPEARE.

Cheered up himself with ends of verse,
And sayings of philosophers.
_Hudibras, Pt. I. Canto III_. S. BUTLER.

O life! thou art a galling load,
Along a rough, a weary road,
To wretches such as I!
_Despondency_. R. BURNS.

A wretched soul, bruised with adversity.
_Comedy of Errors, Act ii. Sc_. 1. SHAKESPEARE.

Affliction's sons are brothers in distress;
A brother to relieve, how exquisite the bliss!
_A Winter Night_. R. BURNS.

Henceforth I'll bear
Affliction till it do cry out itself,
Enough, enough, and die.
_King Lear, Act iv. Sc_. 6. SHAKESPEARE.

On me, on me
Time and change can heap no more!
The painful past with blighting grief
Hath left my heart a withered leaf.
Time and change can do no more.
_Dirge_. R.H. HORNE.

I wish thy lot, now bad, still worse, my friend,
For when at worst, they say, things always mend.
_To a Friend in Distress_. DR. J. OWEN.

The wine of life is drawn, and the mere lees
Is left this vault to brag of.
_Macbeth, Act ii. Sc_. 8. SHAKESPEARE.

Things at the worst will cease, or else climb upward
To what they were before.
_Macbeth, Act iv. Sc_. 2. SHAKESPEARE.

I am not now in fortune's power;
He that is down can fall no lower.
_Hudibras, Pt. I. Canto III_. S. BUTLER.

The worst is not
So long as we can say, _This is the worst.
King Lear, Act iv. Sc_. 1. SHAKESPEARE.

ADVICE.

The worst men often give the best advice.
Our deeds are sometimes better than our thoughts,
_Festus: Sc. A Village Feast_. P.J. BAILEY.

I pray thee cease thy counsel.
Which falls into mine ears as profitless
As water in a sieve.
_Much Ado About Nothing, Act v. Sc. 1_. SHAKESPEARE.

O Life! how pleasant in thy morning.
Young Fancy's rays the hills adorning!
Cold-pausing Caution's lesson scorning,
We frisk away,
Like schoolboys at th' expected warning,
To joy and play.
_Epistle to James Smith_. B. BURNS.

Know when to speake; for many times it brings
Danger to give the best advice to kings.
_Hesperides' Caution in Councell._ R. HEBRICK.

AGE.

I'm growing fonder of my staff;
I'm growing dimmer in the eyes;
I'm growing fainter in my laugh;
I'm growing deeper in my sighs;
I'm growing careless of my dress;
I'm growing frugal of my gold;
I'm growing wise; I'm growing,--yes,--
I'm growing old.
_I'm Growing Old_. J.G. SAXE.

And his big manly voice,
Turning again toward childish treble, pipes
And whistles in his sound.
_As You Like It, Act ii. Sc. 7_. SHAKESPEARE.

Time has laid his hand
Upon my heart, gently, not smiting it,
But as a harper lays his open palm
Upon his harp, to deaden its vibrations.
_The Golden Legend, IV_. H.W. LONGFELLOW.

Years steal
Fire from the mind, as vigor from the limb;
And life's enchanted cup but sparkles near the brim.
_Childe Harold, Canto III_. LORD BYRON.

For we are old, and on our quick'st decrees
The inaudible and noiseless foot of Time
Steals ere we can effect them.
_All's Well that Ends Well, Act v. Sc. 3_. SHAKESPEARE.

Strange! that a harp of thousand strings
Should keep in tune so long.
_Hymns and Spiritual Songs, Bk. II_. DR. I. WATTS.

Thus aged men, full loth and slow,
The vanities of life forego,
And count their youthful follies o'er,
Till Memory lends her light no more.
_Rokeby, Canto V_. SIR W. SCOTT.

Though I look old, yet I am strong and lusty;
For in my youth I never did apply
Hot and rebellious liquors in my blood;
Nor did not with unbashful forehead woo
The means of weakness and debility;
Therefore my age is as a lusty winter,
Frosty, but kindly.
_As You Like, It. Act_ ii. _Sc_. 3. SHAKESPEARE.

But grant, the virtues of a temp'rate prime
Bless with an age exempt from scorn or crime;
An age that melts with unperceived decay,
And glides in modest innocence away.
_Vanity of Human Wishes_. DR. S. JOHNSON.

Who soweth good seed shall surely reap;
The year grows rich as it groweth old,
And life's latest sands are its sands of gold!
_To the "Bouquet Club."_ J.C.R. DORR.

The spring, like youth, fresh blossoms doth produce,
But autumn makes them ripe and fit for use:
So Age a mature mellowness doth set
On the green promises of youthful heat.
_Cato Major, Pt. IV_. SIR J. DENHAM.

My May of life
Is fallen into the sear, the yellow leaf:
And that which should accompany old age,
As honor, love, obedience, troops of friends,
I must not look to have; but, in their stead,
Curses, not loud, but deep, mouth-honor, breath,
Which the poor heart would fain deny, and dare not.
_Macbeth, Act_ v. _Sc_. 3. SHAKESPEARE.

What is the worst of woes that wait on age?
What stamps the wrinkle deeper on the brow?
To view each loved one blotted from life's page,
And be alone on earth as I am now.
_Childe Harold, Canto II_. LORD BYRON.

His silver hairs
Will purchase us a good opinion,
And buy men's voices to commend our deeds;
It shall be said--his judgment ruled our hands.
_Julius Caesar, Act_ ii. _Sc. 1_. SHAKESPEARE.

As you are old and reverend, you should be wise.
_King Lear, Act i. Sc. 4_. SHAKESPEARE.

So may'st thou live, till like ripe fruit thou drop
Into thy mother's lap, or be with ease
Gathered, not harshly plucked for death mature.
_Paradise Lost, Bk. XI_. MILTON.

AIR.

DUNCAN. This castle hath a pleasant seat: the air
Nimbly and sweetly recommends itself
Unto our gentle senses.

BANQUO.... The heaven's breath
Smells wooingly here: no jutty, frieze,
Buttress, nor coigne of vantage, but this bird
Hath made his pendent bed and procreant cradle:
Where they most breed and haunt, I have observed,
The air is delicate.
_Macbeth, Act i. Sc. 6_. SHAKESPEARE.

Joyous the birds; fresh gales and gentle airs
Whispered it to the woods, and from their wings
Flung rose, flung odors from the spicy shrub.
_Paradise Lost, Bk. VIII_. MILTON.

HAMLET. The air bites shrewdly; it is very cold.

HORATIO. It is a nipping and an 'eager air.
_Hamlet, Act i. Sc. 4_. SHAKESPEARE.

The parching air
Burns frore, and cold performs the effect of fire.
_Paradise Lost, Bk. II_. MILTON.

Drew audience and attention still as night
Or summer's noontide air.
_Paradise Lost, Bk. II_. MILTON.

As one who long in populous city pent,
Where houses thick and sewers annoy the air.
_Paradise Lost, Bk. IX_, MILTON.

Nor waste their sweetness in the desert air.
_Gotham, Bk. II_. C. CHURCHILL.

AMBITION.

Ambition is our idol, on whose wings
Great minds are carried only to extreme;
To be sublimely great, or to be nothing.
_The Loyal Brother, Act i. Sc. 1_. T. SOUTHERNE.

To reign is worth ambition, though in hell:
Better to reign in hell, than serve in heaven.
_Paradise Lost, Bk. I_. MILTON.

Rather than be less
Cared not to be at all.
_Paradise Lost, Bk. II_. MILTON.

Lowliness is young ambition's ladder,
Whereto the climber-upward turns his face;
But when he once attains the upmost round,
He then unto the ladder turns his back,
Looks in the clouds, scorning the base degrees
By which he did ascend.
_Julius Caesar, Act ii. Sc. 1_. SHAKESPEARE.

I have no spur
To prick the sides of my intent; but only
Vaulting ambition, which o'erleaps itself,
And falls on the other.
_Macbeth, Act i. Sc. 7_. SHAKESPEARE.

But wild ambition loves to slide, not stand,
And Fortune's ice prefers to Virtue's land.
_Absalom and Achitophel, Pt. I_. J. DRYDEN.

Ambition's monstrous stomach does increase
By eating, and it fears to starve unless
It still may feed, and all it sees devour.
_Playhouse to Let_. SIR W. DAVENANT.

But see how oft ambition's aims are crossed,
And chiefs contend 'til all the prize is lost!
_Rape of the Lock, Canto V_. A. POPE.

O, sons of earth! attempt ye still to rise,
By mountains piled on mountains to the skies?
Heaven still with laughter the vain toil surveys,
And buries madmen in the heaps they raise.
_Essay on Man, Epistle IV_. A. POPE.

The very substance of the ambitious is merely the shadow
of a dream.
_Hamlet, Act ii. Sc. 2_. SHAKESPEARE.

Why then doth flesh, a bubble-glass of breath,
Hunt after honour and advancement vain,
And rear a trophy for devouring death?
_Ruins of Time_. E. SPENSER.

Oh, sons of earth! attempt ye still to rise
By mountains piled on mountains to the skies?
Heaven still with laughter the vain toil surveys,
And buries madmen in the heaps they raise.
_Essay on Man_. A. POPE.

ANGEL.

In this dim world of clouding cares,
We rarely know, till 'wildered eyes
See white wings lessening up the skies,
The Angels with us unawares.
_Ballad of Babe Christabel_. G. MASSEY.

Around our pillows golden ladders rise,
And up and down the skies,
With winged sandals shod,
The angels come, and go, the Messengers of God!
Nor, though they fade from us, do they depart--
It is the childly heart:
We walk as heretofore,
Adown their shining ranks, but see them nevermore.
_Hymn to the Beautiful_. R.H. STODDARD.

For God will deign
To visit oft the dwellings of just men
Delighted, and with frequent intercourse
Thither will send his winged messengers
On errands of supernal grace.
_Paradise Lost, Bk. VII_. MILTON.

But sad as angels for the good man's sin,
Weep to record, and blush to give it in.
_The Pleasures of Hope, Pt. II_. T. CAMPBELL.

What though my winged hours of bliss have been,
Like angel-visits, few and far between.
_The Pleasures of Hope, Pt. II_. T. CAMPBELL.

ANGER.

Anger is like
A full-hot horse; who being allowed his way,
Self-mettle tires him.
_King Henry VIII., Act i. Sc 1_. SHAKESPEARE.

Being once chased, he cannot
Be reined again to temperance; then he speaks
What's in his heart.
_Coriolanus, Act iii. Sc. 3_. SHAKESPEARE.

I am very sorry, good Horatio,
That to Laertes I forgot myself,

* * * * *

But, sure, the bravery of his grief did put me
Into a towering passion.
_Hamlet, Act v. Sc. 2_. SHAKESPEARE.

Senseless, and deformed,
Convulsive Anger storms at large; or, pale
And silent, settles into fell revenge.
_The Seasons: Spring_. J. THOMSON.

Be advised;
Heat not a furnace for your foe so hot
That it do singe yourself: we may outrun.
By violent swiftness, that which we run at,
And lose by over-running.
_King Henry VIII., Act i. Sc. 1_. SHAKESPEARE.

Never anger made good guard for itself.
_Antony and Cleopatra, Act iv. Sc. 1_. SHAKESPEARE.

ANGLING.

All's fish they get
That cometh to net.
_Five Hundred Points of Good Husbandry_. T. TUSSER.

In genial spring, beneath the quivering shade,
Where cooling vapors breathe along the mead,
The patient fisher takes his silent stand,
Intent, his angle trembling in his hand;
With looks unmoved, he hopes the scaly breed,
And eyes the dancing cork, and bending reed.
_Windsor Forest_. A. POPE.

Now is the time,
While yet the dark-brown water aids the guile,
To tempt the trout. The well-dissembled fly,
The rod fine tapering with elastic spring,
Snatched from the hoary steed the floating line,
And all thy slender wat'ry stores prepare.
_The Seasons: Spring_. J. THOMSON.

Just in the dubious point, where with the pool
Is mixed the trembling stream, or where it boils
Around the stone, or from the hollowed bank
Reverted plays in undulating flow,
There throw, nice judging, the delusive fly;
And as you lead it round in artful curve,
With eye attentive mark the springing game.
Straight as above the surface of the flood
They wanton rise, or urged by hunger leap,
Then fix, with gentle twitch, the barbed hook:
Some lightly tossing to the grassy bank,
And to the shelving shore slow-dragging some,
With various hand proportioned to their force.
_The Seasons: Spring_. J. THOMSON.

Give me mine angle, we'll to the river; there,
My music playing far off, I will betray
Tawny-finned fishes; my bended hook shall pierce
Their shiny jaws.
_Antony and Cleopatra, Act_ ii. _Sc_. 5. SHAKESPEARE.

His angle-rod made of a sturdy oak;
His line a cable which in storms ne'er broke;
His hook he baited with a dragon's tail,
And sat upon a rock, and bobbed for whale.
_Upon a Giant's Angling_. W. KING.

ANIMALS.

A harmless necessary cat.
_Merchant of Venice, Act_ iv. _Sc_. 1. SHAKESPEARE.

Confound the cats! All cats--alway--
Cats of all colors, black, white, gray;
By night a nuisance and by day--
Confound the cats!
_A Dithyramb on Cats_. O.T. DOBBIN.

I am his Highness' dog at Kew;
Pray tell me, sir, whose dog are you?
_On the Collar of a Dog_. A. POPE.

The little dogs and all,
Tray, Blanche, and Sweetheart, see, they bark at me.
_King Lear, Act_ iii _Sc_. 6. SHAKESPEARE.

How, in his mid-career, the spaniel struck,
Stiff, by the tainted gale, with open nose,
Outstretched and finely sensible, draws full,
Fearful and cautious, on the latent prey.
_The Seasons: Autumn_. J. THOMSON.

A horse! a horse! My kingdom for a horse!
_King Richard III., Act_ v. _Sc_. 4. SHAKESPEARE.

The courser pawed the ground with restless feet,
And snorting foamed, and champed the golden bit.
_Palamon and Arcite, Pt. III_. J. DRYDEN.

Round-hoofed, short-jointed, fetlocks shag and long,
Broad breast, full eye, small head and nostril wide,
High crest, short ears, straight legs and passing strong,
Thin mane, thick tail, broad buttock, tender hide:
Look, what a horse should have he did not lack.
Save a proud rider on so proud a back.
_Venus and Adonis_. SHAKESPEARE.

Oft in this season too the horse, provoked
While his big sinews full of spirits swell,
Trembling with vigor, in the heat of blood,
Springs the high fence.... his nervous chest,
Luxuriant and erect, the seat of strength!
_The Seasons: Summer_. J. THOMSON.

Champing his foam, and bounding o'er the plain,
Arch his high neck, and graceful spread his mane.
_The Courser_. SIR R. BLACKMORE.

Is it the wind those branches stirs?
No, no! from out the forest prance
A trampling troop; I see them come!
In one vast squadron they advance!
I strove to cry,--my lips were dumb.
The steeds rush on in plunging pride;
But where are they the reins to guide!
A thousand horse,--and none to ride!
With flowing tail, and flying mane,
Wide nostrils, never stretched by pain,
Mouths bloodless to the bit or rein,
And feet that iron never shod,
And flanks unscarred by spur or rod,
A thousand horse, the wild, the free,
Like waves that follow o'er the sea,
Came thickly thundering on.
_Mazeppa_. LORD BYRON.

I holde a mouses herte nat worth a leek.
That hath but oon hole for to sterte to.
_Preamble, Wyves Tale of Bath_. CHAUCER.

When now, unsparing as the scourge of war,
Blast follow blasts and groves dismantled roar;
Around their home the storm-pinched cattle lows,
No nourishment in frozen pasture grows.
_The Farmer's Boy: Winter_. R. BLOOMFIELD.

Rural confusion! on the grassy bank
Some ruminating lie; while others stand
Half in the flood, and, often bending, sip
The circling surface. In the middle droops
The strong laborious ox, of honest front,
Which incomposed he shakes; and from his sides
The troublous insects lashes with his tail,
Returning still.
_The Seasons: Summer_. J. THOMSON.

Tossed from rock to rock,
Incessant bleatings run around the hills.
At last, of snowy white, the gathered flocks
Are in the wattled pen innumerous pressed,
Head above head: and ranged in lusty rows,
The shepherds sit, and whet the sounding shears.
_The Seasons: Summer_. J. THOMSON.

The lamb thy riot dooms to bleed to-day,
Had he thy reason, would he skip and play?
Pleased to the last, he crops the flowery food,
And licks the hand just raised to shed his blood.
_Essay on Man, Epistle I_. A. POPE.

Welcome, ye shades! ye bowery thickets, hail!...
Delicious is your shelter to the soul,
As to the hunted hart the sallying spring,
Or stream full-flowing, that his swelling sides
Laves, as he floats along the herbaged brink.
_The Seasons: Autumn_. J. THOMSON.

A poor sequestered stag,
That from the hunter's aim had ta'en a hurt,
Did come to languish;...
... and the big round tears
Coursed one another down his innocent nose
In piteous chase.
_As You Like It, Act ii. Sc. 1_. SHAKESPEARE.

Cruel as Death, and hungry as the Grave!
Burning for blood! bony, and gaunt, and grim!
Assembling wolves in raging troops descend;
And, pouring o'er the country, bear along,
Keen as the north wind sweeps the glossy snows.
All is their prize.
_The Seasons: Winter_. J. THOMSON.

ANTHOLOGY.

Infinite riches in a little room.
_The Jew of Malta, Act i_. C. MARLOWE.

APPARITION.

Thin, airy shoals of visionary ghosts.
_Odyssey_. HOMER. _Trans. of_ POPE.

My people too were scared with eerie sounds,
A footstep, a low throbbing in the walls,
A noise of falling weights that never fell,
Weird whispers, bells that rang without a hand,
Door-handles turned when none was at the door,
And bolted doors that opened of themselves;
And one betwixt the dark and light had seen
_Her_, bending by the cradle of her babe.
_The Ring_. A. TENNYSON.

Great Pompey's shade complains that we are slow,
And Scipio's ghost walks unavenged amongst us!
_Cato, Act ii. Sc_. 1. J. ADDISON.

Now it is the time of night,
That the graves, all gaping wide,
Every one lets forth his sprite,
In the church-way paths to glide.
_Midsummer Night's Dream, Act v. Sc_. 1. SHAKESPEARE.

For night's swift dragons cut the clouds full fast,
And yonder shines Aurora's harbinger;
At whose approach, ghosts, wandering here and there,
Troop home to churchyards.
_Midsummer Night's Dream_, iii, 2. SHAKESPEARE.

APPEARANCE.

Such was Zuleika! such around her shone
The nameless charms unmarked by her alone;
The light of love, the purity of grace,
The mind, the music breathing from her face,
The heart whose softness harmonized the whole,
And oh! that eye was in itself a Soul.
_Bride of Abydos, Canto I_. LORD BYRON.

There's nothing ill can dwell in such a temple;
If the ill spirit have so fair a house,
Good things will strive to dwell with 't.
_The Tempest, Act i. Sc_. 2. SHAKESPEARE.

Exceeding fair she was not; and yet fair
In that she never studied to be fairer
Than Nature made her; beauty cost her nothing,
Her virtues were so rare.
_All Fools, Act i. Sc_. 1. G. CHAPMAN.

Her glossy hair was clustered o'er a brow
Bright with intelligence, and fair and smooth;
Her eyebrow's shape was like the aerial bow,
Her cheek all purple with the beam of youth,
Mounting, at times, to a transparent glow,
As if her veins ran lightning.
_Don Juan, Canto I_. LORD BYRON.

The glass of fashion, and the mould of form,
The observed of all observers!
_Hamlet, Act_ iii _Sc_. 1. SHAKESPEARE.

They brought one Pinch, a hungry lean-faced villain,
A mere anatomy, a mountebank,
A threadbare juggler, and a fortune-teller,
A needy, hollow-eyed, sharp-looking wretch,
A living-dead man.
_Comedy of Errors, Act v. Sc_. 1. SHAKESPEARE.

Falstaff sweats to death,
And lards the lean earth as he walks along;
Were't not for laughing, I should pity him.
_K. Henry IV., Pt. I. Act ii. Sc_. 2. SHAKESPEARE.

Yond' Cassius has a lean and hungry look;
He thinks too much: such men are dangerous.
_Julius Caesar, Act i. Sc_. 2. SHAKESPEARE.

Seemed washing his hands with invisible soap
In imperceptible water.
_Miss Kilmansegg_. T. HOOD.

Her pretty feet
Like snailes did creep
A little out, and then,
As if they played at bo-peep,
Did soon draw in agen.
_Upon her Feet_. R. HERRICK.

Who the silent man can prize,
If a fool he be or wise?
Yet, though lonely seem the wood,
Therein may lurk the beast of blood;
Often bashful looks conceal
Tongue of fire and heart of steel;
And deem not thou in forest gray,
Every dappled skin thy prey,
Lest thou rouse, with luckless spear,
The tiger for the fallow-deer!
_The Gulistan_. BISHOP HEBER.

HORATIO. I saw him once: he was a goodly king.
HAMLET. He was a man, take him for all in all,
I shall not look upon his like again.
_Hamlet, Act_ i. _Sc_. 3. SHAKESPEARE.

On his bold visage middle age
Had slightly pressed his signet sage,
Yet had not quenched the open truth,
And fiery vehemence of youth;
Forward and frolic glee was there,
The will to do, the soul to dare,
The sparkling glance, soon blown to fire
Of hasty love or headlong ire.
_The Lady of the Lake, Canto I_. SIR W. SCOTT.

Mislike me not for my complexion,
The shadowed livery of the burnished sun,
To whom I am a neighbor, and near bred.
Bring me the fairest creature northward born,
Where Phoebus' fire scarce thaws the icicles,
And let us make incision for your love,
To prove whose blood is reddest, his or mine.
_Merchant of Venice, Act_ ii. _Sc. 1_. SHAKESPEARE.

Incensed with indignation Satan stood
Unterrified, and like a comet burned,
That fires the length of Ophiucus huge
In th' arctic sky, and from his horrid hair
Shakes pestilence and war.

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