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Widger's Quotations from The Memoirs of Napoleon by David Widger

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D.W.

QUOTATIONS FROM THREE COLLECTIONS OF MEMOIRS OF NAPOLEON

Contents:

Memoirs of Napoleon, V1, by Bourrienne [NB#01][nb01v10.txt]3551
Memoirs of Napoleon, V2, by Bourrienne [NB#02][nb02v10.txt]3552
Memoirs of Napoleon, V3, by Bourrienne [NB#03][nb03v10.txt]3553
Memoirs of Napoleon, V4, by Bourrienne [NB#04][nb04v10.txt]3554
Memoirs of Napoleon, V5, by Bourrienne [NB#05][nb05v10.txt]3555
Memoirs of Napoleon, V6, by Bourrienne [NB#06][nb06v10.txt]3556
Memoirs of Napoleon, V7, by Bourrienne [NB#07][nb07v10.txt]3557
Memoirs of Napoleon, V8, by Bourrienne [NB#08][nb08v10.txt]3558
Memoirs of Napoleon, V9, by Bourrienne [NB#09][nb09v10.txt]3559
Memoirs of Napoleon, V10, by Bourrienne [NB#10][nb10v10.txt]3560
Memoirs of Napoleon, V11, by Bourrienne [NB#11][nb11v10.txt]3561
Memoirs of Napoleon, V12, by Bourrienne [NB#12][nb12v10.txt]3562
Memoirs of Napoleon, V13, by Bourrienne [NB#13][nb13v10.txt]3563
Memoirs of Napoleon, V14, by Bourrienne [NB#14][nb14v10.txt]3564
Memoirs of Napoleon, V15, by Bourrienne [NB#15][nb15v10.txt]3565
Memoirs of Napoleon, V16, by Bourrienne [NB#16][nb16v10.txt]3566
Complete Memoirs of Napoleon, by Bourrienne[NB#17][nb17v10.txt]3567

Private Life of Napoleon, V1, by Constant [NB#18][nc01v10.txt]3568
Private Life of Napoleon, V2, by Constant [NB#19][nc02v10.txt]3569
Private Life of Napoleon, V3, by Constant [NB#20][nc03v10.txt]3570
Private Life of Napoleon, V4, by Constant [NB#21][nc04v10.txt]3571
Private Life of Napoleon, V5, by Constant [NB#22][nc05v10.txt]3572
Private Life of Napoleon, V6, by Constant [NB#23][nc06v10.txt]3573
Private Life of Napoleon, V7, by Constant [NB#24][nc07v10.txt]3574
Private Life of Napoleon, V8, by Constant [NB#25][nc08v10.txt]3575
Private Life of Napoleon, V9, by Constant [NB#26][nc09v10.txt]3576
Private Life of Napoleon, V10, by Constant [NB#27][nc10v10.txt]3577
Private Life of Napoleon, V11, by Constant [NB#28][nc11v10.txt]3578
Private Life of Napoleon, V12, by Constant [NB#29][nc12v10.txt]3579
Complete Life of Napoleon, V13, by Constant[NB#30][nc13v10.txt]3580

Memoirs of the Court of St. Cloud, v1 [CM#55][cm55b10.txt]3892
Memoirs of the Court of St. Cloud, v2 [CM#56][cm56b10.txt]3893
Memoirs of the Court of St. Cloud, v3 [CM#57][cm57b10.txt]3894
Memoirs of the Court of St. Cloud, v4 [CM#58][cm58b10.txt]3895
Memoirs of the Court of St. Cloud, v5 [CM#59][cm59b10.txt]3896
Memoirs of the Court of St. Cloud, v6 [CM#60][cm60b10.txt]3897
Memoirs of the Court of St. Cloud, v7 [CM#61][cm61b10.txt]3898
The Entire Memoirs of Court of St. Cloud [CM#62][cm62b10.txt]3899

NAPOLEON'S MEMOIRS BY BOURRIENNE

Memoirs of Napoleon, V1, by Bourrienne [NB#01][nb01v10.txt]3551
Memoirs of Napoleon, V2, by Bourrienne [NB#02][nb02v10.txt]3552
Memoirs of Napoleon, V3, by Bourrienne [NB#03][nb03v10.txt]3553
Memoirs of Napoleon, V4, by Bourrienne [NB#04][nb04v10.txt]3554
Memoirs of Napoleon, V5, by Bourrienne [NB#05][nb05v10.txt]3555
Memoirs of Napoleon, V6, by Bourrienne [NB#06][nb06v10.txt]3556
Memoirs of Napoleon, V7, by Bourrienne [NB#07][nb07v10.txt]3557
Memoirs of Napoleon, V8, by Bourrienne [NB#08][nb08v10.txt]3558
Memoirs of Napoleon, V9, by Bourrienne [NB#09][nb09v10.txt]3559
Memoirs of Napoleon, V10, by Bourrienne [NB#10][nb10v10.txt]3560
Memoirs of Napoleon, V11, by Bourrienne [NB#11][nb11v10.txt]3561
Memoirs of Napoleon, V12, by Bourrienne [NB#12][nb12v10.txt]3562
Memoirs of Napoleon, V13, by Bourrienne [NB#13][nb13v10.txt]3563
Memoirs of Napoleon, V14, by Bourrienne [NB#14][nb14v10.txt]3564
Memoirs of Napoleon, V15, by Bourrienne [NB#15][nb15v10.txt]3565
Memoirs of Napoleon, V16, by Bourrienne [NB#16][nb16v10.txt]3566
Complete Memoirs of Napoleon, by Bourrienne[NB#17][nb17v10.txt]3567

MEMOIRS OF NAPOLEON, V1, by Bourrienne
[nb01v10.txt]3551

His superiors, who were anxious to get rid of him
Josephine: Readily laughed at her own credulity
Not always agreeable that every truth should be told
Opinion of posterity is the real immortality of the soul
Passions are always bad counsellors

MEMOIRS OF NAPOLEON, V2, by Bourrienne
[nb02v10.txt]3552

Bonaparte was a creator in the art of war
Leave ordinary letters for three weeks in the basket
Occupied with what he was thinking of than with what was said

MEMOIRS OF NAPOLEON, V3, by Bourrienne
[nb03v10.txt]3553

Always meet your enemies with a bold face
Least benefit which accrues inspires the hope of a new
Look upon religions as the work of men
Napoleon loved only men with strong passions and great weakness
Religions a powerful engine of government
We never know what we wish for

MEMOIRS OF NAPOLEON, V4, by Bourrienne
[nb04v10.txt]3554

Doctrine of indefinite perfectibility
Ideologues
Men were only to be governed by fear and interest
Moliere's--"I pardon you, but you shall pay me for this!"
Police, catch only fools
Trifles often decide the greatest events
Two levers for moving men,--interest and fear
Well-bred ladies can tell falsehoods without seeming to do so

MEMOIRS OF NAPOLEON, V5, by Bourrienne
[nb05v10.txt]3555

Calumny has such powerful charms
Die young, and I shall have some consolatory reflection
Immortality is the recollection one leaves
Most celebrated people lose on a close view
Religion is useful to the Government
The boudoir was often stronger than the cabinet
To leave behind him no traces of his existence
Treaty, according to custom, was called perpetual

MEMOIRS OF NAPOLEON, V6, by Bourrienne
[nb06v10.txt]3556

Ability in making it be supposed that he really possessed talent
Absurdity of interfering with trifles
Admired him more for what he had the fortitude not to do
Animated by an unlucky zeal
Ideologues
Put some gold lace on the coats of my virtuous republicans
Trifles honoured with too much attention
Were made friends of lest they should become enemies
Would enact the more in proportion as we yield

MEMOIRS OF NAPOLEON, V7, by Bourrienne
[nb07v10.txt]3557

Malice delights to blacken the characters of prominent men
Manufacturers of phrases
More glorious to merit a sceptre than to possess one
Necessary to let men and things take their course

MEMOIRS OF NAPOLEON, V8, by Bourrienne
[nb08v10.txt]3558

An old man's blessing never yet harmed any one
Buried for the purpose of being dug up
Kiss the feet of Popes provided their hands are tied
Something so seductive in popular enthusiasm

MEMOIRS OF NAPOLEON, V9, By Bourrienne
[nb09v10.txt]3559

Always proposing what he knew could not be honourably acceded to
Cause of war between the United States and England
Conquest can only be regarded as the genius of destruction
Demand everything, that you may obtain nothing
Submit to events, that he might appear to command them
Tendency to sell the skin of the bear before killing him
When a man has so much money he cannot have got it honestly

MEMOIRS OF NAPOLEON, V10, By Bourrienne
[nb10v10.txt]3560

I have made sovereigns, but have not wished to be one myself
Go to England The English like wrangling politicians
Let women mind their knitting

MEMOIRS OF NAPOLEON, V11, By Bourrienne
[nb11v10.txt]3561

A sect cannot be destroyed by cannon-balls
Every time we go to war with them we teach them how to beat us
God in his mercy has chosen Napoleon to be his representative on earth
The wish and the reality were to him one and the same thing

MEMOIRS OF NAPOLEON, V12, By Bourrienne
[nb12v10.txt]3562

Treaties of peace no less disastrous than the wars
Yield to illusion when the truth was not satisfactory

MEMOIRS OF NAPOLEON, V13, By Bourrienne
[nb13v10.txt]3563

I almost fancy I am dreaming when I look back on the miraculous incapacity of
the persons who were then at the head of our Government. The emigrants, who,
as it has been truly said, had neither learned nor forgotten anything, came
back with all the absurd pretensions of Coblentz. Their silly vanity reminded
one of a character in one of Voltaire's novels who is continually saying, "Un
homme comme moi!" These people were so engrossed with their pretended
merit that they were blind to everything else. They not only disregarded the
wishes and the wants of France; which in overthrowing the Empire hoped to
regain liberty, but they disregarded every warning they had received.

M. de Talleyrand, accompanied by the members of the Provisional Government,
several Marshals and general officers, and the municipal body, headed by the
prefect of the Seine, went in procession beyond the barrier to receive
Monsieur. M. de Talleyrand, in the name of the Provisional Government,
addressed the Prince, who in reply made that observation which has been so
often repeated, "Nothing is changed in France: there is only one Frenchman
more."

This was the opinion which the mass of the people instinctively formed, for
they judged of the Emperor of Austria in his character of a father and not in
his character of a monarch; and as the rights of misfortune are always sacred
in France, more interest was felt for Maria Louisa when she was known to be
forsaken than when she was in the height of her splendour. Francis II. had not
seen his daughter since the day when she left Vienna to unite her destiny with
that of the master of half of Europe

MEMOIRS OF NAPOLEON, V14, by Bourrienne
[nb14v10.txt]3564

The facility with which the Ministers of Finance and of the Treasury provided
for all these expenses astonished everybody, as it was necessary to pay for
everything in ready money. The system of public works was at the same time
resumed throughout France. "It is easy to see," said the workmen, "that 'the
great contractor' is returned; all was dead, now everything revives."

One of the most important struggles of modern times was now about to commence--
a struggle which for many years was to decide the fate of Europe. Napoleon and
Wellington at length stood opposite one another. They had never met; the
military reputation of each was of the highest kind.

On one occasion he ordered his camp-bed to be displayed for the inspection of
the English officers. In two small leather packages were comprised the couch
of the once mighty ruler of the Continent. The steel bedstead which, when
folded up, was only two feet long, and eighteen inches wide, occupied one case,
while the otter contained the mattress and curtains. The whole was so
contrived as to be ready for use in three minutes.

MEMOIRS OF NAPOLEON, V15, by Bourrienne
[nb15v10.txt]3565

In 1812 Jerome was given the command of the right wing of the Grand Army in its
advance against Russia, but he did not fulfil the expectations of his brother,
and Davoust took the command instead. Every king feels himself a born general:
whatever else they cannot do, war is an art which comes with the crown, and
Jerome, unwilling to serve under a mere Marshal, withdrew in disgust. In 1813
he had the good feeling and the good sense to refuse the treacherous offer of
the Allies to allow him to retain his kingdom if he joined them against his
brother, a snare his sister Caroline fell into at Naples.

Having returned to private life solely on account of Fouche's presence in the
Ministry, I yielded to that consolation which is always left to the
discontented. I watched the extravagance and inconsistency that were passing
around me, and the new follies which were every day committed; and it must be
confessed that a rich and varied picture presented itself to my observation.

The reintroduction of much that was bad in the old system (one country even
going so far as to re-establish torture), the steady attack on liberty and on
all liberal ideas, Wurtemberg being practically the only State which grumbled
at the tightening of the reins so dear to Metternich,--all formed a fitting
commentary on the proclamations by which the Sovereigns had hounded on their
people against the man they represented as the one obstacle to the freedom and
peace of Europe.

MEMOIRS OF NAPOLEON, V16, by Bourrienne
[nb16v10.txt]3566

Every one cannot be an atheist who pleases
Grew more angry as his anger was less regarded
I do not live--I merely exist
Strike their imaginations by absurdities than by rational ideas
Those who are free from common prejudices acquire others

COMPLETE MEMOIRS OF NAPOLEON, by Bourrienne
[nb17v10.txt]3567

Always proposing what he knew could not be honourably acceded to
Cause of war between the United States and England
Conquest can only be regarded as the genius of destruction
Demand everything, that you may obtain nothing
Submit to events, that he might appear to command them
Tendency to sell the skin of the bear before killing him
When a man has so much money he cannot have got it honestly
I have made sovereigns, but have not wished to be one myself
Go to England The English like wrangling politicians
Let women mind their knitting
A sect cannot be destroyed by cannon-balls
Every time we go to war with them we teach them how to beat us
God in his mercy has chosen Napoleon to be his representative on earth
The wish and the reality were to him one and the same thing
Treaties of peace no less disastrous than the wars
Yield to illusion when the truth was not satisfactory
Every one cannot be an atheist who pleases
Grew more angry as his anger was less regarded
I do not live--I merely exist
Strike their imaginations by absurdities than by rational ideas
Those who are free from common prejudices acquire others

RECOLLECTIONS OF THE PRIVATE LIFE OF NAPOLEON BY JULES CONSTANT

Private Life of Napoleon, V1, by Constant [NB#18][nc01v10.txt]3568
Private Life of Napoleon, V2, by Constant [NB#19][nc02v10.txt]3569
Private Life of Napoleon, V3, by Constant [NB#20][nc03v10.txt]3570
Private Life of Napoleon, V4, by Constant [NB#21][nc04v10.txt]3571
Private Life of Napoleon, V5, by Constant [NB#22][nc05v10.txt]3572
Private Life of Napoleon, V6, by Constant [NB#23][nc06v10.txt]3573
Private Life of Napoleon, V7, by Constant [NB#24][nc07v10.txt]3574
Private Life of Napoleon, V8, by Constant [NB#25][nc08v10.txt]3575
Private Life of Napoleon, V9, by Constant [NB#26][nc09v10.txt]3576
Private Life of Napoleon, V10, by Constant [NB#27][nc10v10.txt]3577
Private Life of Napoleon, V11, by Constant [NB#28][nc11v10.txt]3578
Private Life of Napoleon, V12, by Constant [NB#29][nc12v10.txt]3579
Complete Life of Napoleon, V13, by Constant[NB#30][nc13v10.txt]3580

PRIVATE LIFE OF NAPOLEON, V1, by Constant
[nc01v10.txt]3568

"To paint Caesar in undress is not to paint Caesar," some one has said. Yet
men will always like to see the great 'en deshabille'. In these volumes the
hero is painted in undress. His foibles, his peculiarities, his vices, are
here depicted without reserve. But so also are his kindness of heart, his vast
intellect, his knowledge of men, his extraordinary energy, his public spirit.
The shutters are taken down, and the workings of the mighty machinery are laid
bare.

Never did poet or novelist imagine scenes so improbable. The son of an obscure
lawyer in an unimportant island becomes Emperor of the French and King of
Italy. His brothers and sisters become kings and queens. The sons of
innkeepers, notaries; lawyers, and peasants become marshals of the empire. The
Emperor, first making a West India Creole his wife and Empress, puts her away,
and marries a daughter of the haughtiest and oldest royal house in Europe, the
niece of a queen whom the people of France had beheaded a few years before.
Their son is born a king--King of Rome. Then suddenly the pageantry dissolves,
and Emperor, kings, and queens become subjects again.

The old woman who met him incognito climbing the hill of Tarare, and replying
to his assertion that "Napoleon was only a tyrant like the rest," exclaimed,
"It may be so, but the others are the kings of the nobility, while he is one of
us, and we have chosen him ourselves,"

Attached to the person of the Emperor Napoleon for fifteen years, I have seen
all the men, and witnessed all the important events, which centered around him.
I have seen far more than that; for I have had under my eyes all the
circumstances of his life, the least as well as the greatest, the most secret
as well as those which are known to history

PRIVATE LIFE OF NAPOLEON, V2, by Constant
[nc02v10.txt]3569

He admitted, however, notwithstanding all his jokes, that he had never thought
himself so near death, and that he felt as if he had been dead for a few
seconds. I do not remember whether it was on this or another occasion that I
heard the Emperor say, that "death was only asleep without dreams."

Mademoiselle Hortense was extremely pretty, with an expressive and mobile
countenance, and in addition to this was graceful, talented, and affable.
Kindhearted and amiable like her mother, she had not that excessive desire to
oblige which sometimes detracted from Madame Bonaparte's character.

About this time she inspired a most violent passion in a gentleman of a very
good family, who was, I think, a little deranged before this mad love affected
his brain. This poor unfortunate roamed incessantly around Malmaison; and as
soon as Mademoiselle Hortense left the house, ran by the side of her carriage
with the liveliest demonstrations of tenderness, and threw through the window
flowers, locks of his hair, and verses of his own composition. When he met
Mademoiselle Hortense on foot, he threw himself on his knees before her with a
thousand passionate gestures, addressing her in most endearing terms, and
followed her, in spite of all opposition, even into the courtyard of the
chateau, and abandoned himself to all kinds of folly.

The Archbishop of Milan had come to Lyons, notwithstanding his great age, in
order to see the First Consul, whom he loved with such tenderness that in
conversation the venerable old man continually addressed the young general as
"my son." The peasants of Pavia, having revolted because their fanaticism had
been excited by false assertions that the French wished to destroy their
religion, the Archbishop of Milan, in order to prove that their fears were
groundless, often showed himself in a carriage with General Bonaparte.

The celebration of this sacrament at Notre Dame was a novel sight to the
Parisians, and many attended as if it were a theatrical representation. Many,
also, especially amongst the military, found it rather a matter of raillery
than of edification; and those who, during the Revolution, had contributed all
their strength to the overthrow of the worship which the First Consul had just
re-established, could with difficulty conceal their indignation and their
chagrin.

"Why did you quit the service?" resumed the First Consul, who appeared to take
great interest in the conversation.--"My faith, General, each one in his turn,
and there are saber strokes enough for every one. One fell on me there " (the
worthy laborer bent his head and divided the locks of his hair); "and after
some weeks in the field hospital, they gave me a discharge to return to my wife
and my plow."

PRIVATE LIFE OF NAPOLEON, V3, by Constant
[nc03v10.txt]3570

Her sudden appearance astonished, and even alarmed, Roustan and myself; for it
was only an extraordinary circumstance which could have induced Madame
Bonaparte to leave her room in this costume, before taking all necessary
precautions to conceal the damage which the want of the accessories of the
toilet did her. She entered, or rather rushed, into the room, crying, "The
Duke d'Enghien is dead! Ah, my friend! what have you done?" Then she fell
sobbing into the arms of the First Consul, who became pale as death, and said
with extraordinary emotion, "The miserable wretches have been too quick!" He
then left the room, supporting Madame Bonaparte, who could hardly walk, and was
still weeping. The news of the prince's death spread consternation in the
chateau; and the First Consul remarked this universal grief, but reprimanded no
one for it. The fact is, the greatest chagrin which this mournful catastrophe
caused his servants, most of whom were attached to him by affection even more
than by duty, came from the belief that it would inevitably tarnish the glory
and destroy the peace of mind of their master.

Women not residing in Boulogne were prohibited from remaining there without a
special permit from the minister of police. This measure had been judged
necessary on account of the army; for otherwise each soldier perhaps would have
brought a woman to Boulogne, and the disorder would have been indescribable.

In spite of all these precautions, spies from the English fleet each day
penetrated into Boulogne. When they were discovered no quarter was given; and
notwithstanding this, emissaries who had landed, no one knew where, came each
evening to the theater, and carried their imprudence so far as to write their
opinion of the actors and actresses, whom they designated by name, and to post
these writings on the walls of the theater, thus defying the police.

There were also traitors in Boulogne. A schoolmaster, the secret agent of
Lords Keith and Melville, was surprised one morning on the cliff above the camp
of the right wing, making telegraphic signals with his arms; and being arrested
almost in the act by the sentinels, he protested his innocence, and tried to
turn the incident into a jest, but his papers were searched, and correspondence
with the English found, which clearly proved his guilt. He was delivered to
the council of war, and shot the next day.

About this time his Majesty was riding on horseback near his barracks, when a
pretty young girl of fifteen or sixteen, dressed in white, her face bathed in
tears, threw herself on her knees in his path. The Emperor immediately
alighted from his horse, and assisted her to rise, asking most compassionately
what he could do for her. The poor girl had come to entreat the pardon of her
father, a storekeeper in the commissary department, who had been condemned to
the galleys for grave crimes. His Majesty could not resist the many charms of
the youthful suppliant, and the pardon was granted.

PRIVATE LIFE OF NAPOLEON, V4, by Constant
[nc04v10.txt]3571

The Empress Josephine was of medium height, with an exquisite figure; and in
all her movements there was an airiness and grace which gave to her walk
something ethereal, without detracting from the majesty of the sovereign. Her
expressive countenance portrayed all the emotions of her soul, while retaining
the charming sweetness which was its ruling expression. In pleasure, as in
grief, she was beautiful, and even against your will you would smile when she
smiled; if she was sad, you would be also. Never did a woman justify better
than she the expression that the eyes are the mirror of the soul. Hers were of
a deep blue, and nearly always half closed by her long lids, which were
slightly arched, and fringed with the most beautiful lashes in the world; in
regarding her you felt yourself drawn to her by an irresistible power. It must
have been difficult for the Empress to give severity to that seductive look;
but she could do this, and well knew how to render it imposing when necessary.

The Empress had a remarkable memory, of which the Emperor often availed
himself; she was also an excellent musician, played well on the harp, and sang
with taste. She had perfect tact, an exquisite perception of what was
suitable, the soundest, most infallible judgment imaginable, and, with a
disposition always lovely, always the same, indulgent to her enemies as to her
friends, she restored peace wherever there was quarrel or discord. When the
Emperor was vexed with his brothers or other persons, which often happened, the
Empress spoke a few words, and everything was settled. If she demanded a
pardon, it was very rare that the Emperor did not grant it, however grave the
crime committed; and I could cite a thousand examples of pardons thus solicited
and obtained.

Before his departure for Russia, the Empress, distressed at this war, of which
she entirely disapproved, again redoubled her recommendations concerning the
Emperor, and made me a present of her portrait, saying to me, "My good
Constant, I rely on you; if the Emperor were sick, you would inform me of it,
would you not? Conceal nothing from me, I love him so much."

His Majesty walked in advance of the persons who accompanied him, and took much
pleasure in being first to call by their names the various localities he
passed. A peasant, seeing him thus some distance from his suite, cried out to
him familiarly, "Oh, citizen, is the Emperor going to pass soon?"--"Yes,"
replied the Emperor, "have patience."

PRIVATE LIFE OF NAPOLEON, V5, by Constant
[nc05v10.txt]3572

I left the Emperor at Berlin, where each day, and each hour of the day, he
received news of some victory gained, or some success obtained by his generals.
General Beaumont presented to him eighty flags captured from the enemy by his
division, and Colonel Gerard also presented sixty taken from Blucher at the
battle of Wismar. Madgeburg had capitulated, and a garrison of sixty thousand
men had marched out under the eyes of General Savary. Marshal Mortier occupied
Hanover in the name of France, and Prince Murat was on the point of entering
Warsaw after driving out the Russians.

....since his Majesty took the lead, and left the others but little to say.
Such was often his habit; but no one thought of complaining of this, so
interesting were nearly always the Emperor's ideas, and so original and
brilliantly expressed. His Majesty did not converse, as had been truthfully
said in the journal which I have added to my memoirs, but he spoke with an
inexpressible charm.

Thereupon the Emperor left the table, opened a little casket, took therefrom a
package in the shape of a long square, and handed it to Marshal Lefebvre,
saying to him, "Duke of Dantzig, accept this chocolate; little gifts preserve
friendship."

This premature death was to her an inconsolable grief; and she shut herself up
for three days, weeping bitterly, seeing no one except her women, and taking
almost no nourishment. It even seemed that she feared to be distracted from
her grief....

PRIVATE LIFE OF NAPOLEON, V6, by Constant
[nc06v10.txt]3573

When his Majesty returned to his apartment, I heard Marshal Berthier say to
him, "Sire, are you not afraid that the sovereigns may some day use to
advantage against you all that you have just taught them? Your Majesty just
now seemed to forget what you formerly told us, that it is necessary to act
with our allies as if they were afterwards to be our enemies." --"Berthier,"
replied the Emperor, smiling, that is a good observation on your part, and I
thank you for it; I really believe I have made you think I was an idiot. You
think, then," continued his Majesty, pinching sharply one of the Prince de
Neuchatel's ears, "that I committed the indiscretion of giving them whips with
which to return and flog us? Calm yourself, I did not tell them all."

The day after their arrival at Saint-Cloud, the Emperor and Empress went to
Paris in order to be present at the fetes of the 15th of August, which it is
useless to say were magnificent. As soon as he entered the Tuileries, the
Emperor hastened through the chateau to examine the repairs and improvements
which had been made during his absence, and, as was his habit, criticised more
than he praised all that he saw.

By this arrangement the two Emperors found themselves in such a conspicuous
position that it was impossible for them to make a movement without being seen
by every one. On the 3d of October AEdipus was presented. "All the
sovereigns," as the Emperor called them, were present at this representation;
and just as the actor pronounced these words in the first scene: "The
friendship of a great man is a gift from the gods:"--the Czar arose, and held
out his hand with much grace to the Emperor; and immediately acclamations,
which the presence of the sovereigns could not restrain, burst forth from every
part of the hall.

Those who traded in curiosities and objects of art liked him exceedingly, since
he bought their wares without much bargaining. However, on one occasion he
wished to purchase a telescope, and sent for a famous optician, who seized the
opportunity to charge him an enormous price. But Asker-Khan having examined
the instrument, with which he was much pleased, said to the optician, "You have
given me your long price, now give me your short one."

PRIVATE LIFE OF NAPOLEON, V7, by Constant
[nc07v10.txt]3574

The officers of the line, who had served in several campaigns and had gained
their epaulettes on the field of battle, held a very different position in the
army. Always grave, polite, and considerate, there was a kind of fraternity
among them; and having known suffering and misery themselves, they were always
ready to help others; and their conversation, though not distinguished by
brilliant information, was often full of interest. In nearly every case
boasting quitted them with their youth, and the bravest were always the most
modest. Influenced by no imaginary points of honor, they estimated themselves
at their real worth; and all fear of being suspected of cowardice was beneath
them.

His Majesty passed the two months and a half of his stay working in his
cabinet, which he rarely left, and always unwillingly; his amusements being, as
always, the theater and concerts. He loved music passionately, especially
Italian music, and like all great amateurs was hard to please. He would have
much liked to sing had he been able, but he had no voice, though this did not
prevent his humming now and then pieces which struck his fancy; and as these
little reminiscences usually recurred to him in the mornings, he regaled me
with them while he was being dressed. The air that I have heard him thus
mutilate most frequently was that of The Marseillaise.

His Majesty's, favorite singer were Crescentini and Madame Grassini.
I saw Crescentini's debut at Paris in the role of Romeo, in Romeo and Juliet.
He came preceded by a reputation as the first singer of Italy; and this
reputation was found to be well deserved, notwithstanding all the prejudices he
had to overcome, for I remember well the disparaging statements made concerning
him before his debut at the court theater. According to these self-appointed
connoisseurs, he was a bawler without taste, without method, a maker of absurd
trills, an unimpassioned actor of little intelligence, and many other things
besides.

PRIVATE LIFE OF NAPOLEON, V8, by Constant
[nc08v10.txt]3575

A short time after, my wife went to see the Empress Josephine at Malmaison; and
this lovely princess deigned to receive her alone in the little room in front
of her bedroom. There she seated herself beside her, and tried in touching
words of sympathy to console her, saying that this stroke did not reach us
alone, and that her grandson, too, had died of the same disease. As she said
this she began to weep; for this remembrance reopened in her soul recent
griefs, and my wife bathed with tears the hands of this excellent princess.
Josephine added many touching remarks, trying to alleviate her sorrow by
sharing it, and thus restore resignation to the heart of the poor mother.

When this hilarity had somewhat subsided, Princess Stephanie returned to the
charge, saying, "It really is a pity that your Majesty does not know how to
waltz, for the Germans are wild over waltzing, and the Empress will naturally
share the taste of her compatriots; she can have no partner but the Emperor,
and thus she will be deprived of a great pleasure through your Majesty's
fault."--"You are right!" replied the Emperor; "well, give me a lesson, and you
will have a specimen of my skill." Whereupon he rose, took a few turns with
Princess Stephanie, humming the air of the Queen of Prussia; but he could not
take more than two or three turns, and even this he did so awkwardly that it
increased the amusement of these ladies. Then the Princess of Baden stopped,
saying, "Sire, that is quite enough to convince me that you will never be
anything but a poor pupil. You were made to give lessons, not to take them."

Her Majesty the Queen of Naples had been sent to Brannan, by the Emperor to
receive the Empress. Queen Caroline, of whom the Emperor once said that she
was a man among her sisters, as Prince Joseph was a woman among his brothers,
mistook, it is said, the timidity of Marie Louise for weakness, and thought
that she would only have to speak and her young sister-in-law would hasten to
obey.

No one could resemble the first Empress less than the second, and except in the
two points of similarity of temperament, and an extreme regard for the Emperor,
the one was exactly the opposite of the other; and it must be confessed the
Emperor congratulated himself on this difference, in which he found both
novelty and charm. He himself drew a parallel between his two wives in these
terms: "The one [Josephine] was all art and grace; the other [Marie Louise]
innocence and natural simplicity.

PRIVATE LIFE OF NAPOLEON, V9, by Constant
[nc09v10.txt]3576

Even the vessels and broom-handles were painted various colors, and cared for
like the remainder of the establishment; the inhabitants carrying their love of
cleanliness so far as to compel those who entered to take off their shoes, and
replace them with slippers, which stood at the door for this singular purpose.
I am reminded on this subject of an anecdote relating to the Emperor Joseph the
Second. That prince, having presented himself in boots at the door of a house
in Broek, and being requested to remove them before entering, exclaimed, "I am
the Emperor!" --"Even if you were the burgomaster of Amsterdam, you should not
enter in boots," replied the master of the dwelling. The good Emperor
thereupon put on the slippers.

The Emperor in his tender moods was sometimes even more childish than his son.
The young prince was only four months old when his father put his three-
cornered hat on the pretty infant.

The child usually cried a good deal, and at these times the Emperor embraced
him with an ardor and delight which none but a tender father could feel, saying
to him, "What, Sire, you crying! A king weeping; fie, then, how ugly that is!"
He was just a year old when I saw the Emperor, on the lawn in front of the
chateau, place his sword-belt over the shoulders of the king, and his hat on
his head, and holding out his arms to the child, who tottered to him, his
little feet now and then entangled in his father's sword; and it was beautiful
to see the eagerness with which the Emperor extended his arms to keep him from
falling.

The Cossacks, in common with all races still in their infancy, believe in
magicians. A very amusing anecdote was told of the great chief of the
Cossacks, the celebrated Platoff. Pursued by the King of Naples, he was
beating a retreat, when a ball reached one of the officers beside him, on which
event the headman was so much irritated against his magician that he had him
flogged in presence of all his hordes, reproaching him most bitterly because he
had not turned away the balls by his witchcraft. This was plain evidence of
the fact that he had more faith in his art than the sorcerer himself possessed.

The Emperor rode over the field of battle, which presented a horrible
spectacle, nearly all the dead being covered with wounds; which proved with
what bitterness the battle had been waged. The weather was very inclement, and
rain was falling, accompanied by a very high wind. Poor wounded creatures, who
had not yet been removed to the ambulances, half rose from the ground in their
desire not to be overlooked and to receive aid; while some among them still
cried, Vive l'Empereur!" in spite of their suffering and exhaustion. Those of
our soldiers who had been killed by Russian balls showed on their corpses deep
and broad wounds, for the Russian balls were much larger than ours. We saw a
color-bearer, wrapped in his banner as a winding-sheet, who seemed to give
signs of life, but he expired in the shock of being raised. The Emperor walked
on and said nothing, though many times when he passed by the most mutilated, he
put his hand over his eyes to avoid the sight. This calm lasted only a short
while; for there was a place on the battlefield where French and Russians had
fallen pell-mell, almost all of whom were wounded more or less grievously. And
when the Emperor heard their cries, he became enraged, and shouted at those who
had charge of removing the wounded, much irritated by the slowness with which
this was done. It was difficult to prevent the horses from trampling on the
corpses, so thickly did they lie. A wounded soldier was struck by the shoe of
a horse in the Emperor's suite, and uttered a heartrending cry, upon which the
Emperor quickly turned, and inquired in a most vehement manner who was the
awkward person by whom the man was hurt. He was told, thinking that it would
calm his anger, that the man was nothing but a Russian. "Russian or French,"
he exclaimed, "I wish every one removed!" Poor young fellows who were making
their first campaign, being wounded to the death, lost courage, and wept like
children crying for their mothers. The terrible picture will be forever
engraven on my memory.

PRIVATE LIFE OF NAPOLEON, V10, by Constant
[nc10v10.txt]3577

"Viewed from a political standpoint, how would the papal government in these
days appear compared with the great kingdoms of Europe? Formerly mediocre men
succeeded to the pontifical throne at an age in which one breathes well only
after resting. At this period of life routine and habit are everything; and
nothing is considered but the elevated position, and how to make it redound to
the advantage of his family.
A pope now arrives at sovereign power with a mind sharpened by being accustomed
to intrigue, and with a fear of making powerful enemies who may hereafter
revenge themselves on his family, since his successor is always unknown. In
fine, he cares for nothing but to live and die in peace. In the seat of Sixtus
V. --[Sixtus V., originally Felix Peretti, born at Montalto, 1525, and in 1585
succeeded Gregory XIII. as pope. He was distinguished by his energy and
munificence. He constructed the Vatican Library, the great aqueduct, and other
public works, and placed the obelisk before St. Peter's. Died 1589. ]--how
many popes have there been who have occupied themselves only with frivolous
subjects, as little advantageous to the best interests of religion as fruitful
in inspiring scorn for such a government! But that would lead us too far."

The Emperor indicated every movement with admirable tact, and in such a manner
that it was impossible to be taken at a disadvantage. He commanded only the
troops as a whole, transmitting either personally, or through his staff
officers, his orders to the commander of the corps and divisions, who in their
turn transmitted or had them transmitted to the chiefs of battalions. All
orders given by his Majesty were short, precise, and so clear that it was never
necessary to ask explanations.

It would have been said that the past was no longer anything to him; and living
ever in the future, he already saw victory perched again on our banner, and his
enemies humiliated and vanquished.

As for myself, during the entire campaign I did not a single time undress to
retire to bed, for I never found one anywhere. It was necessary to supply this
deficiency by some means; and as it is well known that necessity is ever ready
with inventions, we supplied deficiency in our furnishings in the following
manner: we had great bags of coarse cloth made, into which we entered, and thus
protected, threw ourselves on a little straw, when we were fortunate enough to
obtain it;--

And when to this is added the neighing of horses, bellowing of cattle, rumbling
of wheels over the stones, cries of the soldiers, sounds from trumpets, drums,
fifes, and the complaints of the inhabitants, with hundreds of persons all
together asking questions at the same time, speaking German to the Italians,
and French to the Germans, how could it be possible that his Majesty should be
as tranquil and as much at his ease in the midst of this fearful uproar as in
his cabinet at Saint-Cloud or the Tuileries? This was nevertheless the case;
and the Emperor, seated before a miserable table covered with a kind of cloth,
a map spread before him, compass and pen in hand, entirely given up to
meditation, showed not the least impatience; and it would have been said that
no exterior noise reached his ears. But let a cry of pain be heard in any
direction, the Emperor instantly raised his head, and gave orders to go and
ascertain what had happened. The power of thus isolating one's self completely
from all the surrounding world is very difficult to acquire, and no one
possessed it to the same degree as his Majesty.

PRIVATE LIFE OF NAPOLEON, V11, by Constant
[nc11v10.txt]3578

These are the details which I learned in regard to Moreau; and, as is well
known, he did not long survive his wound. The same ball which broke both his
legs carried off an arm from Prince Ipsilanti, then aide-de-camp to the Emperor
Alexander; so that if the evil that is done can be repaired by the evil
received, it might be said that the cannon-shot which tore away from us General
Kirgener and Marshal Duroc was this day sent back on the enemy. But alas! it
is a sad sort of consolation that is drawn from reprisals.

"Nothing has been interposed on my part to the re-establishment of peace; I
know and share the sentiments of the French people. I repeat, of the French
people, since there are none among them who desire peace at the expense of
honor. It is with regret that I demand of this generous people new sacrifices,
but they are necessary for their noblest and dearest interests. I have been
compelled to re-enforce my armies by numerous levies, for nations treat with
security only when they display all their strength. An increase of receipts
has become indispensable. The propositions which my minister of finance will
submit to you are in conformity with the system of finance I have established.
We will meet all demands without borrowing, which uses up the resources of the
future, and without paper money, which is the greatest enemy of social order."

It was while speaking of this audacious attack of Vandamme that the Emperor
used this expression, which has been so justly admired, "For a retreating enemy
it is necessary to make a bridge of gold, or oppose a wall of brass."

It would seem that this was well understood in Paris; for the day on which the
'Moniteur' published the reply of his Majesty to the senate, stocks increased
in value more than two francs, which the Emperor did not fail to remark with
much satisfaction; for as is well known, the rise and decline of stocks was
with him the real thermometer of public opinion.

Within the palace itself I heard many persons attached to the Emperor say the
same thing when he was not present, though they spoke very differently in the
presence of his Majesty. When he deigned to interrogate me, as he frequently
did, on what I had heard people say, I reported to him the exact truth; and
when in these confidential toilet conversations of the Emperor I uttered the
word peace, he exclaimed again and again, "Peace! Peace! Ah! who can desire
it more than I? There are some, however, who do not desire it, and the more I
concede the more they demand."

PRIVATE LIFE OF NAPOLEON, V12, by Constant
[nc12v10.txt]3579

She was a brunette of ordinary height, but with a beautiful figure, and pretty
feet and hands, her whole person full of grace, and was indeed perfectly
charming in all respects, and, besides, united with most enticing coquetry
every accomplishment, danced with much grace, played on several instruments,
and was full of intelligence; in fact, she had received that kind of showy
education which forms the most charming mistresses and the worst wives.

It has been said that no man is, a hero to his valet. It would give wide
latitude to a witty remark, which has become proverbial, to make it the
epigraph of these memoirs. The valet of a hero by that very fact is something
more than a valet.

Affairs had reached a point where the great question of triumph or defeat could
not long remain undecided. According to one of the habitual expressions of the
Emperor, the pear was ripe; but who was to gather it?

The princes of the imperial family also enjoyed the right to enter the
Emperor's apartment in the morning. I often saw the Emperor's mother. The
Emperor kissed her hand with much respect and tenderness, but I have many times
heard him reproach her for her excessive economy. Madame Mere listened, and
then gave as excuse for not changing her style of living reasons which often
vexed his Majesty, but which events have unfortunately justified.

COMPLETE PRIVATE LIFE OF NAPOLEON, V13, by Constant
[nc13v10.txt]3580

A sad sort of consolation that is drawn from reprisals
Act with our allies as if they were afterwards to be our enemies
Age in which one breathes well only after resting
All orders given by his Majesty were short, precise
As was his habit, criticised more than he praised
Borrowing, which uses up the resources of the future
Death is only asleep without dreams
Excessive desire to oblige
Fear of being suspected of cowardice was beneath them
For a retreating enemy it is necessary to make a bridge of gold
Frederick the Great: "No man is a hero to his valet"
Hair, arranged with charming negligence
His Majesty did not converse: he spoke.
Like all great amateurs was hard to please
Little gifts preserve friendship
Living ever in the future
Make a bridge of gold, or oppose a wall of brass
Most charming mistresses and the worst wives
Necessity is ever ready with inventions
No man is, a hero to his valet
Paper money, which is the greatest enemy of social order
Power of thus isolating one's self completely from all the world
Rise and decline of stocks was with him the real thermometer
Rubbings with eau de Cologne, his favorite remedy
Self-appointed connoisseurs
She feared to be distracted from her grief
The more I concede the more they demand
The friendship of a great man is a gift from the gods
The pear was ripe; but who was to gather it?
There are saber strokes enough for every one
Trying to alleviate her sorrow by sharing it
You have given me your long price, now give me your short one.
You were made to give lessons, not to take them.

MEMOIRS OF COURT OF ST. CLOUD

Memoirs of the Court of St. Cloud, v1 [CM#55][cm55b10.txt]3892
Memoirs of the Court of St. Cloud, v2 [CM#56][cm56b10.txt]3893
Memoirs of the Court of St. Cloud, v3 [CM#57][cm57b10.txt]3894
Memoirs of the Court of St. Cloud, v4 [CM#58][cm58b10.txt]3895
Memoirs of the Court of St. Cloud, v5 [CM#59][cm59b10.txt]3896
Memoirs of the Court of St. Cloud, v6 [CM#60][cm60b10.txt]3897
Memoirs of the Court of St. Cloud, v7 [CM#61][cm61b10.txt]3898
The Entire Memoirs of Court of St. Cloud [CM#62][cm62b10.txt]3899

MEMOIRS OF THE COURT OF ST. CLOUD, V1
[cm55b10.txt]3892

Easy to give places to men to whom Nature has refused parts
Indifference of the French people to all religion
Prepared to become your victim, but not your accomplice
Were my generals as great fools as some of my Ministers
Which crime in power has interest to render impenetrable

MEMOIRS OF THE COURT OF ST. CLOUD, V2
[cm56b10.txt]3893

Bestowing on the Almighty the passions of mortals
Bow to their charlatanism as if it was sublimity
Cannot be expressed, and if expressed, would not be believed
Feeling, however, the want of consolation in their misfortunes
Future effects dreaded from its past enormities
God is only the invention of fear
Gold, changes black to white, guilt to innocence
Hail their sophistry and imposture as inspiration
Invention of new tortures and improved racks
Labour as much as possible in the dark
Misfortunes and proscription would not only inspire courage
My means were the boundaries of my wants
Not suspected of any vices, but all his virtues are negative
Nothing was decided, though nothing was refused
Now that she is old (as is generally the case), turned devotee
Prelate on whom Bonaparte intends to confer the Roman tiara
Saints supplied her with a finger, a toe, or some other parts
Step is but short from superstition to infidelity
Suspicion and tyranny are inseparable companions
Two hundred and twenty thousand prostitute licenses
Usurped the easy direction of ignorance
Would cease to rule the day he became just

MEMOIRS OF THE COURT OF ST. CLOUD, V3
[CM#57][cm57b10.txt]3894

As confident and obstinate as ignorant
Bonaparte and his wife go now every morning to hear Mass
Bourrienne
Distinguished for their piety or rewarded for their flattery
Extravagances of a head filled with paradoxes
Forced military men to kneel before priests
Indifference about futurity
Military diplomacy
More vain than ambitious
Nature has destined him to obey, and not to govern
One of the negative accomplices of the criminal
Promises of impostors or fools to delude the ignorant
Salaries as the men, under the name of washerwomen
"This is the age of upstarts," said Talleyrand
Thought at least extraordinary, even by our friends

MEMOIRS OF THE COURT OF ST. CLOUD, V4
[CM#58][cm58b10.txt]3895

All his creditors, denounced and executed
All priests are to be proscribed as criminals
How much people talk about what they do not comprehend
Thought himself eloquent when only insolent or impertinent

MEMOIRS OF THE COURT OF ST. CLOUD, V5
[CM#59][cm59b10.txt]3896

Hero of great ambition and small capacity: La Fayette
Marble lives longer than man
Satisfying himself with keeping three mistresses only
Under the notion of being frank, are rude
Want is the parent of industry
With us, unfortunately, suspicion is the same as conviction

MEMOIRS OF THE COURT OF ST. CLOUD, V6
[CM#60][cm60b10.txt]3897

A stranger to remorse and repentance, as well as to honour
Accused of fanaticism, because she refused to cohabit with him
As everywhere else, supported injustice by violence
Bonaparte dreads more the liberty of the Press than all other
Chevalier of the Guillotine: Toureaux
Country where power forces the law to lie dormant
Encounter with dignity and self-command unbecoming provocations
Error to admit any neutrality at all
Expeditious justice, as it is called here
French Revolution was fostered by robbery and murder
He was too honest to judge soundly and to act rightly
Her present Serene Idiot, as she styles the Prince Borghese
If Bonaparte is fond of flattery--pays for it like a real Emperor
Its pretensions rose in proportion to the condescensions
Jealous of his wife as a lover of his mistress
Justice is invoked in vain when the criminal is powerful
May change his habitations six times in the month--yet be home
Men and women, old men and children are no more
My maid always sleeps with me when my husband is absent
Napoleon invasion of States of the American Commonwealth
Not only portable guillotines, but portable Jacobin clubs
Procure him after a useless life, a glorious death
Should our system of cringing continue progressively
Sold cats' meat and tripe in the streets of Rome
Sufferings of individuals, he said, are nothing
Suspicion is evidence
United States will be exposed to Napoleon's outrages
Who complains is shot as a conspirator

MEMOIRS OF THE COURT OF ST. CLOUD, V7
[CM#61][cm61b10.txt]3898

Complacency which may be felt, but ought never to be published
General who is too fond of his life ought never to enter a camp
Generals of Cabinets are often indifferent captains in the field
How many reputations are gained by an impudent assurance
Irresolution and weakness in a commander operate the same
Love of life increase in proportion as its real value diminishes
Opinion almost constitutes half the strength of armies
Presumptuous charlatan
Pretensions or passions of upstart vanity
Pride of an insupportable and outrageous ambition
Prudence without weakness, and with firmness without obstinacy
They ought to be just before they are generous
They will create some quarrel to destroy you
Vices or virtues of all civilized nations are relatively the same
We are tired of everything, even of our existence

THE ENTIRE MEMOIRS OF COURT OF ST. CLOUD
[CM#62][cm62b10.txt]3899

A stranger to remorse and repentance, as well as to honour
Accused of fanaticism, because she refused to cohabit with him
All his creditors, denounced and executed
All priests are to be proscribed as criminals
As everywhere else, supported injustice by violence
As confident and obstinate as ignorant
Bestowing on the Almighty the passions of mortals
Bonaparte and his wife go now every morning to hear Mass
Bonaparte dreads more the liberty of the Press than all other
Bourrienne
Bow to their charlatanism as if it was sublimity
Cannot be expressed, and if expressed, would not be believed
Chevalier of the Guillotine: Toureaux
Complacency which may be felt, but ought never to be published
Country where power forces the law to lie dormant
Distinguished for their piety or rewarded for their flattery
Easy to give places to men to whom Nature has refused parts
Encounter with dignity and self_command unbecoming provocations
Error to admit any neutrality at all
Expeditious justice, as it is called here
Extravagances of a head filled with paradoxes
Feeling, however, the want of consolation in their misfortunes
Forced military men to kneel before priests
French Revolution was fostered by robbery and murder
Future effects dreaded from its past enormities
General who is too fond of his life ought never to enter a camp
Generals of Cabinets are often indifferent captains in the field
God is only the invention of fear
Gold, changes black to white, guilt to innocence
Hail their sophistry and imposture as inspiration
He was too honest to judge soundly and to act rightly
Her present Serene Idiot, as she styles the Prince Borghese
Hero of great ambition and small capacity: La Fayette
How many reputations are gained by an impudent assurance
How much people talk about what they do not comprehend
If Bonaparte is fond of flattery__pays for it like a real Emperor
Indifference about futurity
Indifference of the French people to all religion
Invention of new tortures and improved racks
Irresolution and weakness in a commander operate the same
Its pretensions rose in proportion to the condescensions
Jealous of his wife as a lover of his mistress
Justice is invoked in vain when the criminal is powerful
Labour as much as possible in the dark
Love of life increase in proportion as its real value diminishes
Marble lives longer than man
May change his habitations six times in the month__yet be home
Men and women, old men and children are no more
Military diplomacy
Misfortunes and proscription would not only inspire courage
More vain than ambitious
My maid always sleeps with me when my husband is absent
My means were the boundaries of my wants
Napoleon invasion of States of the American Commonwealth
Nature has destined him to obey, and not to govern
Not suspected of any vices, but all his virtues are negative
Not only portable guillotines, but portable Jacobin clubs
Nothing was decided, though nothing was refused
Now that she is old (as is generally the case), turned devotee
One of the negative accomplices of the criminal
Opinion almost constitutes half the strength of armies
Prelate on whom Bonaparte intends to confer the Roman tiara
Prepared to become your victim, but not your accomplice
Presumptuous charlatan
Pretensions or passions of upstart vanity
Pride of an insupportable and outrageous ambition
Procure him after a useless life, a glorious death
Promises of impostors or fools to delude the ignorant
Prudence without weakness, and with firmness without obstinacy
Saints supplied her with a finger, a toe, or some other parts
Salaries as the men, under the name of washerwomen
Satisfying himself with keeping three mistresses only
Should our system of cringing continue progressively
Sold cats' meat and tripe in the streets of Rome
Step is but short from superstition to infidelity
Sufferings of individuals, he said, are nothing
Suspicion and tyranny are inseparable companions
Suspicion is evidence
They will create some quarrel to destroy you
They ought to be just before they are generous
This is the age of upstarts," said Talleyrand
Thought at least extraordinary, even by our friends
Thought himself eloquent when only insolent or impertinent
Two hundred and twenty thousand prostitute licenses
Under the notion of being frank, are rude
United States will be exposed to Napoleon's outrages
Usurped the easy direction of ignorance
Vices or virtues of all civilized nations are relatively the same
Want is the parent of industry
We are tired of everything, even of our existence
Were my generals as great fools as some of my Ministers
Which crime in power has interest to render impenetrable
Who complains is shot as a conspirator
With us, unfortunately, suspicion is the same as conviction
Would cease to rule the day he became just

THE ENTIRE NAPOLEON MEMOIRS SERIES:

A sect cannot be destroyed by cannon-balls
A stranger to remorse and repentance, as well as to honour
A sad sort of consolation that is drawn from reprisals
Accused of fanaticism, because she refused to cohabit with him
Act with our allies as if they were afterwards to be our enemies
Age in which one breathes well only after resting
All priests are to be proscribed as criminals
All his creditors, denounced and executed
All orders given by his Majesty were short, precise
Always proposing what he knew could not be honourably acceded to
As everywhere else, supported injustice by violence
As confident and obstinate as ignorant
As was his habit, criticised more than he praised
Bestowing on the Almighty the passions of mortals
Bonaparte and his wife go now every morning to hear Mass
Bonaparte dreads more the liberty of the Press than all other
Borrowing, which uses up the resources of the future
Bourrienne
Bow to their charlatanism as if it was sublimity
Cannot be expressed, and if expressed, would not be believed
Cause of war between the United States and England
Chevalier of the Guillotine: Toureaux
Complacency which may be felt, but ought never to be published
Conquest can only be regarded as the genius of destruction
Country where power forces the law to lie dormant
Death is only asleep without dreams
Demand everything, that you may obtain nothing
Distinguished for their piety or rewarded for their flattery
Easy to give places to men to whom Nature has refused parts
Encounter with dignity and self_command unbecoming provocations
Error to admit any neutrality at all
Every one cannot be an atheist who pleases
Every time we go to war with them we teach them how to beat us
Excessive desire to oblige
Expeditious justice, as it is called here
Extravagances of a head filled with paradoxes
Fear of being suspected of cowardice was beneath them
Feeling, however, the want of consolation in their misfortunes
For a retreating enemy it is necessary to make a bridge of gold
Forced military men to kneel before priests
Frederick the Great: "No man is a hero to his valet"
French Revolution was fostered by robbery and murder
Future effects dreaded from its past enormities
General who is too fond of his life ought never to enter a camp
Generals of Cabinets are often indifferent captains in the field
Go to England The English like wrangling politicians
God is only the invention of fear
God in his mercy has chosen Napoleon to be his representative on earth
Gold, changes black to white, guilt to innocence
Grew more angry as his anger was less regarded
Hail their sophistry and imposture as inspiration
Hair, arranged with charming negligence
He was too honest to judge soundly and to act rightly
Her present Serene Idiot, as she styles the Prince Borghese
Hero of great ambition and small capacity: La Fayette
His Majesty did not converse: he spoke.
How many reputations are gained by an impudent assurance
How much people talk about what they do not comprehend
I do not live--I merely exist
I have made sovereigns, but have not wished to be one myself
If Bonaparte is fond of flattery__pays for it like a real Emperor
Indifference of the French people to all religion
Indifference about futurity
Invention of new tortures and improved racks
Irresolution and weakness in a commander operate the same
Its pretensions rose in proportion to the condescensions
Jealous of his wife as a lover of his mistress
Justice is invoked in vain when the criminal is powerful
Labour as much as possible in the dark
Let women mind their knitting
Like all great amateurs was hard to please
Little gifts preserve friendship
Living ever in the future
Love of life increase in proportion as its real value diminishes
Make a bridge of gold, or oppose a wall of brass
Marble lives longer than man
May change his habitations six times in the month__yet be home
Men and women, old men and children are no more
Military diplomacy
Misfortunes and proscription would not only inspire courage
More vain than ambitious
Most charming mistresses and the worst wives
My means were the boundaries of my wants
My maid always sleeps with me when my husband is absent
Napoleon invasion of States of the American Commonwealth
Nature has destined him to obey, and not to govern
Necessity is ever ready with inventions
No man is, a hero to his valet
Not suspected of any vices, but all his virtues are negative
Not only portable guillotines, but portable Jacobin clubs
Nothing was decided, though nothing was refused
Now that she is old (as is generally the case), turned devotee
One of the negative accomplices of the criminal
Opinion almost constitutes half the strength of armies
Paper money, which is the greatest enemy of social order
Power of thus isolating one's self completely from all the world
Prelate on whom Bonaparte intends to confer the Roman tiara
Prepared to become your victim, but not your accomplice
Presumptuous charlatan
Pretensions or passions of upstart vanity
Pride of an insupportable and outrageous ambition
Procure him after a useless life, a glorious death
Promises of impostors or fools to delude the ignorant
Prudence without weakness, and with firmness without obstinacy
Rise and decline of stocks was with him the real thermometer
Rubbings with eau de Cologne, his favorite remedy
Saints supplied her with a finger, a toe, or some other parts
Salaries as the men, under the name of washerwomen
Satisfying himself with keeping three mistresses only
Self-appointed connoisseurs
She feared to be distracted from her grief
Should our system of cringing continue progressively
Sold cats' meat and tripe in the streets of Rome
Step is but short from superstition to infidelity
Strike their imaginations by absurdities than by rational ideas
Submit to events, that he might appear to command them
Sufferings of individuals, he said, are nothing
Suspicion is evidence
Suspicion and tyranny are inseparable companions
Tendency to sell the skin of the bear before killing him
The more I concede the more they demand
The wish and the reality were to him one and the same thing
The friendship of a great man is a gift from the gods
The pear was ripe; but who was to gather it?
There are saber strokes enough for every one
They ought to be just before they are generous
They will create some quarrel to destroy you
This is the age of upstarts," said Talleyrand
Those who are free from common prejudices acquire others
Thought at least extraordinary, even by our friends
Thought himself eloquent when only insolent or impertinent
Treaties of peace no less disastrous than the wars
Trying to alleviate her sorrow by sharing it
Two hundred and twenty thousand prostitute licenses
Under the notion of being frank, are rude
United States will be exposed to Napoleon's outrages
Usurped the easy direction of ignorance
Vices or virtues of all civilized nations are relatively the same
Want is the parent of industry
We are tired of everything, even of our existence
Were my generals as great fools as some of my Ministers
When a man has so much money he cannot have got it honestly
Which crime in power has interest to render impenetrable
Who complains is shot as a conspirator
With us, unfortunately, suspicion is the same as conviction
Would cease to rule the day he became just
Yield to illusion when the truth was not satisfactory
You have given me your long price, now give me your short one.
You were made to give lessons, not to take them.

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