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Widger's Quotations from The Court Memoirs of France by David Widger

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The quotations are in two formats:
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The editor may be contacted at for comments,
questions or suggested additions to these extracts.

D.W.

CONTENTS: (in reversed order)

Mar 2003 The Entire Court Memoirs of France Series [CM#63][cm63b10.txt]3900
Mar 2003 The Entire Memoirs of Court of St. Cloud [CM#62][cm62b10.txt]3899
Mar 2003 Memoirs of the Court of St. Cloud, v7 [CM#61][cm61b10.txt]3898
Mar 2003 Memoirs of the Court of St. Cloud, v6 [CM#60][cm60b10.txt]3897
Mar 2003 Memoirs of the Court of St. Cloud, v5 [CM#59][cm59b10.txt]3896
Mar 2003 Memoirs of the Court of St. Cloud, v4 [CM#58][cm58b10.txt]3895
Mar 2003 Memoirs of the Court of St. Cloud, v3 [CM#57][cm57b10.txt]3894
Mar 2003 Memoirs of the Court of St. Cloud, v2 [CM#56][cm56b10.txt]3893
Mar 2003 Memoirs of the Court of St. Cloud, v1 [CM#55][cm55b10.txt]3892
Mar 2003 The Entire Marie Antoinette, by Campan [CM#54][cm54b10.txt]3891
Mar 2003 Memoirs of Marie Antoinette, by Campan, v7 [CM#53][cm53b10.txt]3890
Mar 2003 Memoirs of Marie Antoinette, by Campan, v6 [CM#52][cm52b10.txt]3889
Mar 2003 Memoirs of Marie Antoinette, by Campan, v5 [CM#51][cm51b10.txt]3888
Mar 2003 Memoirs of Marie Antoinette, by Campan, v4 [CM#50][cm50b10.txt]3887
Mar 2003 Memoirs of Marie Antoinette, by Campan, v3 [CM#49][cm49b10.txt]3886
Mar 2003 Memoirs of Marie Antoinette, by Campan, v2 [CM#48][cm48b10.txt]3885
Mar 2003 Memoirs of Marie Antoinette, by Campan, v1 [CM#47][cm47b10.txt]3884
Mar 2003 The Entire Louis XV./XVI, by Hausset [CM#46][cm46b10.txt]3883
Mar 2003 Memoirs of Louis XV./XVI, by Hausset, v7 [CM#45][cm45b10.txt]3882
Mar 2003 Memoirs of Louis XV./XVI, by Hausset, v6 [CM#44][cm44b10.txt]3881
Mar 2003 Memoirs of Louis XV./XVI, by Hausset, v5 [CM#43][cm43b10.txt]3880
Mar 2003 Memoirs of Louis XV./XVI, by Hausset, v4 [CM#42][cm42b10.txt]3879
Mar 2003 Memoirs of Louis XV./XVI, by Hausset, v3 [CM#41][cm41b10.txt]3878
Mar 2003 Memoirs of Louis XV./XVI, by Hausset, v2 [CM#40][cm40b10.txt]3877
Mar 2003 Memoirs of Louis XV./XVI, by Hausset, v1 [CM#39][cm39b10.txt]3876
Mar 2003 Entire Memoirs of Louis XIV, by Saint-Simon[CM#38][cm38b10.txt]3875
Mar 2003 Memoirs of Louis XIV, by Saint-Simon, v15 [CM#37][cm37b10.txt]3874
Mar 2003 Memoirs of Louis XIV, by Saint-Simon, v14 [CM#36][cm36b10.txt]3873
Mar 2003 Memoirs of Louis XIV, by Saint-Simon, v13 [CM#35][cm35b10.txt]3872
Mar 2003 Memoirs of Louis XIV, by Saint-Simon, v12 [CM#34][cm34b10.txt]3871
Mar 2003 Memoirs of Louis XIV, by Saint-Simon, v11 [CM#33][cm33b10.txt]3870
Mar 2003 Memoirs of Louis XIV, by Saint-Simon, v10 [CM#32][cm32b10.txt]3869
Mar 2003 Memoirs of Louis XIV, by Saint-Simon, v9 [CM#31][cm31b10.txt]3868
Mar 2003 Memoirs of Louis XIV, by Saint-Simon, v8 [CM#30][cm30b10.txt]3867
Mar 2003 Memoirs of Louis XIV, by Saint-Simon, v7 [CM#29][cm29b10.txt]3866
Mar 2003 Memoirs of Louis XIV, by Saint-Simon, v6 [CM#28][cm28b10.txt]3865
Mar 2003 Memoirs of Louis XIV, by Saint-Simon, v5 [CM#27][cm27b10.txt]3864
Mar 2003 Memoirs of Louis XIV, by Saint-Simon, v4 [CM#26][cm26b10.txt]3863
Mar 2003 Memoirs of Louis XIV, by Saint-Simon, v3 [CM#25][cm25b10.txt]3862
Mar 2003 Memoirs of Louis XIV, by Saint-Simon, v2 [CM#24][cm24b10.txt]3861
Mar 2003 Memoirs of Louis XIV, by Saint-Simon, v1 [CM#23][cm23b10.txt]3860
Mar 2003 Entire Memoirs Louis XIV, by Duch d'Orleans[CM#22][cm22b10.txt]3859
Mar 2003 Memoirs of Louis XIV, by Duch d'Orleans, v4[CM#21][cm21b10.txt]3858
Mar 2003 Memoirs of Louis XIV, by Duch d'Orleans, v3[CM#20][cm20b10.txt]3857
Mar 2003 Memoirs of Louis XIV, by Duch d'Orleans, v2[CM#19][cm19b10.txt]3856
Mar 2003 Memoirs of Louis XIV, by Duch d'Orleans, v1[CM#18][cm18b10.txt]3855
Mar 2003 The Entire Memoirs of Madame de Montespan [CM#17][cm17b10.txt]3854
Mar 2003 The Memoirs of Madame de Montespan, v7 [CM#16][cm16b10.txt]3853
Mar 2003 The Memoirs of Madame de Montespan, v6 [CM#15][cm15b10.txt]3852
Mar 2003 The Memoirs of Madame de Montespan, v5 [CM#14][cm14b10.txt]3851
Mar 2003 The Memoirs of Madame de Montespan, v4 [CM#13][cm13b10.txt]3850
Mar 2003 The Memoirs of Madame de Montespan, v3 [CM#12][cm12b10.txt]3849
Mar 2003 The Memoirs of Madame de Montespan, v2 [CM#11][cm11b10.txt]3848
Mar 2003 The Memoirs of Madame de Montespan, v1 [CM#10][cm10b10.txt]3847
Mar 2003 The Entire Memoirs of Cardinal de Retz [CM#09][cm09b10.txt]3846
Mar 2003 The Memoirs of Cardinal de Retz, v4 [CM#08][cm08b10.txt]3845
Mar 2003 The Memoirs of Cardinal de Retz, v3 [CM#07][cm07b10.txt]3844
Mar 2003 The Memoirs of Cardinal de Retz, v2 [CM#06][cm06b10.txt]3843
Mar 2003 The Memoirs of Cardinal de Retz, v1 [CM#05][cm05b10.txt]3842
Mar 2003 The Entire Memoirs of Marguerite de Valois [CM#04][cm04b10.txt]3841
Mar 2003 The History of the House of Valois, v3 [CM#03][cm03b10.txt]3840
Mar 2003 The Memoirs of Marguerite de Valois, v2 [CM#02][cm02b10.txt]3839
Mar 2003 The Memoirs of Marguerite de Valois, v1 [CM#01][cm01b10.txt]3838

HISTORIC COURT MEMOIRS IN 62 VOLUMES

THE MEMOIRS OF MARGUERITE DE VALOIS

THE MEMOIRS OF MARGUERITE DE VALOIS, v1
[CM#01][cm01b10.txt]3838

Adversity is solitary, while prosperity dwells in a crowd
Comeliness of his person, which at all times pleads powerfully
Everything in the world bore a double aspect
Hearsay liable to be influenced by ignorance or malice
Hopes they (enemies) should hereafter become our friends
I should praise you more had you praised me less
It is the usual frailty of our sex to be fond of flattery
Mistrust is the sure forerunner of hatred
Necessity is said to be the mother of invention
Never approached any other man near enough to know a difference
Not to repose too much confidence in our friends
Prefer truth to embellishment
Rather out of contempt, and because it was good policy
The Massacre of St. Bartholomew's Day
To embellish my story I have neither leisure nor ability
Troubles might not be lasting
Young girls seldom take much notice of children

THE MEMOIRS OF MARGUERITE DE VALOIS, V2
[CM#02][cm02b10.txt]3839

Envy and malice are self-deceivers
Honours and success are followed by envy
Lovers are not criminal in the estimation of one another
Situated as I was betwixt fear and hope
The pretended reformed religion
There is too much of it for earnest, and not enough for jest
Those who have given offence to hate the offended party

THE HISTORY OF THE HOUSE OF VALOIS, V3
[CM#03][cm03b10.txt]3840

From faith to action the bridge is short
Much is forgiven to a king
Parliament aided the King to expel the Jesuits from France
The record of the war is as the smoke of a furnace

THE ENTIRE MEMOIRS OF MARGUERITE DE VALOIS
[CM#04][cm04b10.txt]3841

Adversity is solitary, while prosperity dwells in a crowd
Comeliness of his person, which at all times pleads powerfully
Envy and malice are self-deceivers
Everything in the world bore a double aspect
From faith to action the bridge is short
Hearsay liable to be influenced by ignorance or malice
Honours and success are followed by envy
Hopes they (enemies) should hereafter become our friends
I should praise you more had you praised me less
It is the usual frailty of our sex to be fond of flattery
Lovers are not criminal in the estimation of one another
Mistrust is the sure forerunner of hatred
Much is forgiven to a king
Necessity is said to be the mother of invention
Never approached any other man near enough to know a difference
Not to repose too much confidence in our friends
Parliament aided the King to expel the Jesuits from France
Prefer truth to embellishment
Rather out of contempt, and because it was good policy
Situated as I was betwixt fear and hope
The pretended reformed religion
The Massacre of St. Bartholomew's Day
The record of the war is as the smoke of a furnace
There is too much of it for earnest, and not enough for jest
Those who have given offence to hate the offended party
To embellish my story I have neither leisure nor ability
Troubles might not be lasting
Young girls seldom take much notice of children

THE MEMOIRS OF CARDINAL DE RETZ

THE MEMOIRS OF CARDINAL DE RETZ, V1
[CM#05][cm05b10.txt]3842

Assurrance often supplies the room of good sense
By the means of a hundred pistoles down, and vast promises
False glory and false modesty
He knew how to put a good gloss upon his failings
He weighed everything, but fixed on nothing
Is there a greater in the world than heading a party?
Nothing is so subject to delusion as piety
So indiscreet as to boast of his successful amours
Verily believed he was really the man which he affected to be

THE MEMOIRS OF CARDINAL DE RETZ, V2
[CM#06][cm06b10.txt]3843

Always to sacrifice the little affairs to the greater
Always judged of actions by men, and never men by their actions
Arms which are not tempered by laws quickly become anarchy
Associating patience with activity
Blindness that make authority to consist only in force
Bounty, which, though very often secret, had the louder echo
Civil war is one of those complicated diseases
Clergy always great examples of slavish servitude
Confounded the most weighty with the most trifling
Contempt--the most dangerous disease of any State
Dangerous to refuse presents from one's superiors
Distinguished between bad and worse, good and better
Fading flowers, which are fragrant to-day and offensive tomorrow
Fool in adversity and a knave in prosperity
Fools yield only when they cannot help it
Good news should be employed in providing against bad
He had not a long view of what was beyond his reach
His wit was far inferior to his courage
His ideas were infinitely above his capacity
Impossible for her to live without being in love with somebody
Inconvenience of popularity
Kinds of fear only to be removed by higher degrees of terror
Laws without the protection of arms sink into contempt
Maxims showed not great regard for virtue
More ambitious than was consistent with morality
My utmost to save other souls, though I took no care of my own
Need of caution in what we say to our friends
Neither capable of governing nor being governed
Men of irresolution are apt to catch at all overtures
Never had woman more contempt for scruples and ceremonies
Oftener deceived by distrusting than by being overcredulous
One piece of bad news seldom comes singly
Only way to acquire them is to show that we do not value them
Poverty so well became him
Power commonly keeps above ridicule
Pretended to a great deal more wit than came to his share
Queen was adored much more for her troubles than for her merit
Strongest may safely promise to the weaker what he thinks fit
Those who carry more sail than ballast
Thought he always stood in need of apologies
Transitory honour is mere smoke
Treated him as she did her petticoat
Useful man in a faction because of his wonderful complacency
Vanity to love to be esteemed the first author of things
Virtue for a man to confess a fault than not to commit one
We are far more moved at the hearing of old stories
Weakening and changing the laws of the land
Whose vivacity supplied the want of judgment
Wisdom in affairs of moment is nothing without courage
With a design to do good, he did evil
Yet he gave more than he promised

THE MEMOIRS OF CARDINAL DE RETZ, V3
[CM#07][cm07b10.txt]3844

Buckingham had been in love with three Queens
Civil war as not powerful enough to conclude a peace
Insinuation is of more service than that of persuasion
Man that supposed everybody had a back door
Mazarin: embezzling some nine millions of the public money
Passed for the author of events of which I was only the prophet
The subdivision of parties is generally the ruin of all
The wisest fool he ever saw in his life
Who imagine the head of a party to be their master

THE MEMOIRS OF CARDINAL DE RETZ, V4
[CM#08][cm08b10.txt]3845

Help to blind the rest of mankind, and they even become blinder
She had nothing but beauty, which cloys when it comes alone
You must know that, with us Princes, words go for nothing

THE ENTIRE MEMOIRS OF CARDINAL DE RETZ
[CM#09][cm09b10.txt]3846

Always judged of actions by men, and never men by their actions
Always to sacrifice the little affairs to the greater
Arms which are not tempered by laws quickly become anarchy
Associating patience with activity
Assurrance often supplies the room of good sense
Blindness that make authority to consist only in force
Bounty, which, though very often secret, had the louder echo
Buckingham had been in love with three Queens
By the means of a hundred pistoles down, and vast promises
Civil war as not powerful enough to conclude a peace
Civil war is one of those complicated diseases
Clergy always great examples of slavish servitude
Confounded the most weighty with the most trifling
Contempt--the most dangerous disease of any State
Dangerous to refuse presents from one's superiors
Distinguished between bad and worse, good and better
Fading flowers, which are fragrant to-day and offensive tomorrow
False glory and false modesty
Fool in adversity and a knave in prosperity
Fools yield only when they cannot help it
Good news should be employed in providing against bad
He weighed everything, but fixed on nothing
He knew how to put a good gloss upon his failings
He had not a long view of what was beyond his reach
Help to blind the rest of mankind, and they even become blinder
His ideas were infinitely above his capacity
His wit was far inferior to his courage
Impossible for her to live without being in love with somebody
Inconvenience of popularity
Insinuation is of more service than that of persuasion
Is there a greater in the world than heading a party?
Kinds of fear only to be removed by higher degrees of terror
Laws without the protection of arms sink into contempt
Man that supposed everybody had a back door
Maxims showed not great regard for virtue
Mazarin: embezzling some nine millions of the public money
Men of irresolution are apt to catch at all overtures
More ambitious than was consistent with morality
My utmost to save other souls, though I took no care of my own
Need of caution in what we say to our friends
Neither capable of governing nor being governed
Never had woman more contempt for scruples and ceremonies
Nothing is so subject to delusion as piety
Oftener deceived by distrusting than by being overcredulous
One piece of bad news seldom comes singly
Only way to acquire them is to show that we do not value them
Passed for the author of events of which I was only the prophet
Poverty so well became him
Power commonly keeps above ridicule
Pretended to a great deal more wit than came to his share
Queen was adored much more for her troubles than for her merit
She had nothing but beauty, which cloys when it comes alone
So indiscreet as to boast of his successful amours
Strongest may safely promise to the weaker what he thinks fit
The subdivision of parties is generally the ruin of all
The wisest fool he ever saw in his life
Those who carry more sail than ballast
Thought he always stood in need of apologies
Transitory honour is mere smoke
Treated him as she did her petticoat
Useful man in a faction because of his wonderful complacency
Vanity to love to be esteemed the first author of things
Verily believed he was really the man which he affected to be
Virtue for a man to confess a fault than not to commit one
We are far more moved at the hearing of old stories
Weakening and changing the laws of the land
Who imagine the head of a party to be their master
Whose vivacity supplied the want of judgment
Wisdom in affairs of moment is nothing without courage
With a design to do good, he did evil
Yet he gave more than he promised
You must know that, with us Princes, words go for nothing

THE MEMOIRS OF MADAME DE MONTESPAN

THE MEMOIRS OF MADAME DE MONTESPAN, V1
[CM#10][cm10b10.txt]3847

Armed with beauty and sarcasm
Conduct of the sort which cements and revives attachments
Console me on the morrow for what had troubled me to-day
Depicting other figures she really portrays her own
In England a man is the absolute proprietor of his wife
In Rome justice and religion always rank second to politics
Kings only desire to be obeyed when they command
Laws will only be as so many black lines on white paper
Love-affair between Mademoiselle de la Valliere and the King
Madame de Montespan had died of an attack of coquetry
Not show it off was as if one only possessed a kennel
That Which Often It is Best to Ignore
Violent passion had changed to mere friendship
When women rule their reign is always stormy and troublous
Wife: property or of furniture, useful to his house
Won for himself a great name and great wealth by words

THE MEMOIRS OF MADAME DE MONTESPAN, V2
[CM#11][cm11b10.txt]3848

Cannot reconcile themselves to what exists
Domestics included two nurses, a waiting-maid, a physician
Extravagant, without the means to be so
Happy with him as a woman who takes her husband's place can be
Poetry without rhapsody
Present princes and let those be scandalised who will!
Satire without bitterness
Talent without artifice
The pulpit is in want of comedians; they work wonders there
Then comes discouragement; after that, habit
Trust not in kings
What they need is abstinence, prohibitions, thwartings
When one has seen him, everything is excusable
Would you like to be a cardinal? I can manage that

THE MEMOIRS OF MADAME DE MONTESPAN, V3
[CM#12][cm12b10.txt]3849

And then he would go off, laughing in his sleeve
Hate me, but fear me
He was not fool enough for his place
I myself being the first to make merry at it (my plainness)
In the great world, a vague promise is the same as a refusal
It is easier to offend me than to deceive me
Knew how to point the Bastille cannon at the troops of the King
Madame de Sevigne
Time, the irresistible healer
Weeping just as if princes had not got to die like anybody else
Went so far as to shed tears, his most difficult feat of all
When one has been pretty, one imagines that one is still so

THE MEMOIRS OF MADAME DE MONTESPAN, V4
[CM#13][cm13b10.txt]3850

All the death-in-life of a convent
Cuddlings and caresses of decrepitude
In ill-assorted unions, good sense or good nature must intervene

THE MEMOIRS OF MADAME DE MONTESPAN, V5
[CM#14][cm14b10.txt]3851

Grow like a dilapidated house; I am only here to repair myself
He contradicted me about trifles
Intimacy, once broken, cannot be renewed
Jealous without motive, and almost without love
The King replied that "too much was too much"
The monarch suddenly enough rejuvenated his attire
There is an exaggeration in your sorrow

THE MEMOIRS OF MADAME DE MONTESPAN, V6
[CM#15][cm15b10.txt]3852

Always sold at a loss which must be sold at a given moment
Permissible neither to applaud nor to hiss
Respectful without servility
She awaits your replies without interruption
These liars in surplice, in black cassock, or in purple
Wish you had the generosity to show, now and again, less wit
You know, madame, that he generally gets everything he wants

THE MEMOIRS OF MADAME DE MONTESPAN, V7
[CM#16][cm16b10.txt]3853

Ambition puts a thick bandage over the eyes
Says all that he means, and resolutely means all that he can say
Situations in life where we are condemned to see evil done
Women who misconduct themselves are pitiless and severe

THE ENTIRE MEMOIRS OF MADAME DE MONTESPAN
[CM#17][cm17b10.txt]3854

All the death-in-life of a convent
Always sold at a loss which must be sold at a given moment
Ambition puts a thick bandage over the eyes
And then he would go off, laughing in his sleeve
Armed with beauty and sarcasm
Cannot reconcile themselves to what exists
Conduct of the sort which cements and revives attachments
Console me on the morrow for what had troubled me to-day
Cuddlings and caresses of decrepitude
Depicting other figures she really portrays her own
Domestics included two nurses, a waiting-maid, a physician
Extravagant, without the means to be so
Grow like a dilapidated house; I am only here to repair myself
Happy with him as a woman who takes her husband's place can be
Hate me, but fear me
He contradicted me about trifles
He was not fool enough for his place
I myself being the first to make merry at it (my plainness)
In the great world, a vague promise is the same as a refusal
In Rome justice and religion always rank second to politics
In ill-assorted unions, good sense or good nature must intervene
In England a man is the absolute proprietor of his wife
Intimacy, once broken, cannot be renewed
It is easier to offend me than to deceive me
Jealous without motive, and almost without love
Kings only desire to be obeyed when they command
Knew how to point the Bastille cannon at the troops of the King
Laws will only be as so many black lines on white paper
Love-affair between Mademoiselle de la Valliere and the King
Madame de Sevigne
Madame de Montespan had died of an attack of coquetry
Not show it off was as if one only possessed a kennel
Permissible neither to applaud nor to hiss
Poetry without rhapsody
Present princes and let those be scandalised who will!
Respectful without servility
Satire without bitterness
Says all that he means, and resolutely means all that he can say
She awaits your replies without interruption
Situations in life where we are condemned to see evil done
Talent without artifice
That Which Often It is Best to Ignore
The King replied that "too much was too much"
The monarch suddenly enough rejuvenated his attire
The pulpit is in want of comedians; they work wonders there
Then comes discouragement; after that, habit
There is an exaggeration in your sorrow
These liars in surplice, in black cassock, or in purple
Time, the irresistible healer
Trust not in kings
Violent passion had changed to mere friendship
Weeping just as if princes had not got to die like anybody else
Went so far as to shed tears, his most difficult feat of all
What they need is abstinence, prohibitions, thwartings
When women rule their reign is always stormy and troublous
When one has seen him, everything is excusable
When one has been pretty, one imagines that one is still so
Wife: property or of furniture, useful to his house
Wish you had the generosity to show, now and again, less wit
Women who misconduct themselves are pitiless and severe
Won for himself a great name and great wealth by words
Would you like to be a cardinal? I can manage that
You know, madame, that he generally gets everything he wants

MEMOIRS OF LOUIS XIV, BY DUCHESSE D'ORLEANS

MEMOIRS OF LOUIS XIV, BY DUCH D'ORLEANS, V1
[CM#18][cm18b10.txt]3855

A pious Capuchin explained her dream to her
Art of satisfying people even while he reproved their requests
Asked the King a hundred questions, which is not the fashion
Because the Queen has only the rinsings of the glass
Duplicity passes for wit, and frankness is looked upon as folly
Even doubt whether he believes in the existence of a God
Follies and superstitions as the rosaries and other things
Formerly the custom to swear horridly on all occasions
Great filthiness in the interior of their houses
Great things originated from the most insignificant trifles
He always slept in the Queen's bed
He had good natural wit, but was extremely ignorant
He was a good sort of man, notwithstanding his weaknesses
Her teeth were very ugly, being black and broken (Queen)
I am unquestionably very ugly
I formed a religion of my own
I have seldom been at a loss for something to laugh at
I never take medicine but on urgent occasions
It was not permitted to argue with him
Jewels and decoration attract attention (to the ugly)
Louis XIV. scarcely knew how to read and write
Made his mistresses treat her with all becoming respect
My husband proposed separate beds
No man more ignorant of religion than the King was
Nobility becoming poor could not afford to buy the high offices
Not lawful to investigate in matters of religion
Robes battantes for the purpose of concealing her pregnancy
Seeing myself look as ugly as I really am (in a mirror)
So great a fear of hell had been instilled into the King
Soon tired of war, and wishing to return home (Louis XIV)
The old woman (Madame Maintenon)
To die is the least event of my life (Maintenon)
To tell the truth, I was never very fond of having children
You are a King; you weep, and yet I go
You never look in a mirror when you pass it

MEMOIRS OF LOUIS XIV, BY DUCH D'ORLEANS, V2
[CM#19][cm19b10.txt]3856

Always has a fictitious malady in reserve
I had a mind, he said, to commit one sin, but not two
I wished the husband not to be informed of it
Old Maintenon
Provided they are talked of, they are satisfied
That what he called love was mere debauchery

MEMOIRS OF LOUIS XIV, BY DUCH D'ORLEANS, V3
[CM#20][cm20b10.txt]3857

Bad company spoils good manners
Duc de Grammont, then Ambassador, played the Confessor
Frequent and excessive bathing have undermined her health
It is an unfortunate thing for a man not to know himself
Like will to like

MEMOIRS OF LOUIS XIV, BY DUCH D'ORLEANS, V4
[CM#21][cm21b10.txt]3858

But all shame is extinct in France
Exclaimed so long against high head-dresses
Honour grows again as well as hair
I thought I should win it, and so I lost it
If I should die, shall I not have lived long enough?
Only your illegitimate daughter
Original manuscripts of the Memoirs of Cardinal Retz
She never could be agreeable to women
Since becoming Queen she had not had a day of real happiness
Stout, healthy girl of nineteen had no other sins to confess
Subject to frequent fits of abstraction
Throw his priest into the Necker

ENTIRE MEMOIRS LOUIS XIV, BY DUCH D'ORLEANS
[CM#22][cm22b10.txt]3859

A pious Capuchin explained her dream to her
Always has a fictitious malady in reserve
Art of satisfying people even while he reproved their requests
Asked the King a hundred questions, which is not the fashion
Bad company spoils good manners
Because the Queen has only the rinsings of the glass
But all shame is extinct in France
Duc de Grammont, then Ambassador, played the Confessor
Duplicity passes for wit, and frankness is looked upon as folly
Even doubt whether he believes in the existence of a God
Exclaimed so long against high head-dresses
Follies and superstitions as the rosaries and other things
Formerly the custom to swear horridly on all occasions
Frequent and excessive bathing have undermined her health
Great filthiness in the interior of their houses
Great things originated from the most insignificant trifles
He had good natural wit, but was extremely ignorant
He always slept in the Queen's bed
He was a good sort of man, notwithstanding his weaknesses
Her teeth were very ugly, being black and broken (Queen)
Honour grows again as well as hair
I thought I should win it, and so I lost it
I never take medicine but on urgent occasions
I wished the husband not to be informed of it
I have seldom been at a loss for something to laugh at
I am unquestionably very ugly
I had a mind, he said, to commit one sin, but not two
I formed a religion of my own
If I should die, shall I not have lived long enough?
It is an unfortunate thing for a man not to know himself
It was not permitted to argue with him
Jewels and decoration attract attention (to the ugly)
Like will to like
Louis XIV. scarcely knew how to read and write
Made his mistresses treat her with all becoming respect
My husband proposed separate beds
No man more ignorant of religion than the King was
Nobility becoming poor could not afford to buy the high offices
Not lawful to investigate in matters of religion
Old Maintenon
Only your illegitimate daughter
Original manuscripts of the Memoirs of Cardinal Retz
Provided they are talked of, they are satisfied
Robes battantes for the purpose of concealing her pregnancy
Seeing myself look as ugly as I really am (in a mirror)
She never could be agreeable to women
Since becoming Queen she had not had a day of real happiness
So great a fear of hell had been instilled into the King
Soon tired of war, and wishing to return home (Louis XIV)
Stout, healthy girl of nineteen had no other sins to confess
Subject to frequent fits of abstraction
That what he called love was mere debauchery
The old woman (Madame Maintenon)
Throw his priest into the Necker
To tell the truth, I was never very fond of having children
To die is the least event of my life (Maintenon)
You never look in a mirror when you pass it
You are a King; you weep, and yet I go

MEMOIRS OF LOUIS XIV, BY THE DUC de SAINT-SIMON

MEMOIRS OF LOUIS XIV, BY SAINT-SIMON, V1
[CM#23][cm23b10.txt]3860

Aptitude did not come up to my desire
Believed that to undertake and succeed were only the same things
Exceeded all that was promised of her, and all that I had hoped
He had pleased (the King) by his drugs
King was being wheeled in his easy chair in the gardens
Less easily forget the injuries we inflict than those received
Make religion a little more palpable
Manifesto of a man who disgorges his bile
Mightily tired of masters and books
More facility I have as King to gratify myself
My wife went to bed, and received a crowd of visitors
People who had only sores to share
Persuaded themselves they understood each other
Received all the Court in her bed
Saw peace desired were they less inclined to listen to terms
Spark of ambition would have destroyed all his edifice
Sulpicians
The safest place on the Continent
Wise and disdainful silence is difficult to keep under reverses
With him one's life was safe

MEMOIRS OF LOUIS XIV, BY SAINT-SIMON, V2
[CM#24][cm24b10.txt]3861

But with a crawling baseness equal to her previous audacity
He limped audaciously
Height to which her insignificance had risen
His death, so happy for him and so sad for his friends
His habits were publicly known to be those of the Greeks
In order to say something cutting to you, says it to himself
Madame de Maintenon in returning young and poor from America
No means, therefore, of being wise among so many fools
Omissions must be repaired as soon as they are perceived
Pope excommunicated those who read the book or kept it
She lose her head, and her accomplice to be broken on the wheel
The clergy, to whom envy is not unfamiliar
The porter and the soldier were arrested and tortured
Whitehall, the largest and ugliest palace in Europe
World; so unreasoning, and so little in accord with itself

MEMOIRS OF LOUIS XIV, BY SAINT-SIMON, V3
[CM#25][cm25b10.txt]3862

A King's son, a King's father, and never a King
Capacity was small, and yet he believed he knew everything
He was accused of putting on an imperceptible touch of rouge
Monseigneur, who had been out wolf-hunting
Never been able to bend her to a more human way of life
Spoke only about as much as three or four women
Supported by unanswerable reasons that did not convince
The most horrible sights have often ridiculous contrasts
The nothingness of what the world calls great destinies
Whatever course I adopt many people will condemn me

MEMOIRS OF LOUIS XIV, BY SAINT-SIMON, V4
[CM#26][cm26b10.txt]3863

His great piety contributed to weaken his mind
Of a politeness that was unendurable
Reproaches rarely succeed in love
Spoil all by asking too much
Teacher lost little, because he had little to lose
There was no end to the outrageous civilities of M. de Coislin

MEMOIRS OF LOUIS XIV, BY SAINT-SIMON, V5
[CM#27][cm27b10.txt]3864

Imagining themselves everywhere in marvellous danger of capture
Oh, my lord! how many virtues you make me detest
Polite when necessary, but insolent when he dared
Promotion was granted according to length of service

MEMOIRS OF LOUIS XIV, BY SAINT-SIMON, V6
[CM#28][cm28b10.txt]3865

Compelled to pay, who would have preferred giving voluntarily
Conjugal impatience of the Duc de Bourgogne
Desmarets no longer knew of what wood to make a crutch
He was so good that I sometimes reproached him for it
Indiscreet and tyrannical charity
Jesuits: all means were good that furthered his designs
Said that if they were good, they were sure to be hated

MEMOIRS OF LOUIS XIV, BY SAINT-SIMON, V7
[CM#29][cm29b10.txt]3866

Found it easier to fly into a rage than to reply

MEMOIRS OF LOUIS XIV, BY SAINT-SIMON, V8
[CM#30][cm30b10.txt]3867

A king is made for his subjects, and not the subjects for him
A lingering fear lest the sick man should recover
Danger of inducing hypocrisy by placing devotion too high
For want of better support I sustained myself with courage
Interests of all interested painted on their faces
Never was a man so ready with tears, so backward with grief
Suspicion of a goitre, which did not ill become her
The shortness of each day was his only sorrow

MEMOIRS OF LOUIS XIV, BY SAINT-SIMON, V9
[CM#31][cm31b10.txt]3868

Admit our ignorance, and not to give fictions and inventions
Arranged his affairs that he died without money
For penance: "we must make our servants fast"
The argument of interest is the best of all with monks

MEMOIRS OF LOUIS XIV, BY SAINT-SIMON, V10
[CM#32][cm32b10.txt]3869

Depopulated a quarter of the realm
He liked nobody to be in any way superior to him
He was born bored; he was so accustomed to live out of himself
He was scarcely taught how to read or write
It is a sign that I have touched the sore point
Pope not been ashamed to extol the Saint-Bartholomew
Revocation of the edict of Nantes
Seeing him eat olives with a fork!
Touched, but like a man who does not wish to seem so
Unreasonable love of admiration, was his ruin
Who counted others only as they stood in relation to himself

MEMOIRS OF LOUIS XIV, BY SAINT-SIMON, V11
[CM#33][cm33b10.txt]3870

Scarcely any history has been written at first hand

MEMOIRS OF LOUIS XIV, BY SAINT-SIMON, V12
[CM#34][cm34b10.txt]3871

He was often firm in promises

MEMOIRS OF LOUIS XIV, BY SAINT-SIMON, V13
[CM#35][cm35b10.txt]3872

A cardinal may be poisoned, stabbed, got rid of altogether
Enriched one at the expense of the other
Few would be enriched at the expense of the many
I abhorred to gain at the expense of others
Juggle, which put the wealth of Peter into the pockets of Paul
Not allowing ecclesiastics to meddle with public affairs
People with difficulty believe what they have seen
Rome must be infallible, or she is nothing

MEMOIRS OF LOUIS XIV, BY SAINT-SIMON, V14
[CM#36][cm36b10.txt]3873

Countries of the Inquisition, where science is a crime
Ignorance and superstition the first of virtues

MEMOIRS OF LOUIS XIV, BY SAINT-SIMON, V15
[CM#37][cm37b10.txt]3874

A good friend when a friend at all, which was rare
Artagnan, captain of the grey musketeers
Death came to laugh at him for the sweating labour he had taken
From bad to worse was easy
Others were not allowed to dream as he had lived
We die as we have lived, and 'tis rare it happens otherwise

ENTIRE MEMOIRS OF LOUIS XIV, BY SAINT-SIMON
[CM#38][cm38b10.txt]3875

A cardinal may be poisoned, stabbed, got rid of altogether
A good friend when a friend at all, which was rare
A King's son, a King's father, and never a King
A lingering fear lest the sick man should recover
A king is made for his subjects, and not the subjects for him
Admit our ignorance, and not to give fictions and inventions
Aptitude did not come up to my desire
Arranged his affairs that he died without money
Artagnan, captain of the grey musketeers
Believed that to undertake and succeed were only the same things
But with a crawling baseness equal to her previous audacity
Capacity was small, and yet he believed he knew everything
Compelled to pay, who would have preferred giving voluntarily
Conjugal impatience of the Duc de Bourgogne
Countries of the Inquisition, where science is a crime
Danger of inducing hypocrisy by placing devotion too high
Death came to laugh at him for the sweating labour he had taken
Depopulated a quarter of the realm
Desmarets no longer knew of what wood to make a crutch
Enriched one at the expense of the other
Exceeded all that was promised of her, and all that I had hoped
Few would be enriched at the expense of the many
For penance: "we must make our servants fast"
For want of better support I sustained myself with courage
Found it easier to fly into a rage than to reply
From bad to worse was easy
He had pleased (the King) by his drugs
He limped audaciously
He was often firm in promises
He was so good that I sometimes reproached him for it
He was born bored; he was so accustomed to live out of himself
He liked nobody to be in any way superior to him
He was scarcely taught how to read or write
He was accused of putting on an imperceptible touch of rouge
Height to which her insignificance had risen
His death, so happy for him and so sad for his friends
His habits were publicly known to be those of the Greeks
His great piety contributed to weaken his mind
I abhorred to gain at the expense of others
Ignorance and superstition the first of virtues
Imagining themselves everywhere in marvellous danger of capture
In order to say something cutting to you, says it to himself
Indiscreet and tyrannical charity
Interests of all interested painted on their faces
It is a sign that I have touched the sore point
Jesuits: all means were good that furthered his designs
Juggle, which put the wealth of Peter into the pockets of Paul
King was being wheeled in his easy chair in the gardens
Less easily forget the injuries we inflict than those received
Madame de Maintenon in returning young and poor from America
Make religion a little more palpable
Manifesto of a man who disgorges his bile
Mightily tired of masters and books
Monseigneur, who had been out wolf-hunting
More facility I have as King to gratify myself
My wife went to bed, and received a crowd of visitors
Never been able to bend her to a more human way of life
Never was a man so ready with tears, so backward with grief
No means, therefore, of being wise among so many fools
Not allowing ecclesiastics to meddle with public affairs
Of a politeness that was unendurable
Oh, my lord! how many virtues you make me detest
Omissions must be repaired as soon as they are perceived
Others were not allowed to dream as he had lived
People who had only sores to share
People with difficulty believe what they have seen
Persuaded themselves they understood each other
Polite when necessary, but insolent when he dared
Pope excommunicated those who read the book or kept it
Pope not been ashamed to extol the Saint-Bartholomew
Promotion was granted according to length of service
Received all the Court in her bed
Reproaches rarely succeed in love
Revocation of the edict of Nantes
Rome must be infallible, or she is nothing
Said that if they were good, they were sure to be hated
Saw peace desired were they less inclined to listen to terms
Scarcely any history has been written at first hand
Seeing him eat olives with a fork!
She lose her head, and her accomplice to be broken on the wheel
Spark of ambition would have destroyed all his edifice
Spoil all by asking too much
Spoke only about as much as three or four women
Sulpicians
Supported by unanswerable reasons that did not convince
Suspicion of a goitre, which did not ill become her
Teacher lost little, because he had little to lose
The clergy, to whom envy is not unfamiliar
The porter and the soldier were arrested and tortured
The shortness of each day was his only sorrow
The most horrible sights have often ridiculous contrasts
The argument of interest is the best of all with monks
The nothingness of what the world calls great destinies
The safest place on the Continent
There was no end to the outrageous civilities of M. de Coislin
Touched, but like a man who does not wish to seem so
Unreasonable love of admiration, was his ruin
We die as we have lived, and 'tis rare it happens otherwise
Whatever course I adopt many people will condemn me
Whitehall, the largest and ugliest palace in Europe
Who counted others only as they stood in relation to himself
Wise and disdainful silence is difficult to keep under reverses
With him one's life was safe
World; so unreasoning, and so little in accord with itself

MEMOIRS OF LOUIS XV./XVI, BY HAUSSET and PRINCESS LAMBALLE

MEMOIRS OF LOUIS XV./XVI, BY HAUSSET, V1
[CM#39][cm39b10.txt]3876

A liar ought to have a good memory
Because he is fat, he is thought dull and heavy
Danger of confiding the administration to noblemen
Do not repulse him in his fond moments
He who quits the field loses it
Money the universal lever, and you are in want of it
Offering you the spectacle of my miseries
Sentiment is more prompt, and inspires me with fear
Sworn that she had thought of nothing but you all her life
To despise money, is to despise happiness, liberty...
We look upon you as a cat, or a dog, and go on talking
When the only security of a King rests upon his troops
You tell me bad news: having packed up, I had rather go

MEMOIRS OF LOUIS XV./XVI, BY HAUSSET, V2
[CM#40][cm40b10.txt]3877

Air of science calculated to deceive the vulgar
Bad habit of talking very indiscreetly before others
Clouds--you may see what you please in them
Dared to say to me, so he writes
Dead always in fault, and cannot be put out of sight too soon
French people do not do things by halves
Fresh proof of the intrigues of the Jesuits
How difficult it is to do good
I dared not touch that string
Infinite astonishment at his sharing the common destiny
Madame made the Treaty of Sienna
Pension is granted on condition that his poems are never printed
Pleasure of making a great noise at little expense
Sending astronomers to Mexico and Peru, to measure the earth
She always says the right thing in the right place
She drives quick and will certainly be overturned on the road

MEMOIRS OF LOUIS XV./XVI, BY HAUSSET, V3
[CM#41][cm41b10.txt]3878

Embonpoint of the French Princesses
Few individuals except Princesses do with parade and publicity
Frailty in the ambitious, through which the artful can act
Laughed at qualities she could not comprehend
Mind well stored against human casualties
Policy, in sovereigns, is paramount to every other
Quiet work of ruin by whispers and detraction
Ridicule, than which no weapon is more false or deadly
Salique Laws
Thank Heaven, I am out of harness
Traducing virtues the slanderers never possessed
Underrated what she could not imitate
Where the knout is the logician

MEMOIRS OF LOUIS XV./XVI, BY HAUSSET, V4
[CM#42][cm42b10.txt]3879

Fatal error of conscious rectitude
Feel themselves injured by the favour shown to others
Listeners never hear any good of themselves
Only retire to make room for another race
Regardlessness of appearances

MEMOIRS OF LOUIS XV./XVI, BY HAUSSET, V5
[CM#43][cm43b10.txt]3880

Beaumarchais sent arms to the Americans
Educate his children as quietists in matters of religion
It is an ill wind that blows no one any good
Judge of men by the company they keep
Les culottes--what do you call them?' 'Small clothes'
My little English protegee
No phrase becomes a proverb until after a century's experience
We say "inexpressibles"
Wish art to eclipse nature

MEMOIRS OF LOUIS XV./XVI, BY HAUSSET, V6
[CM#44][cm44b10.txt]3881

And scarcely a woman; for your answers are very short
Can make a Duchess a beggar, but cannot make a beggar a Duchess
Canvassing for a majority to set up D'Orleans
Clergy enjoyed one-third the national revenues
Declaring the Duke of Orleans the constitutional King
Foolishly occupying themselves with petty matters
Many an aching heart rides in a carriage
Over-caution may produce evils almost equal to carelessness
Panegyric of the great Edmund Burke upon Marie Antoinette
People in independence are only the puppets of demagogues
Revolution not as the Americans, founded on grievances
Suppression of all superfluous religious institutions
The King remained as if paralysed and stupefied
These expounders--or confounders--of codes
To be accused was to incur instant death
Who confound logic with their wishes

MEMOIRS OF LOUIS XV./XVI, BY HAUSSET, V7
[CM#45][cm45b10.txt]3882

Honesty is to be trusted before genius
More dangerous to attack the habits of men than their religion

THE ENTIRE LOUIS XV./XVI, BY HAUSSET
[CM#46][cm46b10.txt]3883

A liar ought to have a good memory
Air of science calculated to deceive the vulgar
And scarcely a woman; for your answers are very short
Bad habit of talking very indiscreetly before others
Beaumarchais sent arms to the Americans
Because he is fat, he is thought dull and heavy
Can make a Duchess a beggar, but cannot make a beggar a Duchess
Canvassing for a majority to set up D'Orleans
Clergy enjoyed one-third the national revenues
Clouds--you may see what you please in them
Danger of confiding the administration to noblemen
Dared to say to me, so he writes
Dead always in fault, and cannot be put out of sight too soon
Declaring the Duke of Orleans the constitutional King
Do not repulse him in his fond moments
Educate his children as quietists in matters of religion
Embonpoint of the French Princesses
Fatal error of conscious rectitude
Feel themselves injured by the favour shown to others
Few individuals except Princesses do with parade and publicity
Foolishly occupying themselves with petty matters
Frailty in the ambitious, through which the artful can act
French people do not do things by halves
Fresh proof of the intrigues of the Jesuits
He who quits the field loses it
Honesty is to be trusted before genius
How difficult it is to do good
I dared not touch that string
Infinite astonishment at his sharing the common destiny
It is an ill wind that blows no one any good
Judge of men by the company they keep
Laughed at qualities she could not comprehend
Les culottes--what do you call them?' 'Small clothes'
Listeners never hear any good of themselves
Madame made the Treaty of Sienna
Many an aching heart rides in a carriage
Mind well stored against human casualties
Money the universal lever, and you are in want of it
More dangerous to attack the habits of men than their religion
My little English protegee
No phrase becomes a proverb until after a century's experience
Offering you the spectacle of my miseries
Only retire to make room for another race
Over-caution may produce evils almost equal to carelessness
Panegyric of the great Edmund Burke upon Marie Antoinette
Pension is granted on condition that his poems are never printed
People in independence are only the puppets of demagogues
Pleasure of making a great noise at little expense
Policy, in sovereigns, is paramount to every other
Quiet work of ruin by whispers and detraction
Regardlessness of appearances
Revolution not as the Americans, founded on grievances
Ridicule, than which no weapon is more false or deadly
Salique Laws
Sending astronomers to Mexico and Peru, to measure the earth
Sentiment is more prompt, and inspires me with fear
She always says the right thing in the right place
She drives quick and will certainly be overturned on the road
Suppression of all superfluous religious institutions
Sworn that she had thought of nothing but you all her life
Thank Heaven, I am out of harness
The King remained as if paralysed and stupefied
These expounders--or confounders--of codes
To be accused was to incur instant death
To despise money, is to despise happiness, liberty...
Traducing virtues the slanderers never possessed
Underrated what she could not imitate
We look upon you as a cat, or a dog, and go on talking
We say "inexpressibles"
When the only security of a King rests upon his troops
Where the knout is the logician
Who confound logic with their wishes
Wish art to eclipse nature
You tell me bad news: having packed up, I had rather go

MEMOIRS OF MARIE ANTOINETTE, BY MADAME CAMPAN

MEMOIRS OF MARIE ANTOINETTE, BY CAMPAN, V1
[CM#47][cm47b10.txt]3884

Ah, Madame, we have all been killed in our masters' service!
Brought me her daughter Hortense de Beauharnais
Condescension which renders approbation more offensive
Difference between brilliant theories and the simplest practice
Extreme simplicity was the Queens first and only real mistake
I hate all that savours of fanaticism
If ever I establish a republic of women....
No ears that will discover when she (The Princess) is out of tune
Observe the least pretension on account of the rank or fortune
On domestic management depends the preservation of their fortune
Spirit of party can degrade the character of a nation
Tastes may change
The anti-Austrian party, discontented and vindictive
They say you live very poorly here, Moliere
True nobility, gentlemen, consists in giving proofs of it
We must have obedience, and no reasoning
What do young women stand in need of?--Mothers!
"Would be a pity," she said, "to stop when so fairly on the road"
Your swords have rusted in their scabbards

MEMOIRS OF MARIE ANTOINETTE, BY CAMPAN, V2
[CM#48][cm48b10.txt]3885

Carried the idea of the prerogative of rank to a high pitch
Common and blamable practice of indulgence
Dignified tone which alone secures the respect due to power
Etiquette still existed at Court, dignity alone was wanting
Happiness does not dwell in palaces
His seraglio in the Parc-aux-Cerfs
I love the conveniences of life too well
Leave me in peace; be assured that I can put no heir in danger
Most intriguing little Carmelite in the kingdom
Princes thus accustomed to be treated as divinities
Princess at 12 years was not mistress of the whole alphabet
Taken pains only to render himself beloved by his pupil
The Jesuits were suppressed
The King delighted to manage the most disgraceful points
To be formally mistress, a husband had to be found
Ventured to give such rash advice: inoculation
Was but one brilliant action that she could perform

MEMOIRS OF MARIE ANTOINETTE, BY CAMPAN, V3
[CM#49][cm49b10.txt]3886

Elegant entertainments were given to Doctor Franklin
Fashion of wearing a black coat without being in mourning
Favourite of a queen is not, in France, a happy one
History of the man with the iron mask
Of course I shall be either hissed or applauded.
She often carried her economy to a degree of parsimony
Shocking to find so little a man in the son of the Marechal
Simplicity of the Queen's toilet began to be strongly censured
The charge of extravagance
The three ministers, more ambitious than amorous
Well, this is royally ill played!
While the Queen was blamed, she was blindly imitated

MEMOIRS OF MARIE ANTOINETTE, BY CAMPAN, V4
[CM#50][cm50b10.txt]3887

Customs are nearly equal to laws
Displaying her acquirements with rather too much confidence
I do not like these rhapsodies
Indulge in the pleasure of vice and assume the credit of virtue
No accounting for the caprices of a woman
None but little minds dreaded little books
Shun all kinds of confidence
The author (Beaumarchais) was sent to prison soon afterwards
Those muskets were immediately embarked and sold to the Americans
Young Prince suffered from the rickets

MEMOIRS OF MARIE ANTOINETTE, BY CAMPAN, V5
[CM#51][cm51b10.txt]3888

Advised the King not to separate himself from his army
Grand-Dieu, mamma! will it be yesterday over again?
Mirabeau forgot that it was more easy to do harm than good
Never shall a drop of French blood be shed by my order
Saw no other advantage in it than that of saving her own life
That air of truth which always carries conviction
When kings become prisoners they are very near death
Whispered in his mother's ear, "Was that right?"

MEMOIRS OF MARIE ANTOINETTE, BY CAMPAN, V6
[CM#52][cm52b10.txt]3889

A man born solely to contradict
Alas! her griefs double mine!
He is afraid to command
His ruin was resolved on; they passed to the order of the day
King (gave) the fatal order to the Swiss to cease firing
La Fayette to rescue the royal family and convey them to Rouen
Prevent disorder from organising itself
The emigrant party have their intrigues and schemes
There is not one real patriot among all this infamous horde
Those who did it should not pretend to wish to remedy it

MEMOIRS OF MARIE ANTOINETTE, BY CAMPAN, V7
[CM#53][cm53b10.txt]3890

Allowed her candles and as much firewood as she wanted
Better to die than to implicate anybody
Duc d'Orleans, when called on to give his vote for death of King
Formed rather to endure calamity with patience than to contend
How can I have any regret when I partake your misfortunes
Louis Philippe, the usurper of the inheritance of her family
My father fortunately found a library which amused him
No one is more dangerous than a man clothed with recent authority
Rabble, always ready to insult genius, virtue, and misfortune
So many crimes perpetrated under that name (liberty)
Subjecting the vanquished to be tried by the conquerors

THE ENTIRE MARIE ANTOINETTE, BY CAMPAN
[CM#54][cm54b10.txt]3891

A man born solely to contradict
Advised the King not to separate himself from his army
Ah, Madame, we have all been killed in our masters' service!
Alas! her griefs double mine!
Allowed her candles and as much firewood as she wanted
Better to die than to implicate anybody
Brought me her daughter Hortense de Beauharnais
Carried the idea of the prerogative of rank to a high pitch
Common and blamable practice of indulgence
Condescension which renders approbation more offensive
Customs are nearly equal to laws
Difference between brilliant theories and the simplest practice
Dignified tone which alone secures the respect due to power
Displaying her acquirements with rather too much confidence
Duc d'Orleans, when called on to give his vote for death of King
Elegant entertainments were given to Doctor Franklin
Etiquette still existed at Court, dignity alone was wanting
Extreme simplicity was the Queens first and only real mistake
Fashion of wearing a black coat without being in mourning
Favourite of a queen is not, in France, a happy one
Formed rather to endure calamity with patience than to contend
Grand-Dieu, mamma! will it be yesterday over again?
Happiness does not dwell in palaces
He is afraid to command
His ruin was resolved on; they passed to the order of the day
His seraglio in the Parc-aux-Cerfs
History of the man with the iron mask
How can I have any regret when I partake your misfortunes
I hate all that savours of fanaticism
I do not like these rhapsodies
I love the conveniences of life too well
If ever I establish a republic of women....
Indulge in the pleasure of vice and assume the credit of virtue
King (gave) the fatal order to the Swiss to cease firing
La Fayette to rescue the royal family and convey them to Rouen
Leave me in peace; be assured that I can put no heir in danger
Louis Philippe, the usurper of the inheritance of her family
Mirabeau forgot that it was more easy to do harm than good
Most intriguing little Carmelite in the kingdom
My father fortunately found a library which amused him
Never shall a drop of French blood be shed by my order
No one is more dangerous than a man clothed with recent authority
No accounting for the caprices of a woman
No ears that will discover when she (The Princess) is out of tune
None but little minds dreaded little books
Observe the least pretension on account of the rank or fortune
Of course I shall be either hissed or applauded.
On domestic management depends the preservation of their fortune
Prevent disorder from organising itself
Princes thus accustomed to be treated as divinities
Princess at 12 years was not mistress of the whole alphabet
Rabble, always ready to insult genius, virtue, and misfortune
Saw no other advantage in it than that of saving her own life
She often carried her economy to a degree of parsimony
Shocking to find so little a man in the son of the Marechal
Shun all kinds of confidence
Simplicity of the Queen's toilet began to be strongly censured
So many crimes perpetrated under that name (liberty)
Spirit of party can degrade the character of a nation
Subjecting the vanquished to be tried by the conquerors
Taken pains only to render himself beloved by his pupil
Tastes may change
That air of truth which always carries conviction
The author (Beaumarchais) was sent to prison soon afterwards
The Jesuits were suppressed
The three ministers, more ambitious than amorous
The charge of extravagance
The emigrant party have their intrigues and schemes
The King delighted to manage the most disgraceful points
The anti-Austrian party, discontented and vindictive
There is not one real patriot among all this infamous horde
They say you live very poorly here, Moliere
Those muskets were immediately embarked and sold to the Americans
Those who did it should not pretend to wish to remedy it
To be formally mistress, a husband had to be found
True nobility, gentlemen, consists in giving proofs of it
Ventured to give such rash advice: inoculation
Was but one brilliant action that she could perform
We must have obedience, and no reasoning
Well, this is royally ill played!
What do young women stand in need of?--Mothers!
When kings become prisoners they are very near death
While the Queen was blamed, she was blindly imitated
Whispered in his mother's ear, "Was that right?"
"Would be a pity," she said, "to stop when so fairly on the road"
Young Prince suffered from the rickets
Your swords have rusted in their scabbards

MEMOIRS OF THE COURT OF ST. CLOUD BY A GENTLEMAN AT PARIS

MEMOIRS OF THE COURT OF ST. CLOUD, V1
[CM#55][cm55b10.txt]3892

Easy to give places to men to whom Nature has refused parts
Indifference of the French people to all religion
Prepared to become your victim, but not your accomplice
Were my generals as great fools as some of my Ministers
Which crime in power has interest to render impenetrable

MEMOIRS OF THE COURT OF ST. CLOUD, V2
[CM#56][cm56b10.txt]3893

Bestowing on the Almighty the passions of mortals
Bow to their charlatanism as if it was sublimity
Cannot be expressed, and if expressed, would not be believed
Feeling, however, the want of consolation in their misfortunes
Future effects dreaded from its past enormities
God is only the invention of fear
Gold, changes black to white, guilt to innocence
Hail their sophistry and imposture as inspiration
Invention of new tortures and improved racks
Labour as much as possible in the dark
Misfortunes and proscription would not only inspire courage
My means were the boundaries of my wants
Not suspected of any vices, but all his virtues are negative
Nothing was decided, though nothing was refused
Now that she is old (as is generally the case), turned devotee
Prelate on whom Bonaparte intends to confer the Roman tiara
Saints supplied her with a finger, a toe, or some other parts
Step is but short from superstition to infidelity
Suspicion and tyranny are inseparable companions
Two hundred and twenty thousand prostitute licenses
Usurped the easy direction of ignorance
Would cease to rule the day he became just

MEMOIRS OF THE COURT OF ST. CLOUD, V3
[CM#57][cm57b10.txt]3894

As confident and obstinate as ignorant
Bonaparte and his wife go now every morning to hear Mass
Bourrienne
Distinguished for their piety or rewarded for their flattery
Extravagances of a head filled with paradoxes
Forced military men to kneel before priests
Indifference about futurity
Military diplomacy
More vain than ambitious
Nature has destined him to obey, and not to govern
One of the negative accomplices of the criminal
Promises of impostors or fools to delude the ignorant
Salaries as the men, under the name of washerwomen
This is the age of upstarts," said Talleyrand
Thought at least extraordinary, even by our friends

MEMOIRS OF THE COURT OF ST. CLOUD, V4
[CM#58][cm58b10.txt]3895

All his creditors, denounced and executed
All priests are to be proscribed as criminals
How much people talk about what they do not comprehend
Thought himself eloquent when only insolent or impertinent

MEMOIRS OF THE COURT OF ST. CLOUD, V5
[CM#59][cm59b10.txt]3896

Hero of great ambition and small capacity: La Fayette
Marble lives longer than man
Satisfying himself with keeping three mistresses only
Under the notion of being frank, are rude
Want is the parent of industry
With us, unfortunately, suspicion is the same as conviction

MEMOIRS OF THE COURT OF ST. CLOUD, V6
[CM#60][cm60b10.txt]3897

A stranger to remorse and repentance, as well as to honour
Accused of fanaticism, because she refused to cohabit with him
As everywhere else, supported injustice by violence
Bonaparte dreads more the liberty of the Press than all other
Chevalier of the Guillotine: Toureaux
Country where power forces the law to lie dormant
Encounter with dignity and self-command unbecoming provocations
Error to admit any neutrality at all
Expeditious justice, as it is called here
French Revolution was fostered by robbery and murder
He was too honest to judge soundly and to act rightly
Her present Serene Idiot, as she styles the Prince Borghese
If Bonaparte is fond of flattery--pays for it like a real Emperor
Its pretensions rose in proportion to the condescensions
Jealous of his wife as a lover of his mistress
Justice is invoked in vain when the criminal is powerful
May change his habitations six times in the month--yet be home
Men and women, old men and children are no more
My maid always sleeps with me when my husband is absent
Napoleon invasion of States of the American Commonwealth
Not only portable guillotines, but portable Jacobin clubs
Procure him after a useless life, a glorious death
Should our system of cringing continue progressively
Sold cats' meat and tripe in the streets of Rome
Sufferings of individuals, he said, are nothing
Suspicion is evidence
United States will be exposed to Napoleon's outrages
Who complains is shot as a conspirator

MEMOIRS OF THE COURT OF ST. CLOUD, V7
[CM#61][cm61b10.txt]3898

Complacency which may be felt, but ought never to be published
General who is too fond of his life ought never to enter a camp
Generals of Cabinets are often indifferent captains in the field
How many reputations are gained by an impudent assurance
Irresolution and weakness in a commander operate the same
Love of life increase in proportion as its real value diminishes
Opinion almost constitutes half the strength of armies
Presumptuous charlatan
Pretensions or passions of upstart vanity
Pride of an insupportable and outrageous ambition
Prudence without weakness, and with firmness without obstinacy
They ought to be just before they are generous
They will create some quarrel to destroy you
Vices or virtues of all civilized nations are relatively the same
We are tired of everything, even of our existence

THE ENTIRE MEMOIRS OF COURT OF ST. CLOUD
[CM#62][cm62b10.txt]3899

A stranger to remorse and repentance, as well as to honour
Accused of fanaticism, because she refused to cohabit with him
All his creditors, denounced and executed
All priests are to be proscribed as criminals
As everywhere else, supported injustice by violence
As confident and obstinate as ignorant
Bestowing on the Almighty the passions of mortals
Bonaparte and his wife go now every morning to hear Mass
Bonaparte dreads more the liberty of the Press than all other
Bourrienne
Bow to their charlatanism as if it was sublimity
Cannot be expressed, and if expressed, would not be believed
Chevalier of the Guillotine: Toureaux
Complacency which may be felt, but ought never to be published
Country where power forces the law to lie dormant
Distinguished for their piety or rewarded for their flattery
Easy to give places to men to whom Nature has refused parts
Encounter with dignity and self_command unbecoming provocations
Error to admit any neutrality at all
Expeditious justice, as it is called here
Extravagances of a head filled with paradoxes
Feeling, however, the want of consolation in their misfortunes
Forced military men to kneel before priests
French Revolution was fostered by robbery and murder
Future effects dreaded from its past enormities
General who is too fond of his life ought never to enter a camp
Generals of Cabinets are often indifferent captains in the field
God is only the invention of fear
Gold, changes black to white, guilt to innocence
Hail their sophistry and imposture as inspiration
He was too honest to judge soundly and to act rightly
Her present Serene Idiot, as she styles the Prince Borghese
Hero of great ambition and small capacity: La Fayette
How many reputations are gained by an impudent assurance
How much people talk about what they do not comprehend
If Bonaparte is fond of flattery__pays for it like a real Emperor
Indifference about futurity
Indifference of the French people to all religion
Invention of new tortures and improved racks
Irresolution and weakness in a commander operate the same
Its pretensions rose in proportion to the condescensions
Jealous of his wife as a lover of his mistress
Justice is invoked in vain when the criminal is powerful
Labour as much as possible in the dark
Love of life increase in proportion as its real value diminishes
Marble lives longer than man
May change his habitations six times in the month__yet be home
Men and women, old men and children are no more
Military diplomacy
Misfortunes and proscription would not only inspire courage
More vain than ambitious
My maid always sleeps with me when my husband is absent
My means were the boundaries of my wants
Napoleon invasion of States of the American Commonwealth
Nature has destined him to obey, and not to govern
Not suspected of any vices, but all his virtues are negative
Not only portable guillotines, but portable Jacobin clubs
Nothing was decided, though nothing was refused
Now that she is old (as is generally the case), turned devotee
One of the negative accomplices of the criminal
Opinion almost constitutes half the strength of armies
Prelate on whom Bonaparte intends to confer the Roman tiara
Prepared to become your victim, but not your accomplice
Presumptuous charlatan
Pretensions or passions of upstart vanity
Pride of an insupportable and outrageous ambition
Procure him after a useless life, a glorious death
Promises of impostors or fools to delude the ignorant
Prudence without weakness, and with firmness without obstinacy
Saints supplied her with a finger, a toe, or some other parts
Salaries as the men, under the name of washerwomen
Satisfying himself with keeping three mistresses only
Should our system of cringing continue progressively
Sold cats' meat and tripe in the streets of Rome
Step is but short from superstition to infidelity
Sufferings of individuals, he said, are nothing
Suspicion and tyranny are inseparable companions
Suspicion is evidence
They will create some quarrel to destroy you
They ought to be just before they are generous
This is the age of upstarts," said Talleyrand
Thought at least extraordinary, even by our friends
Thought himself eloquent when only insolent or impertinent
Two hundred and twenty thousand prostitute licenses
Under the notion of being frank, are rude
United States will be exposed to Napoleon's outrages
Usurped the easy direction of ignorance
Vices or virtues of all civilized nations are relatively the same
Want is the parent of industry
We are tired of everything, even of our existence
Were my generals as great fools as some of my Ministers
Which crime in power has interest to render impenetrable
Who complains is shot as a conspirator
With us, unfortunately, suspicion is the same as conviction
Would cease to rule the day he became just

THE ENTIRE HISTORIC COURT MEMOIRS OF FRANCE SERIES

THE ENTIRE HISTORIC COURT MEMOIRS OF FRANCE SERIES
[CM#63][cm63b10.txt]3900

A man born solely to contradict
A stranger to remorse and repentance, as well as to honour
A pious Capuchin explained her dream to her
A cardinal may be poisoned, stabbed, got rid of altogether
A good friend when a friend at all, which was rare
A King's son, a King's father, and never a King
A liar ought to have a good memory
A lingering fear lest the sick man should recover
A king is made for his subjects, and not the subjects for him
Accused of fanaticism, because she refused to cohabit with him
Admit our ignorance, and not to give fictions and inventions
Adversity is solitary, while prosperity dwells in a crowd
Advised the King not to separate himself from his army
Ah, Madame, we have all been killed in our masters' service!
Air of science calculated to deceive the vulgar
Alas! her griefs double mine!
All the death-in-life of a convent
All priests are to be proscribed as criminals
All his creditors, denounced and executed
Allowed her candles and as much firewood as she wanted
Always sold at a loss which must be sold at a given moment
Always has a fictitious malady in reserve
Ambition puts a thick bandage over the eyes
And then he would go off, laughing in his sleeve
And scarcely a woman; for your answers are very short
Aptitude did not come up to my desire
Armed with beauty and sarcasm
Arranged his affairs that he died without money
Art of satisfying people even while he reproved their requests
Artagnan, captain of the grey musketeers
As confident and obstinate as ignorant
As everywhere else, supported injustice by violence
Asked the King a hundred questions, which is not the fashion
Bad company spoils good manners
Bad habit of talking very indiscreetly before others
Beaumarchais sent arms to the Americans
Because he is fat, he is thought dull and heavy
Because the Queen has only the rinsings of the glass
Believed that to undertake and succeed were only the same things
Bestowing on the Almighty the passions of mortals
Better to die than to implicate anybody
Bonaparte dreads more the liberty of the Press than all other
Bonaparte and his wife go now every morning to hear Mass
Bourrienne
Bow to their charlatanism as if it was sublimity
Brought me her daughter Hortense de Beauharnais
But all shame is extinct in France
But with a crawling baseness equal to her previous audacity
Can make a Duchess a beggar, but cannot make a beggar a Duchess
Cannot reconcile themselves to what exists
Cannot be expressed, and if expressed, would not be believed
Canvassing for a majority to set up D'Orleans
Capacity was small, and yet he believed he knew everything
Carried the idea of the prerogative of rank to a high pitch
Chevalier of the Guillotine: Toureaux
Clergy enjoyed one-third the national revenues
Clouds--you may see what you please in them
Comeliness of his person, which at all times pleads powerfully
Common and blamable practice of indulgence
Compelled to pay, who would have preferred giving voluntarily
Complacency which may be felt, but ought never to be published
Condescension which renders approbation more offensive
Conduct of the sort which cements and revives attachments
Conjugal impatience of the Duc de Bourgogne
Console me on the morrow for what had troubled me to-day
Countries of the Inquisition, where science is a crime
Country where power forces the law to lie dormant
Cuddlings and caresses of decrepitude
Customs are nearly equal to laws
Danger of inducing hypocrisy by placing devotion too high
Danger of confiding the administration to noblemen
Dared to say to me, so he writes
Dead always in fault, and cannot be put out of sight too soon
Death came to laugh at him for the sweating labour he had taken
Declaring the Duke of Orleans the constitutional King
Depicting other figures she really portrays her own
Depopulated a quarter of the realm
Desmarets no longer knew of what wood to make a crutch
Difference between brilliant theories and the simplest practice
Dignified tone which alone secures the respect due to power
Displaying her acquirements with rather too much confidence
Distinguished for their piety or rewarded for their flattery
Do not repulse him in his fond moments
Domestics included two nurses, a waiting-maid, a physician
Duc de Grammont, then Ambassador, played the Confessor
Duc d'Orleans, when called on to give his vote for death of King
Duplicity passes for wit, and frankness is looked upon as folly
Easy to give places to men to whom Nature has refused parts
Educate his children as quietists in matters of religion
Elegant entertainments were given to Doctor Franklin
Embonpoint of the French Princesses
Encounter with dignity and self-command unbecoming provocations
Enriched one at the expense of the other
Envy and malice are self-deceivers
Error to admit any neutrality at all
Etiquette still existed at Court, dignity alone was wanting
Even doubt whether he believes in the existence of a God
Everything in the world bore a double aspect
Exceeded all that was promised of her, and all that I had hoped
Exclaimed so long against high head-dresses
Expeditious justice, as it is called here
Extravagances of a head filled with paradoxes
Extravagant, without the means to be so
Extreme simplicity was the Queens first and only real mistake
Fashion of wearing a black coat without being in mourning
Fatal error of conscious rectitude
Favourite of a queen is not, in France, a happy one
Feel themselves injured by the favour shown to others
Feeling, however, the want of consolation in their misfortunes
Few would be enriched at the expense of the many
Few individuals except Princesses do with parade and publicity
Follies and superstitions as the rosaries and other things
Foolishly occupying themselves with petty matters
For penance: "we must make our servants fast"
For want of better support I sustained myself with courage
Forced military men to kneel before priests
Formed rather to endure calamity with patience than to contend
Formerly the custom to swear horridly on all occasions
Found it easier to fly into a rage than to reply
Frailty in the ambitious, through which the artful can act
French people do not do things by halves
French Revolution was fostered by robbery and murder
Frequent and excessive bathing have undermined her health
Fresh proof of the intrigues of the Jesuits
From bad to worse was easy
From faith to action the bridge is short
Future effects dreaded from its past enormities
General who is too fond of his life ought never to enter a camp
Generals of Cabinets are often indifferent captains in the field
God is only the invention of fear
Gold, changes black to white, guilt to innocence
Grand-Dieu, mamma! will it be yesterday over again?
Great filthiness in the interior of their houses
Great things originated from the most insignificant trifles
Grow like a dilapidated house; I am only here to repair myself
Hail their sophistry and imposture as inspiration
Happiness does not dwell in palaces
Happy with him as a woman who takes her husband's place can be
Hate me, but fear me
He was scarcely taught how to read or write
He was accused of putting on an imperceptible touch of rouge
He was too honest to judge soundly and to act rightly
He contradicted me about trifles
He liked nobody to be in any way superior to him
He always slept in the Queen's bed
He is afraid to command
He was not fool enough for his place
He who quits the field loses it
He limped audaciously
He was a good sort of man, notwithstanding his weaknesses
He had good natural wit, but was extremely ignorant
He had pleased (the King) by his drugs
He was born bored; he was so accustomed to live out of himself
He was so good that I sometimes reproached him for it
He was often firm in promises
Hearsay liable to be influenced by ignorance or malice
Height to which her insignificance had risen
Her present Serene Idiot, as she styles the Prince Borghese
Her teeth were very ugly, being black and broken (Queen)
Hero of great ambition and small capacity: La Fayette
His ruin was resolved on; they passed to the order of the day
His death, so happy for him and so sad for his friends
His habits were publicly known to be those of the Greeks
His great piety contributed to weaken his mind
His seraglio in the Parc-aux-Cerfs
History of the man with the iron mask
Honesty is to be trusted before genius
Honour grows again as well as hair
Honours and success are followed by envy
Hopes they (enemies) should hereafter become our friends
How difficult it is to do good
How much people talk about what they do not comprehend
How can I have any regret when I partake your misfortunes
How many reputations are gained by an impudent assurance
I love the conveniences of life too well
I am unquestionably very ugly
I do not like these rhapsodies
I had a mind, he said, to commit one sin, but not two
I hate all that savours of fanaticism
I formed a religion of my own
I dared not touch that string
I abhorred to gain at the expense of others
I thought I should win it, and so I lost it
I have seldom been at a loss for something to laugh at
I myself being the first to make merry at it (my plainness)
I should praise you more had you praised me less
I never take medicine but on urgent occasions
I wished the husband not to be informed of it
If Bonaparte is fond of flattery--pays for it like a real Emperor
If ever I establish a republic of women....
If I should die, shall I not have lived long enough?
Ignorance and superstition the first of virtues
Imagining themselves everywhere in marvellous danger of capture
In order to say something cutting to you, says it to himself
In England a man is the absolute proprietor of his wife
In the great world, a vague promise is the same as a refusal
In Rome justice and religion always rank second to politics
In ill-assorted unions, good sense or good nature must intervene
Indifference of the French people to all religion
Indifference about futurity
Indiscreet and tyrannical charity
Indulge in the pleasure of vice and assume the credit of virtue
Infinite astonishment at his sharing the common destiny
Interests of all interested painted on their faces
Intimacy, once broken, cannot be renewed
Invention of new tortures and improved racks
Irresolution and weakness in a commander operate the same
It is easier to offend me than to deceive me
It is an unfortunate thing for a man not to know himself
It was not permitted to argue with him
It is an ill wind that blows no one any good
It is the usual frailty of our sex to be fond of flattery
It is a sign that I have touched the sore poin
Its pretensions rose in proportion to the condescensions
Jealous of his wife as a lover of his mistress
Jealous without motive, and almost without love
Jesuits: all means were good that furthered his designs
Jewels and decoration attract attention (to the ugly)
Judge of men by the company they keep
Juggle, which put the wealth of Peter into the pockets of Paul
Justice is invoked in vain when the criminal is powerful
King was being wheeled in his easy chair in the gardens
King (gave) the fatal order to the Swiss to cease firing
Kings only desire to be obeyed when they command
Knew how to point the Bastille cannon at the troops of the King
La Fayette to rescue the royal family and convey them to Rouen
Labour as much as possible in the dark
Laughed at qualities she could not comprehend
Laws will only be as so many black lines on white paper
Leave me in peace; be assured that I can put no heir in danger
Les culottes--what do you call them?' 'Small clothes,'
Less easily forget the injuries we inflict than those received
Like will to like
Listeners never hear any good of themselves
Louis Philippe, the usurper of the inheritance of her family
Louis XIV. scarcely knew how to read and write
Love of life increase in proportion as its real value diminishes
Love-affair between Mademoiselle de la Valliere and the King
Lovers are not criminal in the estimation of one another
Madame de Montespan had died of an attack of coquetry
Madame made the Treaty of Sienna
Madame de Sevigne
Madame de Maintenon in returning young and poor from America
Made his mistresses treat her with all becoming respect
Make religion a little more palpable
Manifesto of a man who disgorges his bile
Many an aching heart rides in a carriage
Marble lives longer than man
May change his habitations six times in the month--yet be home
Men and women, old men and children are no more
Mightily tired of masters and books
Military diplomacy
Mind well stored against human casualties
Mirabeau forgot that it was more easy to do harm than good
Misfortunes and proscription would not only inspire courage
Mistrust is the sure forerunner of hatred
Money the universal lever, and you are in want of it
Monseigneur, who had been out wolf-hunting
More facility I have as King to gratify myself
More vain than ambitious
More dangerous to attack the habits of men than their religion
Most intriguing little Carmelite in the kingdom
Much is forgiven to a king
My maid always sleeps with me when my husband is absent
My husband proposed separate beds
My little English protegee
My means were the boundaries of my wants
My wife went to bed, and received a crowd of visitors
My father fortunately found a library which amused him
Napoleon invasion of States of the American Commonwealth
Nature has destined him to obey, and not to govern
Necessity is said to be the mother of invention
Never been able to bend her to a more human way of life
Never was a man so ready with tears, so backward with grief
Never approached any other man near enough to know a difference
Never shall a drop of French blood be shed by my order
No ears that will discover when she (The Princess) is out of tune
No accounting for the caprices of a woman
No one is more dangerous than a man clothed with recent authority
No phrase becomes a proverb until after a century's experience
No man more ignorant of religion than the King was
No means, therefore, of being wise among so many fools
Nobility becoming poor could not afford to buy the high offices
None but little minds dreaded little books
Not show it off was as if one only possessed a kennel
Not only portable guillotines, but portable Jacobin clubs
Not to repose too much confidence in our friends
Not suspected of any vices, but all his virtues are negative
Not allowing ecclesiastics to meddle with public affairs
Not lawful to investigate in matters of religion
Nothing was decided, though nothing was refused
Now that she is old (as is generally the case), turned devotee
Observe the least pretension on account of the rank or fortune
Of course I shall be either hissed or applauded.
Of a politeness that was unendurable
Offering you the spectacle of my miseries
Oh, my lord! how many virtues you make me detest
Old Maintenon
Omissions must be repaired as soon as they are perceived
On domestic management depends the preservation of their fortune
One of the negative accomplices of the criminal
Only retire to make room for another race
Only your illegitimate daughter
Opinion almost constitutes half the strength of armies
Original manuscripts of the Memoirs of Cardinal Retz
Others were not allowed to dream as he had lived
Over-caution may produce evils almost equal to carelessness
Panegyric of the great Edmund Burke upon Marie Antoinette
Parliament aided the King to expel the Jesuits from France
Pension is granted on condition that his poems are never printed
People with difficulty believe what they have seen
People in independence are only the puppets of demagogues
People who had only sores to share
Permissible neither to applaud nor to hiss
Persuaded themselves they understood each other
Pleasure of making a great noise at little expense
Poetry without rhapsody
Policy, in sovereigns, is paramount to every other
Polite when necessary, but insolent when he dared
Pope excommunicated those who read the book or kept it
Pope not been ashamed to extol the Saint-Bartholomew
Prefer truth to embellishment
Prelate on whom Bonaparte intends to confer the Roman tiara
Prepared to become your victim, but not your accomplice
Present princes and let those be scandalised who will!
Presumptuous charlatan
Pretensions or passions of upstart vanity
Prevent disorder from organising itself
Pride of an insupportable and outrageous ambition
Princes thus accustomed to be treated as divinities
Princess at 12 years was not mistress of the whole alphabet
Procure him after a useless life, a glorious death
Promises of impostors or fools to delude the ignorant
Promotion was granted according to length of service
Provided they are talked of, they are satisfied
Prudence without weakness, and with firmness without obstinacy
Quiet work of ruin by whispers and detraction
Rabble, always ready to insult genius, virtue, and misfortune
Rather out of contempt, and because it was good policy
Received all the Court in her bed
Regardlessness of appearances
Reproaches rarely succeed in love
Respectful without servility
Revocation of the edict of Nantes
Revolution not as the Americans, founded on grievances
Ridicule, than which no weapon is more false or deadly
Robes battantes for the purpose of concealing her pregnancy
Rome must be infallible, or she is nothing
Said that if they were good, they were sure to be hated
Saints supplied her with a finger, a toe, or some other parts
Salaries as the men, under the name of washerwomen
Salique Laws
Satire without bitterness
Satisfying himself with keeping three mistresses only
Saw peace desired were they less inclined to listen to terms
Saw no other advantage in it than that of saving her own life
Says all that he means, and resolutely means all that he can say
Scarcely any history has been written at first hand
Seeing myself look as ugly as I really am (in a mirror)
Seeing him eat olives with a fork!
Sending astronomers to Mexico and Peru, to measure the earth
Sentiment is more prompt, and inspires me with fear
She often carried her economy to a degree of parsimony
She never could be agreeable to women
She lose her head, and her accomplice to be broken on the wheel
She drives quick and will certainly be overturned on the road
She always says the right thing in the right place
She awaits your replies without interruption
Shocking to find so little a man in the son of the Marechal
Should our system of cringing continue progressively
Shun all kinds of confidence
Simplicity of the Queen's toilet began to be strongly censured
Since becoming Queen she had not had a day of real happiness
Situated as I was betwixt fear and hope
Situations in life where we are condemned to see evil done
So many crimes perpetrated under that name (liberty)
So great a fear of hell had been instilled into the King
Sold cats' meat and tripe in the streets of Rome
Soon tired of war, and wishing to return home (Louis XIV)
Spark of ambition would have destroyed all his edifice
Spirit of party can degrade the character of a nation
Spoil all by asking too much
Spoke only about as much as three or four women
Step is but short from superstition to infidelity
Stout, healthy girl of nineteen had no other sins to confess
Subject to frequent fits of abstraction
Subjecting the vanquished to be tried by the conquerors
Sufferings of individuals, he said, are nothing
Sulpicians
Supported by unanswerable reasons that did not convince
Suppression of all superfluous religious institutions
Suspicion and tyranny are inseparable companions
Suspicion of a goitre, which did not ill become her
Suspicion is evidence
Sworn that she had thought of nothing but you all her life
Taken pains only to render himself beloved by his pupil
Talent without artifice
Tastes may change
Teacher lost little, because he had little to lose
Thank Heaven, I am out of harness
That what he called love was mere debauchery
That air of truth which always carries conviction
That Which Often It is Best to Ignore
The Jesuits were suppressed
The emigrant party have their intrigues and schemes
The King delighted to manage the most disgraceful points
The charge of extravagance
The three ministers, more ambitious than amorous
The anti-Austrian party, discontented and vindictive
The author (Beaumarchais) was sent to prison soon afterwards
The record of the war is as the smoke of a furnace
The Massacre of St. Bartholomew's Day
The pretended reformed religion
The King replied that "too much was too much"
The King remained as if paralysed and stupefied
The shortness of each day was his only sorrow
The safest place on the Continent
The most horrible sights have often ridiculous contrasts
The old woman (Madame Maintenon)
The nothingness of what the world calls great destinies
The argument of interest is the best of all with monks
The clergy, to whom envy is not unfamiliar
The pulpit is in want of comedians; they work wonders there
The monarch suddenly enough rejuvenated his attire
The porter and the soldier were arrested and tortured
Then comes discouragement; after that, habit
There was no end to the outrageous civilities of M. de Coislin
There is not one real patriot among all this infamous horde
There is too much of it for earnest, and not enough for jest
There is an exaggeration in your sorrow
These expounders--or confounders--of codes
These liars in surplice, in black cassock, or in purple
They ought to be just before they are generous
They will create some quarrel to destroy you
They say you live very poorly here, Moliere
This is the age of upstarts," said Talleyrand
Those muskets were immediately embarked and sold to the Americans
Those who have given offence to hate the offended party
Those who did it should not pretend to wish to remedy it
Thought at least extraordinary, even by our friends
Thought himself eloquent when only insolent or impertinent
Throw his priest into the Necker
Time, the irresistible healer
To tell the truth, I was never very fond of having children
To despise money, is to despise happiness, liberty...
To be accused was to incur instant death
To die is the least event of my life (Maintenon)
To be formally mistress, a husband had to be found
To embellish my story I have neither leisure nor ability
Touched, but like a man who does not wish to seem so
Traducing virtues the slanderers never possessed
Troubles might not be lasting
True nobility, gentlemen, consists in giving proofs of it
Trust not in kings
Two hundred and twenty thousand prostitute licenses
Under the notion of being frank, are rude
Underrated what she could not imitate
United States will be exposed to Napoleon's outrages
Unreasonable love of admiration, was his ruin
Usurped the easy direction of ignorance
Ventured to give such rash advice: inoculation
Vices or virtues of all civilized nations are relatively the same
Violent passion had changed to mere friendship
Want is the parent of industry
Was but one brilliant action that she could perform
We are tired of everything, even of our existence
We die as we have lived, and 'tis rare it happens otherwise
We say "inexpressibles
We look upon you as a cat, or a dog, and go on talking
We must have obedience, and no reasoning
Weeping just as if princes had not got to die like anybody else
Well, this is royally ill played!
Went so far as to shed tears, his most difficult feat of all
Were my generals as great fools as some of my Ministers
What they need is abstinence, prohibitions, thwartings
What do young women stand in need of?--Mothers!
Whatever course I adopt many people will condemn me
When the only security of a King rests upon his troops
When one has been pretty, one imagines that one is still so
When kings become prisoners they are very near death
When women rule their reign is always stormy and troublous
When one has seen him, everything is excusable
Where the knout is the logician
Which crime in power has interest to render impenetrable
While the Queen was blamed, she was blindly imitated
Whispered in his mother's ear, "Was that right?"
Whitehall, the largest and ugliest palace in Europe
Who counted others only as they stood in relation to himself
Who confound logic with their wishes
Who complains is shot as a conspirator
Wife: property or of furniture, useful to his house
Wise and disdainful silence is difficult to keep under reverses
Wish you had the generosity to show, now and again, less wit
Wish art to eclipse nature
With us, unfortunately, suspicion is the same as conviction
With him one's life was safe
Women who misconduct themselves are pitiless and severe
Won for himself a great name and great wealth by words
World; so unreasoning, and so little in accord with itself
Would you like to be a cardinal? I can manage that
"Would be a pity," she said, "to stop when so fairly on the road"
Would cease to rule the day he became just
You are a King; you weep, and yet I go
You never look in a mirror when you pass it
You know, madame, that he generally gets everything he wants
You tell me bad news: having packed up, I had rather go
Young Prince suffered from the rickets
Young girls seldom take much notice of children
Your swords have rusted in their scabbards

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