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Twixt France and Spain by E. Ernest Bilbrough

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Pic d'Ardiden.--8-1/2 hours up and down. Guide necessary. A fine
but difficult climb.

SAINT SAVIN.--A very ancient village in the Argeles valley, in
the Hautes-Pyrenees; fully described in Chapter IV.

SAINT SEBASTIEN.--A town in the north of Spain, on the shores of
the Biscay, 163-1/2 miles from Bordeaux, 35 from Biarritz, and 19 from
Hendaye (the French frontier town). Possessing a fine citadel,
bull-ring, beach, and bathing establishment, and two fine churches. See
Chapter XIII.

Hotels.--De Londres, || De Escurra, Anglais, De Arrese, De
Berdejo, &c.

SALECHAN.--A village in the Garonne valley, in the Hautes-Pyrenees,
and station on the Montrejeau-Luchon line for Ste. Marie (baths)
and Siradan (baths).

SALIES.--A town on the river of same name, in the Basses-Pyrenees,
10 miles from Orthez, the nearest station.

It is celebrated for its salt springs; and Bayonne hams are said to owe
their fine (?) flavour to the use of the salt produced from them.

Hotels.--Du Cheval Blanc, De France, De Paris.

SAZOS.--A small village near St. Sauveur, in the Hautes-Pyrenees,
below the hamlet of Grust. For description of church, &c., refer
to Chapter VII.

SIRADAN.--A small bathing resort in the valley of same name, in
the Hautes-Pyrenees, with a bathing establishment and hotel in one
building, 2 miles from Salechan station on the Luchon-Montrejeau line.
The springs contain sulphuret of lime and bicarbonate of iron. They
have a similar effect to those of Ste. Marie (1 mile distant), but tend
to excite more strongly. The water stands bottling well.

SOULOM.--A small village at the foot of the peak of same name,
in the Hautes-Pyrenees, near Pierrefitte, possessing a curious old
church. See Chapter IV.

TARBES.--A large town on the Adour, in the Hautes-Pyrenees.
Station on the railway between Pau and Toulouse, and junction for the
Bigorre and Morcenz lines. Cavalry barracks, cathedral, &c. Buffet at
the station. See Chapter III.

Hotels.--De la Paix, France, Commerce.

URRUGNE.--A village in the Basses-Pyrenees, 2-1/2 miles from St.
Jean de Luz.

USTARITZ.--The name of two villages, formerly separate, in the
Basses-Pyrenees, 8-3/4 miles from Bayonne, on the carriage-road thence
_via_ Elizondo to Pampeluna (63 miles).

VALCABRERE.--A small village in the Haute-Garonne, 2 miles from
Loures station on the Luchon-Montrejeau line, celebrated for the Church
of St. Just, a venerable pile in the vicinity.

VENASQUE.--A small and prosperous town in Spain, 9 hours from
Luchon (21 miles) by the _Port_ of the same name. There are some
baths similar in their uses to those of Luchon, fed by sulphurous
springs at some distance from the town, and 2-1/2 hours nearer Luchon.

Excellent accommodation can be obtained at the Casa san Mimi
(Antonio Saora) for travellers.

VERNET-LES-BAINS (2050 ft.), a bathing resort situated in a
hollow in the Eastern Pyrenees, 7 miles from the nearest railway
station.

There are several springs which supply the large Bathing
Establishment and the smaller Thermes Mercader. The water is
largely charged with sulphate of lime, and possesses properties similar
to other waters of that type. It is especially useful in affections of
the air-passages and skin complaints, and is more or less exciting
according to the springs. The climate is mild, and therefore Vernet has
some reputation as a winter resort, being very little colder than
Amelie (to which refer in Appendix).

Hotels.--Des Commandants (in the bathing establishment), Du
Parc, Ibrahim Pacha et des Bains, Du Canigou, &c.

Villas furnished to be let.

Carriages and Horses.

Post and Telegraph Office, Theatre, Clubs, &c.

Guide.--Michael Nou.

Chief Excursions:--

The Canigou (9144 ft.)--11 hours up and down. Guide
recommended, also provisions. Horses 10 frs., guide 10 frs. Horses can
go within a mile of the top, from which the view is splendid. The
ascent is long but not difficult.

The Fountain des Esquereyres.--_Via_ Castell, 1/2 hour; a
pleasant walk.

Tour de Goa.--4 hours up and down. An interesting battlemented
tower, with a fine view.

Vallee de Sahorre.--3 hours there and back; an enjoyable trip.

Cascade de Cadi.--6 hours there and back; guide recommended.

The Abbey of Canigou.--2-1/2 hours there and back; guide
unnecessary. An interesting ruin.

Vieuzac.--A suburb of Argeles, in the Hautes-Pyrenees,
possessing a donjon tower. The station on the line from Lourdes is
called Argeles-Vieuzac.

Villelongue.--A small village in the Argeles valley, in the
Hautes-Pyrenees, near Pierrefitte. See Chapter IV.

APPENDIX B

RAILWAY INFORMATION AND SKELETON ROUTES TO THE CHIEF RESORTS IN THE
PYRENEES.

For the ordinary traveller a "Continental Bradshaw" is as useful a
railway guide as any, especially if his knowledge of French is limited,
but the time tables published by Chaix and Cie. are also most excellent
in every way. Of these the best and most expensive is the "Livret-Chaix
Continental," price 2 frs, containing all continental railways and a
complete index. A cheaper time table is the "Indicateur des Chemins de
Fer," published by the same firm, price 1/2 fr., which gives the French
railways only, with map and index. Besides these, all the principal
lines have time tables of their own, price 30 cents.

It is advisable, when people are travelling as a party, that they
should have their luggage all weighed together, presenting the whole of
the tickets at the same time; this not only frequently saves expense,
but, as the number of persons is marked by the luggage clerk on their
baggage receipt, it is a guarantee that each has bought a ticket, which
saves trouble if one should happen to be lost.

When people are stopping the night _en route_ at a place, and do
not wish to take their registered luggage to the hotel, only to have to
bring it back for re-registration next day, they have simply to leave
it in the station, and when starting again on the morrow to tell the
porter--when they give him the baggage ticket--that it was left
overnight (for which the charge is 1d. per package), whereupon he will
register it without further trouble.

If a ticket is taken for the wrong station (by mistake) and the luggage
is accordingly registered wrongly too, the passenger must represent the
same to the station-master and ask him to allow a change to be made; if
there is not time to do this the luggage clerk may take the
responsibility--if the urgency of the case is made _argentiferously_
clear--but the plan is not recommended. _It is important
to know_ that if a traveller misses his train he _must present_
his _ticket_ at the ticket office to be _restamped_ in order
to make it again available--otherwise it is liable to be forfeited.

Travellers will also save themselves much trouble by settling which
hotel they intend to go to, before arriving at their destination; and
it must be fully understood that for the carrying of small parcels
taken into the carriage, the aid of porters can _never_ be counted
on. See Chapter XI.

Luggage not exceeding 30 kilogrammes (_i.e._ 66 lbs. Eng.) is
carried free; 1d. being charged for the registration thereof.

* * * * *

_Routes from London to Paris._

_Route_ 1.--_Via_ Dover, Calais, Montreuil, Abbeville, Amiens,
Claremont, and Creil: the quickest route.

_Route_ 2.--_Via_ Folkestone, Boulogne, Montreuil, &c. as above.

_Route_ 3.--_Via_ Newhaven, Dieppe, Rouen, Gaillon, Mantes, and
Poissy: the least expensive route.

_From Liverpool to Bordeaux._

_Route_ 4.--Per Pacific Steam Navigation Co.'s steamers, fortnightly,
sailing on Wednesdays; average passage 2-1/2 days.

_From London to Bordeaux._

_Route_. 5.--Per General Steam Navigation Co.'s steamers, average
passage 3 to 4 days.

_Route_ 6.--_Via_ Weymouth, Cherbourg, Caen, Alencon, Le Mans,
Tours and Angouleme. _From Paris to Bordeaux._

_Route_ 7.--_Via_ Orleans, Blois, St. Pierre les Corps (for
Tours), Poitiers, Angouleme, and Libourne.

_From Paris to Bagneres de Bigorre._

_Route_ 8.--_Via_ Orleans, Nexon, Perigueux, Les Eyzies, Libos, Agen,
Lectoure, Auch, Mirande, and Tarbes: the most direct route from
Paris to the Pyrenees.

_From Paris to Toulouse._

_Route_ 9.--_Via_ Issoudun, Argenton, Limoges, Nexon, Brives,
Rocamadour, Assier, Figeac, Villefranche, and Tessonieres: the quickest
and best route for the Pyrenees Orientales, and resorts of Vernet,
Amelie, &c.

_From Bordeaux to Arcachon_.

_Route_ 10.--_Via_ Gazinet, Facture, Lamothe, and La Teste.

_From Bordeaux to Bagneres de Bigorre_.

_Route_ 11.--_Via_ Morcenx, Arjuzaux, Arengosse, Mont de Marsan,
Aire, Vic-Bigorre, Tarbes, Salles, Adour, and Montgaillard: a
longer route from Paris, by a few miles only, than Route 8.

_From Bordeaux to Biarritz_.

_Route_ 12.--_Via_ Ychoux, Morcenx, Dax, Saint Geours, and
Bayonne.

_From Bordeaux to Pau_.

_Route 13_.--_Via_ Ychoux, Morcenx, Dax, Puyoo, Orthez, Lacq,
and Lescar.

_From Pau to Eaux Bonnes and Eux Chaudes_. _Route_ 14.--By
carriage _via_ Gan, Louvie-Juzon, and Laruns.

_Route_ 15.--By rail _via_ Gan and Laruns, [Footnote: This
railway was to be opened this year (1883).] and carriage from Laruns.

_From Pau to Lourdes_.

_Route_ 16.--_Via_ Coarraze-Nay, Montaut-Betharram, and St.
Pe.

_From Pau to Oloron_.

_Route_ 17.--_Via_ Gan and Belair.

_From Lourdes to Argeles_.

_Route_ 18.--_Via_ Soum, Lugagnan, and Boo-Silhen.

_From Lourdes to Pierrefitte_.

_Route_ 19.--_Via_ Soum, Lugagnan, Boo-Silhen and Argeles.

_From Lourdes to Cauterets, Luz, St. Sauveur, Bareges, and
Gavarnie_.

_Route_ 20.--By Route 19 to Pierrefitte, thence by diligence or
private carriage to Cauterets.

_Route_ 21.--By Route 19 to Pierrefitte, thence by diligence or
private carriage to Luz.

_Route_ 22.--By Route 19 to Pierrefitte, thence by similar
conveyances to St. Sauveur.

_Route_ 23.--By Route 21 to Luz and continuation to Bareges.

_Route_ 24.--By Route 22 to St. Sauveur and continuation to
Gavarnie.

_From Bagneres de Bigorre to Bareges_.

_Route_ 25.--By carriage _via_ Ste. Marie, Gripp, Tramesaigues,
and the Col de Tourmalet. This route is only open in midsummer.

_From Bagneres de Bigorre to Bagneres de Luchon_.

_Route_ 26.--By carriage _via_ Campan, Ste. Marie, Payole,
Col d'Aspin, Arreau, Borderes, Col de Peyresourde, and Garin.
Considered the finest drive in the Pyrenees.

_Route_ 27.--By rail _via_ Montgaillard, Tarbes, Montrejeau,
Salechan, Marignac, and Luchon. An exceedingly long round.

_From Bagneres de Luchon to St. Bertrand de Comminges_.

_Route_ 27.--By carriage _via_ Cier, Marignac, Salechan,
Loures, and Labroquere.

_Route_ 28.--By train _via_ Marignac and Salechan to Loures,
and carriage thence to St. Bertrand. The rail continues from Loures to
Montrejeau.

_From St. Bertrand to Montrejeau_.

_Route_ 29.--By carriage to Loures station, thence by train to
Montrejeau.

_Route_ 30.--By carriage direct to Montrejeau.

_From Toulouse to Perpignan_.

_Route_ 31.--Via Castelnaudary, Carcassone, Narbonne, La Nouvelle,
Salses, and Rivesaltes.

_From Perpignan to Amelie-les-Bains_.

_Route_ 32.--By diligence or carriage _via_ Pollestres, Le
Boulou, and Le Pont de Ceret.

_From Perpignan to Molitg_.

_Route_ 33.--By rail _via_ Millas, Ille, Bouleternere, and
Vinca, to Prades, thence by diligence or carriage _via_ Catlar to
Molitg.

_From Perpignan to Vernet_.

_Route_ 34--Route 33 to Prades and coach to Vernet.

_Route_ 35--By rail _via_ Prades to Villefranche, and carriage
thence to Vernet.

APPENDIX C.

SOME LOCAL PYRENEAN TERMS AND THEIR ENGLISH EQUIVALENTS.

_Artigue_, pasturage, prairie.
_Barranque_, a deep hollow or ravine.
_Borde, Bourdette_, farm-house, barn, cot.
_Caire, Quaire, Quairat_, a cone-shaped peak, rocky and bare.
_Canaou_, narrow ravine worn by the snow.
_Cap_, mountain tip.
_Clot_, a valley without exit.
_Colline_, a small valley, a dale.
_Cortal, Courtaou_, sheep-fold, sheep-pen.
_Couila, Couillade_, shepherd's cabin, hut, fertile vale.
_Estibe_, pasturage, feeding-ground.
_Estibere_, a well-pastured mountain.
_Fitte_, pointed summit.
_Montagne_, feeding-ground (on a mountainside).
_Neste_, mountain torrent.
_Orrhy, Orri_, shepherd's hut.
_Oule_, a bowl-shaped valley.
_Pech, Pouey, Puy_, a mountain of no great height, in the Western
Pyrenees; but also applied to loftier summits, in the Eastern range.
_Pene, Pena, Penne_, pointed rock.
_Peyre_, a large crag.
_Piche, Pisse_, a cascade waterfall.
_Pinede, Pinade_, pine forest, site of pine forest.
_Pique_, synonymous with _Fitte_, pointed summit, peak.
_Pla, Plan_, a valley with level meadows.
_Prade, Pradere_, similar to _Estibe_,
feeding-ground, meadow.
_Raillere_, steep decline, avalanche channel.
_Roque_, a mountain, steep and covered with crags.
_Sarrat, Serre, Serrere_, a sharp-toothed crest, backbone of
mountain.
_Sarre_, a small hill.
_Seoube, Scube_, wood, forest.
_Tausse, Truc, Truque, Tuc_, a steep and lofty peak with large
buttresses.

The _Defiles_ and _Passes_ of the mountains for which the word
_Col_ is generally applied, bear many other names, of which the
following, with their special significations, are the chief:--

_Core_, a pass on a side range or small lateral chain.
_Fourgue, Fourquette, Hourque, Hourquette_, generally applied to
passes on the small side ranges.
_Pas_, a pass difficult of approach.
_Port_, a pass in the principal chain.
_Porteil, Portillon, Pourtet_, passes in the principal or side chains.

APPENDIX D.

GENERAL INFORMATION, AND TABLES OF METRES, GRAMMES, DEGREES, &c. &c.

It would be difficult to speak with _too_ much weight on the
subject of _bread_, especially where invalids are concerned, and
that article in the Pyrenees is essentially _bad_--we might almost
say _unfit for food_. With the exception of Bagneres de
Bigorre--and then only when specially ordered--and _in the
season_, Bagneres de Luchon, the bread throughout the mountain
resorts is abominably sour. Travellers _do_ eat it, because they
have no other, but to invalids it is positively nauseous. In our
opinion it is the only real drawback to enjoying a Pyrenean trip! But
it would be foolish to bring it into such prominence when we have all
along recommended a stay amid these lovely scenes, unless we could
suggest a remedy, and the remedy is as simple as, with us, it proved
complete. There are several bakers in Pau selling bread as good as one
could wish for, and doubtless any of these would be glad to meet the
wishes of travellers; in our case we addressed ourselves to Mr. Otto
Kern, Vienna Bakery, Rue de la Prefecture, Pau, requesting him to
supply us with a certain quantity of bread daily, at whatever place we
might be. We had previously decided on our route on broad lines, so
that a postcard as a rule was sufficient to give notice of a change in
our address; while if a sudden alteration occurred in our plans, a
half-franc telegram told him the news, and _our bread_ never
failed to be at the _right_ place on the _right day_. The
bread sufficient for four people, carriage thereof, and a trifle for
commission (i.e. paper and trouble) cost on an average 2 frs. 50 cents
per diem, which was a little over 80 centimes each. Perhaps in time
hotel-keepers will resort to this method; in fact, we were assured that
it would be so; but in the meantime every traveller is recommended to
do so on his own account; though in all other respects he will find
most of the hotels throughout the mountains very well found. When once
in the Pyrenees, after Pau had been left behind, we found an average
price of 10 frs. per day--perhaps a shade less--was what our hotel
expenses amounted to; including--coffee and milk, bread and butter,
eggs _or_ kidneys _or_ chops for the first breakfast; table
d'hote luncheon and table d'hote dinner, with a good bedroom not higher
than 2nd floor. These prices must be understood as only those of a
spring or autumn tour--_out of the season_--and rather easier than
a traveller would pay at many of the hotels if he arrived without
having previously written and made terms. _We_ invariably wrote,
and at all the hotels marked thus || received every attention, good
rooms, good food, and _dry beds_.

It is difficult to give a hard-and-fast amount per diem as to
expenditure, as it depends so much on the drives, excursions, &c.; as
above stated 10 frs. per day paid all hotel expenses (including _vin
ordinaire_), and we consider that in the spring, with several
excursions, and "a landau and four" for the principal drives--such as
Bigorre to Luchon, Lourdes to St. Sauveur, St. Sauveur to Gavarnie, &c.
&c.--25 frs. or L1 per day ought to cover the whole daily expense of
each person. In the summer of course 35 frs., or even 40 frs., would be
required for the same period. Horses and carriages are cheap in the
spring, but even then a little judicious bargaining is required, as it
is in nearly every transaction, in the Pyrenees.

Jam, marmalade, bloater-paste, and small luxuries of that kind, not
excluding _whiskey_, are difficult to obtain, and it is well to
take them all from Pau or Biarritz, wherever the start is made.
Bagneres de Bigorre, chez M. Peltier, is fairly well supplied, but
other resorts know not the sound of their names! It is also worth
knowing that a system of "Parcels Post" is in operation, whereby any
moderate-sized parcel can be dispatched from any station for 85 cents,
and delivered at any place within reach of the railway or diligence;
but it must be understood at the same time that _bread_ will in
like manner be delivered _only_ where the railway or diligence
runs; if travellers therefore go to places where there is no
_official_ communication, they must depute some agent to receive
letters or parcels where the diligence last stops, and then forward
them by special messenger. This can be done of course, but it will
prove costly.

The rate of postage is 2-1/2d. the 15 grammes (a shade over 1/2 oz.),
and 2-1/2d. for every additional 15 grammes.

Money orders are issued at all the principal towns to which (see
Appendix A) a post-office belongs.

Telegrams, 1/2 d = 5 cents, per word, the address being charged for the
same as the rest; but no telegram can cost less than 50 centimes.

The rate to England is variable; usually 2-1/2 d. per word.

Money is reckoned at 25 frs. to the L1 English, and banknotes or gold
will be accepted in nearly all hotels, and circular notes as well, at
the larger resorts.

TABLE OF LITRES AND PINTS.

1/2 litre = 7/8 pint.
1 " = 1-3/4 pints.
2 litres = 3-1/2 pints.
4 " = 7 pints.
8 " = 7 quarts.

TABLES OF GRAMMES AND OUNCES.

29 grammes = 1 oz.
57 " = 2 oz.
86 " = 3 oz.
114 " = 4 oz. = 1/4 lb.
227 " = 8 oz. = 1/2 lb.
454 " = 16 oz. = 1 lb.
908 " = 32 oz. = 2 lbs.
1000 " = 35-1/5 oz. = 2 lbs. 3-1/5 oz.
1 kilogramme = 1000 grammes = 2 lbs. 3-1/5 oz.

TABLE OF CENTIMETRES AND INCHES.

100 centimetres = 1 metre = 39-1/3 inches; 1 centimetre = 2/5 inch
as near as possible.

5 centimetres = 2 inches.
10 " = 4 "
15 " = 6 "
20 " = 8 "
25 " = 10 "
30 " = 12 " = 1 foot.
45 " = 18 " = 1-1/2 feet.
50 " = 20 " = 1 ft. 8 in.
60 " = 24 " = 2 feet.
90 " = 36 " = 3 feet.
100 " = 39-1/3 " = 3 ft. 3-1/3 in.

TABLE OF METRES AND FEET, FOR DETERMINING THE
HEIGHT OF MOUNTAINS, &c.

1 metre = 3 ft. 3-1/3 in. as near as possible, without using decimals;
but at this computation 2 inches are lost in every 25 metres, which
however have been duly supplied in the following table, but the
fractions omitted:--

Metres. Ft. in. Metres. Ft. in. Metres. Ft. in..
1 = 3 3 26 = 85 4 140 = 459 4
2 = 6 7 27 = 88 7 150 = 492 2
3 = 9 10 28 = 91 10 160 = 524 11
4 = 13 1 29 = 95 2 170 = 557 9
5 = 16 5 30 = 98 8 175 = 574 3
6 = 19 8 35 = 114 10 180 = 590 7
7 = 22 11 40 = 131 2 190 = 623 4
8 = 26 3 45 = 147 7 200 = 656 3
9 = 29 6 50 = 164 1 300 = 984 4
10 = 32 9 55 = 180 5 400 = 1,312 6
11 = 36 1 60 = 196 10 500 = 1,640 7
12 = 39 4 65 = 213 3 600 = 1,968 8
13 = 42 7 70 = 229 7 700 = 2,296 9
14 = 45 11 75 = 246 1 800 = 2,624 10
15 = 49 2 80 = 262 6 900 = 2,953 0
16 = 52 5 85 = 278 10 1,000 = 3,281 1
17 = 55 9 90 = 295 3 2,000 = 6,562 2
18 = 59 0 95 = 311 8 3,000 = 9,843 3
19 = 62 3 1OO = 328 2 3,100 = 10,171 5
20 = 65 7 105 = 344 6 3,200 = 10,499 6
21 = 68 10 110 = 360 11 3,300 = 10,827 7
22 = 72 1 115 = 377 4 3,400 = 11,155 8
23 = 75 5 120 = 393 8 3,500 = 11,483 9
24 = 78 8 125 = 410 2 4,000 = 13,124 4
25 = 82 0 130 = 426 6

TABLE OF KILOMETRES AND MILES.

1 kilometre = 1,000 metres = 1,093 yards = 5/8 mile, as nearly as
possible, without employing decimals; but at this computation the
kilometre gains 11 yards, 40 kilometres gain 1/4 mile, and 160
kilometres gain 1 mile. This gain has been deducted in the following
table, and all fractions less than 1/4 omitted:--

Kilos. Miles. Kilos. Miles.

1 = 5/8 19 = 11-3/4
2 = 1-1/4 20 = 12-1/4
3 = 2 30 = 18-1/2
4 = 2-1/2 40 = 24-3/4
5 = 3 50 = 31
6 = 3-3/4 60 = 37
7 = 4-1/4 70 = 43-1/4
8 = 5 80 = 55-3/4
9 = 5-1/2 100 = 62
10 = 6-1/4 120 = 74-1/4
11 = 7 160 = 99
12 = 7-1/2 200 = 123-3/4
13 = 8 300 = 185-1/2
14 = 8-3/4 320 = 198
15 = 9-1/4 400 = 247-1/2
16 = 10 500 = 309-1/4
17 = 10-1/2 1,000 = 618-3/4
18 = 11-1/4

COMPARISON TABLE OF THE CENTIGRADE AND FAHRENHEIT THERMOMETERS.

1 deg. Centigrade = 1-4/5 Fahr.; 5 deg. Cent. = 9 deg. Fahr. It must
be understood that, as the freezing-point of Centigrade is Zero and of
Fahrenheit 32 deg., these 32 deg. must be taken into account in all
calculations above freezing-point: thus +5 deg. Cent. are equivalent
to a temperature of 41 deg. Fahr.

Cent. Fahr. Cent. Fahr.

Below -15 = +3 17 = 63
Zero. -10 = +12 18 = 64
-5 = +21 19 = 65
0 = 32 Freezing-point. 20 = 67
1 = 34 25 = 76
2 = 36 30 = 85
3 = 37 35 = 94
4 = 39 35-1/2 = 95 Blood heat.
5 = 41 40 = 103
6 = 43 45 = 112
7 = 45 50 = 121
8 = 47 55 = 130
9 = 48 60 = 139
10 = 50 65 = 148
11 = 52 70 = 156
12 = 54 75 = 165
13 = 55 80 = 174
13-1/2 = 56 Temperate. 85 = 183
14 = 57 90 = 192
15 = 59 95 = 201
16 = 61 100 = 210 Boiling-point.

INDEX.

A.

Abbe's song, the,
A dirty avalanche,
A "double stroke" (St. Sauveur),
Adour, basin of,
Allee d'Etigny (Luchon),
de Barcugna,
des Bains,
Verte (Bareges),
Allees de Cambasque,
Amelie-les-Bains,
excursions from,
general information,
hotels at, &c.,
Amoy, Valley of Ten Thousand Rocks,
Ancient church of the Templars (Luz),
_Anemone vernalis_,
scarlet,
wood,
A new "diet of worms,"
An excited dog-fancier,
An extraordinary detachment,
Anglet,
Appendix A,
B,
C,
D,
Aran, valley of,
Arboust, valley of,
Arcachon,
Arcachon, excursions from,
general information,
hotels at,
Argeles,
drive round valley of,
excursions from,
hotels at,
valley of,
Argeles-sur-Mer,
Arles-sur-Tech,
Arlos,
Arreau,
hotels at and excursions from,
Arrens,
excursions from,
hotels at,
Arrieuze (river),
Arroudet, cascade of,
Artigues-Tellin,
Arudy,
Ascent of the Col de Riou,
Ascent of the Pic de Bergons,
Aspe, valley of,
Aspin,
col of,
Asphodel,
Assat,
Aste,
Atalaya, cape,
Auberge du Lys (Luchon),
Auch, road of,
Aure, valley of,
Avajan,
Avalanche, a dirty,
Avenue de Salut,
Ax, road of,

B.

Bagneres de Bigorre to Bagneres de Luchon
Bagneres de Luchon to Bareges
Bagneres de Bigorre
Bagneres de Bigorre, bathing establishment of
Bagneres de Bigorre, excursions from
Bagneres de Bigorre, hotels of
Bagneres de Bigorre, springs of
Bagneres de Luchon to Montrejeau
Bagneres de Luchon to St. Bertrand de Comminges
Bagneres de Luchon
Bagneres de Luchon, baths of
Bagneres de Luchon, casino of
Bagneres de Luchon, excursions from
Bagneres de Luchon, general information
Bagneres de Luchon, hotels at
Ballooning
Barbe de Bouch
Bareges
" bathing establishment of
" excursions from
" hotels of
Barousse, valley of
Basin of Adour
" Echez
Baths of Amelie
" Bareges
" Capvern
" Cesar
" Grand Pre
" Hontalade
" Le Pre
" Luchon
" Luz
" Marie Therese
" Mauhourat
" Molitg
" OEufs
" Panticosa
" Pauze Nouveaux
" " Vieux
" Petit St. Sauveur
" Preste
" Raillere
" Ste. Marie (near Luchon)
" St. Sauveur
" Salut
" Sante
" Siradan
" Vernet
Baudean
Bayonne
" general information
" hotels at
Beaucens, castle of
Bedat
Bee orchids
Behobie
Belesten
Bernadette Soubirons
Betharram
" bridge near
Betpouey (Bareges)
Biarritz
" amusements of
" Cape Atalaya at
" general information
" hotels at
" Port Vieux at
Bidart
Bidassoa
Bielle
Bilheres
Billeres (Pau)
Billeres plains of,
" woods of,
Bious-Artigues,
Bishop's arrival, the,
Bizanos,
Black Forest (Bosost),
Black Prince,
Boo-Silhen,
Bordeaux to Arcachon,
Bordeaux to Bagneres de Bigorre,
Bordeaux to Biarritz,
" to Pau,
Bordeaux,
" hotels at,
" steamers to,
" trains to,
Borderes,
Bosost,
" chapel of St. Antoine at,
" church of,
" Fonda (inn) d'Espana at,
Box plants,
Brada (mountain),
Bread,
" arrival of,
Breche d'Allanz,
" Fausse,
" de Roland,
Broussette, valley of,
Bue,
Bugaret (mountain),
" torrent of,
Burbe, valley of,
Burnished toes,
Butte du Tresor,
Buvette de Minvieille,

C.

Cabaliros, the,
Cabanes du Lys,
Cagots,
Cambo,
" hotels at,
Campan,
Canine absurdity,
" feat, a,
Canton, odours of,
Capercailzie,
Capvern,
" baths of,
" hotels at,
Carmelites, church of the (Bigorre),
Carnival time (Pau),
Cascade d'Arroudet,
" de Cerizey,
" du Coeur,
" de Discoo,
" des Eaux Bonnes,
" d'Enfer,
" du Groshetre,
" de Laressec,
" de Lassariou,
" du Lutour,
" du Marbore,
" de Montauban,
" de Pisse-Arros,
" de Rioumaou,
" du Serpent,
" de Sidonie,
" du Valentin,
Casino (Luchon),
" (Pau),
" du Portillon (Luchon),
" de Roulette (Luchon),
Castel-Geloos,
Castel-Mouly,
Castel-Vieilh (or Castelvieil)
Castets,
Catarabe,
Cat-fight,
Cauterets,
" baths of,
" excursions from,
" Fruitiere of,
" Gorge of,
" hotels of,
Cazaril,
Cazaux,
Cecire (Bosost),
" (Superbagneres),
Cemetery, Luz,
" Pau,
Cercle des Etrangers (Bareges),
Cerizey, cascade of,
Chambre d'Amour (inn),
Chamois,
Chandelles du Marbore,
Chaos, the,
Chapelle de Pietad,
" de St. Antoine,
" de St. Exupere,
" de St. Roch,
" de Solferino,
Chateau de Beaucens,
" de Despourrins,
" de Geloz,
" de Miramont,
" de Ste. Marie,
Chester, resemblance to,
Cheval, Madame,
Chinaougue,
Church of Montauban,
" Notre Dame, Arreau,
" Notre Dame, Lourdes,
" Pietat,
" St. Jacques, Pau,
" St. Martin, Pau,
" St. Savin, Argeles,
" St. Vincent, Bigorre,
" Sazos,
" Soulom,
Chute de Lapaca,
" la Pique,
Cier de Luchon,
Cierp,
Cirque de Gavarnie,
" Troumouse,
Clerical sensation,
Coarraze,
Coffre d'Ossau,
Col d'Arbeousse,
" d'Aspin,
" d'Aubiste,
" de Bue
" d'Estom Soubiran,
" de Gourzy,
" de Marie Blanque,
" de Peyresourde,
" de Portillon,
" de Riou,
" de Tortes,
" de Tourmalet,
Columbine (_aquilegia_),
Confirmation at Cauterets,
Coteaux, the (Pau),
Cottin, Madame,
Coumelie (mountain),
Couradilles, the,
Coustous, the,
" music on the,
Cowslips,
Crabe (bridge),
Crabioules, glacier of,
Crere d'Ordincede,
"Crocodile of St. Bertrand," the,
Croix de Manse,
" de Mouguere,
"Cry of the Lourdes Shopkeepers," the,
Cucurlon rock (Biarritz),
Cylindre (du Marbore),

D.

Dax,
" baths of,
" hotels at,
Daffodils,
Dangerous footing,
Dear travelling,
Dog-fancier, an excited,
Dragon's-mouth Rock,

E.

Eaux Bonnes, 178;
" bathing establishment of,
" cascade of,
" excursions from,
Eaux Bonnes, hotels at,
Eaux Chaudes,
baths at,
excursions from,
grotto of,
hotels at,
Echez, basin of,
Echo, wonderful,
English Church (Bigorre),
Entecade, peak,
Espelette,
Esplanade des Oeufs,
Esquiez,
Esterre,
"Exhortation to the First Snow,"

F.

Fashion on a donkey,
Fausse Breche (Gavarnie),
Feather moss,
Females, importunate,
Fete de Payole,
Flight of lizards,
Fontaine de Marnieres (Pau)
Fos,
French sportsmen (Pau),
Fuenterabia (_Fr_. Fontarabie),

G.

Gabas,
Gabrielle d'Estrelle,
Gan,
Garin,
Garonne, river,
valley of,
Gavarnie,
Cirque of,
hotels of,
Port de,
Gave d'Azun,
Gave de Bareges,
Gave de Bastan,
Cauterets,
Gavarnie,
Heas,
Lutour,
Marcadau,
d'Ossau,
de Pau,
Gazost-les-Bains,
Gedre,
excursions from,
grotto of,
Geloos, Castel
Gelos,
General information, Appendix D,
Gentians,
Gerde,
Geruzet's marble works,
Ges,
Glacier de Crabioules,
Gorge de Bacheviron,
Cauterets,
du Hourat,
Gouffre d'Enfer,
Granges de Gouron,
Grange de la Reine Hortense,
Gripp,
Grocer's opinion, the (Cauterets),
Grotto of Eaux Chaudes,
Gedre,
Lourdes,
the Neez,
Grust (St. Sauveur),
Guetary,
"Guide's Auction," the,

H.

Heas,
inn, &c.,
valley of,
Hendaye,
Hepaticas,
Hermitage of St. Peter (St. Sauveur),
Herrere, stream,
Hospice Civil (Bigorre)
" de France (Luchon)
" de Ste. Eugenie (Bareges)
Hotel d'Angleterre, Argeles
" Baudot, Eaux Chaudes
" Beau Sejour (Bigorre)
" Canton, Luchon
" de Comminges
" d'Espana, Bosost
" de France, Argeles
" " Arreau
" " Eaux Bonnes
" " St. Sauveur
" du Parc, Cauterets
" de Paris, Biarritz
" de la Poste, Payole
" " Pierrefitte
" des Pyrenees, Lourdes
" " Louvie-Juzon
" de l'Univers, Luz
" des Voyageurs, Gavarnie
Houn Blanquo
Hourat, Gorge de
Hungry guardian, a
Hyacinths

I.

"Idyllic Colbert" (Pau)
Importunate females
Irun
Itsatsou
Izeste

J.

Jaca, a
"Jackdaw's Causerie"
Jardin a l'Anglaise (St. Sauveur)
" Darralde
" des Quinconces
"Jay of Bareges," the
"Jeannette's Lamb,"
Jonquils
Jurancon

L.

Labassere, a
waters of (see Bagneres de Bigorre)
La Brune (Cauterets)
La Casque du Marbore
Lac Bleu
" d'Estibaoute
" d'Estom
" d'Estom Soubiran
" de Gaube
" Vert
"Lady's Farewell to her Asinine Steed," the
Lagas, fountain of
Lamothe
Lapaca, Chute de
Laressec, cascade of,
Laruns
church of
inns at
Lassariou, cascade of
La Tour du Marbore
Les
Lescar
"Lesson of the Mountains," the
Lime-works (Eaux Bonnes)
_Linaria_
Liverpool to Bordeaux
Lizards, flight of
Llanberis Pass, resemblance to
London to Bordeaux
London to Paris
Louderville
Lourdes to Argeles
" Bareges
" Cauterets
" Gavarnie
" Luz
Lourdes to Pierrefitte,
St. Sauveur,
Lourdes,
castle of,
chapel of,
church of,
grotto of,
hotels at,
panorama of,
Loures,
inns of,
Louron, valley of,
Louvie-la-Haute,
Louvie-Juzon,
Louvie-Soubiron,
Luchon (see Bagneres de Luchon)
Lunch on the Bergons,
Lutour, cascade of,
valley of,
Luz,
hotels at,
baths of,
Lys, valley of,

M.

Marble Works, Geruzet's,
Marbore, the,
Cascade du,
Chandelles du,
Epaule du,
La Casque du,
La Tour du,
"March of the Men of Garlic," the,
Marignac,
Marion, Lake,
Marnieres, Fontaine de,
Maucapera,
Mauleon-Barousse,
Licharre,
Mediabat, bridge of,
Menu (Cauterets),
(Payole),
Mill conduits,
Milord, a,
Minvieille, Buvette de,
Molitg,
baths of, &c.,
excursions from,
hotels at,
Monne, Bigorre,
Cauterets,
Rouge,
Montagne de Brada,
Mont Arrouye,
Montaigu, Pic de (see Pic)
Montauban,
church of,
cascade of,
Mont Bedat,
Ferrat,
Montgaillard,
Montrejeau,
buffet of,
Mont Segu, Bosost,
Morcenx,
Mouguere (cross of),
Mountain rhododendrons,
violets,
Mouriscot, Lake,
Museum (Luchon),
(Luz),

N.

Napoleon's pillar (St. Sauveur),
Narcissus,
Nature's voice,
Nay,
Neez, grotto of the,
stream,
valley of,
Negresse (station),
Nestalas,
Neste (river),
Nethou, Pic de,
New "diet of worms," a,
Nivelle (river),
Noah's ark landscape, a,

O.

"Old world and the new," the (Pau),
Oloron,
general information,
hotels at,
roads to,
Oo,
Open-air concert,
Ordincede, Crete d',
Orphanage of Notre Dame du Rocher (Luchon),
Orphanage, church of,
Orpheon, the,
Orthez,
Osmunda regalis (fern),
Ossau, Gave d',
Val d',
Ourous,
"Oxen's Appeal," the,
Oxslips,

P.

Paillole (see Payole)
Pagoda Villa, the (Cauterets),
Palais de Justice, Pau,
Palomieres de Gerde,
Panorama of Lourdes,
Panticosa,
hotels at,
Parc Beaumont, Pau,
du Chateau, Pau,
Paris to Bagneres de Bigorre,
Paris to Bordeaux,
Paris to Toulouse,
Pasages,
Pas de l'Echelle,
Pas de l'Escalette,
Pas de Roland,
Pau to Eaux Bonnes and Chaudes,
Pau to Lourdes,
Pau to Oloron,
Pau, I,
amusements at,
castle of,
drives, &c., at,
general information,
history of,
hotels of,
Payole,
en fete, 136
Peasants and their ways,
Peculiar teams,
Peguere, the,
Pena Blanca,
Pene de l'Heris,
Pene de Montarque,
Perpignan,
Perpignan to Amelie,
Perpignan to Molitg,
Perpignan to Vernet,
Perpignan,
chief excursions from,
hotels at,
Peyrehorade,
Peyresourde, Col de,
Pic d'Antenac,
Pic d'Arbizon,
Pic d'Ardiden,
Pic d'Arrens,
Pic d'Aspe,
Pic d'Astazou,
Pic d'Aubiste,
Pic d'Ayre,
Pic de Bergons,
Pic de Boum,
Pic de Bugaret,
Pic de Campbieil,
Pic de Clarabide,
Pic de Crabioules,
Pic de Gabietou,
Pic de Gabizos,
Pic de Gar,
Pic de Gaube,
Pic de Ger,
Pic de Gourzy,
Pic de Labassa,
Pic du Lac Grand,
Pic de Laruns
de Lienz
de Litouese
de Maladetta
de Maucapera
du Midi d'Arrens (see Pic
d'Arrens)
du Midi de Bigorre
du Midi d'Ossau
du Milieu
de la Mine
de Montaigu (near Bigorre)
de Montaigu (near Saint
Sauveur)
de Neouville
de Nere
de Nethou
Rouge de Pailla
de Pez
de la Pique
de Posets
Poujastou
Sacroux
de Sarradets
de Sauvegarde
de Soulom
de Villelongue
de Viscos
Picnicking (Pau)
Pie de Mars
Pierrefitte;
hotels at,
road to
Pietat
Pilgrims
Pimene, the
Pique, valley of
Pitton de Tournefort
Place Royale, Pau
Ste. Eugenie, Biarritz
"Plaint of the Weather-beaten Pine,"
Plateau of the Bious-Artigues
Poc (guide)
_Polygala amara_
_Polygala rosea_
Pont d'Arrouge
de Benques
de Crabe
de Desdouroucat
d'Enfer (near Eaux Chaudes)
d'Enfer (near Luz)
d'Espagne
de la Hiladere
de Lestelle
de Nadie
Napoleon
de Pescadere
de Ravi
de Sia
de Villelongue
"Poor Pillicoddy,"
Port de Gavarnie
de Peyresourde (see Col de)
de la Picade
de Venasque
Posets, the Peak
Post-office (Luz)
_Potentilla_
Pragneres
Preste-les-Bains;
baths and hotels of,
_Primula farinosa_
Promenade Horizontale (Bareges)
de l'Imperatrice
Puyoo
Pyramide de Peyrelance
Pyrenean dogs
prices of
treatment of
local terms translated,
some,
songs

Q.

Quairat, Pic
Quatre Moulins de Sia

R.

Railway information and skeleton routes to the Pyrenees,
_Ramondia pyrenaica_
Ravin d'Araille
Rebenac
Red tape
"Riou,"
Rioumaou, cascade of
"Roads up again,"
Rocks at Biarritz
Rue d'Enfer (Luchon)
" de la Fontaine (Pau)

S.

Saint Antoine, chapel of Aventin
" Beat
" Bernard, statue of
" Bertrand de Comminges to Montrejeau
" Bertrand de Comminges,
" " " " cathedral of
" " " " cloisters of
" " " " history of
St. Christau,
" " hotels at
" Etienne
Jacques Church (Pau)
" Jean de Luz
" " dogs of
" " general information
" Laurent de la Salanque
" Mamet
" " church of
" Martin's Church (Pau)
" Pe
" Pee
" Peter's statue (Lourdes)
" Pierre
St. Sauveur
" " baths of
" " excursions from
" " hotels at
" Savin
" Vincent's Church (Bigorre)
Ste. Marie (near Bigorre)
" (near Oloron)
" (near St. Laurent)
" (near Salechan)
" baths of
Sakurazawa, memories of
Salies
Salechan
Salluz (Argeles)
Salut, avenue of
San Sebastian
" chief features of,
" hotels at
Sarsaparilla
Sassis (St. Sauveur)
Sazos (St. Sauveur)
_Scabii_
Sere (Luz)
Serres
Sevignac
Sia
" bridge of
" Quatre Moulins de
Sidonie, cascade of
Silver beeches
Siradan
" valley of
Skeleton routes and railway information
Sketching advice
" with a donkey-cart
Snow
Some Pyrenean local terms translated
Songs, Pyrenean
Soulom
Soulom, Pic de
Soum de Secugnac
Sour grapes (Pau)
Sourde, valley of
Spanish mules and peasants
Sport, French
"Spring's Bitters and Sweets"
Sugar-loaf Mountain (Gavarnie)
Superbagneres
view from
Swine-feeding

T.

Tables of centigrade and Fahrenheit thermometers
of centimetres and inches
of grammes and ounces
of kilometres and miles
of litres and pints
of metres and feet
Taillon, the
Tapere (stream)
Tarbes
road
Templars' church at Luz
"The Abbe's Song"
"The Argeles Shepherd's Reply"
The Bishop's arrival
The Chaos
"The Crocodile of St. Bertrand"
The Couradilles
"The Guide's Auction"
"The Jackdaw's Causerie"
"The Jay of Bareges"
"The Lady's Farewell to her Asinine Steed"
"The Lesson of the Mountains"
"The March of the Men of Garlic"
"The Organ's Tale"
"The Oxen's Appeal"
"The Plaint of the Weather-beaten Pine"
"The Three Cormorants"
The "witch of the hills"
"Three Cormorants," the
Torrent of Bugaret
Toulouse to Perpignan
road to
Tour des Lacs (Biarritz)
Tour de la Monnaie (Pau)
Tourmalet, Col de
Trained vines
Tramesaigues
Travellers' troubles
Troumouse, Cirque of
Trous d'Enfer
Tuc de Maupas

U.

Urrugne
Ustaritz

V.

Valcabrere
Val d'Ossau
Valentin (river)
Vallee d'Aran
d'Arboust
d'Argeles
d'Aspe
d'Aure
de Bareges
de Barousse
de Broussette
de Campan
de Garonne
de Heas
de l'Hospice
de Lesponne
de Lienz
de Louron
de Luchon
history of
Vallee du Lutour
de Luz
du Lys
de Marcadau
du Neez
de la Pique
de Seoube
de Serris
de Siradan
de Sourde (or Soude)
Valley of the Ten Thousand
Rocks (Amoy)
Venasque
Port de
Vernet-les-Bains
baths of
excursions from
hotels at
Via Crucis (Betharram)
Viella (near Bareges)
(near St. Beat)
Vieuzac
Vignemale, Pic de
Villelongue
Pic de
Villenave
Vines trained by the roadside
Violets

W.

Washerwomen and their gamps
Wonderful echo
Wood anemones

Y.

Yankee tale, a

Z.

Zinc mines

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