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The Wisdom of Father Brown by G. K. Chesterton

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1. The Absence of Mr Glass
2. The Paradise of Thieves
3. The Duel of Dr Hirsch
4. The Man in the Passage
5. The Mistake of the Machine
6. The Head of Caesar
7. The Purple Wig
8. The Perishing of the Pendragons
9. The God of the Gongs
10. The Salad of Colonel Cray
11. The Strange Crime of John Boulnois
12. The Fairy Tale of Father Brown


The Absence of Mr Glass

THE consulting-rooms of Dr Orion Hood, the eminent criminologist
and specialist in certain moral disorders, lay along the sea-front
at Scarborough, in a series of very large and well-lighted french windows,
which showed the North Sea like one endless outer wall of blue-green marble.
In such a place the sea had something of the monotony of a blue-green dado:
for the chambers themselves were ruled throughout by a terrible tidiness
not unlike the terrible tidiness of the sea. It must not be supposed
that Dr Hood's apartments excluded luxury, or even poetry.
These things were there, in their place; but one felt that
they were never allowed out of their place. Luxury was there:
there stood upon a special table eight or ten boxes of the best cigars;
but they were built upon a plan so that the strongest were always
nearest the wall and the mildest nearest the window. A tantalus
containing three kinds of spirit, all of a liqueur excellence,
stood always on this table of luxury; but the fanciful have asserted
that the whisky, brandy, and rum seemed always to stand at the same level.
Poetry was there: the left-hand corner of the room was lined with
as complete a set of English classics as the right hand could show
of English and foreign physiologists. But if one took a volume
of Chaucer or Shelley from that rank, its absence irritated the mind
like a gap in a man's front teeth. One could not say the books
were never read; probably they were, but there was a sense of their
being chained to their places, like the Bibles in the old churches.
Dr Hood treated his private book-shelf as if it were a public library.
And if this strict scientific intangibility steeped even the shelves
laden with lyrics and ballads and the tables laden with drink and tobacco,
it goes without saying that yet more of such heathen holiness
protected the other shelves that held the specialist's library,
and the other tables that sustained the frail and even fairylike
instruments of chemistry or mechanics.

Dr Hood paced the length of his string of apartments, bounded--
as the boys' geographies say--on the east by the North Sea and on the west
by the serried ranks of his sociological and criminologist library.
He was clad in an artist's velvet, but with none of an artist's negligence;
his hair was heavily shot with grey, but growing thick and healthy;
his face was lean, but sanguine and expectant. Everything about him
and his room indicated something at once rigid and restless,
like that great northern sea by which (on pure principles of hygiene)
he had built his home.

Fate, being in a funny mood, pushed the door open and
introduced into those long, strict, sea-flanked apartments
one who was perhaps the most startling opposite of them and their master.
In answer to a curt but civil summons, the door opened inwards
and there shambled into the room a shapeless little figure,
which seemed to find its own hat and umbrella as unmanageable as
a mass of luggage. The umbrella was a black and prosaic bundle
long past repair; the hat was a broad-curved black hat, clerical
but not common in England; the man was the very embodiment of all
that is homely and helpless.

The doctor regarded the new-comer with a restrained astonishment,
not unlike that he would have shown if some huge but obviously
harmless sea-beast had crawled into his room. The new-comer
regarded the doctor with that beaming but breathless geniality
which characterizes a corpulent charwoman who has just managed
to stuff herself into an omnibus. It is a rich confusion of
social self-congratulation and bodily disarray. His hat tumbled
to the carpet, his heavy umbrella slipped between his knees with a thud;
he reached after the one and ducked after the other, but with
an unimpaired smile on his round face spoke simultaneously as follows:

"My name is Brown. Pray excuse me. I've come about
that business of the MacNabs. I have heard, you often help people
out of such troubles. Pray excuse me if I am wrong."

By this time he had sprawlingly recovered the hat, and made
an odd little bobbing bow over it, as if setting everything quite right.

"I hardly understand you," replied the scientist, with
a cold intensity of manner. "I fear you have mistaken the chambers.
I am Dr Hood, and my work is almost entirely literary and educational.
It is true that I have sometimes been consulted by the police
in cases of peculiar difficulty and importance, but--"

"Oh, this is of the greatest importance," broke in the little man
called Brown. "Why, her mother won't let them get engaged."
And he leaned back in his chair in radiant rationality.

The brows of Dr Hood were drawn down darkly, but the eyes
under them were bright with something that might be anger or
might be amusement. "And still," he said, "I do not quite understand."

"You see, they want to get married," said the man with the
clerical hat. "Maggie MacNab and young Todhunter want to get married.
Now, what can be more important than that?"

The great Orion Hood's scientific triumphs had deprived him
of many things--some said of his health, others of his God;
but they had not wholly despoiled him of his sense of the absurd.
At the last plea of the ingenuous priest a chuckle broke out of him
from inside, and he threw himself into an arm-chair in an ironical attitude
of the consulting physician.

"Mr Brown," he said gravely, "it is quite fourteen and a half years
since I was personally asked to test a personal problem: then it was
the case of an attempt to poison the French President at
a Lord Mayor's Banquet. It is now, I understand, a question of whether
some friend of yours called Maggie is a suitable fiancee for some friend
of hers called Todhunter. Well, Mr Brown, I am a sportsman.
I will take it on. I will give the MacNab family my best advice,
as good as I gave the French Republic and the King of England--no, better:
fourteen years better. I have nothing else to do this afternoon.
Tell me your story."

The little clergyman called Brown thanked him with
unquestionable warmth, but still with a queer kind of simplicity.
It was rather as if he were thanking a stranger in a smoking-room
for some trouble in passing the matches, than as if he were (as he was)
practically thanking the Curator of Kew Gardens for coming with him
into a field to find a four-leaved clover. With scarcely a semi-colon
after his hearty thanks, the little man began his recital:

"I told you my name was Brown; well, that's the fact,
and I'm the priest of the little Catholic Church I dare say you've seen
beyond those straggly streets, where the town ends towards the north.
In the last and straggliest of those streets which runs along the sea
like a sea-wall there is a very honest but rather sharp-tempered
member of my flock, a widow called MacNab. She has one daughter,
and she lets lodgings, and between her and the daughter,
and between her and the lodgers--well, I dare say there is a great deal
to be said on both sides. At present she has only one lodger,
the young man called Todhunter; but he has given more trouble
than all the rest, for he wants to marry the young woman of the house."

"And the young woman of the house," asked Dr Hood, with huge and
silent amusement, "what does she want?"

"Why, she wants to marry him," cried Father Brown, sitting up eagerly.
"That is just the awful complication."

"It is indeed a hideous enigma," said Dr Hood.

"This young James Todhunter," continued the cleric,
"is a very decent man so far as I know; but then nobody knows very much.
He is a bright, brownish little fellow, agile like a monkey,
clean-shaven like an actor, and obliging like a born courtier.
He seems to have quite a pocketful of money, but nobody knows what
his trade is. Mrs MacNab, therefore (being of a pessimistic turn),
is quite sure it is something dreadful, and probably connected with dynamite.
The dynamite must be of a shy and noiseless sort, for the poor fellow
only shuts himself up for several hours of the day and studies something
behind a locked door. He declares his privacy is temporary and justified,
and promises to explain before the wedding. That is all that anyone knows
for certain, but Mrs MacNab will tell you a great deal more than
even she is certain of. You know how the tales grow like grass on
such a patch of ignorance as that. There are tales of two voices
heard talking in the room; though, when the door is opened,
Todhunter is always found alone. There are tales of a mysterious
tall man in a silk hat, who once came out of the sea-mists and
apparently out of the sea, stepping softly across the sandy fields and
through the small back garden at twilight, till he was heard
talking to the lodger at his open window. The colloquy seemed to end
in a quarrel. Todhunter dashed down his window with violence,
and the man in the high hat melted into the sea-fog again.
This story is told by the family with the fiercest mystification;
but I really think Mrs MacNab prefers her own original tale:
that the Other Man (or whatever it is) crawls out every night from the
big box in the corner, which is kept locked all day. You see,
therefore, how this sealed door of Todhunter's is treated as the gate
of all the fancies and monstrosities of the `Thousand and One Nights'.
And yet there is the little fellow in his respectable black jacket,
as punctual and innocent as a parlour clock. He pays his rent to the tick;
he is practically a teetotaller; he is tirelessly kind with
the younger children, and can keep them amused for a day on end; and,
last and most urgent of all, he has made himself equally popular with
the eldest daughter, who is ready to go to church with him tomorrow."

A man warmly concerned with any large theories has always
a relish for applying them to any triviality. The great specialist
having condescended to the priest's simplicity, condescended expansively.
He settled himself with comfort in his arm-chair and began to talk in
the tone of a somewhat absent-minded lecturer:

"Even in a minute instance, it is best to look first to
the main tendencies of Nature. A particular flower may not be dead
in early winter, but the flowers are dying; a particular pebble
may never be wetted with the tide, but the tide is coming in.
To the scientific eye all human history is a series of collective movements,
destructions or migrations, like the massacre of flies in winter
or the return of birds in spring. Now the root fact in all history is Race.
Race produces religion; Race produces legal and ethical wars.
There is no stronger case than that of the wild, unworldly and
perishing stock which we commonly call the Celts, of whom your friends
the MacNabs are specimens. Small, swarthy, and of this dreamy and
drifting blood, they accept easily the superstitious explanation of
any incidents, just as they still accept (you will excuse me for saying)
that superstitious explanation of all incidents which you
and your Church represent. It is not remarkable that such people,
with the sea moaning behind them and the Church (excuse me again)
droning in front of them, should put fantastic features into what are
probably plain events. You, with your small parochial responsibilities,
see only this particular Mrs MacNab, terrified with this particular tale
of two voices and a tall man out of the sea. But the man with
the scientific imagination sees, as it were, the whole clans of MacNab
scattered over the whole world, in its ultimate average as uniform
as a tribe of birds. He sees thousands of Mrs MacNabs,
in thousands of houses, dropping their little drop of morbidity
in the tea-cups of their friends; he sees--"

Before the scientist could conclude his sentence, another and
more impatient summons sounded from without; someone with swishing skirts
was marshalled hurriedly down the corridor, and the door opened on
a young girl, decently dressed but disordered and red-hot with haste.
She had sea-blown blonde hair, and would have been entirely beautiful
if her cheek-bones had not been, in the Scotch manner, a little
high in relief as well as in colour. Her apology was almost as abrupt
as a command.

"I'm sorry to interrupt you, sir," she said, "but I had to follow
Father Brown at once; it's nothing less than life or death."

Father Brown began to get to his feet in some disorder.
"Why, what has happened, Maggie?" he said.

"James has been murdered, for all I can make out,"
answered the girl, still breathing hard from her rush. "That man Glass
has been with him again; I heard them talking through the door quite plain.
Two separate voices: for James speaks low, with a burr,
and the other voice was high and quavery."

"That man Glass?" repeated the priest in some perplexity.

"I know his name is Glass," answered the girl, in great impatience.
"I heard it through the door. They were quarrelling--about money,
I think--for I heard James say again and again, `That's right, Mr Glass,'
or `No, Mr Glass,' and then, `Two or three, Mr Glass.' But we're talking
too much; you must come at once, and there may be time yet."

"But time for what?" asked Dr Hood, who had been studying
the young lady with marked interest. "What is there about Mr Glass
and his money troubles that should impel such urgency?"

"I tried to break down the door and couldn't," answered the girl shortly,
"Then I ran to the back-yard, and managed to climb on to the window-sill
that looks into the room. It was an dim, and seemed to be empty,
but I swear I saw James lying huddled up in a corner, as if he were
drugged or strangled."

"This is very serious," said Father Brown, gathering his errant hat
and umbrella and standing up; "in point of fact I was just putting
your case before this gentleman, and his view--"

"Has been largely altered," said the scientist gravely.
"I do not think this young lady is so Celtic as I had supposed.
As I have nothing else to do, I will put on my hat and stroll
down town with you."

In a few minutes all three were approaching the dreary tail of
the MacNabs' street: the girl with the stern and breathless stride
of the mountaineer, the criminologist with a lounging grace (which was
not without a certain leopard-like swiftness), and the priest at an
energetic trot entirely devoid of distinction. The aspect of this
edge of the town was not entirely without justification for
the doctor's hints about desolate moods and environments.
The scattered houses stood farther and farther apart in a broken string
along the seashore; the afternoon was closing with a premature and
partly lurid twilight; the sea was of an inky purple and murmuring ominously.
In the scrappy back garden of the MacNabs which ran down towards the sand,
two black, barren-looking trees stood up like demon hands held up
in astonishment, and as Mrs MacNab ran down the street to meet them
with lean hands similarly spread, and her fierce face in shadow,
she was a little like a demon herself. The doctor and the priest
made scant reply to her shrill reiterations of her daughter's story,
with more disturbing details of her own, to the divided vows of vengeance
against Mr Glass for murdering, and against Mr Todhunter for being murdered,
or against the latter for having dared to want to marry her daughter,
and for not having lived to do it. They passed through the narrow passage
in the front of the house until they came to the lodger's door at the back,
and there Dr Hood, with the trick of an old detective, put his shoulder
sharply to the panel and burst in the door.

It opened on a scene of silent catastrophe. No one seeing it,
even for a flash, could doubt that the room had been the theatre
of some thrilling collision between two, or perhaps more, persons.
Playing-cards lay littered across the table or fluttered about
the floor as if a game had been interrupted. Two wine glasses stood
ready for wine on a side-table, but a third lay smashed
in a star of crystal upon the carpet. A few feet from it lay
what looked like a long knife or short sword, straight,
but with an ornamental and pictured handle, its dull blade just caught
a grey glint from the dreary window behind, which showed the black trees
against the leaden level of the sea. Towards the opposite corner
of the room was rolled a gentleman's silk top hat, as if it had
just been knocked off his head; so much so, indeed, that one almost looked
to see it still rolling. And in the corner behind it, thrown like a sack
of potatoes, but corded like a railway trunk, lay Mr James Todhunter,
with a scarf across his mouth, and six or seven ropes knotted round
his elbows and ankles. His brown eyes were alive and shifted alertly.

Dr Orion Hood paused for one instant on the doormat and drank in
the whole scene of voiceless violence. Then he stepped swiftly
across the carpet, picked up the tall silk hat, and gravely put it
upon the head of the yet pinioned Todhunter. It was so much too large
for him that it almost slipped down on to his shoulders.

"Mr Glass's hat," said the doctor, returning with it and peering
into the inside with a pocket lens. "How to explain the absence
of Mr Glass and the presence of Mr Glass's hat? For Mr Glass is not a
careless man with his clothes. That hat is of a stylish shape and
systematically brushed and burnished, though not very new.
An old dandy, I should think."

"But, good heavens!" called out Miss MacNab, "aren't you going to
untie the man first?"

"I say `old' with intention, though not with certainty"
continued the expositor; "my reason for it might seem a little far-fetched.
The hair of human beings falls out in very varying degrees,
but almost always falls out slightly, and with the lens I should see
the tiny hairs in a hat recently worn. It has none, which leads me
to guess that Mr Glass is bald. Now when this is taken with
the high-pitched and querulous voice which Miss MacNab described
so vividly (patience, my dear lady, patience), when we take
the hairless head together with the tone common in senile anger,
I should think we may deduce some advance in years. Nevertheless,
he was probably vigorous, and he was almost certainly tall.
I might rely in some degree on the story of his previous appearance
at the window, as a tall man in a silk hat, but I think I have
more exact indication. This wineglass has been smashed all over the place,
but one of its splinters lies on the high bracket beside the mantelpiece.
No such fragment could have fallen there if the vessel had been smashed
in the hand of a comparatively short man like Mr Todhunter."

"By the way," said Father Brown, "might it not be as well
to untie Mr Todhunter?"

"Our lesson from the drinking-vessels does not end here,"
proceeded the specialist. "I may say at once that it is possible
that the man Glass was bald or nervous through dissipation rather than age.
Mr Todhunter, as has been remarked, is a quiet thrifty gentleman,
essentially an abstainer. These cards and wine-cups are no part
of his normal habit; they have been produced for a particular companion.
But, as it happens, we may go farther. Mr Todhunter may or may not
possess this wine-service, but there is no appearance of his
possessing any wine. What, then, were these vessels to contain?
I would at once suggest some brandy or whisky, perhaps of a luxurious sort,
from a flask in the pocket of Mr Glass. We have thus something like
a picture of the man, or at least of the type: tall, elderly, fashionable,
but somewhat frayed, certainly fond of play and strong waters,
perhaps rather too fond of them. Mr Glass is a gentleman not unknown
on the fringes of society."

"Look here," cried the young woman, "if you don't let me pass to
untie him I'll run outside and scream for the police."

"I should not advise you, Miss MacNab," said Dr Hood gravely,
"to be in any hurry to fetch the police. Father Brown,
I seriously ask you to compose your flock, for their sakes, not for mine.
Well, we have seen something of the figure and quality of Mr Glass;
what are the chief facts known of Mr Todhunter? They are substantially three:
that he is economical, that he is more or less wealthy, and that
he has a secret. Now, surely it is obvious that there are
the three chief marks of the kind of man who is blackmailed.
And surely it is equally obvious that the faded finery,
the profligate habits, and the shrill irritation of Mr Glass
are the unmistakable marks of the kind of man who blackmails him.
We have the two typical figures of a tragedy of hush money:
on the one hand, the respectable man with a mystery; on the other,
the West-end vulture with a scent for a mystery. These two men
have met here today and have quarrelled, using blows and a bare weapon."

"Are you going to take those ropes off?" asked the girl stubbornly.

Dr Hood replaced the silk hat carefully on the side table,
and went across to the captive. He studied him intently,
even moving him a little and half-turning him round by the shoulders,
but he only answered:

"No; I think these ropes will do very well till your friends
the police bring the handcuffs."

Father Brown, who had been looking dully at the carpet,
lifted his round face and said: "What do you mean?"

The man of science had picked up the peculiar dagger-sword
from the carpet and was examining it intently as he answered:

"Because you find Mr Todhunter tied up," he said, "you all jump
to the conclusion that Mr Glass had tied him up; and then, I suppose,
escaped. There are four objections to this: First, why should a gentleman
so dressy as our friend Glass leave his hat behind him, if he left
of his own free will? Second," he continued, moving towards the window,
"this is the only exit, and it is locked on the inside. Third, this
blade here has a tiny touch of blood at the point, but there is
no wound on Mr Todhunter. Mr Glass took that wound away with him,
dead or alive. Add to all this primary probability.
It is much more likely that the blackmailed person would try to kill
his incubus, rather than that the blackmailer would try to kill
the goose that lays his golden egg. There, I think, we have
a pretty complete story."

"But the ropes?" inquired the priest, whose eyes had remained
open with a rather vacant admiration.

"Ah, the ropes," said the expert with a singular intonation.
"Miss MacNab very much wanted to know why I did not set Mr Todhunter
free from his ropes. Well, I will tell her. I did not do it because
Mr Todhunter can set himself free from them at any minute he chooses."

"What?" cried the audience on quite different notes of astonishment.

"I have looked at all the knots on Mr Todhunter," reiterated Hood
quietly. "I happen to know something about knots; they are quite
a branch of criminal science. Every one of those knots he has
made himself and could loosen himself; not one of them would have been made
by an enemy really trying to pinion him. The whole of this affair
of the ropes is a clever fake, to make us think him the victim of
the struggle instead of the wretched Glass, whose corpse may be hidden
in the garden or stuffed up the chimney."

There was a rather depressed silence; the room was darkening,
the sea-blighted boughs of the garden trees looked leaner and
blacker than ever, yet they seemed to have come nearer to the window.
One could almost fancy they were sea-monsters like krakens or cuttlefish,
writhing polypi who had crawled up from the sea to see the end
of this tragedy, even as he, the villain and victim of it,
the terrible man in the tall hat, had once crawled up from the sea.
For the whole air was dense with the morbidity of blackmail, which is
the most morbid of human things, because it is a crime concealing a crime;
a black plaster on a blacker wound.

The face of the little Catholic priest, which was commonly complacent
and even comic, had suddenly become knotted with a curious frown.
It was not the blank curiosity of his first innocence. It was rather
that creative curiosity which comes when a man has the beginnings of
an idea. "Say it again, please," he said in a simple, bothered manner;
"do you mean that Todhunter can tie himself up all alone and
untie himself all alone?"

"That is what I mean," said the doctor.

"Jerusalem!" ejaculated Brown suddenly, "I wonder if it could
possibly be that!"

He scuttled across the room rather like a rabbit, and peered with
quite a new impulsiveness into the partially-covered face of the captive.
Then he turned his own rather fatuous face to the company.
"Yes, that's it!" he cried in a certain excitement. "Can't you see it
in the man's face? Why, look at his eyes!"

Both the Professor and the girl followed the direction of his glance.
And though the broad black scarf completely masked the lower half
of Todhunter's visage, they did grow conscious of something struggling
and intense about the upper part of it.

"His eyes do look queer," cried the young woman, strongly moved.
"You brutes; I believe it's hurting him!"

"Not that, I think," said Dr Hood; "the eyes have certainly
a singular expression. But I should interpret those transverse
wrinkles as expressing rather such slight psychological abnormality--"

"Oh, bosh!" cried Father Brown: "can't you see he's laughing?"

"Laughing!" repeated the doctor, with a start; "but what on earth
can he be laughing at?"

"Well," replied the Reverend Brown apologetically,
"not to put too fine a point on it, I think he is laughing at you.
And indeed, I'm a little inclined to laugh at myself, now I know about it."

"Now you know about what?" asked Hood, in some exasperation.

"Now I know," replied the priest, "the profession of Mr Todhunter."

He shuffled about the room, looking at one object after another
with what seemed to be a vacant stare, and then invariably bursting
into an equally vacant laugh, a highly irritating process for those
who had to watch it. He laughed very much over the hat,
still more uproariously over the broken glass, but the blood on
the sword point sent him into mortal convulsions of amusement.
Then he turned to the fuming specialist.

"Dr Hood," he cried enthusiastically, "you are a great poet!
You have called an uncreated being out of the void. How much more godlike
that is than if you had only ferreted out the mere facts!
Indeed, the mere facts are rather commonplace and comic by comparison."

"I have no notion what you are talking about," said Dr Hood
rather haughtily; "my facts are all inevitable, though necessarily incomplete.
A place may be permitted to intuition, perhaps (or poetry if you
prefer the term), but only because the corresponding details cannot
as yet be ascertained. In the absence of Mr Glass--"

"That's it, that's it," said the little priest, nodding quite eagerly,
"that's the first idea to get fixed; the absence of Mr Glass.
He is so extremely absent. I suppose," he added reflectively,
"that there was never anybody so absent as Mr Glass."

"Do you mean he is absent from the town?" demanded the doctor.

"I mean he is absent from everywhere," answered Father Brown;
"he is absent from the Nature of Things, so to speak."

"Do you seriously mean," said the specialist with a smile,
"that there is no such person?"

The priest made a sign of assent. "It does seem a pity," he said.

Orion Hood broke into a contemptuous laugh. "Well," he said,
"before we go on to the hundred and one other evidences, let us take
the first proof we found; the first fact we fell over when we fell
into this room. If there is no Mr Glass, whose hat is this?"

"It is Mr Todhunter's," replied Father Brown.

"But it doesn't fit him," cried Hood impatiently. "He couldn't
possibly wear it!"

Father Brown shook his head with ineffable mildness.
"I never said he could wear it," he answered. "I said it was his hat.
Or, if you insist on a shade of difference, a hat that is his."

"And what is the shade of difference?" asked the criminologist
with a slight sneer.

"My good sir," cried the mild little man, with his first movement
akin to impatience, "if you will walk down the street to the nearest
hatter's shop, you will see that there is, in common speech,
a difference between a man's hat and the hats that are his."

"But a hatter," protested Hood, "can get money out of his
stock of new hats. What could Todhunter get out of this one old hat?"

"Rabbits," replied Father Brown promptly.

"What?" cried Dr Hood.

"Rabbits, ribbons, sweetmeats, goldfish, rolls of coloured paper,"
said the reverend gentleman with rapidity. "Didn't you see it all
when you found out the faked ropes? It's just the same with the sword.
Mr Todhunter hasn't got a scratch on him, as you say; but he's got
a scratch in him, if you follow me."

"Do you mean inside Mr Todhunter's clothes?" inquired
Mrs MacNab sternly.

"I do not mean inside Mr Todhunter's clothes," said Father Brown.
"I mean inside Mr Todhunter."

"Well, what in the name of Bedlam do you mean?"

"Mr Todhunter," explained Father Brown placidly, "is learning
to be a professional conjurer, as well as juggler, ventriloquist,
and expert in the rope trick. The conjuring explains the hat.
It is without traces of hair, not because it is worn by
the prematurely bald Mr Glass, but because it has never been worn
by anybody. The juggling explains the three glasses, which Todhunter
was teaching himself to throw up and catch in rotation.
But, being only at the stage of practice, he smashed one glass
against the ceiling. And the juggling also explains the sword,
which it was Mr Todhunter's professional pride and duty to swallow.
But, again, being at the stage of practice, he very slightly grazed
the inside of his throat with the weapon. Hence he has a wound
inside him, which I am sure (from the expression on his face)
is not a serious one. He was also practising the trick of
a release from ropes, like the Davenport Brothers, and he was just about
to free himself when we all burst into the room. The cards, of course,
are for card tricks, and they are scattered on the floor because
he had just been practising one of those dodges of sending them
flying through the air. He merely kept his trade secret,
because he had to keep his tricks secret, like any other conjurer.
But the mere fact of an idler in a top hat having once looked in
at his back window, and been driven away by him with great indignation,
was enough to set us all on a wrong track of romance, and make us imagine
his whole life overshadowed by the silk-hatted spectre of Mr Glass."

"But What about the two voices?" asked Maggie, staring.

"Have you never heard a ventriloquist?" asked Father Brown.
"Don't you know they speak first in their natural voice, and then
answer themselves in just that shrill, squeaky, unnatural voice
that you heard?"

There was a long silence, and Dr Hood regarded the little man
who had spoken with a dark and attentive smile. "You are certainly
a very ingenious person," he said; "it could not have been done better
in a book. But there is just one part of Mr Glass you have not succeeded
in explaining away, and that is his name. Miss MacNab distinctly
heard him so addressed by Mr Todhunter."

The Rev. Mr Brown broke into a rather childish giggle.
"Well, that," he said, "that's the silliest part of the whole silly story.
When our juggling friend here threw up the three glasses in turn,
he counted them aloud as he caught them, and also commented aloud
when he failed to catch them. What he really said was: `One, two
and three--missed a glass one, two--missed a glass.' And so on."

There was a second of stillness in the room, and then everyone
with one accord burst out laughing. As they did so the figure
in the corner complacently uncoiled all the ropes and let them fall
with a flourish. Then, advancing into the middle of the room with a bow,
he produced from his pocket a big bill printed in blue and red,
which announced that ZALADIN, the World's Greatest Conjurer,
Contortionist, Ventriloquist and Human Kangaroo would be ready
with an entirely new series of Tricks at the Empire Pavilion,
Scarborough, on Monday next at eight o'clock precisely.


The Paradise of Thieves

THE great Muscari, most original of the young Tuscan poets,
walked swiftly into his favourite restaurant, which overlooked
the Mediterranean, was covered by an awning and fenced by little lemon
and orange trees. Waiters in white aprons were already laying out
on white tables the insignia of an early and elegant lunch;
and this seemed to increase a satisfaction that already touched
the top of swagger. Muscari had an eagle nose like Dante;
his hair and neckerchief were dark and flowing; he carried a black cloak,
and might almost have carried a black mask, so much did he bear with him
a sort of Venetian melodrama. He acted as if a troubadour had still
a definite social office, like a bishop. He went as near as
his century permitted to walking the world literally like Don Juan,
with rapier and guitar.

For he never travelled without a case of swords, with which
he had fought many brilliant duels, or without a corresponding case
for his mandolin, with which he had actually serenaded Miss Ethel Harrogate,
the highly conventional daughter of a Yorkshire banker on a holiday.
Yet he was neither a charlatan nor a child; but a hot, logical Latin
who liked a certain thing and was it. His poetry was as straightforward
as anyone else's prose. He desired fame or wine or the beauty of women
with a torrid directness inconceivable among the cloudy ideals
or cloudy compromises of the north; to vaguer races his intensity
smelt of danger or even crime. Like fire or the sea, he was too simple
to be trusted.

The banker and his beautiful English daughter were staying
at the hotel attached to Muscari's restaurant; that was why it was
his favourite restaurant. A glance flashed around the room
told him at once, however, that the English party had not descended.
The restaurant was glittering, but still comparatively empty.
Two priests were talking at a table in a corner, but Muscari
(an ardent Catholic) took no more notice of them than of a couple of crows.
But from a yet farther seat, partly concealed behind a dwarf tree
golden with oranges, there rose and advanced towards the poet a person
whose costume was the most aggressively opposite to his own.

This figure was clad in tweeds of a piebald check, with a pink tie,
a sharp collar and protuberant yellow boots. He contrived,
in the true tradition of 'Arry at Margate, to look at once startling
and commonplace. But as the Cockney apparition drew nearer,
Muscari was astounded to observe that the head was distinctly
different from the body. It was an Italian head: fuzzy, swarthy and
very vivacious, that rose abruptly out of the standing collar
like cardboard and the comic pink tie. In fact it was a head he knew.
He recognized it, above all the dire erection of English holiday array,
as the face of an old but forgotten friend name Ezza. This youth
had been a prodigy at college, and European fame was promised him
when he was barely fifteen; but when he appeared in the world he failed,
first publicly as a dramatist and a demagogue, and then privately
for years on end as an actor, a traveller, a commission agent
or a journalist. Muscari had known him last behind the footlights;
he was but too well attuned to the excitements of that profession,
and it was believed that some moral calamity had swallowed him up.

"Ezza!" cried the poet, rising and shaking hands in
a pleasant astonishment. "Well, I've seen you in many costumes
in the green room; but I never expected to see you dressed up
as an Englishman."

"This," answered Ezza gravely, "is not the costume of an Englishman,
but of the Italian of the future."

"In that case," remarked Muscari, "I confess I prefer
the Italian of the past."

"That is your old mistake, Muscari," said the man in tweeds,
shaking his head; "and the mistake of Italy. In the sixteenth century
we Tuscans made the morning: we had the newest steel, the newest carving,
the newest chemistry. Why should we not now have the newest factories,
the newest motors, the newest finance--the newest clothes?"

"Because they are not worth having," answered Muscari.
"You cannot make Italians really progressive; they are too intelligent.
Men who see the short cut to good living will never go by
the new elaborate roads."

"Well, to me Marconi, or D'Annunzio, is the star of Italy"
said the other. "That is why I have become a Futurist--and a courier."

"A courier!" cried Muscari, laughing. "Is that the last of your
list of trades? And whom are you conducting?"

"Oh, a man of the name of Harrogate, and his family, I believe."

"Not the banker in this hotel?" inquired the poet,
with some eagerness.

"That's the man," answered the courier.

"Does it pay well?" asked the troubadour innocently.

"It will pay me," said Ezza, with a very enigmatic smile.
"But I am a rather curious sort of courier." Then, as if
changing the subject, he said abruptly: "He has a daughter--and a son."

"The daughter is divine," affirmed Muscari, "the father and son are,
I suppose, human. But granted his harmless qualities doesn't that banker
strike you as a splendid instance of my argument? Harrogate has millions
in his safes, and I have--the hole in my pocket. But you daren't say--
you can't say--that he's cleverer than I, or bolder than I, or even
more energetic. He's not clever, he's got eyes like blue buttons;
he's not energetic, he moves from chair to chair like a paralytic.
He's a conscientious, kindly old blockhead; but he's got money simply
because he collects money, as a boy collects stamps.
You're too strong-minded for business, Ezza. You won't get on.
To be clever enough to get all that money, one must be stupid enough
to want it."

"I'm stupid enough for that," said Ezza gloomily. "But I should
suggest a suspension of your critique of the banker, for here he comes."

Mr Harrogate, the great financier, did indeed enter the room,
but nobody looked at him. He was a massive elderly man with
a boiled blue eye and faded grey-sandy moustaches; but for
his heavy stoop he might have been a colonel. He carried several
unopened letters in his hand. His son Frank was a really fine lad,
curly-haired, sun-burnt and strenuous; but nobody looked at him either.
All eyes, as usual, were riveted, for the moment at least,
upon Ethel Harrogate, whose golden Greek head and colour of the dawn
seemed set purposely above that sapphire sea, like a goddess's.
The poet Muscari drew a deep breath as if he were drinking something,
as indeed he was. He was drinking the Classic; which his fathers made.
Ezza studied her with a gaze equally intense and far more baffling.

Miss Harrogate was specially radiant and ready for conversation
on this occasion; and her family had fallen into the easier
Continental habit, allowing the stranger Muscari and even
the courier Ezza to share their table and their talk. In Ethel Harrogate
conventionality crowned itself with a perfection and splendour of its own.
Proud of her father's prosperity, fond of fashionable pleasures,
a fond daughter but an arrant flirt, she was all these things with
a sort of golden good-nature that made her very pride pleasing
and her worldly respectability a fresh and hearty thing.

They were in an eddy of excitement about some alleged peril
in the mountain path they were to attempt that week. The danger was
not from rock and avalanche, but from something yet more romantic.
Ethel had been earnestly assured that brigands, the true cut-throats
of the modern legend, still haunted that ridge and held that pass
of the Apennines.

"They say," she cried, with the awful relish of a schoolgirl,
"that all that country isn't ruled by the King of Italy, but by
the King of Thieves. Who is the King of Thieves?"

"A great man," replied Muscari, "worthy to rank with
your own Robin Hood, signorina. Montano, the King of Thieves,
was first heard of in the mountains some ten years ago, when people
said brigands were extinct. But his wild authority spread with
the swiftness of a silent revolution. Men found his fierce proclamations
nailed in every mountain village; his sentinels, gun in hand,
in every mountain ravine. Six times the Italian Government
tried to dislodge him, and was defeated in six pitched battles
as if by Napoleon."

"Now that sort of thing," observed the banker weightily,
"would never be allowed in England; perhaps, after all, we had better
choose another route. But the courier thought it perfectly safe."

"It is perfectly safe," said the courier contemptuously.
"I have been over it twenty times. There may have been some old
jailbird called a King in the time of our grandmothers;
but he belongs to history if not to fable. Brigandage is utterly
stamped out."

"It can never be utterly stamped out," Muscari answered;
"because armed revolt is a recreation natural to southerners.
Our peasants are like their mountains, rich in grace and green gaiety,
but with the fires beneath. There is a point of human despair where
the northern poor take to drink--and our own poor take to daggers."

"A poet is privileged," replied Ezza, with a sneer.
"If Signor Muscari were English he would still be looking
for highwaymen in Wandsworth. Believe me, there is no more danger
of being captured in Italy than of being scalped in Boston."

"Then you propose to attempt it?" asked Mr Harrogate, frowning.

"Oh, it sounds rather dreadful," cried the girl, turning her
glorious eyes on Muscari. "Do you really think the pass is dangerous?"

Muscari threw back his black mane. "I know it is dangerous:"
he said. "I am crossing it tomorrow."

The young Harrogate was left behind for a moment emptying a glass of
white wine and lighting a cigarette, as the beauty retired with the banker,
the courier and the poet, distributing peals of silvery satire.
At about the same instant the two priests in the corner rose;
the taller, a white-haired Italian, taking his leave. The shorter priest
turned and walked towards the banker's son, and the latter was astonished
to realize that though a Roman priest the man was an Englishman.
He vaguely remembered meeting him at the social crushes of some of
his Catholic friends. But the man spoke before his memories could
collect themselves.

"Mr Frank Harrogate, I think," he said. "I have had an introduction,
but I do not mean to presume on it. The odd thing I have to say
will come far better from a stranger. Mr Harrogate, I say one word and go:
take care of your sister in her great sorrow."

Even for Frank's truly fraternal indifference the radiance
and derision of his sister still seemed to sparkle and ring;
he could hear her laughter still from the garden of the hotel,
and he stared at his sombre adviser in puzzledom.

"Do you mean the brigands?" he asked; and then, remembering
a vague fear of his own, "or can you be thinking of Muscari?"

"One is never thinking of the real sorrow," said the strange priest.
"One can only be kind when it comes."

And he passed promptly from the room, leaving the other almost
with his mouth open.

A day or two afterwards a coach containing the company was
really crawling and staggering up the spurs of the menacing mountain range.
Between Ezza's cheery denial of the danger and Muscari's boisterous
defiance of it, the financial family were firm in their original purpose;
and Muscari made his mountain journey coincide with theirs.
A more surprising feature was the appearance at the coast-town station
of the little priest of the restaurant; he alleged merely
that business led him also to cross the mountains of the midland.
But young Harrogate could not but connect his presence with
the mystical fears and warnings of yesterday.

The coach was a kind of commodious wagonette, invented by
the modernist talent of the courier, who dominated the expedition
with his scientific activity and breezy wit. The theory of danger from
thieves was banished from thought and speech; though so far conceded
in formal act that some slight protection was employed. The courier
and the young banker carried loaded revolvers, and Muscari
(with much boyish gratification) buckled on a kind of cutlass
under his black cloak.

He had planted his person at a flying leap next to
the lovely Englishwoman; on the other side of her sat the priest,
whose name was Brown and who was fortunately a silent individual;
the courier and the father and son were on the banc behind.
Muscari was in towering spirits, seriously believing in the peril,
and his talk to Ethel might well have made her think him a maniac.
But there was something in the crazy and gorgeous ascent,
amid crags like peaks loaded with woods like orchards, that dragged
her spirit up alone with his into purple preposterous heavens
with wheeling suns. The white road climbed like a white cat;
it spanned sunless chasms like a tight-rope; it was flung round
far-off headlands like a lasso.

And yet, however high they went, the desert still blossomed
like the rose. The fields were burnished in sun and wind
with the colour of kingfisher and parrot and humming-bird,
the hues of a hundred flowering flowers. There are no lovelier meadows
and woodlands than the English, no nobler crests or chasms than
those of Snowdon and Glencoe. But Ethel Harrogate had never before
seen the southern parks tilted on the splintered northern peaks;
the gorge of Glencoe laden with the fruits of Kent. There was nothing here
of that chill and desolation that in Britain one associates with
high and wild scenery. It was rather like a mosaic palace,
rent with earthquakes; or like a Dutch tulip garden blown to the stars
with dynamite.

"It's like Kew Gardens on Beachy Head," said Ethel.

"It is our secret," answered he, "the secret of the volcano;
that is also the secret of the revolution--that a thing can be violent
and yet fruitful."

"You are rather violent yourself," and she smiled at him.

"And yet rather fruitless," he admitted; "if I die tonight
I die unmarried and a fool."

"It is not my fault if you have come," she said after
a difficult silence.

"It is never your fault," answered Muscari; "it was not your fault
that Troy fell."

As they spoke they came under overwhelming cliffs that spread
almost like wings above a corner of peculiar peril. Shocked by the
big shadow on the narrow ledge, the horses stirred doubtfully.
The driver leapt to the earth to hold their heads, and they
became ungovernable. One horse reared up to his full height--
the titanic and terrifying height of a horse when he becomes a biped.
It was just enough to alter the equilibrium; the whole coach
heeled over like a ship and crashed through the fringe of bushes
over the cliff. Muscari threw an arm round Ethel, who clung to him,
and shouted aloud. It was for such moments that he lived.

At the moment when the gorgeous mountain walls went round
the poet's head like a purple windmill a thing happened which was
superficially even more startling. The elderly and lethargic banker
sprang erect in the coach and leapt over the precipice before
the tilted vehicle could take him there. In the first flash
it looked as wild as suicide; but in the second it was as sensible as
a safe investment. The Yorkshireman had evidently more promptitude,
as well as more sagacity, than Muscari had given him credit for;
for he landed in a lap of land which might have been specially padded
with turf and clover to receive him. As it happened, indeed,
the whole company were equally lucky, if less dignified in their
form of ejection. Immediately under this abrupt turn of the road
was a grassy and flowery hollow like a sunken meadow; a sort of
green velvet pocket in the long, green, trailing garments of the hills.
Into this they were all tipped or tumbled with little damage,
save that their smallest baggage and even the contents of their pockets
were scattered in the grass around them. The wrecked coach still
hung above, entangled in the tough hedge, and the horses plunged
painfully down the slope. The first to sit up was the little priest,
who scratched his head with a face of foolish wonder. Frank Harrogate
heard him say to himself: "Now why on earth have we fallen just here?"

He blinked at the litter around him, and recovered his own
very clumsy umbrella. Beyond it lay the broad sombrero fallen from
the head of Muscari, and beside it a sealed business letter which,
after a glance at the address, he returned to the elder Harrogate.
On the other side of him the grass partly hid Miss Ethel's sunshade,
and just beyond it lay a curious little glass bottle hardly two inches long.
The priest picked it up; in a quick, unobtrusive manner he uncorked
and sniffed it, and his heavy face turned the colour of clay.

"Heaven deliver us!" he muttered; "it can't be hers!
Has her sorrow come on her already?" He slipped it into his own
waistcoat pocket. "I think I'm justified," he said, "till I know
a little more."

He gazed painfully at the girl, at that moment being raised out of
the flowers by Muscari, who was saying: "We have fallen into heaven;
it is a sign. Mortals climb up and they fall down; but it is only
gods and goddesses who can fall upwards."

And indeed she rose out of the sea of colours so beautiful and
happy a vision that the priest felt his suspicion shaken and shifted.
"After all," he thought, "perhaps the poison isn't hers; perhaps it's
one of Muscari's melodramatic tricks."

Muscari set the lady lightly on her feet, made her an absurdly
theatrical bow, and then, drawing his cutlass, hacked hard at
the taut reins of the horses, so that they scrambled to their feet
and stood in the grass trembling. When he had done so,
a most remarkable thing occurred. A very quiet man, very poorly dressed
and extremely sunburnt, came out of the bushes and took hold of
the horses' heads. He had a queer-shaped knife, very broad and crooked,
buckled on his belt; there was nothing else remarkable about him,
except his sudden and silent appearance. The poet asked him who he was,
and he did not answer.

Looking around him at the confused and startled group in the hollow,
Muscari then perceived that another tanned and tattered man,
with a short gun under his arm, was looking at them from
the ledge just below, leaning his elbows on the edge of the turf.
Then he looked up at the road from which they had fallen and saw,
looking down on them, the muzzles of four other carbines and
four other brown faces with bright but quite motionless eyes.

"The brigands!" cried Muscari, with a kind of monstrous gaiety.
"This was a trap. Ezza, if you will oblige me by shooting the
coachman first, we can cut our way out yet. There are only six of them."

"The coachman," said Ezza, who was standing grimly with his hands
in his pockets, "happens to be a servant of Mr Harrogate's."

"Then shoot him all the more," cried the poet impatiently;
"he was bribed to upset his master. Then put the lady in the middle,
and we will break the line up there--with a rush."

And, wading in wild grass and flowers, he advanced fearlessly
on the four carbines; but finding that no one followed except
young Harrogate, he turned, brandishing his cutlass to wave the others on.
He beheld the courier still standing slightly astride in the centre of
the grassy ring, his hands in his pockets; and his lean, ironical
Italian face seemed to grow longer and longer in the evening light.

"You thought, Muscari, I was the failure among our schoolfellows,"
he said, "and you thought you were the success. But I have succeeded
more than you and fill a bigger place in history. I have been
acting epics while you have been writing them."

"Come on, I tell you!" thundered Muscari from above.
"Will you stand there talking nonsense about yourself with a woman
to save and three strong men to help you? What do you call yourself?"

"I call myself Montano," cried the strange courier in a voice
equally loud and full. "I am the King of Thieves, and I welcome you all
to my summer palace."

And even as he spoke five more silent men with weapons ready
came out of the bushes, and looked towards him for their orders.
One of them held a large paper in his hand.

"This pretty little nest where we are all picnicking,"
went on the courier-brigand, with the same easy yet sinister smile,
"is, together with some caves underneath it, known by the name of
the Paradise of Thieves. It is my principal stronghold on these hills;
for (as you have doubtless noticed) the eyrie is invisible both from
the road above and from the valley below. It is something better
than impregnable; it is unnoticeable. Here I mostly live, and here
I shall certainly die, if the gendarmes ever track me here.
I am not the kind of criminal that `reserves his defence,'
but the better kind that reserves his last bullet."

All were staring at him thunderstruck and still, except Father Brown,
who heaved a huge sigh as of relief and fingered the little phial
in his pocket. "Thank God!" he muttered; "that's much more probable.
The poison belongs to this robber-chief, of course. He carries it
so that he may never be captured, like Cato."

The King of Thieves was, however, continuing his address with
the same kind of dangerous politeness. "It only remains for me,"
he said, "to explain to my guests the social conditions upon which
I have the pleasure of entertaining them. I need not expound
the quaint old ritual of ransom, which it is incumbent upon me
to keep up; and even this only applies to a part of the company.
The Reverend Father Brown and the celebrated Signor Muscari
I shall release tomorrow at dawn and escort to my outposts.
Poets and priests, if you will pardon my simplicity of speech,
never have any money. And so (since it is impossible to get anything
out of them), let us, seize the opportunity to show our admiration for
classic literature and our reverence for Holy Church."

He paused with an unpleasing smile; and Father Brown
blinked repeatedly at him, and seemed suddenly to be listening
with great attention. The brigand captain took the large paper from
the attendant brigand and, glancing over it, continued:
"My other intentions are clearly set forth in this public document,
which I will hand round in a moment; and which after that will be
posted on a tree by every village in the valley, and every cross-road
in the hills. I will not weary you with the verbalism, since you
will be able to check it; the substance of my proclamation is this:
I announce first that I have captured the English millionaire,
the colossus of finance, Mr Samuel Harrogate. I next announce
that I have found on his person notes and bonds for two thousand pounds,
which he has given up to me. Now since it would be really immoral
to announce such a thing to a credulous public if it had not occurred,
I suggest it should occur without further delay. I suggest that
Mr Harrogate senior should now give me the two thousand pounds
in his pocket."

The banker looked at him under lowering brows, red-faced and sulky,
but seemingly cowed. That leap from the failing carriage seemed
to have used up his last virility. He had held back in a hang-dog style
when his son and Muscari had made a bold movement to break out of
the brigand trap. And now his red and trembling hand went reluctantly
to his breast-pocket, and passed a bundle of papers and envelopes
to the brigand.

"Excellent!" cried that outlaw gaily; "so far we are all cosy.
I resume the points of my proclamation, so soon to be published
to all Italy. The third item is that of ransom. I am asking
from the friends of the Harrogate family a ransom of three thousand pounds,
which I am sure is almost insulting to that family in its moderate estimate
of their importance. Who would not pay triple this sum for another day's
association with such a domestic circle? I will not conceal from you
that the document ends with certain legal phrases about
the unpleasant things that may happen if the money is not paid;
but meanwhile, ladies and gentlemen, let me assure you that
I am comfortably off here for accommodation, wine and cigars,
and bid you for the present a sportsman-like welcome to the luxuries
of the Paradise of Thieves."

All the time that he had been speaking, the dubious-looking men
with carbines and dirty slouch hats had been gathering silently
in such preponderating numbers that even Muscari was compelled
to recognize his sally with the sword as hopeless. He glanced around him;
but the girl had already gone over to soothe and comfort her father,
for her natural affection for his person was as strong or stronger than
her somewhat snobbish pride in his success. Muscari, with the illogicality
of a lover, admired this filial devotion, and yet was irritated by it.
He slapped his sword back in the scabbard and went and flung himself
somewhat sulkily on one of the green banks. The priest sat down
within a yard or two, and Muscari turned his aquiline nose on him
in an instantaneous irritation.

"Well," said the poet tartly, "do people still think me too romantic?
Are there, I wonder, any brigands left in the mountains?"

"There may be," said Father Brown agnostically.

"What do you mean?" asked the other sharply.

"I mean I am puzzled," replied the priest. "I am puzzled about
Ezza or Montano, or whatever his name is. He seems to me much more
inexplicable as a brigand even than he was as a courier."

"But in what way?" persisted his companion. "Santa Maria!
I should have thought the brigand was plain enough."

"I find three curious difficulties," said the priest in a quiet voice.
"I should like to have your opinion on them. First of all
I must tell you I was lunching in that restaurant at the seaside.
As four of you left the room, you and Miss Harrogate went ahead,
talking and laughing; the banker and the courier came behind,
speaking sparely and rather low. But I could not help hearing Ezza
say these words--`Well, let her have a little fun; you know the blow
may smash her any minute.' Mr Harrogate answered nothing;
so the words must have had some meaning. On the impulse of the moment
I warned her brother that she might be in peril; I said nothing
of its nature, for I did not know. But if it meant this capture
in the hills, the thing is nonsense. Why should the brigand-courier
warn his patron, even by a hint, when it was his whole purpose to lure him
into the mountain-mousetrap? It could not have meant that.
But if not, what is this disaster, known both to courier and banker,
which hangs over Miss Harrogate's head?"

"Disaster to Miss Harrogate!" ejaculated the poet, sitting up
with some ferocity. "Explain yourself; go on."

"All my riddles, however, revolve round our bandit chief,"
resumed the priest reflectively. "And here is the second of them.
Why did he put so prominently in his demand for ransom the fact that
he had taken two thousand pounds from his victim on the spot?
It had no faintest tendency to evoke the ransom. Quite the other way,
in fact. Harrogate's friends would be far likelier to fear for his fate
if they thought the thieves were poor and desperate. Yet the spoliation
on the spot was emphasized and even put first in the demand.
Why should Ezza Montano want so specially to tell all Europe that
he had picked the pocket before he levied the blackmail?"

"I cannot imagine," said Muscari, rubbing up his black hair
for once with an unaffected gesture. "You may think you enlighten me,
but you are leading me deeper in the dark. What may be the third
objection to the King of the Thieves?" "The third objection,"
said Father Brown, still in meditation, "is this bank we are sitting on.
Why does our brigand-courier call this his chief fortress and
the Paradise of Thieves? It is certainly a soft spot to fall on
and a sweet spot to look at. It is also quite true, as he says,
that it is invisible from valley and peak, and is therefore a hiding-place.
But it is not a fortress. It never could be a fortress.
I think it would be the worst fortress in the world. For it is actually
commanded from above by the common high-road across the mountains--
the very place where the police would most probably pass.
Why, five shabby short guns held us helpless here about half an hour ago.
The quarter of a company of any kind of soldiers could have blown us
over the precipice. Whatever is the meaning of this odd little nook
of grass and flowers, it is not an entrenched position.
It is something else; it has some other strange sort of importance;
some value that I do not understand. It is more like an accidental theatre
or a natural green-room; it is like the scene for some romantic comedy;
it is like...."

As the little priest's words lengthened and lost themselves
in a dull and dreamy sincerity, Muscari, whose animal senses were alert
and impatient, heard a new noise in the mountains. Even for him
the sound was as yet very small and faint; but he could have sworn
the evening breeze bore with it something like the pulsation of
horses' hoofs and a distant hallooing.

At the same moment, and long before the vibration had touched
the less-experienced English ears, Montano the brigand ran up
the bank above them and stood in the broken hedge, steadying himself
against a tree and peering down the road. He was a strange figure
as he stood there, for he had assumed a flapped fantastic hat and
swinging baldric and cutlass in his capacity of bandit king,
but the bright prosaic tweed of the courier showed through in patches
all over him.

The next moment he turned his olive, sneering face and made
a movement with his hand. The brigands scattered at the signal,
not in confusion, but in what was evidently a kind of guerrilla discipline.
Instead of occupying the road along the ridge, they sprinkled themselves
along the side of it behind the trees and the hedge, as if watching unseen
for an enemy. The noise beyond grew stronger, beginning to shake
the mountain road, and a voice could be clearly heard calling out orders.
The brigands swayed and huddled, cursing and whispering,
and the evening air was full of little metallic noises as they
cocked their pistols, or loosened their knives, or trailed their scabbards
over the stones. Then the noises from both quarters seemed to meet
on the road above; branches broke, horses neighed, men cried out.

"A rescue!" cried Muscari, springing to his feet and waving his hat;
"the gendarmes are on them! Now for freedom and a blow for it!
Now to be rebels against robbers! Come, don't let us leave everything
to the police; that is so dreadfully modern. Fall on the rear
of these ruffians. The gendarmes are rescuing us; come, friends,
let us rescue the gendarmes!"

And throwing his hat over the trees, he drew his cutlass once more
and began to escalade the slope up to the road. Frank Harrogate
jumped up and ran across to help him, revolver in hand, but was astounded
to hear himself imperatively recalled by the raucous voice of his father,
who seemed to be in great agitation.

"I won't have it," said the banker in a choking voice;
"I command you not to interfere."

"But, father," said Frank very warmly, "an Italian gentleman has
led the way. You wouldn't have it said that the English hung back."

"It is useless," said the older man, who was trembling violently,
"it is useless. We must submit to our lot."

Father Brown looked at the banker; then he put his hand instinctively
as if on his heart, but really on the little bottle of poison;
and a great light came into his face like the light of the revelation
of death.

Muscari meanwhile, without waiting for support, had crested the bank
up to the road, and struck the brigand king heavily on the shoulder,
causing him to stagger and swing round. Montano also had
his cutlass unsheathed, and Muscari, without further speech,
sent a slash at his head which he was compelled to catch and parry.
But even as the two short blades crossed and clashed the King of Thieves
deliberately dropped his point and laughed.

"What's the good, old man?" he said in spirited Italian slang;
"this damned farce will soon be over."

"What do you mean, you shuffler?" panted the fire-eating poet.
"Is your courage a sham as well as your honesty?"

"Everything about me is a sham," responded the ex-courier
in complete good humour. "I am an actor; and if I ever had
a private character, I have forgotten it. I am no more a genuine brigand
than I am a genuine courier. I am only a bundle of masks,
and you can't fight a duel with that." And he laughed with boyish pleasure
and fell into his old straddling attitude, with his back to the skirmish
up the road.

Darkness was deepening under the mountain walls, and it was not easy
to discern much of the progress of the struggle, save that tall men
were pushing their horses' muzzles through a clinging crowd of brigands,
who seemed more inclined to harass and hustle the invaders
than to kill them. It was more like a town crowd preventing
the passage of the police than anything the poet had ever pictured
as the last stand of doomed and outlawed men of blood. Just as he was
rolling his eyes in bewilderment he felt a touch on his elbow,
and found the odd little priest standing there like a small Noah
with a large hat, and requesting the favour of a word or two.

"Signor Muscari," said the cleric, "in this queer crisis
personalities may be pardoned. I may tell you without offence
of a way in which you will do more good than by helping the gendarmes,
who are bound to break through in any case. You will permit me
the impertinent intimacy, but do you care about that girl?
Care enough to marry her and make her a good husband, I mean?"

"Yes," said the poet quite simply.

"Does she care about you?"

"I think so," was the equally grave reply.

"Then go over there and offer yourself," said the priest:
"offer her everything you can; offer her heaven and earth
if you've got them. The time is short."

"Why?" asked the astonished man of letters.

"Because," said Father Brown, "her Doom is coming up the road."

"Nothing is coming up the road," argued Muscari, "except the rescue."

"Well, you go over there," said his adviser, "and be ready
to rescue her from the rescue."

Almost as he spoke the hedges were broken all along the ridge
by a rush of the escaping brigands. They dived into bushes
and thick grass like defeated men pursued; and the great cocked hats
of the mounted gendarmerie were seen passing along above the broken hedge.
Another order was given; there was a noise of dismounting,
and a tall officer with cocked hat, a grey imperial, and a paper in his hand
appeared in the gap that was the gate of the Paradise of Thieves.
There was a momentary silence, broken in an extraordinary way by the banker,
who cried out in a hoarse and strangled voice: "Robbed! I've been robbed!"

"Why, that was hours ago," cried his son in astonishment:
"when you were robbed of two thousand pounds."

"Not of two thousand pounds," said the financier, with an abrupt
and terrible composure, "only of a small bottle."

The policeman with the grey imperial was striding across
the green hollow. Encountering the King of the Thieves in his path,
he clapped him on the shoulder with something between a caress
and a buffet and gave him a push that sent him staggering away.
"You'll get into trouble, too," he said, "if you play these tricks."

Again to Muscari's artistic eye it seemed scarcely like
the capture of a great outlaw at bay. Passing on, the policeman halted
before the Harrogate group and said: "Samuel Harrogate, I arrest you
in the name of the law for embezzlement of the funds of the Hull and
Huddersfield Bank."

The great banker nodded with an odd air of business assent,
seemed to reflect a moment, and before they could interpose took
a half turn and a step that brought him to the edge of the outer
mountain wall. Then, flinging up his hands, he leapt exactly as he leapt
out of the coach. But this time he did not fall into a little meadow
just beneath; he fell a thousand feet below, to become a wreck of bones
in the valley.

The anger of the Italian policeman, which he expressed volubly
to Father Brown, was largely mixed with admiration. "It was like him
to escape us at last," he said. "He was a great brigand if you like.
This last trick of his I believe to be absolutely unprecedented.
He fled with the company's money to Italy, and actually got himself
captured by sham brigands in his own pay, so as to explain both the
disappearance of the money and the disappearance of himself.
That demand for ransom was really taken seriously by most of the police.
But for years he's been doing things as good as that, quite as good
as that. He will be a serious loss to his family."

Muscari was leading away the unhappy daughter, who held hard to him,
as she did for many a year after. But even in that tragic wreck
he could not help having a smile and a hand of half-mocking friendship
for the indefensible Ezza Montano. "And where are you going next?"
he asked him over his shoulder.

"Birmingham," answered the actor, puffing a cigarette.
"Didn't I tell you I was a Futurist? I really do believe in those things
if I believe in anything. Change, bustle and new things every morning.
I am going to Manchester, Liverpool, Leeds, Hull, Huddersfield,
Glasgow, Chicago--in short, to enlightened, energetic, civilized society!"

"In short," said Muscari, "to the real Paradise of Thieves."


The Duel of Dr Hirsch

M. MAURICE BRUN and M. Armand Armagnac were crossing the sunlit
Champs Elysee with a kind of vivacious respectability.
They were both short, brisk and bold. They both had black beards
that did not seem to belong to their faces, after the strange French fashion
which makes real hair look like artificial. M. Brun had
a dark wedge of beard apparently affixed under his lower lip.
M. Armagnac, by way of a change, had two beards; one sticking out
from each corner of his emphatic chin. They were both young.
They were both atheists, with a depressing fixity of outlook
but great mobility of exposition. They were both pupils of
the great Dr Hirsch, scientist, publicist and moralist.

M. Brun had become prominent by his proposal that the common
expression "Adieu" should be obliterated from all the French classics,
and a slight fine imposed for its use in private life. "Then," he said,
"the very name of your imagined God will have echoed for the last time
in the ear of man." M. Armagnac specialized rather in a resistance
to militarism, and wished the chorus of the Marseillaise altered from
"Aux armes, citoyens" to "Aux greves, citoyens". But his antimilitarism
was of a peculiar and Gallic sort. An eminent and very wealthy
English Quaker, who had come to see him to arrange for the disarmament
of the whole planet, was rather distressed by Armagnac's proposal
that (by way of beginning) the soldiers should shoot their officers.

And indeed it was in this regard that the two men differed most
from their leader and father in philosophy. Dr Hirsch,
though born in France and covered with the most triumphant favours
of French education, was temperamentally of another type--mild, dreamy,
humane; and, despite his sceptical system, not devoid of transcendentalism.
He was, in short, more like a German than a Frenchman; and much as they
admired him, something in the subconsciousness of these Gauls was
irritated at his pleading for peace in so peaceful a manner.
To their party throughout Europe, however, Paul Hirsch was
a saint of science. His large and daring cosmic theories
advertised his austere life and innocent, if somewhat frigid, morality;
he held something of the position of Darwin doubled with the position
of Tolstoy. But he was neither an anarchist nor an antipatriot;
his views on disarmament were moderate and evolutionary--
the Republican Government put considerable confidence in him
as to various chemical improvements. He had lately even discovered
a noiseless explosive, the secret of which the Government was
carefully guarding.

His house stood in a handsome street near the Elysee--
a street which in that strong summer seemed almost as full of foliage
as the park itself; a row of chestnuts shattered the sunshine,
interrupted only in one place where a large cafe ran out into the street.
Almost opposite to this were the white and green blinds of
the great scientist's house, an iron balcony, also painted green,
running along in front of the first-floor windows. Beneath this was
the entrance into a kind of court, gay with shrubs and tiles,
into which the two Frenchmen passed in animated talk.

The door was opened to them by the doctor's old servant, Simon,
who might very well have passed for a doctor himself, having a strict
suit of black, spectacles, grey hair, and a confidential manner.
In fact, he was a far more presentable man of science than his master,
Dr Hirsch, who was a forked radish of a fellow, with just enough
bulb of a head to make his body insignificant. With all the gravity
of a great physician handling a prescription, Simon handed a letter
to M. Armagnac. That gentleman ripped it up with a racial impatience,
and rapidly read the following:

I cannot come down to speak to you. There is a man in this house
whom I refuse to meet. He is a Chauvinist officer, Dubosc.
He is sitting on the stairs. He has been kicking the furniture about
in all the other rooms; I have locked myself in my study,
opposite that cafe. If you love me, go over to the cafe and wait
at one of the tables outside. I will try to send him over to you.
I want you to answer him and deal with him. I cannot meet him myself.
I cannot: I will not.

There is going to be another Dreyfus case.


M. Armagnac looked at M. Brun. M. Brun borrowed the letter,
read it, and looked at M. Armagnac. Then both betook themselves briskly
to one of the little tables under the chestnuts opposite,
where they procured two tall glasses of horrible green absinthe,
which they could drink apparently in any weather and at any time.
Otherwise the cafe seemed empty, except for one soldier drinking coffee
at one table, and at another a large man drinking a small syrup and
a priest drinking nothing.

Maurice Brun cleared his throat and said: "Of course we must help
the master in every way, but--"

There was an abrupt silence, and Armagnac said: "He may have
excellent reasons for not meeting the man himself, but--"

Before either could complete a sentence, it was evident that
the invader had been expelled from the house opposite. The shrubs under
the archway swayed and burst apart, as that unwelcome guest was
shot out of them like a cannon-ball.

He was a sturdy figure in a small and tilted Tyrolean felt hat,
a figure that had indeed something generally Tyrolean about it.
The man's shoulders were big and broad, but his legs were neat and active
in knee-breeches and knitted stockings. His face was brown like a nut;
he had very bright and restless brown eyes; his dark hair was brushed back
stiffly in front and cropped close behind, outlining a square and
powerful skull; and he had a huge black moustache like the horns of a bison.
Such a substantial head is generally based on a bull neck; but this was
hidden by a big coloured scarf, swathed round up the man's ears
and falling in front inside his jacket like a sort of fancy waistcoat.
It was a scarf of strong dead colours, dark red and old gold and purple,
probably of Oriental fabrication. Altogether the man had something
a shade barbaric about him; more like a Hungarian squire than
an ordinary French officer. His French, however, was obviously
that of a native; and his French patriotism was so impulsive
as to be slightly absurd. His first act when he burst out of the archway
was to call in a clarion voice down the street: "Are there any
Frenchmen here?" as if he were calling for Christians in Mecca.

Armagnac and Brun instantly stood up; but they were too late.
Men were already running from the street corners; there was a small
but ever-clustering crowd. With the prompt French instinct for
the politics of the street, the man with the black moustache had already
run across to a corner of the cafe, sprung on one of the tables,
and seizing a branch of chestnut to steady himself, shouted
as Camille Desmoulins once shouted when he scattered the oak-leaves
among the populace.

"Frenchmen!" he volleyed; "I cannot speak! God help me, that is why
I am speaking! The fellows in their filthy parliaments who learn
to speak also learn to be silent--silent as that spy cowering
in the house opposite! Silent as he is when I beat on his bedroom door!
Silent as he is now, though he hears my voice across this street
and shakes where he sits! Oh, they can be silent eloquently--
the politicians! But the time has come when we that cannot speak
must speak. You are betrayed to the Prussians. Betrayed at this moment.
Betrayed by that man. I am Jules Dubosc, Colonel of Artillery, Belfort.
We caught a German spy in the Vosges yesterday, and a paper was found
on him--a paper I hold in my hand. Oh, they tried to hush it up;
but I took it direct to the man who wrote it--the man in that house!
It is in his hand. It is signed with his initials. It is a direction
for finding the secret of this new Noiseless Powder. Hirsch invented it;
Hirsch wrote this note about it. This note is in German, and was found
in a German's pocket. `Tell the man the formula for powder is in
grey envelope in first drawer to the left of Secretary's desk,
War Office, in red ink. He must be careful. P.H.'"

He rattled short sentences like a quick-firing gun, but he was plainly
the sort of man who is either mad or right. The mass of the crowd
was Nationalist, and already in threatening uproar; and a minority
of equally angry Intellectuals, led by Armagnac and Brun, only made
the majority more militant.

"If this is a military secret," shouted Brun, "why do you yell
about it in the street?"

"I will tell you why I do!" roared Dubosc above the roaring crowd.
"I went to this man in straight and civil style. If he had any explanation
it could have been given in complete confidence. He refuses to explain.
He refers me to two strangers in a cafe as to two flunkeys.
He has thrown me out of the house, but I am going back into it,
with the people of Paris behind me!"

A shout seemed to shake the very facade of mansions and
two stones flew, one breaking a window above the balcony.
The indignant Colonel plunged once more under the archway and was heard
crying and thundering inside. Every instant the human sea grew wider
and wider; it surged up against the rails and steps of the traitor's house;
it was already certain that the place would be burst into like
the Bastille, when the broken french window opened and Dr Hirsch came out
on the balcony. For an instant the fury half turned to laughter;
for he was an absurd figure in such a scene. His long bare neck and
sloping shoulders were the shape of a champagne bottle, but that was
the only festive thing about him. His coat hung on him as on a peg;
he wore his carrot-coloured hair long and weedy; his cheeks and chin
were fully fringed with one of those irritating beards that begin
far from the mouth. He was very pale, and he wore blue spectacles.

Livid as he was, he spoke with a sort of prim decision,
so that the mob fell silent in the middle of his third sentence.

"...only two things to say to you now. The first is to my foes,
the second to my friends. To my foes I say: It is true I will not
meet M. Dubosc, though he is storming outside this very room.
It is true I have asked two other men to confront him for me.
And I will tell you why! Because I will not and must not see him--
because it would be against all rules of dignity and honour to see him.
Before I am triumphantly cleared before a court, there is
another arbitration this gentleman owes me as a gentleman,
and in referring him to my seconds I am strictly--"

Armagnac and Brun were waving their hats wildly, and even
the Doctor's enemies roared applause at this unexpected defiance.
Once more a few sentences were inaudible, but they could hear him say:
"To my friends--I myself should always prefer weapons purely intellectual,
and to these an evolved humanity will certainly confine itself.
But our own most precious truth is the fundamental force of matter
and heredity. My books are successful; my theories are unrefuted;
but I suffer in politics from a prejudice almost physical in the French.
I cannot speak like Clemenceau and Deroulede, for their words are like
echoes of their pistols. The French ask for a duellist as the English
ask for a sportsman. Well, I give my proofs: I will pay
this barbaric bribe, and then go back to reason for the rest of my life."

Two men were instantly found in the crowd itself to offer
their services to Colonel Dubosc, who came out presently, satisfied.
One was the common soldier with the coffee, who said simply:
"I will act for you, sir. I am the Duc de Valognes." The other was
the big man, whom his friend the priest sought at first to dissuade;
and then walked away alone.

In the early evening a light dinner was spread at the back of
the Cafe Charlemagne. Though unroofed by any glass or gilt plaster,
the guests were nearly all under a delicate and irregular roof of leaves;
for the ornamental trees stood so thick around and among the tables
as to give something of the dimness and the dazzle of a small orchard.
At one of the central tables a very stumpy little priest sat
in complete solitude, and applied himself to a pile of whitebait
with the gravest sort of enjoyment. His daily living being very plain,
he had a peculiar taste for sudden and isolated luxuries; he was
an abstemious epicure. He did not lift his eyes from his plate,
round which red pepper, lemons, brown bread and butter, etc.,
were rigidly ranked, until a tall shadow fell across the table,
and his friend Flambeau sat down opposite. Flambeau was gloomy.

"I'm afraid I must chuck this business," said he heavily.
"I'm all on the side of the French soldiers like Dubosc,
and I'm all against the French atheists like Hirsch; but it seems to me
in this case we've made a mistake. The Duke and I thought it as well
to investigate the charge, and I must say I'm glad we did."

"Is the paper a forgery, then?" asked the priest

"That's just the odd thing," replied Flambeau. "It's exactly like
Hirsch's writing, and nobody can point out any mistake in it.
But it wasn't written by Hirsch. If he's a French patriot
he didn't write it, because it gives information to Germany.
And if he's a German spy he didn't write it, well--because it doesn't
give information to Germany."

"You mean the information is wrong?" asked Father Brown.

"Wrong," replied the other, "and wrong exactly where Dr Hirsch
would have been right--about the hiding-place of his own secret formula
in his own official department. By favour of Hirsch and the authorities,
the Duke and I have actually been allowed to inspect the secret drawer
at the War Office where the Hirsch formula is kept. We are the only people
who have ever known it, except the inventor himself and the Minister
for War; but the Minister permitted it to save Hirsch from fighting.
After that we really can't support Dubosc if his revelation
is a mare's nest."

"And it is?" asked Father Brown.

"It is," said his friend gloomily. "It is a clumsy forgery
by somebody who knew nothing of the real hiding-place. It says the paper
is in the cupboard on the right of the Secretary's desk. As a fact
the cupboard with the secret drawer is some way to the left of the desk.
It says the grey envelope contains a long document written in red ink.
It isn't written in red ink, but in ordinary black ink.
It's manifestly absurd to say that Hirsch can have made a mistake
about a paper that nobody knew of but himself; or can have tried
to help a foreign thief by telling him to fumble in the wrong drawer.
I think we must chuck it up and apologize to old Carrots."

Father Brown seemed to cogitate; he lifted a little whitebait
on his fork. "You are sure the grey envelope was in the left cupboard?"
he asked.

"Positive," replied Flambeau. "The grey envelope--
it was a white envelope really--was--"

Father Brown put down the small silver fish and the fork and
stared across at his companion. "What?" he asked, in an altered voice.

"Well, what?" repeated Flambeau, eating heartily.

"It was not grey," said the priest. "Flambeau, you frighten me."

"What the deuce are you frightened of?"

"I'm frightened of a white envelope," said the other seriously,
"If it had only just been grey! Hang it all, it might as well
have been grey. But if it was white, the whole business is black.
The Doctor has been dabbling in some of the old brimstone after all."

"But I tell you he couldn't have written such a note!"
cried Flambeau. "The note is utterly wrong about the facts.
And innocent or guilty, Dr Hirsch knew all about the facts."

"The man who wrote that note knew all about the facts,"
said his clerical companion soberly. "He could never have
got 'em so wrong without knowing about 'em. You have to know
an awful lot to be wrong on every subject--like the devil."

"Do you mean--?"

"I mean a man telling lies on chance would have told some of the truth,"
said his friend firmly. "Suppose someone sent you to find a house
with a green door and a blue blind, with a front garden but no back garden,
with a dog but no cat, and where they drank coffee but not tea.
You would say if you found no such house that it was all made up.
But I say no. I say if you found a house where the door was blue and
the blind green, where there was a back garden and no front garden,
where cats were common and dogs instantly shot, where tea was drunk
in quarts and coffee forbidden--then you would know you had
found the house. The man must have known that particular house
to be so accurately inaccurate."

"But what could it mean?" demanded the diner opposite.

"I can't conceive," said Brown; "I don't understand this Hirsch
affair at all. As long as it was only the left drawer instead of
the right, and red ink instead of black, I thought it must be the
chance blunders of a forger, as you say. But three is a mystical number;
it finishes things. It finishes this. That the direction about
the drawer, the colour of ink, the colour of envelope, should none of
them be right by accident, that can't be a coincidence. It wasn't."

"What was it, then? Treason?" asked Flambeau, resuming his dinner.

"I don't know that either," answered Brown, with a face
of blank bewilderment. "The only thing I can think of....
Well, I never understood that Dreyfus case. I can always grasp
moral evidence easier than the other sorts. I go by a man's eyes and voice,
don't you know, and whether his family seems happy, and by what
subjects he chooses--and avoids. Well, I was puzzled in the Dreyfus case.
Not by the horrible things imputed both ways; I know (though it's not
modern to say so) that human nature in the highest places is still capable
of being Cenci or Borgia. No--, what puzzled me was the sincerity
of both parties. I don't mean the political parties; the rank and file
are always roughly honest, and often duped. I mean the persons
of the play. I mean the conspirators, if they were conspirators.
I mean the traitor, if he was a traitor. I mean the men who must have
known the truth. Now Dreyfus went on like a man who knew he was
a wronged man. And yet the French statesmen and soldiers went on
as if they knew he wasn't a wronged man but simply a wrong 'un.
I don't mean they behaved well; I mean they behaved as if they were sure.
I can't describe these things; I know what I mean."

"I wish I did," said his friend. "And what has it to do
with old Hirsch?"

"Suppose a person in a position of trust," went on the priest,
"began to give the enemy information because it was false information.
Suppose he even thought he was saving his country by misleading the foreigner.
Suppose this brought him into spy circles, and little loans were made to him,
and little ties tied on to him. Suppose he kept up his contradictory
position in a confused way by never telling the foreign spies the truth,
but letting it more and more be guessed. The better part of him
(what was left of it) would still say: `I have not helped the enemy;
I said it was the left drawer.' The meaner part of him would already
be saying: `But they may have the sense to see that means the right.'
I think it is psychologically possible--in an enlightened age, you know."

"It may be psychologically possible," answered Flambeau,
"and it certainly would explain Dreyfus being certain he was wronged
and his judges being sure he was guilty. But it won't wash historically,
because Dreyfus's document (if it was his document) was literally correct."

"I wasn't thinking of Dreyfus," said Father Brown.

Silence had sunk around them with the emptying of the tables;
it was already late, though the sunlight still clung to everything,
as if accidentally entangled in the trees. In the stillness Flambeau
shifted his seat sharply--making an isolated and echoing noise--
and threw his elbow over the angle of it. "Well," he said, rather harshly,
"if Hirsch is not better than a timid treason-monger..."

"You mustn't be too hard on them," said Father Brown gently.
"It's not entirely their fault; but they have no instincts.
I mean those things that make a woman refuse to dance with a man
or a man to touch an investment. They've been taught that
it's all a matter of degree."

"Anyhow," cried Flambeau impatiently, "he's not a patch
on my principal; and I shall go through with it. Old Dubosc may be
a bit mad, but he's a sort of patriot after all."

Father Brown continued to consume whitebait.

Something in the stolid way he did so caused Flambeau's
fierce black eyes to ramble over his companion afresh. "What's the matter
with you?" Flambeau demanded. "Dubosc's all right in that way.
You don't doubt him?"

"My friend," said the small priest, laying down his knife and fork
in a kind of cold despair, "I doubt everything. Everything, I mean,
that has happened today. I doubt the whole story, though it has been
acted before my face. I doubt every sight that my eyes have seen
since morning. There is something in this business quite different
from the ordinary police mystery where one man is more or less lying
and the other man more or less telling the truth. Here both men....
Well! I've told you the only theory I can think of that could
satisfy anybody. It doesn't satisfy me."

"Nor me either," replied Flambeau frowning, while the other
went on eating fish with an air of entire resignation. "If all you
can suggest is that notion of a message conveyed by contraries,
I call it uncommonly clever, but...well, what would you call it?"

"I should call it thin," said the priest promptly.
"I should call it uncommonly thin. But that's the queer thing
about the whole business. The lie is like a schoolboy's.
There are only three versions, Dubosc's and Hirsch's and that fancy of mine.
Either that note was written by a French officer to ruin a French official;
or it was written by the French official to help German officers;
or it was written by the French official to mislead German officers.
Very well. You'd expect a secret paper passing between such people,
officials or officers, to look quite different from that.
You'd expect, probably a cipher, certainly abbreviations;
most certainly scientific and strictly professional terms.
But this thing's elaborately simple, like a penny dreadful:
`In the purple grotto you will find the golden casket.' It looks as if...
as if it were meant to be seen through at once."

Almost before they could take it in a short figure in French uniform
had walked up to their table like the wind, and sat down
with a sort of thump.

"I have extraordinary news," said the Duc de Valognes.
"I have just come from this Colonel of ours. He is packing up
to leave the country, and he asks us to make his excuses sur le terrain."

"What?" cried Flambeau, with an incredulity quite frightful--

"Yes," said the Duke gruffly; "then and there--before everybody--
when the swords are drawn. And you and I have to do it while
he is leaving the country."

"But what can this mean?" cried Flambeau. "He can't be afraid of
that little Hirsch! Confound it!" he cried, in a kind of rational rage;
"nobody could be afraid of Hirsch!"

"I believe it's some plot!" snapped Valognes--"some plot of
the Jews and Freemasons. It's meant to work up glory for Hirsch..."

The face of Father Brown was commonplace, but curiously contented;
it could shine with ignorance as well as with knowledge.
But there was always one flash when the foolish mask fell,
and the wise mask fitted itself in its place; and Flambeau,
who knew his friend, knew that his friend had suddenly understood.
Brown said nothing, but finished his plate of fish.

"Where did you last see our precious Colonel?" asked Flambeau,

"He's round at the Hotel Saint Louis by the Elysee,
where we drove with him. He's packing up, I tell you."

"Will he be there still, do you think?" asked Flambeau,
frowning at the table.

"I don't think he can get away yet," replied the Duke;
"he's packing to go a long journey..."

"No," said Father Brown, quite simply, but suddenly standing up,
"for a very short journey. For one of the shortest, in fact.
But we may still be in time to catch him if we go there in a motor-cab."

Nothing more could be got out of him until the cab swept
round the corner by the Hotel Saint Louis, where they got out,
and he led the party up a side lane already in deep shadow with
the growing dusk. Once, when the Duke impatiently asked whether
Hirsch was guilty of treason or not, he answered rather absently:
"No; only of ambition--like Caesar." Then he somewhat inconsequently added:
"He lives a very lonely life; he has had to do everything for himself."

"Well, if he's ambitious, he ought to be satisfied now,"
said Flambeau rather bitterly. "All Paris will cheer him
now our cursed Colonel has turned tail."

"Don't talk so loud," said Father Brown, lowering his voice,
"your cursed Colonel is just in front."

The other two started and shrank farther back into the shadow
of the wall, for the sturdy figure of their runaway principal
could indeed be seen shuffling along in the twilight in front,
a bag in each hand. He looked much the same as when they first saw him,
except that he had changed his picturesque mountaineering knickers
for a conventional pair of trousers. It was clear he was already
escaping from the hotel.

The lane down which they followed him was one of those that
seem to be at the back of things, and look like the wrong side
of the stage scenery. A colourless, continuous wall ran down
one flank of it, interrupted at intervals by dull-hued and
dirt-stained doors, all shut fast and featureless save for
the chalk scribbles of some passing gamin. The tops of trees,
mostly rather depressing evergreens, showed at intervals over
the top of the wall, and beyond them in the grey and purple gloaming
could be seen the back of some long terrace of tall Parisian houses,
really comparatively close, but somehow looking as inaccessible
as a range of marble mountains. On the other side of the lane ran
the high gilt railings of a gloomy park.

Flambeau was looking round him in rather a weird way.
"Do you know," he said, "there is something about this place that--"

"Hullo!" called out the Duke sharply; "that fellow's disappeared.
Vanished, like a blasted fairy!"

"He has a key," explained their clerical friend. "He's only gone
into one of these garden doors," and as he spoke they heard one of
the dull wooden doors close again with a click in front of them.

Flambeau strode up to the door thus shut almost in his face,
and stood in front of it for a moment, biting his black moustache
in a fury of curiosity. Then he threw up his long arms and
swung himself aloft like a monkey and stood on the top of the wall,
his enormous figure dark against the purple sky, like the dark tree-tops.

The Duke looked at the priest. "Dubosc's escape is
more elaborate than we thought," he said; "but I suppose he is
escaping from France."

"He is escaping from everywhere," answered Father Brown.

Valognes's eyes brightened, but his voice sank. "Do you mean
suicide?" he asked.

"You will not find his body," replied the other.

A kind of cry came from Flambeau on the wall above.
"My God," he exclaimed in French, "I know what this place is now!
Why, it's the back of the street where old Hirsch lives. I thought
I could recognize the back of a house as well as the back of a man."

"And Dubosc's gone in there!" cried the Duke, smiting his hip.
"Why, they'll meet after all!" And with sudden Gallic vivacity
he hopped up on the wall beside Flambeau and sat there positively
kicking his legs with excitement. The priest alone remained below,
leaning against the wall, with his back to the whole theatre of events,
and looking wistfully across to the park palings and the twinkling,
twilit trees.

The Duke, however stimulated, had the instincts of an aristocrat,
and desired rather to stare at the house than to spy on it;
but Flambeau, who had the instincts of a burglar (and a detective),
had already swung himself from the wall into the fork of a straggling tree
from which he could crawl quite close to the only illuminated window
in the back of the high dark house. A red blind had been pulled down
over the light, but pulled crookedly, so that it gaped on one side,
and by risking his neck along a branch that looked as treacherous
as a twig, Flambeau could just see Colonel Dubosc walking about
in a brilliantly-lighted and luxurious bedroom. But close as Flambeau was
to the house, he heard the words of his colleagues by the wall,
and repeated them in a low voice.

"Yes, they will meet now after all!"

"They will never meet," said Father Brown. "Hirsch was right
when he said that in such an affair the principals must not meet.
Have you read a queer psychological story by Henry James,
of two persons who so perpetually missed meeting each other by accident
that they began to feel quite frightened of each other, and to think
it was fate? This is something of the kind, but more curious."

"There are people in Paris who will cure them of such morbid fancies,"
said Valognes vindictively. "They will jolly well have to meet
if we capture them and force them to fight."

"They will not meet on the Day of Judgement," said the priest.
"If God Almighty held the truncheon of the lists, if St Michael
blew the trumpet for the swords to cross--even then, if one of them
stood ready, the other would not come."

"Oh, what does all this mysticism mean?" cried the Duc de Valognes,
impatiently; "why on earth shouldn't they meet like other people?"

"They are the opposite of each other," said Father Brown,
with a queer kind of smile. "They contradict each other.
They cancel out, so to speak."

He continued to gaze at the darkening trees opposite, but Valognes
turned his head sharply at a suppressed exclamation from Flambeau.
That investigator, peering into the lighted room, had just seen
the Colonel, after a pace or two, proceed to take his coat off.
Flambeau's first thought was that this really looked like a fight;
but he soon dropped the thought for another. The solidity and
squareness of Dubosc's chest and shoulders was all a powerful piece
of padding and came off with his coat. In his shirt and trousers
he was a comparatively slim gentleman, who walked across the bedroom to
the bathroom with no more pugnacious purpose than that of washing himself.
He bent over a basin, dried his dripping hands and face on a towel,
and turned again so that the strong light fell on his face.
His brown complexion had gone, his big black moustache had gone;
he--was clean-shaven and very pate. Nothing remained of the Colonel
but his bright, hawk-like, brown eyes. Under the wall Father Brown
was going on in heavy meditation, as if to himself.

"It is all just like what I was saying to Flambeau.
These opposites won't do. They don't work. They don't fight.
If it's white instead of black, and solid instead of liquid,
and so on all along the line--then there's something wrong, Monsieur,
there's something wrong. One of these men is fair and the other dark,
one stout and the other slim, one strong and the other weak.
One has a moustache and no beard, so you can't see his mouth;
the other has a beard and no moustache, so you can't see his chin.
One has hair cropped to his skull, but a scarf to hide his neck;
the other has low shirt-collars, but long hair to bide his skull.
It's all too neat and correct, Monsieur, and there's something wrong.
Things made so opposite are things that cannot quarrel.
Wherever the one sticks out the other sinks in. Like a face and a mask,
like a lock and a key..."

Flambeau was peering into the house with a visage as white as a sheet.
The occupant of the room was standing with his back to him,
but in front of a looking-glass, and had already fitted round his face
a sort of framework of rank red hair, hanging disordered from the head and
clinging round the jaws and chin while leaving the mocking mouth uncovered.
Seen thus in the glass the white face looked like the face of Judas
laughing horribly and surrounded by capering flames of hell.
For a spasm Flambeau saw the fierce, red-brown eyes dancing,
then they were covered with a pair of blue spectacles. Slipping on
a loose black coat, the figure vanished towards the front of the house.
A few moments later a roar of popular applause from the street beyond
announced that Dr Hirsch had once more appeared upon the balcony.

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