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The Story of Grettir The Strong by Translated by Eirikr Magnusson and William Morris

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Willowdale, near Asgeirsriver, the manor of the Madpate family. G.
Vigfusson, in Biskupa Soegur, I. 61, note 2. It seems there is no need
of setting aside the clear statement of our saga, that the As was As
in Waterdale (see Index), and not Valdaras in Willowdale at
all, or that Thorvald had, by 1013, moved up to the neighbouring
country-side of Waterdale, and settled among the kin of his
great-grandmother.

P. 114, 1. 1. 'The men of Meals,' is a close translation of the
original, which, however, is incorrect; for the men of Meals were
Grettir's kin-in-law, and natural allies. The saga means the men of
Meal, Kormak and his followers, and the original should be either,
eir Mel-menn, or Mels-menn, or eir Kormakr fra Mel.

P. 129, 1. 10, 11. We have purposely altered the text from: en u
oeruggr i einangri, i.e., 'but thou stout in danger,' into:
en o, i.e., 'but stout in danger none-the-less.' The former
reading seems barely to give any sense, the last a natural and the
required one.

P. 169. Hallmund. Our saga is one among the historic sagas of Iceland
which deals with traditions of ancient belief in the spirits of the
unknown regions of the land that are interested in the well-being of
the mere men who dwell near them. Hallmund and the giant Thorir are
the representatives of these powers in our saga. Of these Hallmund is
the more interesting of the two, both for his human sympathies, his
tragic end, and the poetry ascribed to him. At one time or other he
has had a great name in the Icelandic folk-lore among the spirits of
the land, the so-called land wights (land-voetir), and there is
still existing a poem of ancient type, the refrain of which is closely
similar to that of Grettir's song on Hallmund, but which is stated to
be by some cave-wight that lived in a deep and gloomy cavern somewhere
in Deepfirth, on the north side of Broadfirth. In the so-called
Bergbuaattr or cave-dweller's tale (Edited by G. Vigfusson in
Nordiske Old-skrifter, xxvii., pp. 123-128, and 140-143, Copenhagen,
1860), this song is said to have been heard by two men, who, on their
way to church, had lost their road, and were overtaken by the darkness
of night, and, in order to escape straying too far out of their way,
sought shelter under the lee of a sheer rock which chanced to be on
their way. They soon found a mouth of a cave where they knew not that
any cave was to be looked for, whereupon one of the wayfarers set up a
cross-mark in the door of the cave, and then with his fellow-traveller
sat down on two stones at the mouth of the cave, as they did not dare
to risk themselves too far in the gloomy abode away from the cross.
When the first third part of the night was spent they heard something
come along from within the cave doorwards out to them.[20] They signed
themselves with the sign of the cross, and prayed God's mercy to be
on them, for they thought the doings within the deep of the cavern now
grew big enough. On looking into the darkness they saw a sight like
unto two full-moons, or huge targets, with some monstrous figure
(unreadable in the MS.) between them. They thought this was nothing
but two eyes, and that nowise narrow of face might he be who bore such
torches. Next they heard a chanting of a monstrous kind and in a big
voice. A lay there was sung of twelve staves, with the final refrain
of each twice repeated.

[Footnote 20: Innan eptir, as here rendered, is the reading of
the MS. from which Bergbua pattr is edited. Innar eptir, as the
aforesaid edition of the tale has it, is wrong.]

The poem seems to be a death-song over the cave-kin of the country by
the new change of thought brought in by Christianity.

P. 189. 'Grettir lay out that summer on Madderdale-heath, and in
sundry places, and at whiles he was at Reek-heath.' A corroboration
of the saga has been clearly set forth by the discovery of a
Grettir's-lair, in Axefirth-peak, in 1862. True the saga passes over
Grettir's doings on these vast eastern wildernesses, but tradition has
preserved the name for the place, and it shows by its construction and
position that it must have been constructed by one skilled in choosing
a good fighting stand, and a good and wide view at the same time. An
Icelandic farmer has thus given an accurate and reliable description
of Grettir's lair:

'In the summer of 1850, when I came north to Axefirth, I heard talk
of a Grettir's lair upon Axefirth-peak.... Many who had seen it made
a slight matter of it, which brought me to think it must have few
peculiarities of antiquarian interest to show. But on the 7th of
September, this summer (1862), I went with the rape-ruler Arni Jonsson
of Wood-stead to inspect the lair. Walking up to it from the level
ground below took us three minutes. The lair stands in the lower part
of a slip of stones beneath some sheer rocks between a sandstone rock,
called the carline, and the stone slip from the peak. It is built
up of stones, straight as a line, and runs, 4-3/4 ells in length, 10
inches broad, and is, within walls, 7/8 of an ell deep. The half of it
is deftly covered in with flat stones, the longest of which are 2 ells
9 inches long, and about half an ell in thickness, and a little more
in breadth. Small thin fragments of stone are wedged in between these
where their junctures do not close tight, and so firmly are they
fixed, that without instruments they may not be removed. One stone in
the south wall is so large that we deemed it fully the task of
from four to six men to move it when loose. The north side wall is
beginning to give way, where the room is covered in. On the outside
it is overgrown with black scurf and grey moss. The head end we deemed
was the one which is turned to the rock and is not covered in,
and evidently has been open from the beginning. Here the floor
is overgrown with moss, grass, thyme, ferns, crow-foot, and
lady's-mantle. In all likelihood the inmate has closed that part of
the room in with hides, when needful. On sitting up, all who went to
and fro on the road below, must have been within view; not only those
who came from the north of Foxplain (Melrakkasletta) and Nupa-sveit,
but also far toward the north he had a view even unto the open sea,
nay, even unto Budluga-haven. Looking southwards, he must have seen
all who came up from the outer firth; for from the lair there is a
clear view even unto Burn-river, past which the high-road goes. A
popular tradition says, too, that all who must needs pass this way,
when Grettir was in the Peak, had taken at last to going over the
top of the Peak, where there was no road, but the sheep-wilds of the
Axefirthers. The lair-bider, even if he was set on by an overwhelming
force, was not easily won, and least of all a man of such prowess as
Grettir, except by shot; for he might at a moment's notice take his
stand in the rock above his head, where one side only gives the chance
of an onset, and where there is an ample supply of loose stones, large
and small, on the Peak side of the rock to defend oneself; on three
sides sheer rocks hem in the position, and those overhead are many
times the height of a man's.'

P. 208. Knave-game. Perhaps the truer rendering would have been
'nut-game,' if indeed 'hnet tafl' here stands not for 'hnef-tafl,'
as we at first supposed. It is undoubtedly true that among the early
games of Iceland the 'hettafl,' 'hnottafl,' was a distinct kind of
game, as was also the 'hneftafl,' 'hnefatafl,' knave-game. If we
follow the text as it stands, the game that Thorbiorn played is
supposed to have borne some resemblance to what is now called in
Iceland 'refskak,' fox-play, anglice 'fox and geese,' the aim of
which is, by twelve pieces, called lambs, to bring the fox into such a
position as to leave him no place to move, whichso way he turns.

P. 240. Pied-belly we call the Ram, although the saga seems to mean
that he was called Autumn-belly, which is a name of little, if of
any, sense at all. We suppose that haus-moegottr, p. 169, and
haust-magi, p. 184, is one and the same thing, the t
having spuriously crept into the text from a scribe's inadvertence.

P. 243 (cpr. 207, 225, 272). 'In such wise Grettir lost his life, &c.'
The hardest thing to account for, or to bring to an intelligible issue
in Grettir's saga, is the incongruity between the statements as to his
age at his death and the number of years of his outlawry, as compared
with the truthful account of the events told in the saga itself. From
the time when Grettir slew his first man, all the events of the
saga may be traced clearly year for year up to his death, and their
truthfulness is borne out whensoever they chance to run parallel to
events mentioned in other trustworthy sagas, and they fall in with the
right time nearly without an exception. But the statement on the page
referred to above, that he was fourteen years old when he slew Skeggi,
that he was twenty when he dealt with Glam; twenty-five when he fell
into outlawry, and forty-four when he was slain, is utterly confuted
by the chronology of the saga itself.

These numbers given above are obviously made to fall in with the story
in page 225 about the talk of the time of his outlawry at the Thing.
The question is stated to have been this: whether he had been a
fraction of the twentieth year an outlaw, his friends hoping that in
such case a part might count pro toto. But the truth of the
matter was that he had neither been an outlaw for a fraction of the
twentieth year, nor even for anything like nineteen years. He was
outlawed at the Thing held in 1016, his year of outlawry dated from
Thing to Thing; this talk befell in 1031, consequently he had been
full fifteen years and no fraction of a year in outlawry. The story,
therefore, of the twenty years, or nineteen years and a fraction, of
outlawry falls utterly to the ground when brought to the test of the
actual facts as recorded in the saga.

But, despite of this, it is not to be supposed that this episode at
the Thing in 1031 is brought in at random and without any cause. There
are two obvious reasons for assigning twenty years to the length of
Grettir's outlawry, and for bringing into the tale a discussion on
that subject just where it is done. The one we may call the reason of
traditional belief, the other the reason of dramatic effect. Grettir
was indisputably for all reasons the greatest of Icelandic outlaws,
and the fond imagination of his biographers at all times urged them
to give the longest endurance to the time of his outlawry above all
outlaws, without inquiring closely as to whether it agreed with
the saga itself or not. The other, or the dramatic motive, lies
in bringing in the discussion on this long outlawry just at this
particular Thing of 1031; for it was obviously the teller's object to
suggest to the reader the hope of the great outlaw's legal restoration
to the cherished society of man just before the falling of the
crushing blow, in order to give an enhanced tragic interest to his
end, and he undoubtedly succeeds in doing this. To these reasons,
besides others less obvious, we imagine this main inconsistency in
Grettir's saga is to be ascribed.

Nevertheless, it is worth observing that blunders of scribes may have
in a measure been at work here. If we are not mistaken most of the
existing MSS. of our saga state that when he fell (p. 243) 'he was one
winter short of--var hanum vetri fatt a'--whatever number
of years they give as his age. And we venture the suggestion
that originally the passage ran thus: var hanum vetri fatt a half
iv{tugum},[21] i.e., he lacked one winter of thirty-five years,
when he was slain. If a subsequent scribe committed the easy blunder
of dropping I before V, the reading of our original (Edition, 53)
would be the natural result, and an offspring of that same blunder
would also as easily be the other reading, common to one class of the
Grettir MSS.: var hanum vetri fatt i v{tugum} or i hinum v. tug, by
dropping the syllable 'half.'

[Footnote 21: A man of twenty, thirty, forty, &c., is in the Icelandic
expressed by the adjective tvitugr, pritugr, fertugr; a man
twenty-five, thirty-five, &c., is half-pritugr, half-fertugr,
&c.; the units beyond the tens are expressed by the particle
um, a man of twenty-one, thirty-seven, or forty-nine, is said
to have einn (i.e., vetr. winter) um = beyond, tvitugt,
sjoe um ritugt, niu um fertugt, &c.]

If the whole passage on page 243, beginning with the words quoted in
the commencement of this note, be not indeed a later interpolation, we
believe that all that follows the words, 'till the time when he dealt
with Glam, the Thrall,' must, indeed, be taken as an interpolation of
later commentators.

Our suggestion recommends itself in this at least, that it brings
about full harmony between the statements, here treated of, and the
saga itself, for when Grettir left the land in 1011 he was fourteen
years of age, and twenty years later, or 1031, he fell. How far his
age thus given agrees or not with the decrepitude of his father, who
died in 1015, having been apparently already a bedridden man for some
time, is a matter of itself, and need not affect the accuracy of our
suggestion, which, however, we only put forth as a conjecture, not
having within reach the MSS. of Grettir's saga. A critical examination
of these might, perhaps, allow of a more positive discourse on
this vexed point, which to all commentators on Grettir has hitherto
remained an insoluble riddle.

P. 251, 1. 12. The original makes Asdis daughter of Skeggi the
Short-handed. This is here corrected agreeably to Landnama, and other
records of her family.

INDICES.

INDEX I.

* * * * *

PERSONAL NAMES.

Air (Loptr), alias Hallmund, the mountain sprite, 160, 161, 162
Aldis Konal's-daughter, called A. from Barra, 5, 18, 19
Aldis, Ufeigh Grettir's daughter, 5, 27
Alf a-Dales, 5, 27
Ali, an house-carle of Thorbiorn Oxmain's, 130, 131, 132
Alof Ingolf's-daughter, wife of Eric Snare, 20
Angle. See Thorbiorn Angle.
Ari Marson, 80
Arinbiorn. See Arnbiorn.
Arnbiorn, kinsman of Thorfinn of Haramsey, Grettir's companion, 70, 71
Arngeir Berseson, father of Biorn Hitdale-champion, 170
Arni Jonsson, 277
Arnor Thorbiornson, 140-143
Arnor Thordson, called Earls' skald (Jarlaskald), 178, 179, 180
Arnor Thorodson, called Hay-nose (heynef, or hynef, Landnama), 89
Arnora, Thord Yeller's daughter, 225
Asa, Ufeigh Grettir's daughter, first wife of Onund Treefoot, 5, 6,
18, 19
Asbiorn, Ufeigh Grettir's son, 5
Asbrand Thorbrandson, 129
Asdis, Bard Jokulson's daughter, the mother of Grettir Asmundson,27,
28, 30, 33, 36, 40, 112, 133, 139, 142, 143, 204, 205, 246,
247, 251
Asdis Gamli's-daughter, 251
Asgeir Audunson the older, called Madpate (son of Audun Skokul,
al. Onund Treefoot), 20, 79, 83
Asgeir Audunson the younger, grandson of the preceding, called Madpate
34, 77, 83, 151
Asgrim Ellida-Grimson, 16, 159
Asgrim Ondottson, 13, 14, 15, 16
Asmund from Asmund's-peak, 25
Asmund Ondottson, 13, 14, 15, 16
Asmund Thorgrimson, called the Greyhaired (haerulangr), the father of
Grettir the Strong, 25-27, 28-33, 35-36, 39, 40, 77-79, 81, 82,
90, 112, 113, 125, 126, 273
Asmund Ufeigh's-son, called the Beardless (skegglauss), 5
Asny Vestar's-daughter, wife of Ufeigh Grettir, 5
Asta Gudbrand's-daughter, mother of Olaf the Saint, King of Norway, 1
Asvor, Ufeigh Grettir's daughter, 5
Atli Asmundson, Grettir's brother, 28, 29, 30, 36, 83, 87, 88, 89, 90,
91, 92, 111, 112, 125, 127, 128, 129, 130-133, 135, 139, 140, 143,
144, 150, 162
Atli Ulfson, called the Red (hinn rauethi), 80
Aud (alias Unnr) the Deeply Wealthy,18, 19, 79
Audun, Asgeir Madpate's son, 83
Audun Asgeir's-son, of Audunstead, 34, 35, 38, 83, 84, 85, 86, 104
Audun Goaty (geit), an Earl in Norway, 13, 14
Audun Skokul (skoekull), 20
Audun, goodman of Windham in Haramsey, 46, 47, 48

Balk Blaengson of Sotaness, 1, 4, 10, 170
Bard Jokulson,27, 104
Bard, the mate of Haflidi's ship, 40
Bardi (al. Slaying-Bardi) Gudmundson, of Asbiornsness, 85, 86, 87, 92,
93, 94, 95, 104
Bessi Balkson, called the Godless (goethlauss), 170
Bessi Skald-Torfa's-son, 34, 71, 73, 74, 75
Biarni, See Biorn, the settler of Biornfirth.
Biarni of Dog-dale, 81
Biarni of Jorvi in Flysia-Wharf, 179, 277
Biarni Thorsteinson, the Sage (hinn spaki), 11
Biorn Arngeirson, called Hitdale-Champion, 170, 171, 172, 173, 181, 182
Biorn, settler of Biornfirth, 17, 273
Biorn, kinsman of Thorkel in Salft, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69
Biorn of Meadness, 208, 237, 238, 245
Biorn Rolfson, father of Eyvind the Eastman, 3, 5, 10, 11, 12
Biorn Ufeigh's-son, 208
Bloeng of Sotaness, 1
Bodmod, 25
Bodvar of Bodvar's-knolls, 89
Bork the Fat, 201
Botulf, grandfather of Thorir of Garth, 115
Brand, a fisherman, one of Thorgeir Bottleback's house-carles, 20
Brand, one of Thorbiorn Angle's followers at the slaying of Grettir, 238
Bundle-Torfi, 81

Crow-Hreidar. See Hreida.

Dalla Thorvald's-daughter, wife of Bishop Isleif, 77
Dromund. See Thorstein Dromund.

Egil Audunson, 104
Eid Skeggison, from the Ridge,184
Eilif Ketilson, 5
Einar, a bonder in Jadar, 122
Einar of Combe, 22
Einar Olvirson, 5
Ellida-Grim Asgrimson, 16, 159
Eric Alefain (oelfuss), of Sorreldale, 14, 15
Eric Hakonson, Earl of Norway, 50, 51
Eric Hroaldson, of God-dales, 208, 237
Eric Snare (snara), 17, 20, 23
Eric Starrison, 208
Eyulf, brother-in-law of Slaying-Bardi, 94
Eyolf of Fairwood, 179, 181
Eyulf Egilson, 104
Eyulf Gudmundson, 104
Eyvind Biornson, called the Eastman (austmaethr), 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10
Eyvind (Herraudson), settler of Eyvind's-firth, 20

Finnbogi Thorgeirson, 179, 180
Flosi Ericson, of Arnes, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25
Frederick the Bishop, 26
Fridgerd Thord's-daughter, 79
Fridmund of Shady-vale, 95
Frodi, the King, 5

Gamli Skeggison, 251
Gamli, the Vendlander or Widelander (Viethlendingr, Vindlendingr)
29, 90, 273
Gamli Thorhallson, of Meals, 29, 90, 126, 128, 143, 144, 151, 246,
248, 250, 273
Gaut Sleitason, 82, 83
Geirlaug, goodwife of Broadlair-stead, 202
Geirmund Helskin (heljarskinn), king of Hordaland, 2, 4
Geirmund Hiuka-timber, 25
Gerd Bodvar's-daughter, 89
Gerpir, 25
Gisli Thorsteinson, 172, 174, 175, 176, 177
Glam from Sylgsdales, afterwards a ghost, 96-110, 243
Glum Uspakson, 29, 128, 246
Grettir Asmundson, called the Strong, 28-33, 34-35, 36-39, 40-45,
46-59, 60-62, 63-76, 83-87, 88-89, 90-91, 92-94, 95, 104-110,
112-114, 116-121, 122-123, 124-125, 133-134, 135-140, 141-143,
144, 145-148, 149, 150, 151, 152-157, 158-159, 159-162, 163-164,
165-167, 168-170, 171, 173-178, 179-180, 181-183, 187, 189-191,
192-199, 200, 201, 202-203, 204-207, 209-210, 210-212, 213-217,
218, 219-220, 220-222, 223, 224, 225, 226, 228-229, 230, 231, 232,
233-235, 238-243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 250, 251, 252, 253,
254, 272
Grim Gamlison, 29
Grim Kolbiornson, a hersir in Norway, 5, 11, 12, 13, 14
Grim the Northlander, an outlaw and hired assassin, 163, 164
Grim Thorhallson, of Thorhall-stead in Shady-vale, 95
Grim Thorhallson, grandson of the preceding, 95
Grim Thorhallson of Meals, afterwards of Gilsbank, 90, 126, 128, 129,
130, 138, 139, 159, 162, 163, 168, 182
Grim, son of the Widow of Kropp, 184, 185, 188, 200, 201
Grimulf, 25
Gudbiorg Ufeigh's-daughter, 1
Gudbrand Ball (kula), 1
Gudbrandr Vigfusson, 275, 276
Gudmund the Rich (hinn riki), of Maddervales, 200, 204
Gudmund Solmundson, 85, 92
Gudrun, wife of Thorhall Grimson of Shady-vale, 95
Guest (= Grettir Asmundson), 192, 193, 194, 212-214
Gunnar, Court-owner in Tunsberg, 71, 72, 73
Gunnar Thorirson, of the Pass, 90, 91, 126, 127, 128
Gyda, wife of Ingiald the Trusty, 13
Gyrid Einar's-daughter, 122

Haeng, father of Vestar, 5
Haering, 222, 223, 224, 230
Haflidi of Reydarfell, a skipper, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45
Hafr Thorarinson, 212, 214, 215
Hafr Thordson, 212
Hakon, Earl of Norway, 50
Hakon Ericson, an Earl of Norway, 50
Haldor Thorgeirson of Hof in Head-strand, 208, 215, 236, 237, 238,
240, 249, 278
Haldora Steinmod's-daughter, 5
Halfdan the Black (hinn svarti), 2
Hall Gudmundson of Asbiornsness, 86
Hall of Kropp, 136, 137
Hallmund, a mountain sprite, 169, 170, 182, 184, 185-188, 200, 276
Hallstein Horse (hestr), 14, 15
Hallvard Sweeping (sugandi), 1, 4, 10, 15
Hamund, a fisherman, one of Thorgeir Bottleback's household, 20
Harald Halfdanson, called the Unshorn (lufa) and the Fair-hair
(harfagri), King of Norway, 2, 3, 4, 5
Harald Ring, 129
Harald Sigurdson, Varangian chief, afterwards King of Norway, 257,
260, 267, 268, 269
Harek, a king's farmer in Norway, 12, 13
Head-Thord = Thord of Hofdi, 79, 208
Hedin, a Skald.
Hedin of Soknadale, 13
Helga Ondott's-daughter, second wife of Biorn Rolfson, and mother of
Thrand, 5
Helga Thorkel's-daughter, of Fishbrook, 115
Helga Thorir's-daughter, from Boardere, 90
Helgi of Bathstead, 152, 153
Helgi Eyvindson, called the Lean (hinn magri), 6, 16
Hjalti Thord Scalp's-son, 207
Hialti Thordson, of Hof, 207, 209, 211, 215, 216, 217, 237, 241, 251
Hiarandi, Earl Svein's man, 69, 70, 71
Hlif Rolfs-daughter, the first wife of Biorn Rolfson, 5
Holmgang-Starri. See Starri Ericson.
Hoskuld, father of Olaf Peacock, 152
Hrefna Asgeir's-daughter (d. of Asgeir Madpate the Younger), 156
Hreiethar, called Crow-Hreiethar (Kraku-H.), 208
Hroald Geirmundson, 208

Illugi Asmundson, 112, 126, 162, 200, 204, 205, 211, 217, 219, 220,
223, 224, 229, 231, 232, 233, 238, 240, 241, 243, 244, 245, 246,
248, 250, 251
Ingiald the Trusty (tryggvi) of Hvin, 13
Ingiald Frodison, an Earl, 5
Ingimund Thorsteinson, called the Old (hinn gamli), 27, 92
Ingolf (Herraudson), of Ingolf's-firth, 20
Ingolf Ornsorn, 24
Jokul Bardson, 104, 105
Jokul Ingimundson, 27
Isleif Gissurson, first Bishop of Skalholt, 77, 250, 275
Ivar Kolbeinson, 22, 23
Ivar Smiter (beytill), 1

Kalf Asgeirson, of Asgeir's-river, son of Asgeir Madpate the younger,
34, 35
Kari Solmundson, called Singed-(sviethu)-Kari, 19
Karr, one of Thorbiorn Angle's followers in the slaying of Grettir,
238, 240
Karr the Old, a ghost, 46, 47, 48, 56
Ketil the Huge (raumr), 27
Ketil the Onehanded (hinn ein-hendi), 57
Kiarlak of Skridinsenni, 29
Kiartan Steinson, of Isledale-river, 191, 201
Kiarval, a sea-king, 1
Kiarval, king of Ireland, 6, 10
Kiotvi the Wealthy (hinn auethgi), 2
Knut the Mighty, king of England, 50, 173
Kolbein (of Rogaland), 12, 15
Kolbiorn the Abasher (sneypir), 5
Konal Steinmodson, 5
Kormak of Meal in Midfirth, 34, 87, 88, 90, 91, 92, 111

Leif Kolbeinson, 22, 23

Magnus the Good, king of Norway, 268
Mar Atlison, 80
Michael Katalak, 'king' of Constantinople, 253
Midfirth-Skeggi, 19, 24, 25

Narfi, kinsman of Kormak and Thorgils of Meal, 90
Noise. See Thorbiorn Noise.

Odd Foundling-Skald (umaga-skald), 34, 87, 88, 90
Odd, the Monk, 251
Odd Ufeigh's son, 29
Ogmund the Evil (illi), 51-57, 60
Olaf Eyvindson of Drangar, 20, 22, 23, 24
Olaf Haraldson, Saint, king of Norway, 1, 112, 114, 115, 118, 119,
120, 121
Olaf Hoskuldson, called Peacock (pa), 152
Olaf Thorsteinson, called Feilan, 18, 19, 79
Oleif Einarson, called the Broad (breiethr), 5
Olvir Bairn-Carle (barnakarl), 5
Ondott Crow (kraka), 5, 11, 12, 13, 14
Onund Ufeigh's son, called Treefoot (trefotr), 1, 2-4, 5-9, 10, 11,
12-15, 16-18, 19, 20, 23
Orm Eyolfson, chaplain of Bishop Thorlak, 104
Orm Storolfson, 172, 277
Orm the Wealthy (hinn audgi), 1

Rafarta Kiarval's-daughter, 5
Ranveig Asmund's-daughter, 29, 90, 273
Ranveig, first wife of Asmund Gray-hair, 26
Redbeard. See Thorir Redbeard.
Rognvald, an earl, 2
Rolf of Am, father of Biorn, 5
Rolf Ingialdson, father of Hlif, 5
Rut of Combeness, 182

Saemund, the South-Island man, 92, 276
Sam Borkson, 201
Sigfast, son-in-law of King Solver, 5
Sighvat, father-in-law of Ondott Crow, 13
Signy Sighvat's-daughter, 13
Sigurd, Bishop, 115
Sigurd, the husband of Spes, 255, 258, 259, 260, 261, 262, 263, 266,
267
Skald-Torfa, 34, 71, 73
Skapti Thorodson of Hjalli, lawman, 82, 95, 96, 97, 134, 149, 150,
159, 162, 163, 224
Skeggi. See Midfirth Skeggi.
Skeggi Botulfson, 115
Skeggi Gamlison, of Scarf-stead, 251
Skeggi, a house-carle from the Ridge in Waterdale, 37, 38, 243, 250
Skeggi of the Ridge, 184
Skeggi, son of Steinvor, fathered on Kiartan, 201
Skeggi Thorarinson, 79
Skeggi Thorirson, from Garth, 115
Skeggi Gamlison (from Meals), called the Short-handed (Skammhoendungr),
151, 246, 248, 249, 250, 251
Skeggi Gamlison, grandson of the preceding, 251
Skuf of Dog-dale, 81
Slaying-Styr, 152
Sleita-Helgi, 90
Snaebiorn Eyvindson, 6
Snaeskoll, a bearserk, 122, 123
Snorri Thorgrimson, called S. Godi, 144, 145, 151, 152, 201, 202, 203,
224
Solmund (Eilifson), 92
Solmund Thorbiornson, 19
Solver, King of Gothland, 5
Solvi Asbrandson, called the Proud (pruethi), 129
Sons of Thord = Hjalti of Hof and Thorbiorn Angle, 215
Sons of Thorir = Gunnar and Thorgeir from the Pass, 91, 126, 129
Sons of Thorir = Thorgeir and Skeggi, from Garth, 117, 118, 134
Spes, the wife of Sigurd, afterwards wife of Thorstein Dromund, 255
Starri Ericson, called Holmgang-Starri (Holmgaungu-S.), 208
Stein Biornson, called Tongue-Stein (Tungu-S.), 208, 237
Stein, priest of Isledale-river, 191, 195, 201
Stein, a shipwrecked Skipper, 22, 23, 24, 25
Stein Thorgestson, lawman, 225, 250
Stein Thorirson, called the Far-sailing (mjoeksiglandi), 225
Steinmod Konalson, 5
Steinmod Olvirson, 5
Steinulf Olvirson, 5
Steinulf Thorleifson, from Lavadale, 179, 180, 182
Steinun Rut's-daughter, 182
Steinvor the Old (gamla), 24
Steinvor of Sand-heaps, 191, 192, 201
Sturla Thordson, lawman, 144, 207, 272
Sulki, a king in Norway, 2
Swan of Knoll, 23, 24
Svein of Bank, 135-139
Svein, Earl of Norway, 50, 51, 69, 70, 71, 73. 74. 75, 112

Tardy. See Thorbiorn Tardy.
Thora Thormod's-daughter, 11
Thoralf of Ere in Icefirth, 154
Thoralf Skolmson, 172, 277
Thorarin Hafrson, 212
Thorarin Ingialdson of Acres, 179, 180, 182
Thorarin Thordson, called Fylsenni, 79
Thorarin the Wise (hinn spaki), 87, 92, 93
Thorbiorg Olaf's-daughter, called the Big (digra), 152, 154, 155,
156, 157
Thorbiorn Arnorson, called Oxmain (oexnamegin), 89, 90, 91, 92, 111,
125, 126, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133. 139. 140, 141, 142,143, 144,
150, 151, 234
Thorbiorn Earls' champion (Jarlakappi), 18, 19
Thorbiorn Noise (glaumr), Grettir's servant-man, 206, 211, 219, 231,
232, 235, 239, 240, 245
Thorbiorn Salmon-Carle, 5, 11
Thorbiorn Thordson, called Angle, 208, 209, 211, 212, 215, 216, 217,
218, 222, 223, 224, 226, 227, 228, 229, 230, 231, 234, 235, 236,
237, 238, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249,
250, 251, 252, 253, 254
Thorbiorn Tardy (ferethalangr), 89, 91, 111, 112-114, 125, 126, 128
Thorbrand Haraldson, 129
Thord Hialtison, 207, 208
Thord of Hofdi (==Head-Thord), 79
Thord Knob, 212
Thord Kolbeinson, of Hitness, 171, 172, 173, 178
Thord Scalp, 207
Thord Olafson, called the Yeller (gellir), 78, 79, 225
Thord Thordson (son of Head-Thord). See Thorgeir.
Thordis Asmund's-daughter, wife of Thorgrim Greypate, 25
Thordis Asmund's daughter, wife of Glum Uspakson, 29
Thordis Thord's-daughter, 208
Thordis Thorgrim's-daughter, second wife of Onund Treefoot, 19, 20
Thords, two brothers of Broad-river in Flat-lithe in Skagafirth, 209,
211, 216
Thorelf Alf a-Dales'-daughter, 80
Thorfinn of Brook-bow, 179
Thorfinn, house-carle of Flosi in Arnes, 20, 23, 25
Thorfinn Karrson of Haramsey, 46-50, 51, 52, 53, 56, 59, 60, 62, 69,
70,71, 73, 74, 75, 76, 84
Thorgaut, a herdsman of Thorhall-stead in Shady-vale, 101, 102
Thorgeir Havarson, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 145, 146, 147, 148,
149
Thorgeir Onundson, called Bottleback (floeskubak), 19, 20, 21, 23,
24, 25
Thorgeir Thordson (s. of Head-Thord), 208, 278
Thorgeir Thorhaddson of Hitdale, 179
Thorgeir Thorirson from Garth, 115
Thorgeir Thorirson, from the Pass, 90, 91, 126, 127, 128
Thorgerd Alf a-Dales'-daughter, 80
Thorgest Steinson, 225
Thorgils Arison, of Reek-knolls, 80, 81, 82, 144, 145, 146, 147, 148,
149
Thorgils Ingialdson, 179, 180, 289
Thorgils Makson, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81,82
Thorgils of Meal in Midfirth, 34, 87, 90
Thorgrim of Gnup in Midfirth, 19
Thorgrim (Hallormson), the Godi of Cornriver, 26
Thorgrim Onundson, called Greypate (haerukollr), 19, 20, 22, 23, 24,
25, 26, 27
Thorhadd Steinson, 179
Thorhall Asgrimson, of Tongue, 159
Thorhall Fridmundson, 95
Thorhall Gamlison, 29, 90, 273
Thorhall Grimson, of Thorhall-stead in Shady-vale, 95-102, 105,
106-110
Thorir Autumn-mirk (haustmyrkr), 225
Thorir Longchin (haklangr), 2, 3
Thorir Thorkelson, of the Pass, 89, 90, 273
Thorir Redbeard (rauethskeggr), an outlaw and hired assassin, 164-168
Thorir Skeggison, of Garth, 115, 117, 118, 129, 133, 134, 151, 164,
165, 168, 169, 173, 186, 188, 190, 191, 200, 225, 245, 246
Thorir Paunch (oemb), 51-57, 60
Thorir in Thorirs-dale, a mountain-sprite, 183, 276
Thorkel of Boardere, 89
Thorkel Eyulfson, 188
Thorkel of Fishbrook, 115
Thorkel of Giorvidale, 152, 153, 154
Thorkel Moon (Mani), 24
Thorkel Thordson, called Kugg, 78
Thorkel Thorgrimson, called Krafla, 26, 27, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 77
Thorkel of Salft, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67,69
Thorlak (Thorhallson, Saint), Bishop of Skalholt, 104
Thorlaug Saemund's daughter, 92
Thorleif, one of Thorbiorn Angle's followers at the slaying of
Grettir, 238
Thorleif of Lavadale, 182
Thormod Coalbrowskald (kolbrunarskald), 77, 78, 79, 81, 82, 145, 146,
147, 148, 149
Thormod Oleifson, called Shaft (skapti), 4, 5, 6, 7, 11, 12, 19
Thorod, who settled Ramfirth, 89
Thorod Arnorson, called Drapa-Stump (drapustufr), 89, 91, 142, 143,
144, 150, 151, 246, 248, 250
Thorod Eyvindson, the Godi, of Hjalli, 11, 24,96
Thorod Snorrison, 201, 202, 203,204
Thorolf of Ere, 154
Thorolf, called the Fastholding (fasthaldi), 273
Thorolf Skolmson. See Thoralf.
Thorstein Asmundson, called Dromund, 26, 71, 74, 75, 121-125, 252,
253, 254, 255, 256, 257, 258, 259, 260, 261, 262, 263, 264-272
Thorstein, whom Snorri Godi had slain, 172
Thorstein Godi, 11
Thorstein Ketilson, 27
Thorstein the Red (rauethr), 79
Thorstein of Reekness, 22
Thorstein, Thorkel Kugg's son, called Kuggson, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82,
143, 144, 145, 158, 159, 170, 200, 201
Thorstein the Uplander, 26
Thorstein the White (hviti), of Sand-heaps, 191
Thorvald Asgeirson, son of Asgeir Madpate the younger, 34, 35, 77,
79, 110, 129, 130, 151, 248, 249, 250
Thorvald of Drangar, 16
Thorvald Kodranson, 27
Thorvald of Reeks in Skagafirth, 207, 222
Thorvor, Thormod's daughter, 11
Thrand Biornson, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 19
Thrand Thorarinson, 179, 180, 182
Thurid Asgeir's-daughter, d. of Asgeir Madpate the older, 79
Thurid Thorhall's-daughter, 95, 104
Thurid, Thorbiorn Angle's stepmother, 208, 226-231
Tongue-Stein. See Stein Biornson.
Torfi Vebrandson, 234
Ufeigh, the father of Odd, 29
Ufeigh Ivarson, called Clubfoot (burlufotr), 1
Ufeigh Einarson, called Grettir, 4, 5, 6, 7, 11, 12, 18
Ufeigh (Herraudson), the Settler of Ufeigh's-firth, 20
Ufeigh Hreietharson (Crow-Hr.), called Thinbeard (unnskeggr), 208
Ufeigh Onundson, called Grettir, 19, 24, 25
Ulf the Squinter (skjalgi), 80
Ulfheid Eyulf's-daughter, 104
Una Steinulf's-daughter, 5
Uspak Glumson, of Ere in Bitra, 29, 151, 246, 247, 248
Uspak Kiarlakson of Skridinsenni, 29
Vermund the Slender, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 157
Vestar Haengson, 5
Vestmar, a viking, 7, 9
Vigbiod, a viking, 7, 8, 9
Vikar, one of Thord Angle's followers at the slaying of Grettir, 241

INDEX II.

LOCAL NAMES.

Acres (Akrar), 178, 179, 182
Agdir, now Nedenes-Lister-og Mandals-Fogderi, in Norway, 5, 13
Armansfell, 97
Arness in the Strands, 17, 20, 21
Asbiornsness (Asbjarnarnes) in Willowdale, 85, 92
Asgeir's-River (Asgeirsa), a farm in Willowdale, 20, 34, 275
Aslaugs-lithe (Aslaugarhlieth), 176
Audunstead in Willowdale (Auethunarstaethir), 34, 83, 84, 104
Axefirth (Axarfjoerethr), 25, 277
Axefirth-peak (Axarfjardar-nupr), 277

Balkstead (Balkastaethir), two farm-steads in Ramfirth, 10
Ball-jokull, 161, 169
Bank (Bakki), a farmstead in Ramfirth, 89
Bank (Bakki), a farmstead above Thingness, in Bugfirth, 135, 136
Bard-dale (Barethardalr), north of Islefirth, 191, 192, 196, 200
Barra (Barrey), one of the Hebrides, 1, 5, 7, 9
Bathstead (Laugabol), a farmhouse in Icefirth, 152, 153
Berg-Ridge (Bjarga-as), in Waterness, in Hunawater Thing, 129
Bergs (Bjoerg), ibid. 129
Biarg, a farmstead in Midfirth, Grettir's birthplace, 25, 27, 28, 29,
35, 39-77, 83, 87, 88, 90, 92, 93, 95, 104, 111, 113, 126, 127, 128,
130, 131, 132, 139, 142, 144, 200, 204, 246, 247, 251
Bitra, 128, 151
Biornfirth (Bjarnarfjoerethr), in the Strands, 23
Boardere (Boretheyri), a farmstead in Ramfirth, 90
Bodvar's-knolls (Boeethvarsholar), in Westhope, in Hunawaterthing, 89
Bondmaid's-River (Ambattara), 129
Bowerfell (Burfell), a farmstead on Ramfirth-neck, 90, 91
Brakeisle (Hrisey), in Islefirth, 16
Brakelithe, see Kraeklingslithe.
Broadfirth (Breiethifjoerethr),276
Broadfirth-dales (Breiethafjarethardalir), 170, 201
Broadlair-stead (Breiethibolstaethr), in Sokkolfsdale, 202
Broad-river (Breietha), a farmstead in Flat-lithe, in Skagafirth, 209
Brooks-meet (Laekjamot), a farmstead in Willowdale, 27, 77
Brook-bow (Laekjarbugr), a farmstead in the Marshes, 178, 179
Burgfirth (Borgarfjoerethr), 81, 93, 130, 135, 159, 161, 162, 170, 182
Burglava (Borgarhraun), 176
Burn-river (Brunna), 278
Bute (Botz, or Bot), isle of, 7
Byrgirs-Creek (Byrgisvik), 18, 22
Bye (Baer), a farmstead in Burgfirth, 136

Cave-Knolls (Hellisholar), on Reekness, 147
Codfirth (orskafjoerethr) in Bardastrandsylla, 148
Codfirth-heath (orskafjaretharheiethi), 152
Coldback (Kaldbak), a fell in the Strands, 17, 18
Coldback, the farmstead of Onund Treefoot, in the Strands, 18, 19, 20,
21, 22, 23
Coldback-cleft (Kaldbakskleif), 18
Coldback-Creek (Kaldbaksvik), 18, 23, 24
Coldriver-dale (Kaldardalr), 176
Combe (Gjoegr), a farmstead in the Strands, 22
Combe (Kambr), in Reekness in the Strands, 25
Combeness (Kambnes), 182
Cornriver (Kornsa), a farm in Waterdale, 26
Creek, 20, 22. = Treetub-creek.
Cross-river (vera), a stream in Waterness, 129

Dales = Broadfirth-dales, 202
Deepfirth (Djupifjoerdr), 276
Deildar-Tongue (D-Tunga), 137
Dinby (Glaumbaerr), a farmstead in Skagafirth, 206
Dog-dale (Hundadalr), 81
Door-holm (Dyrholmr), the southeastmost point of Iceland, 234
Doveness-path (Dufuness-skeiethi), a portion of the way over the Keel, 160
Drangar, a farmstead in the Strands, 16, 20, 22
Drangey, an island in Skagafirth, 200, 204, 207, 209, 210, 217, 218,
219, 222, 223, 224, 227, 228, 231, 237, 238, 250, 251
Drontheim (randheimr), now Trondhiem, in Norway, 69, 114, 118
Drontheimfirth (randheimsfjoerethr), 67

Eastfirths (Austfirethir), 184
Eastriver (Austra), 202
Eastriverdale (Austrardalr), one of the Broadfirth-dales, 201
England, 50, 115
Ere (Eyri, al. Uspakseyri), in Bitra, 128, 151
Ere (Eyri), in Icefirth, 152, 154
Eres (Eyrar, now Eyrabakki), on the south coast of Iceland, 11
Eyjafirth, 112 = Islefirth.
Eyvindsfirth (Eyvindarfjoerethr), 20
Ernelakeheath, 186 = Ernewaterheath.
Ernewaterheath (Arnarvatnsheitethi), 163, 165, 184, 188

Fairslope (Fagrabrekka), 90
Fairwood (Foegruskogar), a farm near Fairwoodfell, 179, 181, 277
Fairwoodfell (Fagraskogarfjall), north of the Marsh country and
west side of Hitdale, 171, 172, 178, 277
Fishbrook (Fiskilaekr), 115
Fishwaterlakes (Fiskivoetn), 163
Fishless (Veiethilausa), in the Strands, 17, 18
Flat-lithe (Slettahlieth), in Skagafirth, 209
Fleets (Fljot), on the north side of the mouth of Skagafirth, 208,
212, 237, 238
Fleet-tongue (Fljotstunga), 37
Flokedale-river (Flokadalsa), in Burgfirth, 136
Flysja-wharf (Flysju-hverfi or Flysu-hverfi), 174, 179
Foxplain (Melrakkasletta), 278

Gangpass-mouth (Gaunguskarethsos, better Gaunguskarethsaros), 222
Gartar, now Garten, an island in the mouth of Drontheimfirth, 67
Garth (Garethr), in Maindale, 115, 118, 133, 134, 151, 190, 200
Gilsbank (Gilsbakki), 130, 137, 138
Gjorvidale, 152
Gnup-Wards'-rape (Gnupverjahreppr), 11
Gnup, a farmstead in Midfirth, 19
Goatland (Geitland), 182
Goatland's-jokul (Geitland's-joekull), 182
Goat-rock (Hafraklettr), 147
God-dales (Goethdalir), 208, 237
Godis-wood (Goethaskogr), 97
Goosere (Gaseyri, Gasir, prop. Geese, or perhaps Creeks), a
market-place in Islefirth, 112, 113, 133, 251
Gothland (Gautland), 5
Grettirs-point (G-Oddi), 180
Grettirs-hillock (G-ufa), 249
Grettirs-Gill, 18

Hafrsfirth (Hafrsfjorethr), now Hafsfjord, in Jadar in Norway, 3
Haffirth-river (Hafsfjarethrara), in the Marshes, 176
Hall-marsh (Skalamyrr), in Skagafirth, 208
Hallwick (Skalavik), in Sweeping's firth 10
Halogaland, now Nordlandene, in Norway, 62
Haramsey, properly Harhamars-ey, now Haramsoe, in South-Mere, in
Norway, 45, 50, 51
Hawkdale (Haukadalr), a valley in the Broadfirth-dales, 90
Hawkdale (Haukadalr), a farmstead in Biskupstungr in Arnesthing, 159
Hawkdale-pass (Haukadals-skareth), a mountain road between Hawkdale
and Ramfirth, 126
Head, a farm on Head-strand, 79, 276
Head-strand (Hoefethastrond), in Skagafirth, 208
Heel (Haell), 18
Heron-ness (Hegranes), in Skagafirth, 210, 213
Hjalli in Olfus, 11, 159, 162
Hjaltidale (Hjaltadalr), in Skagafirth, 207
Hitdale (Hitardalr), north of the Marshes, 173, 179
Hitness (Hitarnes), in the Marshes, 171, 178
Hitriver (Hitara), in the Marshes, 171, 172, 174, 175, 178, 179
Hof in Hjaltidale, 207
Hof on Head-strand, 208, 237
Hofethi (Hofethi), 79, 276
Holm (Holmr), the homestead of Biorn the Hitdale-champion in
the Marshes, 170
Holtbeacon-heath (Holtavoerethuheiethi), a mountain over which lay the
main road between Northriverdale and Ramfirth, 200
Hordaland, a province of Norway, now Soendre Bergenhus Amt, 1, 2, 4, 114
Horn, 132
Horseholt (Hrossholt), in the Marshes, 177
Hunawater (Hunavatn), 26, 101,
Hvamm, a farmstead in Hvamsveit by Hvamsfirth 18, 79
Hvamsveit, 79
Hvin, now Kvinen, in Norway, 13
Hvinisfirth, now Fedde-Fjorden, in Norway, 5
Haeringsleap, in Drangey, 224

Jadar, now Jaederen, in Norway, 121

Icefirth (Isafjoerethar), 155
Icefirth-deep (Isafjarethar-djup), 273
Iceland (Island), 10, 11, 12, 15, 16, 19, 27, 75,77, 115, 116, 121,
243, 250, 253, 272
Ingolfs-firth (Ingoilfafjoerdr), 17, 20, 22

Jorvi (Jorvi) in Flysia-wharf, 179

Ireland (Irland), 2, 5, 6, 7, 10
Islefirth (Eyjafirth, Eyjafjoerethr), 16
Isledale-river (Eyjardalsa), a farmstead in Bard-dale, 191, 192, 194,
196, 198, 201

Kalf-river (Kaifa), in Gnup-Wards'-rape, 18
Kalfness (Kalfanes), 136, 137

Keel (Kjoelr), a mountain between the North and South quarter of,
Iceland, over which a main road led from Biskupstungur to Islefirth,
159, 162, 169
Kialarnes, 19
Knobstead (Knappstaethir), a farmstead in the Fleets, 212
Knoll (Holl), in the Strands, the farm of Swan, 23
Kolbeins-Creek (Kolbeinsvik) in the Strands, 18
Kolbeinstead (Kolbeinsstaethir), a farmstead in the Marshes, 176
Kraeklings-lithe, a country side in Islefirth, 16, 277
Kropp, 137

Lavadale (Hraundalr), in the Marshlands, 179, 180, 182
Laxdale-heath (Laxardalsheiethi), a mountain road between Laxardale
and Ramfirth, 143
Liarskogar (Ljarskogar), a farmstead in Hvamsveit, 79, 81, 143, 144,
145, 158
Longdale (Langidalr), in Icefirth, 152
Longfit (Langafit), below Reeks in Midfirth, 87
Longholt (Langholt), in Skagafirth, 206
Longness (Langanes), the north-eastmost promontory of Iceland, 16

Madderdale-heath (Moeethrudalsheiethi), in the north-east of Iceland, 189,
277
Maddervales (Moeethruvellir) in Islefirth, 200
Maindale (Aethaldalr), in the north-east of Iceland, 115
Marshes (Myrar; Marsh-country), 170, 171, 178
Marstead (Marstaethir) in Waterdale, 26
Marswell (Marskelda), 81
Meadness (Haganes), a farmstead in the Fleets, 208, 237, 238
Meal (Melr, now Melstaethr) in Midfirth, 34, 87, 114
Meals (Melar) in Ramfirth, 29, 90, 126, 143, 144, 151, 248, 275
Mere (Moeri) = South-Mere, 69
Micklegarth (Constantinople), 252, 253, 268, 270, 272
Midfirth (Miethfjoerethr) in Hunawaterthing, 19, 25, 34, 77, 78, 130,
139, 140, 246
Midfirth-Water (Miethfjoeretharvatn), 34, 83
Midfit (Miethfitjar) in Ramfirth, 144

Neck (= Ramfirth-neck), 130
Necks (= Ramfirth--and--Midfirth-neck), 140
Nes (Nesjar) in Norway, 112
Ness = Snowfellsness, 126
North-Glass-river (Glera en nyrethri), in Islefirth, 16
Northriver (Norethra), a stream in Burgfirth, 81
Northriverdale (Norethrardalr), ibid. 90, 201,
Norway (Noregr), 2, 3, 4, 5,6, 7, 11, 12, 17, 26, 45, 50, 60, 61, 76,
112, 114, 115, 122, 251, 252, 268, 270
Nupasveit in Axefirth, 278

Olaf's-isles (Olafseyjar) in Broadfirth, 146
Oyce-land (Osland) in Skagafirth, 245

Pass (Skareth) the, a farm in Hawkdale, 90, 126, 127, 129, 273

Ramfirth (Hrutafjoeethr), in Hunawaterthing, 10, 29, 89, 90, 126
Ramfirth-neck (Hrutafjaretharhals), 91, 113, 127, 130, 143
Raun (Hraun), a farmstead in the Marshes, 174
Reekfirth (Reykjafjoerethr), a bay in the Strands, 18, 25
Reekfirth, a farmstead in the last-named bay, 18, 20
Reek-heath (Reykjaheiethi), in the North-East of Iceland, 189
Reek-knolls (Reykholar), a farmstead on Reekness in Broadfirth, 80,
144, 145
Reekness (Reykjanes), a promontory in the Strands, 18, 22
Reekness, a farmstead on the last-named ness, 22
Reekness, south-westmost point of Iceland, 40
Reekness, east side of Codfirth, in Broadfirth, 80, 145, 146
Reekpass (Reykjaskareth) in Skagafirth, 205
Reeks (Reykir), a farmstead in Midfirth below Biarg, 87
Reeks, a farmstead nigh to Thorodstead in Ramfirth, 140, 142, 143
Reeks, a farmstead in Reek-strand in Skagafirth, 207, 220, 250, 251
Reek-strand (Reykjastroend), in Skagafirth, 250
Reydarfell in Whiteriverside, in Burgfirth, 39
Rib-skerries (Rifsker) in Reekfirth, 22, 24
Ridge, the, (As, al. Oddsas) in Waterdale, the farm of Thorvald Asgeirson,
37, 77, 110
Ridge, the, (As, al. Storias), in Burgfirth, 184
Ridge (As, al. Valdaras), in Willowdale, 275
Rogaland, now Stavanger Amt, in Norvay, 1, 2, 3, 12
Rome, 271
Rosmwhale-ness (Rosmhvalanes), 24

Saemund's-lithe (Saemundarhlieth) in Skagafirth, 206
Salft (prop. Salpti or Salfti), now
Salten in Salten-Fjord, in Halogafand, 62
Samstead (Samsstaethir), 145
Sand, a wilderness between the North and the South Country,
crossed by a road from Skagafirth south to Burgfirth and
Thingvellir, 249
Sand-heaps (Sandhaugar), 191, 192, 195, 199. 201, 273
Scarf-stead (Skarfsstaethir), 158, 251
Scotland, 2, 5, 7
Shady-vale (Forsaeludalr), inland of Waterdale, 95
Slaftholt (Skaptaholt), in Gnup-Wards'-rape, 11
Shieldbroadfell (Skjaldbreieth), a volcano north-east of Thingvellir, 183
Skagafirth, 83, 200, 205, 207, 217, 250
Skagi, a mountain promontory between Strandbay and Skagafirth, 16
Skalholt (Skalaholt), in Biskupstungur, 77, 250
Skridinsenni, a farmstead in Bitra, 29
Sledgehill (Sleethaas), north of Thingvellir, 39, 97
Slysfirth (Slysfjoerethr, prop. Slygsfjoerethr), now Storfjorden in Soendmoeres
Fogderi, in Norway, 51
Snowfells (Snaefjoell), 275
Snowfellsness (Snaefellsnes), the West-most promontory of Iceland,
126, 173
Sokkolfsdale (Soekkolfsdalr), in the Broadfirth-dales, 202
Soknadale (Soknadalr, or Soknardalr), now Sognedalen, in Norway, 13
Sorbness (Reynines), in Skagafirth, 206
Sorreldale (Surnadalr), now Surendalen, in Norway, 14
Sotanes, in Norway, 1
South-Glass-river (Glera en syethri), a farmstead in Islefirth, 16
South-Mere (Summaeri), now Soendmoeres Fogderi, in Norway, 45, cpr. 69
South-Isles (Suethr-eyjar), the Hebrides, 1, 4, 6, 7, 10, 11
South-Strands (Suethr-strandir), 16
Spear-mead (Spjotsmyrr), in Ramfirth, 144
Stair (Stigi), a foreland peak east of Sweepingsfirth, 10
Stead (Staethr), now Stadtland, promontory in Norway, 115, 116, 117
Steep-brent (Brattabrekka), 201
Steersriver (iorsa), 12
Steinker, an Earl's seat in Drontheim, 69
Stone-holt (Steinsholt), in Gnup-Wards'-rape, 11
Stonestead (Steinstaethir), in Skagafirth, 208
Strandbay (Strandafloi), 16
Strands (Strandir), north-westmost part of Iceland, 16, 77, 80
Sweepingsfirth (Sugandafjoerethr), 10
Sylgdale (Sylgsdalir), in Sweden, 96
Thingere-lands (ingeyrasveit), in Hunawaterthing, 25
Thingness (ingnes), in Burghfirth, 135, 136
Thoreys-peak (oreyjar-nupr) a farm in Willowdale, 93, 94, 104
Thorhall-stead (orhallsstaethir) in Shady-vale, 95, 97, 98, 102, 103, 105
Thorodstead (oroddsstadir) in Ramfirth, 89, 140
Thorir's-dale (orir's-vale, 184, Thorisdalr), 183, 184, 201
Thrandsholt (randarholt), in Gnup-Ward's-rape, 11
Thwart-river (vera), a stream in Gnup-Ward's-rape, 11
Titling-stead (Titlingastaethir), on Reekness, 147
Tongue (Tunga, Saelingsdalstunga), Snorri Godi's home, 144, 145, 203
Tongue (Tunga), a farmstead in Waterdale, 90
Tongue (Tunga, now Nupsdalstunga(?)), a farmstead in Midfirth, 90
Tongue (Tunga), the home of Asgrim Ellida Grimson, in Arnesthing, 159
Tongue-river (Tungua), a stream in the Fleets, 212
Torfa's-stead (Torfustair), a homestead in Midfirth, 34
Treetub-creek, the Creek, the Wick, (Trekyllisvik), in the Strands,
20, 22, 23, 24, 25
Tunsberg, a market-place in Norway, now Toensberg, 71, 75, 121, 123,
251, 252
Twodays-way (Twodays-ride, Tvidaegra), a mountain-road from
Northriverdale to the Midfirth-dales and Willowdale, 93, 139

Ufeigh's-firth (Ufeigsfjoerethr), in the Strands, 22
Ufeigh's-stead (Ufeigsstaethir), in Gnup-Ward's-rape, 11
Ufaera, in the Strands, 17
Uplands (Upploend), Oplandene in Norway, 2

Vogar a fish-fair in Halogaland, in Norway, now Vaagen, 62, 67

Waterdale (Vatnsdalr), in Euna-waterthing, 26, 38, 40, 77, 104, 110,
111, 275, 276
Waterfirth (Vatnsfjoerethr), home-stead of Vermund the Slender,
152, 154, 155, 158
Waterfirth-dale (Vatnsfjarethandalr), in Icefirth, 153
Waterness (Vatnsnes), pron. between Hunafirth and Midfirth, 129
Waterpass (Vatnsskareth), between Hunawaterthing and Skagafirth, 205
Wave-ridge (Oelduhryggr), in Staetharsveit, 173
Weir (Styfla), in the Fleets, 212
Well-ness (Keldunes), 115
Well-wharf (Kelduhverfi), 115
Well-wharfside, id. 187
Westfirths (Vestfirethir), 144, 158, 162
Westhope, (Vestrhop), in Hunawaterthing, 34
Wetherfirth=Ramfirth, 143
Whalesheadholme, (Hvalshausholmr), 146,147
Whiteriver (Hvita), in Burgfirth, 135, 136, 172
Whiteriverside (Hvitarsida), in Burgfirth, 39
Wick (Vikin), in Norway, 26
Wick=Treetub-Creek.
Willowdale (Viethdalr), west of Waterdale, 20,34,83, 104, 275
Windham (Vindheimr), a farmstead of Haramsey, 46, 47
Wolds (Vellir), a harbour on the Whiteriver, 135,136
Woods-tead (Skogar), a farm in Axefirth, 277
Woodwick (Viethvik), a farmstead in Skagafirth, 208, 231, 236, 237, 245

INDEX III.

THINGS.

A nithing's deed, setting on a dying man with weapons, 250
Arson, 2, 5, 13
Assassins (hired), 163, 167

Barrow of Karr the Old of Haramsey, 47, 49
of Onund Treefoot, called "Treefoot's-barrow," 19
Battles and Fights.
Battle of Barra, between Onund Treefoot, and King Kiarval, 1, 2
of Bute, between Onund Treefoot and the Vikings, Vigbiod
and Vestmar, 7, 9
of Ernewaterheath, between Grettir and Hallmund on one
side, and Thorir of Garth with eighty men on the other, 168, 170
of Grettirsoddi by Hitriver, between Grettir and the Marshmen,
179, 180
of Hafrsfirth, between Harald Fairhair and several Norwegian petty
kings, 3, 4
of Nesjar, between St. Olaf and Earl Svein, 112
of the Pass, between Ath Asmundson and the Sons of Thorir of the
Pass, 127, 128
at Bowerfell, between Grettir and the men of Meal, 91

Fight in Drangey, between the Brothers Grettir and Illugi, on one
side, and Thorbiorn Angle and his band on the other, 240, 241

Fight on Ernewaterheath, with the Assassins Grim and Thorir
Redbeard, 163, 164
at Fairwoodfell with Gish, 176,177
at Fleet-tongue with Skeggi, 38
in Gartar, with Biorn, 68
at Goosere, with Thorbiorn Tardy, 144
in Grettir's-Gill, between Ufeigh Grettir and Thorbiorn
Earls' Champion, 18, 19
in Haramsey, with Karr the Old, in his harrow, 48, 49
in Haramsey, with twelve Bearserks, 56, 58
on Midfit, with Thorbiorn Oxmain, 141
on Reekness, between the men of the Creek and those
of Coldback, over a whale, 23
on a common driftland in the Strands over a whale, between
the foster-brothers orgeir Havarson and Thormod
Coalbrowskald on one side, and Thorgils Makson on the other, 77,78
at Sand-heaps, with a troll-wife, 194, 195
nigh to Sand-heaps, in a cave, with a giant, 197
at Steinker, with Hiarandi, 70, 71
Fight at Thorhall-stead with Glam the Thrall, 107, 109
in Tunsberg, with Gunnar, the brother of Hiarandi, 72, 73
with Snaekoll the bearserk, 122, 123

Bridge of Liarskogar, a work of great art, hung with rings and
'din-bells,' 158

Domestic Implements.
Bottles of leather, for keeping drink in, 20
Chopper, 23, 194
Clothes-bag, 175
Curd-bags, hides drawn up to fetch curds in from mountain dairies, 84
Deer-horn, for drinking at feasts, 15
Digging-tools, 47
Kettle, 182
Meal-bags, wherein victuals were kept for the thing-ride, 38
Tools to strike fire, 182
Trough, 194
Wool-combs. 30

Dowry, 7

Dress and Ornamental Apparel.
Breeches (of sail-cloth, 117), 176, 220
Cape, 117, 136, 137
Chain, round the neck, 14
Cloak of rich web, 14
Coloured clothes (over--clothes), 154, 174
Cowl, 220 Drugget-cloak, 107
Fur-cloak, 64
Hat (slouched), 169, 189
Hood, 206
Kirtle (red), 85
Leggings (hose), 65
Mittens, 206
Rings of gold, 14
Shirt, 176
Spurs, 202
State-raiment, 175
Thongs (hose-thongs), 65
Fair in Vagar in Halogaland, 62
Famine, 21

Feasts.
(There were three principal festals in the year: at Winter-nights,
Yule, and Midsummer.)

Autumn-feast (= winter nights' feast, Oct. 14), at Thorbiorn
Oxmain's, III "Drinking turn and turn about," is probably the same
that elsewhere is called "SamburethSarol," an ale-club or rotation
drinking by common subscription, 14 Yule-ale, 51 Yule-biddings,
51, 52

Fights, see Battles and Fights.

Food and Drink.
(The Saga mentions no imported articles of food.)
Beer, 53, 56
Curds, 84
Fish (stockfish), 131, 132
Lent-fare, fat and livers, 183
Mutton, passim.
Fire above hid treasure, 47
Foster-brothers (sworn brothers), 78, 81, 92, 93
Godi's-wood, a wood said to have belonged to six Godar, 97
Grettir's-heave, 39, 91, 176
Horse-Outfit.
Bridle (embossed, 160), 76, 136
Head-gear, 160 Saddle (fair-stained, 84), 38
Snaffle-rings, 160 Hospitality, 54,
Hospitality, 54, 80
Houses and their Outfit.
Beaks of vessels put over the door, 115
Bed, 107
Boards (= tables), 30
Bolt, 56
Boose (= cow-stall in a byre), 103
Booth at the thing, 96
--for drinking assemblages, 72
--for trade-purposes, 113
Bower, serving as a ward-robe, cloth-bower, 56
--a storehouse apart from other houses, out-bower, 56, 245
Closet, 56
Corn-barn, 58
Cross-beam (= tie-beam), 107, 108
Cross-bench (= dais), 193
Door, 56 and passim.
Doorcase, 108
Doorpost, 133
Dungeon, 254
Gable, 193
Hall, fire-hall, passim, see also note on hall pp. 273-275
Hangings, 53
High-chair, 48
Hill-dairy, 84, 153, 154
Horse-stable, 106
House of refuge (saluhus), 117
Latch, 56
Lock-bed, 107
Loft (sleeping-loft), 14, 124
Long-fires, 30
Rafters, 108
Roof, 107, 240
Seat-beam, 84, 107
Side-wall, 193
Thatch, 108, 240
Threshold, 108, 133
Tie-beam, 107

Landwights.

Amongst these are to be numbered Hallmund and Thorir the half-troll
of Thorir's-dale, and the wights told of in Hallmund's Song, 187

Atonement. See Weregild.

Law, Suits, Penalties.

Boot for insulting language, 66
Banishment, 129
Declaring manslaughter as having been done by one's own hand, 133, 142
District-outlawry, 129
Execution (feransdomr), 247-248
Fine, 39, and passim.
Handselling of a lawsuit, 39
Handselling of lawful truce, 212, 214

Law-provisions:
For drift-right, 25
For bearserks challenging men to holm, 51
For heritage of outlawed men in Norway in the days of
Harold Fairhair, 11
For the utmost limit of outlawry, 225
For heathen sacrifices in the earliest days of Christianity
in Iceland, 226
For a rightful suitor in a blood-suit, 150

Lawsuits, 18, 19, 24, 39, 79, 129, 130, 149, 151, 238, 249, 250

Manners and Customs, Civil and Religious.

Bathing, 148, 220
Burial of misdoers in cairns and tidewashed heap of stones, 59, 241
Burial in barrows. See Barrows.
--at churches, 126, 142

Fasting on Yule-eve, 98
--to iron birth, 119

Hallowing of a vessel by a bishop, 115

Iron-birth, 119

Meal-times, 49

Riding, to the Althing, 36, 79
Rubbing of one's back by the fire, 30

Sailors' duties have to be per-formed on board ship by the
passengers, 41, sqq.
Sitting at table in the evening, 48
Sleeping in fire-halls, 30

Thing-men have to provide themselves,
each one with fare at
his own cost, 38

Varangian weapon-show, 253

Washing of hands ere going to
table, 113

Money.

Hundred in silver, 151

Mark in silver, 151, 173

Names of folk derived from their
country or dwelling-stead.

Axefirthers, 278
Gothlander, 11
Halogalander, 57
Icefirthers, 155, 156
Lavadale-men, 182
Marshmen, 182
Northlanders, 163
Northmen, 10, 253
Ramfirthers, 34, and passim.
South-Islander, 7, 92
The men of Biarg, 88, 92
The men of Coldback, 20, sqq.
The men of the Creek, 20, sqq.
Varangians, 253, sqq.
Waterdale-folk, 26, 38
Waterdale-kin, 142
Waterness-men, 34, 88
Well-wharfers, 170
Westfirthers, 80
Westhope-men, 34
Willowdale-men, 34

Occupations.

Binding of hay into horseloads for being conveyed into rick-yard
or barn, 140, 141
Catching of fowl, 219
Drift-watching, 22
Fetching home victuals from mountain dairies, 84
Fetching home stockfish on horses, 126, 128
Fishing in sea and fresh water, 163, 166, 184
Folding, gathering sheep in autumn up from the wilds
and mountains, to be sorted for their owners according to
the marks in the ears of each sheep, 174
Gathering of eggs, 214
Hay-harvest, falls into two parts, the first, the haymaking in the
manured homefield, the second, in unmanured meads and mountains,
132, 140
Iron-smithying, 158
Mowing-tide, the whole season of the summer while grass can be
mown, 84, 132
Watching of home-geese, 29
of horses in winter, 31
of neat, 102
of sheep, 98, 101, 206
Whale-getting, 21, 77
Whale-cutting, 23

Pet Animals.

Keingala, a mare, 31
Pied-belly, a ram, 240
Saddle-fair, a mare, 135

Runes.

Songs cut on staffs, in runes, 186, 198
Baneful runes cut on a bewitched log of wood, 230, 231

Sagas Quoted.

The saga of the Bandamenn, 29
of Bodmod, Grimulf, and Gerpir, 25
of Eric the Earl, 51
of Grim who slew Hallmund, 188
of the heath-slayings, 86
The saga of the Laxdale-men, 19

Settlings of land in Iceland, 10, 11, 12, 16, 17

Ships and their outfit.

Boat, ten oars aboard, 22, 227
Boat-stand, 20, and passim
Beaks, 115
Bark (karfi), of sixteen oars aboard, 46, 52, 62
Bulwark, 3
Forecastle, 3
Grapplings, 3
Gunwale, 147
Row-barge, 115
Sail, 16, 41
Ship shield-hung from stem to stern, 52
stained above sea, 52
cleared from stem to stern, 3
stem, stern, 3, 52
Viking-ship, I
War-ship, 6
Work in connection with ship:
baling, 41, 42, 45
pumping, 44
rolling ship ashore, 174
launching of, 46
building of, 25
Yard, 16

Skalds named in the Saga.

Arnor Earls'-skald, 179
Bessi, Skald-Torfa's son, 34, 71
Grettir Asmundson.
Hallmund, 161, 186-187
Odd the Foundling-Skald, 34, 87-88
Skald-Torfa, 34
Svein of Bank, 135
Thormod Coalbrowskald, 77

Social Stations.

Bonder, 14, and passim
Chapmen, passim
Court-owner, an owner of all such houses in a town as form the
surrounding of a court, 71
Earl, a man next after the king in dignity, 14, 50 sqq.,
69 sqq., 112
Free-men, 53
Godi, a chief combining in his person the religious and administrative
authority of the district over which he ruled, 11, 26
Hand-maid, 220, 221
Herdsman. See Occupations.
Hersir, a man next to an earl in dignity, 14
Home-folk, 54
Home-women, 54
House-carle, passim.

Sports and Games.

Ball-play, 34
Ball, 35
Bat, 35
Horse-fight, 87, 88
Knave-game (note), 208
Sports at Heron-ness thing, 210, 212
Swimming, 117, 167, 220
Tale-game, 208
Wrestling, 211, 212, 216

Things, or Public Law-assemblages.

The Althing, passim
The Thing of Kialarness, 19
Heron-ness, 210
Hunawater, 129, 150
Trade on England, 67

Trolls and Evil Wights.

See Hallmund's song, 187
Troll-carle, 197
Troll-wife, 194-195
The wight that slew Glam, 96, 99, 100
Troth, to sit in troth for three winters, 7
Twainmonth, the second month in the year, corresponding to our
September (Aug. 24--Sept. 22).
Wadmall as an article of trade, 40, 220

Weapons and War-gear.

Axe, passim.
Barb-end, 57
Barb, 57, 132
Buckler, 142
Byrni, 57
Chopper, 194
Cheek-pieces of a helmet, 122
Glaive (heft-sax), 197
Grigs of the sword, 241
Hand-axe, 141
Helmet, 57, 85, 122, 132
Shield (iron-rimmed, inlaid), 72, 122, 128, 175, 203, 241
Socket inlaid with silver, 141
Socket-nail, 141
Short-sword, Karrs-loom, 49, and passim
Spear, great without barbs, 141
with broad barbs, 56, 132
Stones used for missiles, 8
Spear-head, 57
Sword, girt with a sword, 132, 241
Jokul's gift, the heirloom of the kinsmen of Ingimund the
Old, 40, and passim.
Weird of a ghost, 109
of a sorceress, 229
Winter-nights, the first days in winter about Oct. 14, 145

Witchcraft and Sorcery.

Gale of wind brought on by evil craft, 236-237
Witchcraft, an illegal means for overcoming an enemy, 244, 250
Witchcraft wrought into a log of wood, the manner thereof, 230, 231
Wound growing deadly through the effect of evil and witchcrafty
runes, 244, 250
Wooing, 6, 7, 19

PERIPHRASTIC EXPRESSIONS IN THE SONGS.

An Axe: Battle ogress, rock-troll, 38
Blood: Rain of swords, 15
Cave (Hallmund's): Kettle, where waters fall from great
ice-wall, 160
Fight: Dart's breath, 15
Dart-shower, 43
Gale of death, 15
Gale of swords, 95
Hilda's[22] weather, 95
Iron-rain, 234
Mist's[22] mystery, 95
Odin's gale; Odin's storm, 143, 190
Shield-fire's thunder, 6
Shield-rain, 215
Spears' breath, 170
Spear-shower, 138
Spear-storm, 234
Sword-shower, 81

Gallows: Sigar's meed for lovesome deed, (Sigarr hung Hag-bard
the Viking for having befooled his daughter), 157
Gold: Deep sea's flame, 137
Dragon's lair, 49
Serpent's bed, 215
The flame of sea, 49
Wave's flashing flame, 49
Worm's bed, 41
Worm-land, 131
Grettir (an Eddaic name for a serpent): Fell-creeping lad, 86
Head: Thoughts' burg, 76
Man: Elm-stalk, 136
Gold-scatterer, 181
Helm-stalk, 136
Jewel-strewer, 30
Lessener of the flame of sea, 49
Lessener of waves' flashing flame, 49
Ring-bearer, 68
Ring-strewer, 30
Scatterer of serpent's bed, 215
Wormland's haunter, 137
Snatcher of worm's bed, 41
Mouth: Tofts of tooth-hedge, 124
Sailor: He who decks the reindeer's side that 'twixt ness and
ness doth glide, 43
Rider of wind-driven steed, 41
Sea-steeds' rider, 81; Shield: Roof of war, 215
Spear-walk, 12
Ship: Reindeer that 'twixt ness and ness doth glide, 43
Sea-steed, 81
Steed of the rollers, 17
Wind-driven steed, 41
Skald: Giver forth of Odin's mead (Svein of Bank), 137
Sword: Byrni's flame, 76

[Footnote 22: Hilda (Hildr) and Mist, goddesses of fight and
manslaughter.]

Sword: Helmfire, 50, 136
Man's-bane, 41
War-flame, 199
Whiting of the shield, 21
Wound-worm, 114
Thor: Sifs lord, 157
Warrior: Arrow-dealer, 114
Axe-breaker, 2
Begetter of fight, 49
Brand-whetter, 17
Breaker of the bow, 50
Foreteller of spear-shower, 138
Warrior: Grove of Hedin's maid, 125
Raiser-up of roof of war, 215
Spear-grove, 59
Stem of shield, 190
Sword-player, 199
War-god, 66
Wound-worm's tower, 114
Wool-combe: Hook-clawed bird, 31
Woman: Giver forth of gold, 59
Goddess of red gold, 137
Ground of gold, 30
Son of golden stall, 190
Warder of horns' wave, 181

PROVERBS AND PROVERBIAL SAYINGS THAT OCCUR IN THE STORY.

PAGE

A friend should warn a friend of ill ............................. 30
Ale is another man ............................................... 55
All must fare when they are fetched............................... 188
All things bide their day......................................... 218
All will come to an end .......................................... 233
Bare is the back of the brotherless .............................. 241
Best to bairn is mother still .................................... 41
Bewail he, who brought the woe ................................... 175
Broad spears are about now ....................................... 133
Deeds done will be told of ....................................... 224
Even so shall bale be bettered by biding greater bale ............ 140
For one thing alone will I not be known .......................... 192
From ill cometh ill .............................................. 105
Good luck and goodliness are twain ............................... 105
Hand for wont doth yearn ......................................... 226
Hottest is the fire that lies on oneself ......................... 176
Ill deed gains ill hap .......................................... 188
Ill heed still to ill doth lead ................................. 121
Ill if a thrall is thine only friend ............................. 240
Ill it is ill to be .............................................. 165
Ill it is to goad the foolhardy .................................. 30
Let one oak have what from the other it shaves ................... 67
Little can cope with cunning of eld .............................. 205
Long it takes to try a man ....................................... 61
Many a man lies hid within himself ............................... 203
Many a man stretches round the door to the lock .................. 86
More one knows the more one tries ................................ 30
No man makes himself ............................................. 125
Now this, now that has strokes in his garth ...................... 125
Odd haps are worst haps .......................................... 37
Oft a listening ear in the holt is anear ......................... 173
Oft fail in wisdom folk of better trust .......................... 32
Old friends are the last to sever ................................ 240
One may be apaid of a man's aid .................................. 44
Overpraised, and first to fail ................................... 132
Sooth is the sage's guess ........................................ 92
Swear loud and say little ........................................ 266
The lower must lowt .............................................. 267
The nigher the call, the further the man ......................... 211
Things boded will happen, so will things unboded ................. 32
Though the spoon has taken it up, yet the mouth has had no sup ... 168
Thralls wreak themselves at once, dastards never ................. 35
Thrice of yore have all things happed ............................ 262
To the goat-house for wool ....................................... 226
With hell's man are dealings ill ................................. 176
Woe is before one's own door when it is inside
one's neighbour's ................................................ 105

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