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The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of The English Nation, v. 7 by Richard Hakluyt

Part 5 out of 6

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Three tire of Cannon lodg'd on eyther side,
And in each tire, eleuen stronglie lay,
Eyght in her chase, that shot forth right did bide,
And in her sterne, twice eight that howerlie play;
Shee lesse great shot, in infinets did hide,
All which were Agents for a dismall day.
But poore _Reuenge_, lesse rich, and not so great,
Aunswered her cuffe for cuffe, and threat for threat.

Anon they graple eyther to the other,
And doth the ban-dogge with the Martins skinne;
And then the wombe of _Phillip_ did vncouer,
Eight hundred Souldiers, which the fight beginne:
These board Sir _Richard_, and with thronging smother
The daye, the ayre, the time, and neuer linne,
But by their entrance did instruct eight more,
To doe the like, on each side foure and foure.

Thus in one moment was our Knight assaild,
With one huge _Argosie_, and eight great ships,
But all in vaine, their powers naught prevaild,
For the _Reuenge_, her Canon loud-dogs slips,
Whose bruzing teeth, so much the _Phillip_ quaild,
That foundring in the greedie maine, he dips
His damned bodie in his watrie tombe,
Wrapt with dishonour in the Oceans wombe.

The other eight, fighting, were likewise foild,
And driuen perforce vnto a vile retraite,
None durst abide, but all with shame recoild,
Whilst _Valures_ selfe, set _Grinuile_ in her seate;
Onely _Don Luis Saint Iohn_, seeing spoild,
His Countries honour by this strange defaite,
Single encountred _Grinuile_ in the fight,
Who quicklie sent his soule to endlesse night.

_George de Prunaria_, a Spanish Knight,
Euer held valiant in dispight of fate,
Seconded _Luis_, and with mortall might,
Writ on Sir _Richards_ target souldiers hate,
Till _Grinuile_ wakned with his loud rung fight,
Dispatcht his soules course vnto _Plutos_ gate:
And after these two, sent in post all those
Which came within his mercie or his blowes.

By this, the sunne had spread his golden locks,
Vpon the pale green carpet of the sea,
And opned wide the scarlet dore which locks
The easefull euening from the labouring day;
Now Night began to leape from iron Rocks,
And whip her rustie wagon through the way,
Whilst all the _Spanish_ host stoode maz'd in sight,
None darring to assayle a second fight.

When _Don Alfonso_, Generall of the warre,
Saw all his Nauie with one ship controld,
He toare his hayre, and loudlie cryd from farre,
For honour _Spanyards_, and for shame be bold;
Awaken Vertue, say her slumbers marre
_Iberias_ auncient valure, and infold
Her wondred puissance, and her glorious deeds,
In cowards habit, and ignoble weeds.

Fie, that the spyrit of a single man,
Should contradict innumerable wills,
Fie, that infinitiues of forces can,
Nor may effect what one conceit fulfills;
Woe to the wombe, ceaselesse the teats I ban,
That cherrisht life, which all our liues ioyes kills;
Woe to our selues, our fortunes, and our minds,
Agast and scarrd, with whistling of the winds.

See how he triumphes in dispight of death,
_Promethean_ like, laden with liuing fier,
And in his glorie spits disdainfull breath,
Loathing the baseness of our backe retire;
Euen now me thinke in our disgrace he saith,
Foes to your fames, why make you Fate a lyer,
When heauen and she haue giuen into your hand,
What all the world can neuer back demand?

Say that the God of _Warre_; Father of Chiualrie,
The _Worthies_, _Heroes_, all fam'd Conquerours,
_Centaurs_, _Gyants_, victorious _Victorie_,
Were all this _Grinuils_ hart-sworne paramours.
Yet should we fightlesse let our shyps force flie:
Well might we crush his keele with rocklike powers,
And him with them ore-whelme into the maine,
Courage then harts, fetch honour backe againe.

Heere shame, the fretting canker of the mind,
That fiers the face with fuell from the hart,
Fearing his weapons weakenes, eft assigned
To desperate hardines his confounding dart,
And now the _Spanyards_ made through words stone blind,
Desperate by shame, ashamd dispaire should part,
Like damned scritchowles, chimes to dead mens hours,
Make vowes to fight, till fight all liues deuours.

And now the tragicke sceane of death begins,
Acts of the night, deeds of the ouglie darke,
When Furies brands gaue light to furious sins,
And gastlie silence gaping wounds did marke;
Sing sadlie then my Muse (teares pittie wins)
Yet mount thy wings beyond the mornings Larke,
And wanting thunder, with thy lightnings might,
Split cares that heares the dole of this sad night.

The fier of _Spaynes_ pride, quencht by _Grinuils_ sword,
_Alfonso_ rekindles with his tong,
And sets a batelesse edge, ground by his word
Vpon their blunt harts feebled by the strong,
Loe animated now, they all accord,
To die, or ende deaths conflict held so long;
And thus resolud, too greedelie assay
His death, like hounds that hold the Hart at bay.

Blacker then night, more terrible then hell,
Louder then thunder, sharper then _Phoebus_ steele,
Vnder whose wounds the ouglie _Python_ fell,
Were bullets mantles, clowding the haplesse keele,
The slaughtered cryes, the words the cannons tell,
And those which make euen rocky Mountaines reele,
And thicker then in sunne are Atomies,
Flew bullets, fier, and slaughtered dead mens cries.

At this remorsles Dirgie for the dead,
The siluer Moone, dread Soueraigne of the Deepe,
That with the floods fills vp her horned head
And by her waine the wayning ebbs doth keepe:
Taught by the Fat's how destenie was led,
Bidds all the starres pull in their beames and weepe:
For twas vnfit, chast hallowed eyes should see
Honour confounded by impietie.

Then to the night she giues all soueraigne power,
Th'eternall mourner for the dayes diuorce,
Who drowned in her owne harts killing shower,
Viewes others torments with a sad remorse.
This flintie Princesse, ayme cryes to the hower,
On which to looke, kinde eies no force could force.
And yet the sight her dull hart so offended,
That from her sight a fogge dewe descended.

Now on our Knight, raines yron, sword, and fiers,
Iron wrapt in smoke, sword bath'd in smoking blood,
Fiers, furies king, in blood and smoke aspires
The consumation of all liuing good,
Yet _Grinuile_, with like Agents like expires
His foemen's darts, and euermore withstood
Th'assaults of death, and ruins of the warre,
Hoping the splendour of some luckie starre.

On eyther side him, still two _Gallions_ lay,
Which with continuall boardings nurst the fight,
Two great _Armados_, howrelie ploy'd their way,
And by assaulte, made knowne repellesse might.
Those which could not come neere vnto the fray,
Aloose dicharg'd their volleys gainst our Knight.
And when that one shrunk back, beat with disgrace,
An other instantly supply'd the place.

So that their resting, restlesse him containd,
And theyr supplies, deny'd him to supply:
The _Hydra_ of their mightines ordaind
New spoile for death, when old did wounded lie:
But hee, _Herculian_-like one state retaind,
One to triumph, or one for all to die.
Heauen had onelie lent him but one hart,
That hart one thought, that thought no feare of smart.

And now the night grew neere her middle line,
Youthfully lustie in her strongest age,
When one of _Spaynes_ great _Gallions_ did repine,
That one should many vnto death ingage,
And therefore with her force, halfe held diuine,
At once euaporates her mortall rage,
Till powerfull _Grinuille_, yeelding power a toombe
Splyt her, & sunck her in the salt waves wombe.

When _Cutino_, the Hulks great Admirall,
Saw that huge Vessel drencht within the surge,
Enuie and shame tyered vpon his gall,
And for reuenge a thousand meanes doth vrge;
But _Grinuile_, perfect in destructions fall,
His mischiefes with like miseries doth scourge,
And renting with a shot his wooden tower,
Made _Neptunes_ liquid armes his all deuouer.

These two ore-whelm'd, _Siuills Ascension_ came,
A famous ship, well man'd and strongly drest,
_Vindicta_ from her Cannons mouthes doth flame,
And more then any, our dread Knight oppresst:
Much hurt shee did, many shee wounded lame,
And _Valurs_ selfe, her valiant acts confest.
Yet in the end, (for warre of none takes keepe)
_Grinuile_ sunck her within the watry deepe.

An other great _Armado_, brusd and beat,
Sunck neere _S. Michaels_ road, with thought to scape,
And one that by her men more choicely set,
Beeing craz'd and widow'd of her comly shape,
Ran gainst the shore, to pay _Ill-chaunce_ her debt,
Who desolate for desolations gape:
Yet these confounded, were not mist at all.
For new supplies made new the aged brall.

This while on _Grinuile_ ceazed no amaze.
No wonder, dread, nor base astonishment,
But true resolue, and valurs sacred blaze,
The crowne of heauen, and starrie ornament
Deck't his diuine part, and from thence did raze
Affects of earth, or earth's intendiment.
And in this broyle, as cheerefull was his fight,
As _Ioues_, embracing _Danae_ by night.

Looke how a wanton Bridegroome in the morne,
Busilie labours to make glad the day,
And at the noone, with wings of courage borne,
Recourts his bride with dauncing and with play,
Vntil the night which holds meane bliss in scorne,
By action kills imaginations sway,
And then, euen then, gluts and confounds his thought,
With all the sweets, conceit or Nature wrought,

Euen so our Knight the bridegroome vnto _Fame_,
Toild in his battailes morning with vnrest,
At noone triumph'd and daunst, and made his game,
That vertue by no death could be deprest;
But when the night of his loues longings came,
Euen then his intellectuall soule confest
All other ioyes imaginarie were
Honour vnconquerd, heauen and earth held deare.

The bellowing shotte which wakened dead mens swounds,
As _Dorian_ musick, sweetned his cares,
Ryuers of blood, issuing from fountaine wounds,
Hee pytties, but augments not with his teares,
The flaming fier which mercilesse abounds,
Hee not so much as masking torches feares,
The dolefull Eccho of the soules halfe dying,
Quicken his courage in their banefull crying.

When foule _Misfortune_ houering on a Rock,
(The stonie girdle of the _Florean_ Ile,)
Had seene this conflict, and the fearfull shock,
Which all the _Spanish_ mischiefes did compile,
And saw how conquest licklie was to mock
The hope of _Spayne_, and fauster her exile,
Immortall shee, came downe herselfe to fight,
And doe what else no mortall creature might.

And as she flew the midnights waking starre,
Sad _Cassiopea_ with a heauie cheare,
Pusht forth her forehead, to make known from farre,
What time the dryrie dole of earth drew neare,
But when shee saw _Misfortune_ arm'd in warre,
With teares she blinds her eyes, and clouds the ayre,
And asks the Gods, why _Fortune_ fights with man?
They say, to doe, what else no creature can.

O why should such immortall enuie dwell,
In the enclosures of eternall mould?
Let Gods with Gods, and men with men retell,
Vnequall warres t'vnequall shame is sould;
But for this damned deede came shee from hell,
And _Ioue_ is sworne, to doe what dest'nie would,
Weepe then my pen, the tell-tale of our woe,
And curse the fount from whence our sorrows flow.

Now, now, _Misfortune_ fronts our Knight in armes,
And casts her venome through the _Spanysh_ hoast,
Shee salues the dead, and all the lyuing warmes
With vitall enuie, brought from _Plutos_ coast;
Yet all in vaine, all works not _Grinuils_ harmes;
Which seene, shee smiles, and yet with rage imbost[5]
Saith to her selfe, since men are all too weake,
Behold a goddesse shall thy lifes twine breake.

With that shee takes a Musket in her hand,
Raft from a dying Souldiour newlie slaine,
And ayming where th' vnconquered Knight did stand,
Dischargd it through his bodie, and in twaine
Deuids the euer holie nuptiall band,
Which twixt his soule, and worlds part shold remaine,
Had not his hart, stronger then _Fortunes_ will,
Held life perforce to scorne _Misfortunes_ ill.

The bubling wound from whence his blood distild,
Mourn'd to let fall the hallowed drops to ground,
And like a iealous loue by riuall illd,
Sucks in the sacred moisture through the wound;
But he, which felt deaths fatall doome fulfilld,
Grew fiercer valiant, and did all confound,
Was not a _Spanyard_ durst abord him rest,
After he felt his deaths wound in his brest.

Hundreds on hundreds, dead on the maymed fall,
Maymed on sounde, sound in them selues lye slaine,
Blest was the first that to his ship could crall,
For wounded, he wounds multituds againe;
No sacrifice, but sacrifice of all,
Could stay his swords oblations vnto paine,
Nor in _Phillipie_, fell for _Caesars_ death,
Soules thicker then for _Grinuils_ wasting breath.

The _Nemian_ Lyon, _Aramanthian_ Bore,
The _Hircanian_ Tyger, nor the _Cholcean_ Bulls,
Neuer extended rage with such vprore,
Nor in their brests mad monstrous furie lulls;
Now might they learne, that euer learnt before,
Wrath at our Knight, which all wrath disanulls,
For slauish death, his hands commaunded more,
Then Lyon, Tyger, Bull, or angrie Bore.

Had _Pompey_ in _Pharsalia_ held his thought,
_Caesar_ had neuer wept vpon his head,
Had _Anthonie_ at _Actiome_ like him fought,
_Augustus_ teares had neuer drowned him dead,
Had braue _Renaldo_, _Grinuiles_ puissance bought,
_Angelica_ from France had neuer fled,
Nor madded _Rowland_ with inconstancie,
But rather slayne him wanting victorie.

Before a storme flewe neuer Doues so fast,
As _Spanyards_ from the furie of his fist,
The stout _Reuenge_, about whose forlorne wast,
Whilome so many in their moods persist,
Now all alone, none but the scourge imbrast,
Her foes from handie combats cleane desist;
Yet still incirkling her within their powers,
From farre sent shot, as thick as winters showers.

_Anger_, _and Enuie_, enemies to _Life_,
Strong smouldering _Heate_ and noisom stink of _Smoke_,
With over-labouring _Toyle_, _Deaths_ ouglie wife,
These all accord with _Grinuiles_ wounded stroke,
To end his liues date by their ciuell strife,
And him vnto a blessed state inyoke,
But he repelld them whilst repell he might,
Till feinting power, was tane from power to fight

Then downe he sat, and beat his manlie brest,
Not mourning death, but want of meanes to die;
Those which suruiu'd coragiouslie be blest,
Making them gods for god-like victorie;
Not full twice twentie soules aliue did rest,
Of which the most were mangled cruellie,
Yet still, whilst words could speake, or signes could show,
From death he maks eternall life to grow.

The Maister-gunner, which beheld his eyes
Dart fier gainst death triumphant in his face,
Came to sustaine him, and with courage cryes,
How fares my Knight? worlds glory, martiall grace?
Thine honour, former honours ouer-flyes,
And vnto _Heauen_ and _Vertue_ bids the bace;
Cheere then thy soule, and if deaths wounding pain it,
_Abram's_ faire bosome lyes to entertaine it.

Maister, he sayes, euen heers the opned dore,
Through which my spirit bridgroome like must ride,
(And then he bar'd his wounded brest all gore)
To court the blessed virgine Lambe his bride,
Whose innocence the worlds afflictions bore,
Streaming diuine blood from his sliced side,
And to that heauen my soule with courage flyes,
Because vnconquered, conquering it dyes.

But yet, replyed the Maister once againe,
Great vertue of our vertues, strive with fate,
Yeeld not a minute vnto death, retaine
Life like thy glory, made to wonder at.
This wounds recouerie well may entertaine
A double triumph to thy conquering state,
And make thee liue immortall Angell blest,
Pleaseth thee suffer it be searcht and drest.

Descend then gentle _Grinvile_ downe below,
Into my Cabin for a breathing space,
In thee there let thy Surgion stanch our woe,
Giuing recuer to thee, our wounded case,
Our breaths, from thy breaths fountaine gently flow,
If it be dried, our currents loose their grace:
Then both for vs, and thee, and for the best,
Descend, to haue thy wound bound vp and drest.

Maister, reply'd the Knight, since last the sunne
Lookt from the hiest period of the sky,
Giuing a signall of the dayes mid noone,
Vnto this hower of midnight, valiantly,
From off this vpper deck I haue not runne,
But fought, and freed, and welcomd victorie,
Then now to giue new couert to mine head,
Were to reuiue our foes halfe conquered.

Thus with contrarie arguments they warre,
Diuers in their opinions and their speech,
One seeking means, th' other a will to darre;
Yet both one end, and one desire reach:
Both to keepe honour liuing, plyant are,
Hee by his fame, and he by skilfull leach,
At length, the Maister winnes, and hath procurd
The Knight discend, to have his woundings curd.

Downe when he was, and had display'd the port
Through which his life was martching vp to heauen,
Albe the mortall taint all cuers retort,
Yet was his Surgion not of hope bereuen,
But giues him valiant speech of lifes resort,
Saves, longer dayes his longer fame shall euen,
And for the meanes of his recouerie,
He finds both arte and possibilitie.

_Misfortune_ hearing this presage of life,
(For what but chimes within immortall eares)
Within her selfe kindles a home-bred strife,
And for those words the Surgions doomes day swears.
With that, her charg'd peece (_Atropos_ keene knife,)
Againe she takes, and leueld with dispairs,
Sent a shrill bullet through the Surgions head,
Which thence, through _Grinuils_ temples like was led.

Downe fell the Surgion, hope and helpe was reft,
His death gaue manumition to his soule,
_Misfortune_ smyld, and euen then shee left
The mournfull Ocean, mourner for this dole;
Away shee flyes, for all was now bereft,
Both hopes and helpe, for life to win deaths gole;
Yet _Grinuile_ vnamaz'd with constant faith,
Laughing dispisd the second stroke of death.

What foole (saith he) ads to the Sea a drop,
Lends _Etna_ sparks, or angry stormes his wind?
Who burnes the root when lightning fiers the top?
Who vnto hell, can worse then hell combind?
Pale hungry Death, thy greedy longings stop,
Hope of long life is banefull to my mind:
Yet hate not life, but loath captiuitie,
Where rests no trust to purchase victorie.

Then vp he came with feeble pace againe,
Strength from his blood, blood from his wounds descending,
Saies, here I liu'd, and here wil I sustaine,
The worst of Deaths worst, by my fame defending,
And then he fell to warre with might and maine,
Valure on death most valiantly depending,
And thus continued aye coragiously,
Vntil the day chast shadowes from the sky.

But when the mornings dewie locks drunk vp
A mistie moysture from the Oceans face,
Then might he see the source of sorrowes cup,
Plainly prefigured in that hatefull place;
And all the miseries that mortals sup
From their great Grandsire _Adams_ band, disgrace;
For all that did incircle him, was his foe,
And that incircled, modell of true woe.

His masts were broken, and his tackle torne,
His vpper worke hew'd downe into the Sea,
Naught of his ship aboue the sourge was borne,
But euen leueld with the Ocean lay,
Onely the ships foundation (yet that worne)
Remaind a trophey in that mighty fray;
Nothing at all aboue the head remained,
Either for couert, or that force maintained.

Powder for shot, was spent and wasted cleane,
Scarce seene a corne to charge a peece withall,
All her pykes broken, halfe of his best men slaine,
The rest sore wounded, on Deaths Agents call,
On th'other side, her foe in ranks remains,
Displaying multitudes, and store of all
What euer might auaile for victorie,
Had they not wanted harts true valiancie.

When _Grinuile_ saw his desperate drierie case,
Meerely dispoyled of all success-full thought,
Hee calls before him all within the place,
The Maister, Maister-gunner, and them taught
Rules of true hardiment to purchase grace;
Showes them the end their trauailes toile had bought,
How sweet it is, swift _Fame_ to ouer-goe,
How vile to diue in captiue ouerthrow.

Gallants (he saith) since three a clock last noone,
Vntill this morning, fifteene howers by course,
We haue maintaind stoute warre, and still vndoone
Our foes assaults, and driue them to the worse,
Fifteene _Armados_ boardings haue not wonne
Content or ease, but beene repeld by force,
Eight hundred Cannon shot against her side,
Haue not our harts in coward colours died.

Not fifteene thousand men araungd in fight,
And fifteene howers lent them to atchiue,
With fifty three great ships of boundlesse might,
Haue had or meanes or prowesse to contriue
The fall of one, which mayden vertue dight,
Kept in despight of _Spanish_ force aliue.
Then list to mee you imps of memorie,
Borne to assume to immortalitie.

Sith loosing, we vnlost keepe strong our praise,
And make our glories, gaynours by our ends,
Let not the hope of howers (for tedious dayes
Vnto our lines no longer circuite lends)
Confound our wondred actions and assayes,
Whereon the sweete of mortal eares depends,
But as we liue by wills victorious,
So let vs die victours of them and vs.

Wee that haue mercilesse cut Mercies wings,
And muffeld pittie in deaths mistie vale,
Let vs implore no mercie; pittyings,
But from our God, deere fauour to exhale
Our soules to heauen, where all the Angells rings
Renowne of vs, and our deepe tragick tale;
Let us that cannot liue, yet liue to dye,
Vnthrald by men, fit tropheys for the skye.

And thus resolu'd since other meane is reft,
Sweet Maister-gunner, split our keele in twaine,
We cannot liue, whom hope of life hath left,
Dying, our deaths more glorious liues retain,
Let not our ship, of shame and foile bereft,
Vnto our foe-men for a prize remaine;
Sinke her, and sinking with the _Greeke_ wee'le cry,
Best not to be, or beeing soone to dye.

Scarce had his words tane wings from his deere tong,
But the stout Maister-gunner, euer rich
In heauenlie valure and repulsing wrong,
Proud that his hands by action might inritch
His name and nation with a worthie song,
Tow'rd his hart higher then Eagles pitch,
And instantlie indeuours to effect
_Grinuils_ desier, by ending Deaths defect.

But th' other Maister, and the other Mat's,
Disented from the honour of their minds,
And humbly praid the Knight to rue their stat's,
Whom miserie to no such mischiefe binds;
To him th' aleadge great reasons, and dilat's
Their foes amazements, whom their valures blinds,
And maks more eager t'entertaine a truce,
Then they to offer words for warres excuse.

They show him diuers gallant men of might,
Whose wounds not mortall, hope gaue of recuer,
For their saks sue they to diuorce this night
Of desperate chaunce, calld vnto Deaths black lure,
Their lengthened liues, their countries care might right,
And to their Prince they might good hopes assure.
Then quod the Captaine, (deare Knight) do not spill,
The liues whom gods and Fat's seeke not to kill.

And where thou sayst the _Spanyards_ shall not braue
T' haue tane one ship due to our virgin Queene,
O knowe, that they, nor all the world can saue,
This wounded Barke, whose like no age hath seene,
Sixe foote shee leaks in hold, three shot beneath the waue,
All whose repaire so insufficient beene,
That when the Sea shall angrie worke begin,
She cannot chuse but sinke and dye therein.

Besides, the wounds and brusings which she beares,
Are such, so manie, so incurable,
As to remoue her from this place of feares.
No force, no wit, no meane, nor man is able;
Then since that peace prostrate to vs repaires,
Vnlesse our selues, our selues make miserable,
_Herculeen_ Knight, for pittie, pittie lend,
No fame consists in wilfull desperat end.

These words with emphasis and action spent,
Mou'd not Sir _Richard_, but inrag'd him more,
To bow or yeeld, his heart would neare relent,
He still impugns all thought of lifes restore;
The Maister-gunner euer doth consent
To act his wish, swearing, in beds of gore
Death is most louelie, sweete and amiable,
But captiu'd life for foulenes admirable.

The Captayne, seeing words could take no place,
Turnes backe from them vnto the liuing few,
Expounds what pittie is, what victors grace;
Bids them them selues, them selues in kindnes rew,
Peace if they please, will kindlie them imbrace,
And they may liue, from whom warres glory grew;
But if they will to desperate end consent,
Their guilty soules too late shall mourne repent.

The sillie men, who sought but liuing ioyes,
Cryes to the Captaine for an honord truce,
Life they desire, yet no life that destroyes
Their wonne renownes, but such as might excuse
Their woes, their wounds, and al what els anoyes
Beautie of laude, for other they refuse;
All which the Captaine swears they shal obtaine,
Because their foes, in doubtfull states remaine.

O when Sir _Richard_ saw them start aside,
More chaynd to life then to a glorius graue,
And those whom hee so oft in dangers tryde,
Now trembling seeke their hatefull liues to saue.
Sorrow and rage, shame, and his honors pride,
Choking his soule, madly compeld him raue,
Vntil his rage with vigor did confound
His heauie hart; and left him in a swound.

The Maister-gunner, likewise seeing Fate
Bridle his fortune, and his will to die,
With his sharpe sword sought to set ope the gate,
By which his soule might from his bodie flie,
Had not his freends perforce preseru'd his state,
And lockt him in his Cabbin safe to lie,
Whilst others swarm'd where haplesse _Grinuile_ lay,
By cryes recalling life, late runne away.

In this too restlesse turmoile of vnrest,
The poore _Reuenges_ Maister stole awaye,
And to the _Spanish_ Admirall adrest
The dolefull tidings of this mournfull day,
(The _Spanish_ Admirall who then oprest,
Houering with doubt, not daring t'end the fray,)
And pleads for truce, with souldier-like submission
Anexing to his words a straight condition.

_Alfonso_, willing to giue end to armes,
For well he knew _Grinuile_ would neuer yeild,
Able his power stoode like vnnumbred swarmes,
Yet daring not on stricter tearmes to build,
He offers all what may alay their harmes
Safetie of liues, nor any thrall to weild,
Free from the Gallie, prisonment, or paine,
And safe returne vnto their soyle againe

To this he yeelds, as well for his own sake,
Whom desperate hazard might indamage sore,
As for desier the famous Knight to take,
Whom in his hart he seemed to deplore,
And for his valure halfe a God did make,
Extolling him all other men before,
Admiring with an honourable hart,
His valure, wisdome, and his Souldiours Art.

With peacefull newes the Maister backe returns,
And rings it in the liuing remnants eares,
They all reioyce, but _Grinuile_ deadly mourns,
He frets, he sighs, he sorrowes and despaires,
Hee cryes, this truce, their fame and blisse adiourns,
He rents his locks, and all his garments teares,
He vowes his hands shall rent the ship in twaine
Rather then he will _Spanish_ yoke sustaine.

The few reseru'd, that life esteem'd too well,
Knowing his words were warrants for his deede,
Vnkindly left him in that monstrous hell,
And fled vnto _Alfonso_ with greate speede,
To him their Chieftaines mightines they tell,
And how much valure on his soule doth feede,
That if preuention, not his actions dim,
Twill be too late to saue the shyp or him.

_Bassan_ made proude, vnconquering t'ouer-come,
Swore the brave Knight nor ship he would not lose,
Should all the world in a petition come:
And therefore of his gallants, fortie chose
To board Sir _Richard_, charging them be dombe
From threatning words, from anger, and from bloes,
But with all kindnes, honor, and admire
To bring him thence, to further _Fames_ desire.

Sooner they boarded not the crazed Barke,
But they beheld where speechlesse _Grinuile_ lay,
All smeard in blood, and clouded in the darke,
Contagious curtaine of Deaths tragick day;
They wept for pittie, and yet silent marke
Whether his lungs sent liuing breath away,
Which when they sawe in ayrie blasts to flie,
They striu'd who first should stanch his misery.

Anon came life, and lift his eye-lids vp,
Whilst they with teares denounce their Generals wil,
Whose honord mind sought to retort the cup
Of deaths sad poyson, well instruckt to kill;
Tells him what fame and grace his eyes might sup
From _Bassans_ kindnes, and his Surgions skill,
Both how he lou'd him, and admir'd his fame,
To which he sought to lend a liuing flame.

Aye mee (quoth _Grinuile_) simple men, I know
My bodie to your Generall is a pray,
Take it, and as you please my lyms bestow,
For I respect it not, tis earth and clay:
But for my minde that mightier much doth grow,
To heauen it shall, despight of _Spanish_ sway.
He swounded, and did neuer speake againe.
This said, orecome with anguish and with paine,

They took him vp, and to theyr Generall brought
His mangled carkasse, but vnmaimed minde,
Three dayes hee breath'd, yet neuer spake he ought,
Albe his foes were humble, sad, and kinde;
The fourth came downe the Lambe that all souls bot,
And his pure part, from worser parts refind,
Bearing his spirite vp to the loftie skyes,
Leauing his body, wonder to wonders eyes.

When _Bassan_ saw the Angell-spirite fled,
Which lent a mortall frame immortall thought,
With pittie, griefe, and admiration led,
He mournfully complaind what Fat's had wrought.
Woe me (he cryes) but now aliue, now dead,
But now inuincible, now captiue brought:
In this, vniust are Fat's, and Death declared,
That mighty ones, no more than meane are spared.
You powers of heauen, rayne honour on his hearse,
And tune the Cherubins to sing his fame,
Let Infants in the last age him rehearse,
And let no more, honour be Honor's name:
Let him that will obtaine immortall vearse,
Conquer the stile of _Grinuile_ to the same,
For till that fire shall all the world consume,
Shall neuer name, with _Grinuile_ name presume.
Rest then deere soule, in thine all-resting peace,
And take my teares for tropheys to thy tombe,
Let thy lost blood, thy vnlost fame increase,
Make kingly eares thy praises second wombe:
That when all tongues to all reports surcease,
Yet shall thy deeds, out-liue the day of doome,
For even Angels, in the heasens shall sing,
_Grinuile_ vnconquered died, still conquering.
_O aelinam_.

Footnotes:

1: Choristers.

2: Hangings, so called from having first been made at Arras.

3: Constellations.

4: Entangled.

5: Blown by being hunted.
"But being then _imbost_, the stately deer
When he hath gotten ground," &c.
--_Drayton's Polyolbian_, xiii, p. 917.

* * * * *

A true report of a worthy fight, performed in the voyage from Turkie, by
fiue ships of London, against 11. Gallies, and two frigats of the King of
Spaines, at Pantalarea within the Streights. Anno, 1586. Written by
Philip Iones.

The Marchants of London, being of the incorporation of the Turkey trade,
hauing receiued intelligencies, and aduertisements, from time to time, that
the King of Spaine grudging at the prosperitie of this kingdome, had not
onely of late arrested al English ships, bodies, and goods in Spaine, but
also maligning the quiet trafique which they vsed to and in the dominions,
and prouinces, vnder the obedience of the Great Turke, had giuen order to
the Captaines of his gallies in the Leuant, to hinder the passage of all
English ships, and to endeuour by their best meanes, to intercept, take,
and spoile them, their persons, and goods: they hereupon thought it their
best course to set out their flete for Turkie, in such strength and
abilitie for their defence, that the purpose of their Spanish enemie might
the better be preuented, and the voyage accomplished with greater securitie
to the men and shippes. For which cause, fiue tall, and stoute shippes,
appertaining to London, and intending onely a Marchants voyage, were
prouided and furnished with all things belonging to the Seas; the names
whereof were these:

1. The Marchant Royal, a very braue and good shippe, and of great report.

2. The Tobie.

3. The Edward Bonauenture.

4. The William and Iohn.

5. The Susan.

These fiue departing from the coast of England, in the moneth of Nouember
1585. kept together as one fleete, til they came as high as the Isle of
Sicilie, within the Leuant. And there, according to the order and direction
of the voyage, each shippe began to take leaue of the rest, and to separate
himselfe, setting his course for the particular port, whereunto hee was
bounde: one for Tripolie in Syria, another for Constantinople, the chiefe
Citie of the Turkes Empire, situated vpon the coast of Romania, called of
olde, Thracia, and the rest to those places, whereunto they were priuatly
appointed. But before they diuided themselues, they altogether consulted,
of and about a certaine and speciall place for their meeting againe after
the lading of their goods at their seuerall portes. And in conclusion, the
generall agreement was to meet at Zante, an Island neere to the maine
continent of the West part of Morea, well knowen of all the Pilots, and
thought to be the fittest place of their Rendeuous. Concerning which
meeting, it was also couenanted on eche side, and promised, that whatsoeuer
ship of these 5. should first arriue at Zante, should there stay and expect
the comming of the rest of the fleete, for the space of twentie dayes. This
being done, ech man made his best hast according as winde and wether woulde
serue him to fiulfill his course, and to dispatch his businesse: and no
neede was there to admonish or incourage any man, seeing no time was ill
spent, nor opportunitie omitted on any side, in the performance of ech mans
duetie, according to his place.

It fell out that the Tobie which was bound for Constantinople had made such
good speede, and gotten such good weather, that she first of al the rest
came back to the appointed place of Zante, and not forgetting the former
conclusion, did there cast ancre, attending the arriuall of the rest of the
fleete, which accordingly (their busines first performed) failed not to
keepe their promise. The first next after the Tobie was the Royal Marchant,
which together with the William and Iohn came from Tripolie in Syria, and
arriued at Zante within the compasse of the foresaide time limitted. These
ships in token of the ioy on all parts concerned for their happy meeting,
spared not the discharging af their Ordinance, the sounding of drums and
trumpets, the spreading of Ensignes with other warlike and ioyfull
behaviours, expressing by these outward signes, the inward gladnesse of
their mindes, being all as ready to ioyne together in mutuall consent to
resist the cruel enemie, as now in sporting maner they made myrth and
pastyme among themselues. These three had not bene long in the hauen, but
the Edward Bonauenture also, together with the Susan her consort, were come
from Venice with their lading, the sight of whom increased the ioy of the
rest, and they no lesse glad of the presence of the others, saluted them in
most friendly and kinde sort, according to the maner of the Seas: and
whereas some of these ships stoode at that instant in some want of
victuals, they were all content to stay in the port, till the necessities
of ech shippe were supplied, and nothing wanted to set out for their
returne.

In this port of Zante, the newes was fresh and currant, of two seuerall
armies and fleetes prouided by the king of Spaine, and lying in waite to
intercept them: the one consisting of 30. strong Gallies, so well appointed
in all respects for the warre, that no necessary thing wanted: and this
fleete houered about the Streights of Gibraltar. The other armie had in it
20. Gailies, whereof some were of Sicilie, and some of the island of Malta,
vnder the charge and gouernment of Iohn Andrea Dorea, a Captaine of name
seruing the king of Spaine. These two diuers and strong fleetes waited and
attended in the Seas for none, but the English shippes, and no doubt made
their accompt and sure reckoning that not a shippe should escape their
furie. And the opinion, also of the inhabitants of the Isle of Zante was,
that in respect of the number of Gallies in both these armies, hauing
receiued such straight commandement from the king, our ships and men being
but few, and little in comparison of them, it was a thing in humane reason
impossible, that wee should passe either without spoiling, if we resisted,
or without composition at the least, and acknowledgement of duetie to the
Spanish king.

But it was neither the report of the attendance of these armies, nor the
opinions of the people, nor any thing else, that could daunt or dismay the
courages of our men, who grounding themselues upon the goodnesse of their
cause, and the promise of God, to bee deliuered from such as without reason
sought their destruction, carried resolute mindes, notwithstanding all
impediments to aduenture through the Seas, and to finish their Nauigations,
maugre the beards of the Spanish souldiers. But least they should seeme too
carelesse, and too secure of their estate, and by laying the whole and
entire burden of their safetie vpon Gods prouidence, should foolishly
presume altogether of his helpe, and neglect the meanes which was put into
their handes, they failed not to enter into counsell among themselues, and
to deliberate aduisedly for their best defence. And in the end with
generall consent, the Marchant Royall was appointed Admirall of the fleete,
and the Tobie Viceadmiral, by whose orders the rest promised to be
directed, and ech shippe vowed not to breake from another, whatsoeuer
extremitie should fall out, but to stand to it to the death, for the honour
of their Countrey, and the frustrating of the hope of the ambitious and
proud enemie.

Thus in good order they left Zante and the Castle of Graecia, and committed
themselues againe to the Seas, and proceeded in their course and voyage in
quietnes, without sight of any enemie, till they came neere to Pantalarea,
an Island so called, betwixt Sicilie, and the coast of Africke: into sight
wherof they came the 13. day of Iuly 1586. And the same day in the morning
about 7. of the clocke they descried 13. sailes in number, which were of
the Gallies, lying in waite of purpose for them, in and about that place.
As soone as the English ships had spied them, they by and by according to a
common order, made themselues ready for a fight, layd out their Ordinance,
scoured, charged, and primed them, displayed their ensignes, and left
nothing vndone to arme themselues throughly. In the meane time, the Gallies
more and more approched the ships, and in their banners there appeared the
armes of the Isles of Sicilia, and Malta, being all as then in the seruice
and pay of the Spaniard. Immediatly, both the Admirals of the Gallies sent
from ech of them a frigate, to the Admiral of our English ships, which
being come neere them, the Sicilian frigat first hailed them, and demanded
of them whence they were? They answered that they were of England, the
armes whereof appeared in their colours. Whereupon the saide frigat
expostulated with them, and asked why they delayed to sende or come with
their Captaines and pursers to Don Pedro de Leiua their Geuerall, to
acknowledge their duty and obedience to him in the name of the Spanish
king, Lord of those seas? Our men replied and said, that they owed no such
duetie nor obedience to him, and therefore would acknowledge none, but
commanded the frigat to depart with that answere, and not to stay longer a
brabling, vpon her perill. With that away she went, and vp comes towards
them the other frigat of Malta, and shee in like sort hailed the Admiral,
and would needs know whence they were, and where they had bene. Our
Englishmen in the Admirall, not disdaining an answere, tolde them that they
were of England, Marchants of London, had bene at Turkie, and were now
returning home: and to be requited in this case, they also demaunded of the
frigat whence she and the rest of the gallies were: the messenger answered,
we are of Malta, and for mine owne part my name is Cauallero. These gallies
are in seruice and pay to the king of Spaine, vnder the conduct of Don
Pedro de Leiua a noble man of Spaine, who hath bene commanded hither by the
King with this present force and armie, of purpose to intercept you. You
shall therefore (quoth he) do well to repaire to him to know his pleasure,
he is a noble man of good behauiour and courtesie, and meanes you no ill.
The Captaine of the English Admiral, whose name was M. Edward Wilkinson,
replied and said. We purpose not at this time to make triall of Don Pedro
his courtesie, whereof we are suspitious and doubtful, and not without good
cause: vsing withall good words to the messenger, and willing him to come
aboord him, promising securitie and good vsage, that thereby he might the
better knowe the Spaniards minde: whereupon hee in deed left his frigat,
and came aboord him, whom hee intertained in friendly sort, and caused a
cuppe of wine to be drawne for him, which be tooke and beganne, with his
cap in his hand, and with reuerend termes to drinke to the health of the
Queene of England, speaking very honourably of her Maiestie, and giving
good speeches of the courteous vsage and interteinement that he himselfe
had receiued in London, at the time that the duke of Alenson, brother to
the late French king was last in England: and after he had well drunke, hee
tooke his leaue, speaking well of the sufficiencie and goodnesse of our
shippes, and especially of the Marchant Royal, which he confessed to haue
seene before, riding in the Thames neere London. He was no sooner come to
Don Pedro de Leiua the Spanish general, but he was sent off againe, and
returned to the English Admirall, saying that the pleasure of the Generall
was this, that either their Captaines, Masters and Pursers should come to
him with speed, or else hee would set vpon them, and either take them or
sinke them. The reply was made by M. Wilkinson aforesaid, that not a man
should come to him; and for the bragge and threat of Don Pedro, it was not
that Spanish brauado that should make them yeeld a iot to their hinderance,
but they were as ready to make resistance, as he to offer an iniurie.
Whereupon Cauallero the messenger left bragging, and began to persuade them
in quiet sort and with many wordes, but all his labour was to no purpose,
and as his threat did nothing terrifie them, so his perswasion did nothing
mooue them to doe that which hee required. At the last he intreated to haue
the Marchant of the Admirall caried by him as a messenger to the Generall,
so that he might be satisfied, and assured of their mindes by one of their
owne company. But M. Wilkinson would agree to no such thing, although
Richard Rowit the marchant himselfe seemed willing to bee imployed in that
message, and laboured by reasonable perswasions to induce M. Wilkinson to
graunt it, as hoping to be an occasion by his presence and discreet
answeres to satisfie the Generall, and thereby to saue the effusion of
Christian blood, if it should grow to a battel. And he seemed so much the
more willing to be sent, by how much deeper the othes and protestations of
this Cauallero were, that he would (as hee was a true knight and a
souldier) deliuer him backe againe in safetie to his company. Albeit, M.
Wilkinson, which by his long experience had receiued sufficient triall of
Spanish inconsistencie and periurie, wished him in no case to put his life
and libertie in hazard vpon a Spaniards othe. But at last, vpon much
intreatie, he yeelded to let him go to the General, thinking in deed, that
good speeches and answeres of reason would haue contented him, whereas
otherwise refusall to do so, might peraduenture haue prouoked the more
discontentment.

M. Rowit therefore passing to the Spanish Generall, the rest of the Gallies
hauing espied him, thought in deed that the English were rather determined
to yeelde, then to fight, and therefore came flocking about the frigat,
euery man crying out, Que nueuas, que nueuas, Haue these Englishmen
yeelded? the frigate answered, Not so, they neither haue nor purpose to
yeeld, onely they haue sent a man of their company to speake with our
Generall: and being come to the Gallie wherein he was, he shewed himselfe
to M. Rowit in his armour, his guard of souldiers attending vpon him in
armour also, and began to speake very proudly in this sort: Thou
Englishman, from whence is your fleete, why stand ye aloofe off, knowe ye
not your duetie to the Catholique King, whose person I here represent?
Where are your billes of lading, your letters, pasports, and the chiefe of
your men? Thinke ye my attendance in these seas to be in vaine, or my
person to no purpose? Let al these things be done out of hand as I command,
vpon paine of my further displeasure and the spoyle of you all: These
wordes of the Spanish Generall were not so outragiously pronounced as they
were mildly answered by M. Rowit, who tolde him that they were al
Merchantmen, vsing trafique in honest sort, and seeking to passe quietly,
if they were not vrged further then reason. As for the king of Spaine, he
thought (for his part) that there was amitie betwixt him and his Souereigne
the Queene of England, so that neither he nor his officers should goe about
to offer any such injurie to English Marchants, who as they were farre from
giuing offence to any man, so they would be loath to take an abuse at the
handes of any, or sit downe to their losse, where their abilitie was able
to make defence. And as, touching his commandement aforesaide, for the
acknowledging of duetie, in such particular sort, he told him, that were
there was no duetie owing, there none should be performed, assuring him
that the whole company and shippes in generall stood resolutely vpon the
negatiue, and would not yeeld to any such vnreasonable demaund, joyned with
such imperious and absolute maner of commanding. Why then, said he, if they
wil neither come to yeeld, nor shew obedience to me in the name of any
king, I wil either sinke them or bring them to harbor, and so tell them
from me. With that the frigat came away with M. Rowit, and brought him
aboord the English Admiral againe according to promise: who was no sooner
entred in, but by and by defiance was sounded on both sides: the Spaniards
hewed off the noses of the Gallies, that nothing might hinder the leuell of
the shot, and the English on the other side courageously prepared
themselues to the combat, euery man according to his roome, bent to
performe his office with alacritie and diligence. In the meane time a
Cannon was discharged from the Admirall of the gallies, which being the
onset of the fight, was presently answered by the English Admirall with a
Culuering; so the skirmish began, and grew hot and terrible, there was no
powder nor shot spared: ech English ship matched it selfe in good order
against two Spanish Gallies, besides the inequalitie of the frigats on the
Spaniards side: and although our men performed their parts with singular
valure according to their strength, insomuch that the enemie as amased
therewith would oftentimes pause and stay, and consult what was best to be
done, yet they ceased not in the midst of their businesse to make prayer to
Almighty God the reuenger of al euils, and the giuer of victories, that it
would please him to assist them in that good quarell of theirs, in
defending themselues against so proud a tyrant, to teach their handes to
warre, and their fingers to fight, that the glory of the victory might
redound to his Name, and to the honor of true Religion which the insolent
enemie sought so much to ouerthrowe. Contrarily, the foolish Spaniardes
cried out according to their maner, not to God, but to our Lady (as they
terme the virgin Mary) saying O Lady helpe, O blessed Lady giue vs the
victory, and the honour thereof shalbe thine. Thus with blowes and prayers
on both sides the fight continued furious and sharpe, and doubtfull a long
time to which part the victorie would incline: til at the last the Admiral
of the Gallies of Sicilie began to warpe from the fight, and to holde vp
her side for feare of sinking, and after her went also two others in like
case, whom al the sort of them inclosed, labouring by all their meanes to
keep them aboue water, being ready by the force of English shot which they
had receiued to perish in the seas: and what slaughter was done among the
Spaniards themselues, the English were vncertaine, but by a probable
coniecture apparant afar off, they supposed their losse was so great that
they wanted men to continue the charging of their pieces: [Sidenote: A
fight of fiue houres.] whereupon with shame and dishonor, after 5. houres
spent in the battell, they withdrew themselues: and the English contented
in respect of their deepe lading, rather to continue their voyage then to
follow the chase, ceased from further blowes: with the losse onely of two
men slaine amongst them all, and another hurt in his arme, whom M.
Wilkinson with his good words and friendly promises did so comfort, that he
nothing esteemed the smart of his wound in respect of the honour of the
victory, and the shameful repulse of the enemy.

Thus with duetiful thankes to the mercy of God for his gracious assistance
in that danger, the English ships proceeded in their Nauigation, and
comming as high as Alger, a port towne vpon the coast of Barbary, they fell
with it, of purpose to refresh themselues after their wearinesse, and to
take in such supply of fresh water and victuals, as they needed: they were
no sooner entred into the port, but immediatly the king thereof sent a
messenger to the ships to knowe what they were, with which messenger the
chiefe master of ech shippe repaired to the king, and acquainted him not
onely with the state of their ships in respect of marchandize, but with the
late fight which they had passed with the Spanish Gallies, reporting euery
particular circumstance in word as it fell out in action: whereof the said
king shewed himselfe marueilous glad, interteining them in the best sort,
and promising abundant reliefe of all their wants, making generall
proclamation in the city vpon paine of death, that no man of what degree or
state soeuer he were, should presume either to hinder them in their
affaires, or to offer them any maner of inurie in body or goods. By vertue
whereof they dispatched al things in excellent good sort, with al fauor and
peaceablenesse: only such prisoners and captiues of the Spaniards as were
in the Citie, seeing the good vsage which they receiued, and hearing also
what seruice they had performed against the foresaide Gallies, grudged
exceedingly against them, and sought as much as they could to practise some
mischiefe against them: and one amongst the rest seeing an Englishman alone
in a certaine lane of the Citie, came vpon him suddenly, and with his knife
thrust him in the side, yet made no such great wound, but that it was
easily recouered. The English company hearing of it, acquainted the king
with the fact, who immediatly sent both for the party that had receiued the
wound and the offender also, and caused an executioner in the presence of
himselfe and the English, to chastise the slaue euen to death, which was
performed to the ende that no man should presume to commit the like part,
or to doe any thing in contempt of his royal commandement.

The English hauing receiued this good justice at the kings hands, and al
other things that they wanted, or could craue for the furnishing of their
shippes; tooke their leaue of him, and of the rest of their friends, that
were resident in Alger, and put out to Sea, looking to meete with the
second army of the Spanish king, which waited for them about the month of
the Straights of Gibraltar, which they were of necessitie to passe. But
comming neere to the said Straight, it pleased God to raise at that instant
a very darke and mistie fogge, so that one ship could not discerne another,
if it were 40. paces off: by meanes whereof; together with the notable
faire Easterne winds that then blewe most fit for their course, they passed
with great speed through the Straight, and might haue passed with that good
gale, had there bene 500. Gallies to withstand them, and the aire neuer so
cleare for euery ship to be seene. [Sidenote: The second Spanish fleete
lying in watie for the English.] But yet the Spanish Gallies had a sight of
them when they, were come within 3. English miles of the towne, and made
after them in all Possible haste, and although they saw that they were
farre out of their reach, yet in a vaine fury and foolish pride, they shot
off their Ordinance, and made a stirre in the Sea as if they had bene in
the midst of them, which vanitie of theirs ministred to our men notable
matter of pleasure and mirth, seeing men to fight with shadowes, and to
take so great paines to so small purpose.

But thus it pleased God to deride, and delude all the forces of that proud
Spanish king, which, he had prouided of purpose to distressethe English,
who notwithstanding passed through both his Armies, in the one, little
hurt; and in the other nothing touched, to the glory of his immortall Name,
the honour of our Prince and Countrey, and the just commendation of ech
mans seruice performed in that voyage.

END OF VOL. VII.

INDICES TO VOLS. V., VI., & VII.

INDICES.

_Where the same Document is given in Latin and English, the reference is to
the English Version._

_N.B._--The large print indicates that the _whole_ section refers to the
subject mentioned.

VOL. V.

AA (Sir J. de)
ABRAHAM BASSA
ACON or ACRE
--Taken
--History
ADAMS (T)
ADRIANOPLE
AGREEMENT, BETWEEN AMBASSADORS OF ENGLAND AND PRUSSIA, CONFIRMED BY RICHARD
II
--BETWEEN HENRY IV. AND CONRAD DE IUNGINGEN
--BETWEEN HENRY IV. AND HANS TOWNS
--BETWEEN HENRY IV. AND ULRICUS DE IUNGINGEN
--BETWEEN RICHARD I. AND PRINCE OF ACRE
--BETWEEN EDWARD IV. AND IOHN II. OF PORTUGAL
ALBERT, King of Sweden
ALBERT, Marquis of Brandenburg
--Biographical sketch
ALEPPO, A COMMANDMENT FOR
ALEXANDRIA, A COMMANDMENT TO THE CADI OF
--A COMMANDMENT TO THE BASSA OF
ALI BASSA, LETTER FROM QUEEN ELIZABETH
ALWEY (R.)
AMSTERDAM
ANDREW (S.)
APPIAN, quoted
ARTHUR, Duke of Brittany
ASCALON
AUCHER (Sir A.)
AUCHER (ship)
AUSTELL (Henry), HIS VOYAGE OVERLAND TO CONSTANTINOPLE
--HIS SAFE CONDUCT FROM THE SULTAN
AUSTEN (J.)
AUSTRIA

BABA (cape)
BAIRAM (feast of)
BAKER (M.)
BAKER (P.) commits disorders in the Levant
BAKER (R.) HIS FIRST VOYAGE TO GUINEA
--HIS SECOND VOYAGE
BALDWIN, Emperor of Constantinople
BALIABADRAM, A COMMANDMENT FOR
BARANGI or VARANGI
BARRET (A.)
BARRET (W.)
BART (H.)
BARTENSTEIN (castle), built
BEDINGHAM (R,)
BEFFART (C., of Triers)
BELGRADE, taken by the Turks
BELYETERE (E.)
BERENGARIA (Queen)
BETTS (W.)
BLACK SEA
BODENHAM (R.), HIS VOYAGE TO CANDIA AND CHIO
BOULOGNE
BOURGH (Sir John)
--His death
BOWYER (Sir W.)
BRAMPTON (W.)
BRANDEBURG
BRANDON (J.)
BREMEN
BRENNUS
BRESLAU
BRILL
BRISTOL
BRITOMAR
BRITONS, IN ITALY AND GREECE
BROOKE (J.)
BROWNE (J), mentioned
BRUGES
BRUNDUSIUM
BRUNE (H.)
BRUNSBURG (castle), built
BRUNSWICK
BUSS OF ZEALAND (ship), taken
BUSSSHIP (ship), taken

CABRERA or CAPRERA (island)
CADIZ
CALAIS
CAMDEN (W.), HIS. ACCOUNT OF THE BRITONS IN ITALY AND GREECE
--quoted
CAMPEN
CAMPION (G.), HIS DISCOURSE OF THE TRADE OF CHIO
CANDIA
CARUMUSALINI
CASIMIR. King of Poland, wages war against Knights of Jerusalem
--Defeated
--Obtains Marienburg by treason
--Concludes peace
CASTELIN (E.)
CAT (G.)
CAUMBRIGGE (R.)
CEPHALONIA
CERIGO (island)
CHAMBERLAIN (E.)
CHAMPION (meaning of)
CHANCELLOR (Richard)
CHARLES V. (of Spain), knights Peter Read
--mentioned
CHARTER GRANTED BY SULTAN TO ENGLISH
--GRANTED BY QUEEN ELIZABETH TO THE LEVANT COMPANY
--FROM PETER OF MOLDAVIA
CHESTER (Sir W.)
CHIO
--A DISCOURSE OF ITS TRADE
--VOYAGE OF BODENHAM
--A COMMANDMENT FOR
CHRISTMIMMEL built
CLAIRVAUX (abbey of)
CLEMENTS (J.), sent to Levant
CLEYE
COG (ship), seized
COLCHESTER
COLE (P.)
COLEN, or COLOGNE
CONRAD, Duke of Massovia
CONRADUS LANDGRAVIUS
CONSTANTINE THE GREAT
--HIS TRAVELS
CONSTANTINOPLE
COOTE (J.)
CORNWAILE (T.)
COURTBUTTRESSOW
COVENTRY, Parliament held at
COWES
CRACOW
CRETE (island)
CROSSEBAIRE (N.)
CRUTZBURG (castle), built
CURTIS (T.)
CYPRUS
--DESCRIBED
--History

DANTZIC
DANUBE
DASSELE (A. de)
DAWE (J.)
DELFT
DIERE (J.)
DOCKWRAY (Thomas)
DOGGER-SHIP, taken
DORDRECHT
DORIA (Juanette)
DORIA (Prince Pedro)
DOVER
DRAVER (M.)
DUCKET (I.)
DURHAM (S.)

EGYPT, A COMMANDMENT FOR
EINSLEBEN
ELBE (river)
ELBING
ELIZABETH (Queen)
--LETTERS FROM MURAD KHAN
--LETTERS TO MURAD KHAN
--GRANTS CHARTER TO LEVANT COMPANY
--HER COMMISSION TO WILLIAM HAREBORNE TO BE AMBASSADOR IN TURKEY
--LETTER TO ALI BASSA
--LETTER FROM MUSTAPHA CHAUS
--LETTER FROM SINAN BASSA
--LETTER FROM THE SULTANA
ELLERICHSHAUSEN (C. ab)
ELLERICHSHAUSEN (L. ab)
EMDEN
ENGLISHMEN SENT TO CONSTANTINOPLE
ERIGENA (John), HIS TRAVELS
ESTURMY (W.), his account of his embassy to Prussia
--LETTER FROM WERNERUS DE TETTINGEN
EUSEBIUS, quoted
EUTROPIUS, quoted
EYMS (W.)

FAMAGUSTA, SIEGE OF
FARDEL (meaning of)
FEN (H. ap)
FERMENIA or THERMIA (island)
FEUCHTUVANG (C. a)
FEUCHTUVANG (S. a)
FIELD (R.)
FINISTERRE (cape)
FLISPE (S.)
FLORUS, quoted
FORMENTERA (island)
FORREST (G.)
FOSTER (T.), HIS PASSPORT FROM EARL OF LEICESTER
FOWLER (T.)
FRIDAY (ship), taken
FROISSART, HIS ACCOUNT OF KING LYON'S VISIT TO ENGLAND
FUBBORNE (W.)

GABARDS
GAGE, (Sir E.)
GAGE (G.)
GALIPOLI (straits of)
GALITA (island)
GARRARD (Sir W.)
GARRET (William)
GENOA
GIBRALTAR
GLEIDELL (J.)
GODEZERE (ship), taken by Hans Towns
GODFREY, Earl of Hohenloe
GODFREY (J.)
GOLDESMITH (C.)
GONSON (R.)
GONSON (W.)
GONSTON (B.)
GOODWINE (J.)
GOURNEY (M.), VOYAGE TO ALGIERS
GRAA (T.), Ambassador of England
GRAVESEND
GRAY (John)
GRAY (R.)
GREEK FIRE
GRESHAM (J.)
GRINDALL, Archbishop of Canterbury
GRIPESWOLD

HACHENBERG (U.) Ambassador of Prussia
HAGUE (the)
HAKLUYT (R.), HIS ACCOUNT OF THE ANCIENT TRADE TO THE LEVANT
--LIST OF GOODS TO BE OBTAINED IN TURKEY
--MEMORANDUM OF WORK TO BE DONE IN TURKEY
HALBERSTADT
HAMBURG
HANS TOWNS
--AGREEMENT WITH HENRY IV.
--THEIR GRIEVANCES AGAINST ENGLAND
HAREBORNE (William), obtains safe conduct
--His first voyage
--COMMISSION TO BE AMBASSADOR
--VOYAGE IN THE SUSAN
--LETTER TO MUSTAPHA CHAUS
--HIS PETITION TO THE VICEROY OF MOREA
--HIS RETURN TO ENGLAND
HARWICH
HAWKIN DERLIN (ship), plundered
HAWKINS (Sir John)
HAWKWOOD (J.), HIS VICTORIES IN ITALY
HEILSBURG (castle), built
HEITH (W.)
HELDRINGEN (H. ab)
HELENA, HER TRAVELS
--mentioned
HELENA (ship), taken
HENRY (Emperor), his letter to Philip of France
HENRY, Earl of Plaen
HENRY IV., HIS LETTERS TO CONRAD DE IUNGINGEN
--THEIR AGREEMENT
--AGREEMENT WITH HANS TOWNS
--LETTER TO ULRICUS DE IUNGINGEN
--LETTERS FROM ULRICUS DE IUNGINGEN
--AGREEMENT WITH ULRICUS DE IUNGINGEN
HENRY VIII., HIS LETTER TO JOHN OF PORTUGAL
HERSTON (P.)
HICKMAN (A.)
HOLINSHED, HIS ACCOUNT OF THE EMBASSY FROM FERDINANDO TO HENRY VIII
HOLSTOCKE (W.)
HOLY CROSS (ship), voyage to Candia
HOOD (R.)
HORUSE (R.)
HOVEDEN (Roger de), bibliography
HUGHSON (J.)
HULL
HUNT (T.)

IENA
INNSBRUCK
IPSWICH
ISAAC COMNENUS
ISABEL (ship), taken
IUNGINGEN (C. a), sends an embassy to Richard II.
--HIS LETTERS TO RICHARD II
--COMPOSITION BETWEEN HIM AND ENGLAND
--RECEIVES LETTERS FROM HENRY IV
--HIS LETTERS TO HENRY IV
--THEIR AGREEMENT
IUNGINGEN (Ulricus a)
--LETTER FROM HENRY IV
--LETTER TO HENRY IV
--AGREEMENT WITH HENRY IV

JAROSLAW
JASSY or YAS
JENKINSON (A.)
JERUSALEM; voyage of Richard I, to
JERUSALEM (Knights of), CATALOGUE OF MASTERS
--Remove to Ptolemais
--Join the Dutch Knights in Prussia
--First war against Prussian infidels
--Second war against Prussia
--Prussians renounce Christianity
--Third war against Prussia
--Lose Acon
--Return to France
--Remove to Marienburg
--Defeated
--Battle against Wladislaus
--Prussians rebel against the Knights
--Apply to Casimir, King of Poland
--Commanded by Emperor Frederick to return to obedience
--Civil war
--Casimir defeated by the Knights
--Marienburg betrayed to Casimir
--Peace concluded
--Make a treaty with Richard II
--THEIR COMPOSITION WITH ENGLAND IN 1403
--THEIR AGREEMENT WITH HENRY IV. IN 1405
JOHN (of Portugal), letter from Henry VIII
JOHN BAPTIST (ship)
JOHN COMNENUS
JOPPA
JUSTINIAN

KELHAM, his Norman Dictionary quoted
KERPEN (Otto, of)
KINGTON (J.), his account of his embassy to Prussia
KINSTUT, King of Lithuania
--Escape from prison
KNAPPENRODT (W. A.)
KRANTZIUS (A.), HIS ACCOUNT OF THE BURNING OF NORBERN
KUCHENMEISTER (M.)
KUNIGSBERG founded

LAKENSWITHER (H.)
LAKINGLISH (J.)
LAMBERT (F.)
LAMBOLT (H.)
LANGSOUND
LEGHORN
LEICESTER, Earl of
--HIS PASSPORT TO THOMAS FOSTER
LEMAN (R.)
LEO AFRICANUS, quoted
LEOPOLD, Duke of Austria, takes Richard I. prisoner
--Sells him to Emperor
LESSON (O.)
LETIS (J.)
LEVANT, HAKLUYT'S ACCOUNT OF THE ANCIENT TRADE TO
--THE REVIVING OF THE TRADE TO THE
LEVANT COMPANY, CHARTER FROM MURAD KHAN
--FROM QUEEN ELIZABETH
LIBER-TRIADUM, quoted
LIGATE (J.)
LINCOLN (Bishop of), His letters to Conrad de Iungingen
LITTLE, (William), his works
LIVONIA
LOCKE (M.)
LOCKE (W.)
LODGE (Sir T.)
LONDON
LUBECK
LUDOLPHUS, Duke of Brunswick
LUDOLPHUS, surnamed King
LUTHER, born at Einsleben
LYDERPOLE (T.)
LYMASOL or LYMSZEN
LYNN
LYON, King of Armenia, HIS VOYAGE TO ENGLAND
LYONS

MAGDEBURG
MAIN (river)
MALAGA
MALIM (W.), HIS ACCOUNT OF THE SIEGE OF FAMAGUSTA
MALLORCA (island)
MALMESBURY (abbey)
MALMESBURY (W. of), quoted
MALTA
MANUCHIO, HIS SAFE CONDUCT FROM THE SULTAN
MAONE
MARGARET, Queen of Denmark
MARGARET (ship), taken
MARIEBURG or MARIENBURG
--Taken by treason
MARLIN (ship)
MARMORA
MARPURG
MARSEILLES
MARTINE A GOLIN, His wonderful stratagem
MARTININGO (G.)
MATAPAN (cape)
MATTHEW GONSON (ship), VOYAGE TO CANDIA
--SECOND VOYAGE
--Mentioned
MAUSTROND
MEIDENBURG (Bulgrave of)
MERALL (Sir A. de), turns traitor
MERSH (T.)
MESSINA
--Taken by the English
MEYER (H.)
MICHAEL (ship), taken
MICONE (island)
MIDDEEBURG
MILO (island)
MINION (ship)
MITYLENE (island)
--A COMMANDMENT TO
MORAVIA
MOTTE (T.)
MOYLE, meaning of
MUNDE (W.)
MUNSTER, his history of the Dutch Knights of Jerusalem
MURAD KHAN, HIS LETTERS TO QUEEN ELIZABETH
--HIS LETTERS FROM QUEEN ELIZABETH
--GRANTS CHARTER TO LEVANT COMPANY
MUSTAPHA CHAUS, HIS LETTER TO QUEEN ELIZABETH
--LETTER FROM W. HAREBORNE

NARES, quoted
NEWCASTLE-UPON-TYNE
NICHOLAS (ship), taken
NIESTER (river)
NISSA
NOIE (W.)
NORBERN, BURNT BY ROBBERS FROM THE HANS TOWNS
NOVIBAZAR
NORWICH
NUREMBERG

ODOACER, King of Bohemia
OLMUDTZ
ORSELE (W. ab.)
ORWEL
OSBORNE (Sir E.), revives the trade to the Levant
--mentioned
OSTERNA (Boppo ab)
OSTRIGE (W.)
OTTO, Marquis of Brandeburg
OXNEY (W.)

PALANDRIE
PALOS (cape)
PARIS (Matthew), quoted
PARSONS (R.)
PASSARO (cape)
PATRASSO--A COMMANDMENT TO
PEIRS (T.)
PERCY RELIQUES, quoted
PETER, Vayvode of Moldavia
--HIS CHARTER TO ENGLISH MERCHANTS
PETER (ship), taken
PHILIP (of France), his alliance with Richard I
--Returns to France
--LETTER FROM THE EMPEROR HENRY
PHILIPPOPOLI
PICKET (J.)
PIKERON (J.)
PLOKET (T.)
PLUMER (J.)
PLUMMER (T.)
PLYMOUTH
PONTE (N. de), death of
PORTO DE SAN PEDRO
POUND (W.)
PREST (J.)
PRIMROSE (ship)
PRIOUR (J.)
PROCOPIUS
PRUSSIA, privileges of English merchants in
--Esturmy and Kington sent as ambassadors
PRUSSIA (knights of), see Jerusalem (kinghts of)
PURSER (A.)

RACKING, meaning of word
RAGUSA
RATCLIFFE (J.)
READ (Peter), HIS EPITAPH
REDEN (castle), built
RESIL (castle), built
REUSS (H.)
REVELL (R.)
RHODES
--SIEGE AND TAKING OF
--Blockaded
--Provisioned
--A brigantine sent to Candia
--General muster
--Letter from the Great Turk
--The Turks land on the Isle of Lango
--Besieged
--Assisted by Gabriel Martiningo
--Is taken
--A COMMANDMENT TO
RHONE (river)
RICHARD I., HIS VOYAGE INTO ASIA
--Alliance with Philip of France
--Taken prisoner by Duke of Austria
--EPITAPHS
RICHARD II., receives ambassadors from Conrad de Zolner
RICHTENBERG, (H. a)
RIGWEYS (R.)
ROBINES (R.)
RODE (A.)
ROME
RONDELL (L)
ROOS (William, Lord of)
--His letters to Conrad de Iungingen
ROSTOCK
ROTTERDAM
RUMNIE (J.)
RUSSDORFF (P. a)
RUSSE (L. van)

SAFFRON WALDON
ST. JOHN (knights of), go to Cyprus and Rhodes
ST. VINCENT (cape)
SALT
SALTZA.(H. de)
SAMBORUS, son of Suandepolcus
SANDWICH
SAUGERSHUSEN (H. de)
SANTA MARIA (cape)
SANTA SOPHIA (Mosque of)
SAPIENTIA (island)
SARDINIA
SAVIOUR (ship)
SCHIEDAM
SCOF (E.)
SCUVENDEN (B. a)
SEBURGH (J.)
SELAW
SHERWOOD (W.)
SHIPPER (ship), plundered
SIBEL (W.), Ambassador of England
SIGISMUND (Emperor), assists the Knights of Jerusalem
SILISDEN (W.)
SINAN BASSA, HIS LETTER TO QUEEN ELIZABETH
SITHENCE (meaning) of
SMITH (T.)
SNYCOP (J.)
SOPHIA or SOFIA
SOUTHAMPTON
SPENSER, quoted
STAPER (R.), revives trade to Levant
--mentioned
STARKEY (J.)
STETTIN
STEYHARD (N.)
STOCKET (N.), Ambassador of England
STRABO, quoted
STRALSSUND
STURMY. See _Esturmy_
SUANDEPOLCUS, Duke of Pomerania
SULTANA (of Turkey), LETTER TO QUEEN ELIZABETH
SUSAN (ship), Her voyage to Constantinople

TAMASSUS. See _Famagusta_
TANCRED, King of Sicily
TARIFFA
TELENSIN or FLEMCEN
TENEDOS (island)
TERRY (W.)
TETTINGEN (W. de), LETTER TO SIR W. ESTURMY
THEODORICUS, Earl of Aldenborg
THESTER (T.)
TIEFLEN (J. a)
TILBURY
TOBACCO, first introduced
TOOTOO, use of reduplication
TOPCLIFFE (J.)
TREATY. See _Agreement_
TRENT
TREVESO
TRINITY (ship), seized
TRINITY FITZWILLIAMS (ship)
TRUCHSES (M.)
TUK (L.)
TUNIS, taken by Charles V
TURKEY, THE TRADE WITH
TUSIMER (H. a)
TUTTEBURIE. (J.)
TYRE

URE (meaning of)

VARNA
VENICE
VILLIERS (Philip de), Grand Master of Rhodes
VIRUMNIUS, quoted
VISTULA
VITALIANS
VITOLDUS. capt. of Tartars
VLADISLAUS, fights the Knights of Jerusalem

WALCHERN island
WALENROD (C.)
WALKER, meaning of old word
WALPODE (S.), Ambassador of Prussia
WALPOT (H. of)
WALRODE (C. de), Ambassador of Prussia
WALSINGHAM, quoted
WALTERS (J.)
WALTHAM
WARTESLAUS, son of Suandepolcus
WATERDEN (T.)
WESENHAM (J.)
WEST-STOWE
WIGHT (J.), sent to the Levant
WIGHT (R.)
WILFORD (N.)
WILFORD (W.)
WILLIAM (The Pilgrim), his travels
WILLIAMSON (J.), HIS VOVAGE TO CANDIA
WINTER (W.)
WISEDOME (J.)
WISMER
WISSENBURG (Castle), built
WITTENBURG
WIVETON
WOOD, pilot
WYMAN (H,)

YARMOUTH
YARMOUTH (Isle of Wight)
YLGENBURG, built
YORK

ZANTE
ZARA
ZEMBRA
ZEPISWICH. See _Ipswich._
ZOLNER (C. of Rotenstein), sends ambassadors to Richard II.
--THEIR SPEECH
ZUYUERSEE

VOL. VI

ABYDOS, a city of Egypt
ACRIDOPHAGI, live on locusts
--Their extraordinary death
ADRIMACHIDE, their manners
AFRICA, DESCRIBED
--Its limits
--Its original inhabitants
--Agricultural produce
--Its Fauna
--Its state in 1659
AGATHIRSIANS, their manners
ALEXANDER, mentioned
ALEXANDRIA, a city of Egypt
ALFRED, sends alms to India
ALKAIR. See _Cairo_
ALKORAN. See _Koran_
ALLEGONA, a town of Grand Canary, taken and sacked
ALLEGRANIA (island)
ALURED, bishop of Worcester, his voyage to Constantinople and Syria
AMAZONS, their manners
AMERICA, an island
APHRES, their mariners
APSLEY (W.), Bookseller
ARABIA, its limits
--Manners of the inhabitants
--Their marriage customs
--Produce
--Contracts
--Spices
--Serpents
--Monarchs
--Precious metals
--Arms
--First adopts Mahometanism
ARAXIS (river)
ARGIPPIANS, their manners
ARITONE, quoted
ARMENIANS, mentioned
ARUNDEL (Earl of), Dedication of Fardel of Facions to
ASIA, its limits
--DESCRIBED
--Derivation of the name
ASTROLOGY in Egypt
ASSYRIA, DESCRIBED
--Boundaries
--Produce
--Boats
--Dress
--Marriage customs
--Medicine
--Burial customs
--Magi or Chaldei
ATLANTES, their manners
AXIAMA

BABYLON, a city-of Egypt
BABYLONIA. See _Assyria._
BAILEY (N.) quoted
BALE, quoted
BALLARD (W.), in service of Nicolas Thorne
BEROALD (P.), quoted
BEROSUS, quoted
BETANCOURT (J.), obtains the title of King of the Canaries
BIBLIOTHECA CURIOSA, quoted
BLACKNESS
BLANCO (cape)
BLOMME (de)
BOCCHORIS, the Pharaoh of Moses
BOCCHORIDES, a lawgiver of Egypt
BOEMUS (J.), mentioned
BONA ESPERANCA (cape)
BORROWING on parents' corpse
BRACAMONT (R. de), Admiral of France, mentioned
BRILL
BROKAGE (meaning of)
BUDINES, their manners
BURROUGHS, mentioned
BYNON (Captain)

CAIRO, a city of Egypt
CALAIS
CALIFORNIA
CALLACUT (cape)
CAMPION (Caspar), his letters to Lock and Winter
CANARIA. See _Grand Canary._
CANARY ISLANDS, THE ANCIENT TRADE OF THE ENGLISH TO
--Exports from
--DESCRIBED BY THOMAS NICOLS
--Ancient inhabitants
--CONQUEST OF
--mentioned
CANARY WINE
CANNIBALISM
CANTON
CASELIN (E.), mentioned
CASPII, mentioned
CATER (Captain)
CAVE-DWELLINGS, in Grand Canary
CECIL (Sir Robert), Dedication to
CESARIAN (island)
CHAIRUS. See _Cairo_
CHALDEI. See _Assyria_
CHILI
CHRISTIANITY, ITS HISTORY
CHRISTOPHER (The), Sails for Santa Cruz
CHURCH, HISTORY AND DOCTRINES OF THE
CLAUDIANS, not circumcised
CLOINYNG (meaning of)
CLOPER (W. D.)
CLUVERIUS, his description of Africa
COLUMBUS (Christopher), mentioned
CONQUEST of the Grand Canaries
CRANMER, his answer to Bishop Gardiner, quoted
CREMATION
CYNECI, their manners
CYNNAMI, their manners
CYRUS, mentioned

DALIDAE, a city of Panchaia
DAMASCUS, attacked by Mahomet
DAMIETTA (siege of), mentioned
DANIEL (S.), quoted
DARIEN (isthmus of)
DARIUS, mentioned
DARTMOUTH
DAVIS (J.), HIS WORLDES HYDROGRAPHICAL DESCRIPTION
--His preface
--His first voyage
--His second voyage
--His third voyage
--His Seamen's Secreats
DAWSON (T.), printer
DELIVER, meaning of word
DERBY (Earl of), his journey
DERRICKSON (Captain), killed
DESERT, or DESERTAS
DESOLATION (coast)
DIODORUS SICULUS, quoted
DIOSPOLIS
DOEST (P. Van)
DOG-HEADED MEN
DOVER
DRAKE (Sir Francis)
DRAYTON, his Polyolbion quoted

EARTH (THE DIVISIONS AND LIMITS OF THE)
EDGAR (Prince), his voyage
EDWARD (Prince), mentioned
EGYPT, DESCRIBED
--Manners of the inhabitants
--Their double alphabet
--Dress
--Religion
--Food
--Memento Mori
--Learning
--Monarch
--Funeral ceremonies
--Political divisions
--Finance
--Astrology
--Divisions into classes
--Laws
--Marriage customs
--Education
--Medicine
--Sacred Animals
--Curious borrowing transactions
ESPECIO (E. de)
ESSENES or ESSEIS, their peculiarities
ETHIOPIA, DESCRIBED
--ITS INHABITANTS
--Government
--Dress
--Animals
--Agricultural produce
--Precious stones
--Burial
--Religion
--Election of King
--Clergy
--Army
--Laws
--Punishment of adultery
--Banquets
EXACONTHALITUS, a rare stone
EXETER

FAMAGUSTA, invaded by Mustapha Basha
FARDLE OF FACIONS, REPRINTED, Preface
FELLES, meaning of
FERRO. See _Hierro_
FINISTERRE (Cape)
FITCH (Ralph), his voyage to China, mentioned
FITZROY (Oliver), son of King John
FLETCHER, his Purple Island, quoted
FLORENTIUS WIGORNIENSIS, quoted
FLORIDA, discovered
--Voyages, of Ribault, Laudonniere, and Gourges
--printed by Hakluyt
FLUSHING, mentioned
FORTEVENTURA, DESCRIBED, mentioned
FOUCHAl. See _Fienchal_
FOXE, quoted
FREDERICK. (Caesar), mentioned
FROWARD (cape)

GALDER, a city of Grand Canary
GALVANO, HIS ACCOUNT OF MACHAM'S DISCOVERY OF MADEIRA
GAMING forbidden on the Canary Fleet
GARACHICO, a town of Teneriffe
GASCOYNE, his Steel Glass quoted
GEERBRANSTON (J.)
GEORGIANS, mentioned
GHELEINSON (C.)
GIMNOSOPHIST. E
GLANVILLE (R.), Earl of Chester, goes to siege of Damietta
GOLDEN ASS, mentioned
GOMERA, DESCRIBED, THE TAKING OF
GOURGES, his voyage to Florida
GOWBIN, meaning of word
GRACIOSA, mentioned, taken
GRAND CANARY, DESCRIBED
--Derivation of the name
--Original inhabitants
--Principal of the Canary Isles
--Its produce
--Its position
--Visited by the Dutch fleet
--taken
GREENLAND, visited by Davis
GRIPHONES
GROIN (The)
GUANCHES
GUIA, a city of Grand Canary
GUIDALES, their manners

HAKLUYT (R.), in possession of Thorne's account of the Canaries
HAREBORNE (William), mentioned
HARIOT (Thomas), mentioned
HARLAC, Chief Justice of France, mentioned
HARMAN (Captain)
HAWKINS (Sir John)
HELIOPOLIS, a city of Egypt
HENRY II, his vow
HENRY III, of Castille, mentioned
HERODOTUS, quoted
HESPERA, an island
HEYWOOD (T.), quoted
HICKMAN (A.), mentioned
HIEROGLYPHICS
HIERO, DESCRIBED
HIGINIUS, quoted
HILL (J.), plants a vineyard in Hieros
HOCK-MONDAY, The festival explained

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