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The Life of William Carey, Shoemaker & Missionary by George Smith

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and put on a black coat. I knew him and was resolved."

14 In a criticism of the three Sanskrit grammars of Carey, Wilkins,
and Colebrooke, the first number of the Quarterly Review in 1809
pronounces the first "everywhere useful, laborious, and practical.
Mr. Wilkins has also discussed these subjects, though not always so
amply as the worthy and unwearied missionary. We have been much
pleased with Dr. Carey's very sensible preface."

15 It was reserved for a young Orientalist, whom the career of Carey
and Wilson of Bombay attracted to the life of a Christian
missionary, to do full justice to this book and its literature. In
1885 the Hon. Ion Keith-Falconer, M.A., published, at the Cambridge
University Press, his Kalilah and Dimnah, or The Fables of Bidpai:
Being an Account of their Literary History, with an English
Translation of the later Syriac Version of the Same, and Notes. The
heroic scholar and humble follower of Christ, having given himself
and his all to found a Mission to the Mohammedans of South Arabia,
at Sheikh Othman, near Aden, died there, on 11th May 1887, a death
which will bring life to Yemen, through his memory, and the Mission
which he founded, his family support, and the United Free Church of
Scotland carry on in his name.



Published in
1801. BENGALI--New Testament; Old Testament in 1802-9.
1811. Ooriya " " in 1819.
1824. Maghadi " only.
1815-19. Assamese " " in 1832.
1824. Khasi.
1814-24. Manipoori.
1808. SANSKRIT " " in 1811-18.
1809-11. HINDI " " in 1813-18.
1822-32. Bruj-bhasa " only.
1815-22. Kanouji " "
1820. Khosali--Gospel of Matthew only.
1822. Oodeypoori--New Testament only.
1815. Jeypoori "
1821. Bhugeli "
1821. Marwari "
1822. Haraoti "
1823. Bikaneri "
1823. Oojeini "
1824. Bhatti "
1832. Palpa "
1826. Kumaoni "
1832. Gurhwali "
1821. Nepalese "
1811. MARATHI-- " Old Testament in 1820.
1820. Goojarati " only.
1819. Konkan " Pentateuch in 1821.
1815. PANJABI " " and Historical Books
in 1822.
1819. Mooltani--New Testament.
1825. Sindhi--Gospel of Matthew only.
1820. Kashmeeri--New Testament; and Old Testament to 2nd Book
of Kings.
1820-26. Dogri--New Testament only.
1819. PUSHTOO--New Test. and Old Test. Historical Books.
1815. BALOOCHI " Three Gospels.
1818. TELUGOO " and Pentateuch in 1820.
1822. KANARESE " only.
MALDIVIAN--Four Gospels.


Persian. Singhalese.
Hindostani. Chinese (Dr. Marshman's).
Malayalam. Javanese.
Burmese--Matthew's Gospel. Malay.

17 Life and Work in Benares and Kumaon, 1839-77. London, 1884.

18 Mr. John Marshman, in his Life and Times of the three, states
that Fry and Figgins, the London typefounders, would not produce
under £700 half the Nagari fount which the Serampore native turned
out at about £100. In 1813 Dr. Marshman's Chinese Gospels were
printed on movable metallic types, instead of the immemorial wooden
blocks, for the first time in the twenty centuries of the history of
Chinese printing. This forms an era in the history of Chinese
literature, he justly remarks.

19 The fervent printer thus wrote to his Hull friends:--"To give to
a man a New Testament who never saw it, who has been reading lies as
the Word of God; to give him these everlasting lines which angels
would be glad to read--this, this is my blessed work."

20 In 1795 Captain Dodds, a Madras officer front Scotland,
translated part of the Bible into Telugoo, and, lingering on in the
country to complete the work, died seven days after the date of his
letter on the subject in the Missionary Magazines of 1796.

21 Then Editor of the Friend of India.

22 The Chaitanya Charita Amrita, by Krishna Dass in 1557, was the
first of importance.

23 Nor was his influence confined to the Protestant division of
Christendom. When, on the Restoration of 1815, France became once
more aggressively Romanist for a time, the Association for the
Propagation of the Faith was founded at Lyons and Paris, avowedly on
the model of the Baptist Missionary Society, and it now raises a
quarter of a million sterling a year for its missions. The
expression in an early number of its Annales is:--"C'est
l'Angleterre qui a fourni l'idée modèle," etc. "La Société des
Anabaptistes a formé pour ses Missions des Sociétés," etc.

24 Life of Alexander Duff, D.D., LL.D., chapter I.

25 Fuller more than once referred to the dying words of Sutcliff--"I
wish I had prayed more." "I do not suppose he wished he had prayed
more frequently, but more spiritually. I wish I had prayed more for
the influences of the Holy Spirit; I might have enjoyed more of the
power of vital godliness. I wish I had prayed more for the
assistance of the Holy Spirit in studying and preaching my sermons;
I might have seen more of the blessing of God attending my ministry.
I wish I had prayed more for the outpouring of the Holy Spirit to
attend the labours of our friends in India; I might have witnessed
more of the effects of their efforts in the conversion of the

26 The Baptist missionary, who became an Arian, and was afterwards
employed by Lord William Bentinck to report on the actual state of
primary education in Bengal.

27 The first India chaplain of the Church of Scotland,
superintendent of stationery and editor of the John Bull.--See Life
of Alexander Duff, D.D.

28 His Majesty's Lord Chamberlain formally expressed to the British
Minister at Copenhagen, H.E. the Hon. Edmund Monson, C.B., the
King's high pleasure at "the author's noble expressions of the good
his pre-possessors of the throne and the government of Denmark tried
to do for their Indian subjects," when the first edition of this
Life of William Carey, D.D., was presented to His Majesty.--See
Taylor and Son's Biographical and Literary Notices of William Carey,
D.D., Northampton, 1886.

29 In 1834, the year Carey died, there were in the college ten
European and Eurasian students learning Hebrew, Greek, Latin,
Bengali, mathematics, chemistry, mental philosophy, and history
(ancient and ecclesiastical). There were forty-eight resident
native Christians and thirty-four Hindoos, sons of Brahmans chiefly,
learning Sanskrit, Bengali, and English. "The Bengal language is
sedulously cultivated...The Christian natives of India will most
effectually combat error and diffuse sounder information with a
knowledge of Sanskrit. The communication, therefore, of a
thoroughly classic Indian education to Christian youth is deemed an
important but not always an indispensable object."

30 Serampore--Srirampur or place of the worshipful Ram.

31 Aitchison's Collection, vol. i., edition 1892, pp. 81-86

32 Life of Alexander Duff, D.D., LL.D., 1879.

33 William Carey, by James Culross, D.D., 1881.

34 For years, and till the land was sold to the India Jute Company
in 1875, the Garden was kept up at the expense of John Marshman,
Esq., C.S.I.

Sa. Rs.
35 "From May 1801 to June 1807, inclusive, as Teacher of
Bengali and Sanskrit, 74 months at 500 rupees monthly 37,000

From 1st July 1807 to 31st May 1830, as Professor of
ditto, at 1000 rupees monthly 2,75,000

From 23rd Oct. to July 1830, inclusive, 300 rupees
monthly, as Translator of Government Regulations 24,600

From 1st July 1830 to 31st May 1834, a pension of 500
rupees monthly 23,500

"Sicca Rupees 3,60,100"

36 The Evangelical Succession. Third Series. Edinburgh, Macniven and
Wallace, 1884.

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