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The Education Of The Negro Prior To 1861 by Carter Godwin Woodson

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from the Abolition Societies established in different Parts of the
United States, assembled at Philadelphia on the first Day of June,
one thousand seven hundred and ninety-eight, and continued, by
Adjournments, until the sixth Day of the same Month, inclusive._
(Philadelphia, 1798.)

American Convention of Abolition Societies. _Minutes of the
Proceedings of the Sixth Convention of Delegates from the Abolition
Societies established in different parts of the United States,
assembled at Philadelphia, on the fourth Day of June, one thousand
eight hundred, and continued by Adjournments, until the sixth Day of
the same Month, inclusive._ (Philadelphia, 1800.)

--_Minutes of the Proceedings of the Seventh Convention of Delegates
from the Abolition Societies established in different parts of the
United States, assembled at Philadelphia on the third Day of June, one
thousand eight hundred and one, and continued by Adjournments until
the sixth Day of the same Month, inclusive._ (Philadelphia, 1801.)

--_Minutes of the Proceedings of the Eighth Convention of Delegates
from the Abolition Societies established in different parts of the
United States, assembled at Philadelphia, on the tenth Day of January,
one thousand eight hundred and three, and continued by Adjournments
until the fourteenth Day of the same Month, inclusive._ (Philadelphia,
1803.)

--_Minutes of the Proceedings of the Ninth American Convention for
promoting the Abolition of Slavery and improving the Condition of the
African Race; assembled at Philadelphia on the ninth Day of January,
one thousand eight hundred and four, and continued by Adjournments
until the thirteenth Day of the same Month, inclusive._ (Philadelphia,
1804.)

--_Address of the American Convention for promoting the Abolition of
Slavery and improving the Condition of the African Race, assembled at
Philadelphia, in January, 1804, to the People of the United States._
(Philadelphia, 1804.)

--_Minutes of the Proceedings of the Tenth American Convention for
promoting the Abolition of Slavery and improving the Condition of
the African Race; assembled at Philadelphia on the fourteenth Day
of January, one thousand eight hundred and five, and continued by
Adjournments until the seventeenth Day of the same Month, inclusive._
(Philadelphia, 1805.)

--_Minutes of the Proceedings of the Eleventh American Convention for
promoting the Abolition of Slavery and improving the Condition of the
African Race; assembled at Philadelphia, on the thirteenth Day
of January, one thousand eight hundred and six, and continued by
Adjournments until the fifteenth Day of the same Month, inclusive._
(Philadelphia, 1806.)

--_Minutes of the Proceedings of a Special Meeting of the Fifteenth
American Convention for promoting the Abolition of Slavery and
improving the Condition of the African Race; assembled at Philadelphia
on the tenth Day of December, 1818, and continued by Adjournments
until the fifteenth Day of the same Month, inclusive._ (Philadelphia,
1818.)

--_Constitution of the American Convention for promoting the Abolition
of Slavery, and improving the Condition of the African Race. Adopted
on the eleventh Day of December, 1818, to take effect on the fifth Day
of October, 1819._ (Philadelphia, 1819.)

--_Minutes of the Eighteenth Session of the American Convention for
promoting the Abolition of Slavery, and improving the Condition of the
African Race. Convened at Philadelphia, on the seventh Day of October,
1823._ (Philadelphia, 1823.)

--_To the Clergy and Pastors throughout the United States._ (Dated
Philadelphia, September 18, 1826.)

--_Minutes of the Adjourned Session of the Twentieth Biennial American
Convention for promoting the Abolition of Slavery. Held at Baltimore,
November 28._ (Philadelphia, 1828.)

REPORTS OF ANTI-SLAVERY SOCIETIES

_The Annual Report of the American and Foreign Anti-Slavery
Societies, presented at New York, May 6, 1847, with the Addresses and
Resolutions._ (New York, 1847.)

_The Annual Report of the American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Societies,
with the Addresses and Resolutions._ (New York, 1851.)

_The First Annual Report of the American Anti-Slavery Society, with
the Speeches Delivered at the Anniversary Meeting held in Chatham
Street Chapel in the City of New York, on the sixth Day of May by
Adjournment on the eighth, in the Rev. Dr. Lansing's Church, and the
Minutes of the Society for Business._ (New York, 1834.)

_The Second Annual Report of the American Anti-Slavery Society, held
in the City of New York, on the twelfth of May, 1835, and the Minutes
and Proceedings of the Society for Business._ (New York, 1835.)

_The Third Annual Report of the American Anti-Slavery Society, with
the Speeches delivered at the Anniversary Meeting held in the City of
New York on May the tenth, 1836, and Minutes of the Meetings of the
Society for Business._ (New York, 1836.)

_The Fourth Annual Report of the American Anti-Slavery Society, with
the Speeches delivered at the Anniversary Meeting held in the City of
New York on the ninth of May, 1837._ (New York, 1837.)

_The Fifth Annual Report of the American Anti-Slavery Society, with
the Speeches delivered at the Anniversary Meeting and the Minutes and
Proceedings of the Society for Business._ (New York, 1838.)

_The Sixth Annual Report of the American Anti-Slavery Society, with
the Speeches delivered at the Anniversary Meeting held in the City
of New York, on the seventh Day of May, 1839, and the Minutes of the
Meetings of the Society for Business, held on the evenings of the
three following days._ (New York, 1839.)

_The Annual Report of the American Anti-Slavery Society by the
Executive Committee for the year ending May 1, 1859._ (New York,
1860.)

_The Third Annual Report of the Managers of the New England
Anti-Slavery Society presented June 2, 1835_. (Boston, 1835.)

_Annual Reports of the Massachusetts (or New England) Anti-Slavery
Society, 1831-end_.

_Reports of the National Anti-Slavery Convention, 1833-end_.

REPORTS OF COLONIZATION SOCIETIES

_Reports of the American Colonization Society, 1818-1832_.

_Report of the New York Colonization Society, October 1, 1823_. (New
York, 1823.)

_The Seventh Annual Report of the Colonization Society of the City of
New York_. (New York, 1839.)

_Proceedings of the New York State Colonization Society, 1831_.
(Albany, 1831.)

_The Eighteenth Annual Report of the Colonization Society of the State
of New York_. (New York, 1850.)

REPORTS OF CONVENTIONS OF FREE NEGROES

_Minutes and Proceedings of the First Annual Convention of the People
of Color. Held by Adjournment in the City of Philadelphia, from the
sixth to the eleventh of June, inclusive_, 1831.

(Philadelphia, 1831.)

_Minutes and Proceedings of the Second Annual Convention for the
Improvement of the Free People of Color in these United States. Held
by Adjournments in the City of Philadelphia, from the 4th to the 13th
of June, inclusive, 1832_,(Philadelphia, 1832.)

_Minutes and Proceedings of the Third Annual Convention for the
Improvement of the Free People of Color in these United States. Held
by Adjournments in the city of Philadelphia, in 1833. (New York,
1833.)_ These proceedings were published also in the New York
Commercial Advertiser, April 27, 1833.

_Minutes and Proceedings of the Fourth Annual Convention for the
Improvement of the Free People of Color in the United States. held by
Adjournments in the Asbury Church, New York, from the 2d to the 12th
of June, 1834._ (New York, 1834.)

_Proceedings of the Convention of the Colored Freedmen of Ohio at
Cincinnati, January 14, 1852._ (Cincinnati, Ohio, 1852.)

MISCELLANEOUS BOOKS AND PAMPHLETS

ADAMS, ALICE DANA. _The Neglected Period of Anti-Slavery in America._
Radcliffe College Monographs No. 14. (Boston and London, 1908.)
Contains some valuable facts about the education of the Negroes during
the first three decades of the nineteenth century.

ADAMS, JOHN. _The Works of John Adams, Second President of the United
States_; with a Life of the Author, Notes, and Illustrations by his
Grandson, Charles Francis Adams. Ten volumes. Volume x., shows the
attitude of James Otis toward the Negroes.

ADAMS, NEHEMIAH. _A South-Side View of Slavery; or Three Months at
the South in 1854._ (Boston, 1854.) The position of the South on the
education of the colored people is well set forth.

AGRICOLA (pseudonym). _An Impartial View of the Real State of the
Black Population in the United States._ (Philadelphia, 1824.)

ALBERT, O.V. _The House of Bondage_; or Charlotte Brooks and other
Slaves Original and Life-like as they appeared in their Plantation
and City Slave Life; together with pen Pictures of the peculiar
Institution, with Sights and Insights into their new Relations as
Freedmen, Freemen, and Citizens, with an Introduction by Reverend
Bishop Willard Mallalieu. (New York and Cincinnati, 1890.)

ALEXANDER, A. _A History of Colonization on the Western Continent of
Africa._ (Philadelphia, 1846.) Treats of education in "An Account of
the Endeavors used by the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in
Foreign Parts, to instruct Negroes in the City of New York, together
with two of Bishop Gibson's Letters on that subject, being an Extract
from Dr. Humphrey's Historical Account of the Incorporated Society for
the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts from its Foundation in
the Year 1728." (London, 1730.)

_An Address to the People of North Carolina on the Evils of Slavery,
by the Friends of Liberty and Equality, 1830._ (Greensborough, 1830.)

_An Address to the Presbyterians of Kentucky proposing a Plan for the
Instruction and Emancipation of their Slaves by a Committee of the
Synod of Kentucky._ (Newburyport, 1836.)

ANDERSON, MATTHEW._Presbylerianism--Its Relation to the Negro._
(Philadelphia, 1897.)

ANDREWS, E.E. _Slavery and the Domestic Slave Trade in the United
States._ In a series of letters addressed to the Executive Committee
of the American Union for the Relief and Improvement of the Colored
Race. (Boston, 1836.)

BALDWIN, EBENEZER. _Observations on the Physical and Moral Qualities
of our Colored Population with Remarks on the Subject of Emancipation
and Colonization._ (New Haven, 1834.)

BASSETT, J.S. _Slavery and Servitude in the Colony of North Carolina._
(Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science.
Fourteenth Series, iv.-v. Baltimore, 1896.)

---- _Slavery in the State of North Carolina._ (Johns Hopkins
University Studies in Historical and Political Science. Series XVII.,
Nos. 7-8. Baltimore, 1899.)

---- _Anti-Slavery Leaders of North Carolina._ (Johns Hopkins
University Studies in Historical and Political Science. Series XVI.,
No. 6. Baltimore, 1898.)

BAXTER, RICHARD. _Practical Works._ Twenty-three volumes. (London,
1830.)

BENEZET, ANTHONY. _A Caution to Great Britain and Her Colonies in a
Short Representation of the calamitous state of the enslaved Negro in
the British Dominions._ (Philadelphia, 1784.)

---- _The Case of our Fellow-Creatures, the Oppressed Africans,
respectfully recommended to the serious Consideration of the
Legislature of Great Britain, by the People called Quakers._ (London,
1783.)

---- _Observations on the enslaving, importing, and purchasing of
Negroes; with some advice thereon, extracted from the Epistle of the
Yearly-Meeting of the People called Quakers, held at London in the
Year 1748._ (Germantown, 1760.)

---- _The Potent Enemies of America laid open: being some Account of
the baneful Effects attending the Use of distilled spirituous Liquors,
and the Slavery of the Negroes._ (Philadelphia.)

---- _A Short Account of that Part of Africa, inhabited by the
Negroes. With respect to the Fertility of the Country; the good
Disposition of many of the Natives, and the Manner by which the Slave
Trade is carried on._ (Philadelphia, 1792.)

---- _Short Observations on Slavery, Introductory to Some Extracts
from the Writings of the Abbe Raynal, on the Important Subject._

---- _Some Historical Account of Guinea, its Situation, Produce, and
the General Disposition of its Inhabitants. With an Inquiry into
the Rise and Progress of the Slave Trade, its Nature and Lamentable
Effects._ (London, 1788.)

BIRNEY, JAMES G. _The American Churches, the Bulwarks of American
Slavery, by an American._ (Newburyport, 1842.)

BIRNEY, WILLIAM. _James G. Birney and his Times. The Genesis of the
Republican Party, with Some Account of the Abolition Movements in the
South before 1828._ (New York, 1890.)

BOURNE, WILLIAM O. _History of the Public School Society of the City
of New York, with Portraits of the Presidents of the Society._ (New
York, 1870.)

BRACKETT, JEFFERY R._The Negro in Maryland. A Study of the Institution
of Slavery._ (Baltimore, Johns Hopkins University, 1889).

BRANAGAN, THOMAS. _A Preliminary Essay on the Oppression of the Exiled
Sons of Africa, Consisting of Animadversions on the Impolicy and
Barbarity of the Deleterious Commerce and Subsequent Slavery of the
Human Species_. (Philadelphia: Printed for the Author by John W.
Scott, 1804.)

BRANAGAN, T. _Serious Remonstrances Addressed to the Citizens of the
Northern States and their Representatives, being an Appeal to their
Natural Feelings and Common Sense; Consisting of Speculations and
Animadversions, on the Recent Revival of the Slave Trade in the
American Republic_. (Philadelphia, 1805.)

BROWN, W.W. _My Southern Home_. (Boston, 1882.)

CHILD, LYDIA MARIA. _An Appeal in Favor of that Class of Americans
Called Africans_. (Boston: Allen & Ticknor, 1833, and New York: J.S.
Taylor, 1836.)

CHANNING, WILLIAM E. _Slavery_. (Boston: J. Munroe & Co., 1835.)

---- _Remarks on the Slavery Question_. (Boston: J. Munroe & Co.,
1839.)

COBB, T.R.R. _An Historical Sketch of Slavery_. (Philadelphia: T. &
J.W. Johnson, 1858.)

---- _An Inquiry into the Law of Negro Slavery in the United States
of America. To which is Prefixed an Historical Sketch of Slavery by
Thomas R.R. Cobb of Georgia_. (Philadelphia and Savannah, 1858.)

COFFIN, JOSHUA. _An Account of Some of the Principal Slave
Insurrections and Others which have Occurred or been attempted in
the United States and Elsewhere during the Last Two Centuries. With
Various Remarks. Collected from Various Sources_. (New York, 1860.)

CONWAY, MONCURE DANIEL. _Testimonies Concerning Slavery_. (London:
Chapman & Hall, 1865.) The author was a native of Virginia.

CULP, D.W. _Twentieth Century Negro Literature, or a Cyclopedia of
Thought, Vital Topics Relating to the American Negro by One Hundred of
America's Greatest Negroes_. (Toronto, Naperville, Ill., and Atlanta,
Ga., 1902.)

DE BOW, J.D.B. _Industrial Resources of the Southern and Western
States_. (New Orleans, 1852-1853.)

DELANY, M.R. _The Condition of the Colored People in United States_.
(Boston, 1852.)

DRESSER, AMOS. _The Narrative of Amos Dresser with Stone's Letters
from Natchez--an Obituary Notice of the Writer and Two Letters from
Tallahassee Relating to the Treatment of Slaves_. (New York, 1836.)

DREWERY, WILLIAM SIDNEY. _Slave Insurrections in Virginia, 1830-1865._
(Washington, 1900.)

DUBOIS, W.E.B. _The Philadelphia Negro._ (Philadelphia, 1896.)

---- _The Suppression of the African Slave Trade to the United States
of America, 1638-1870._ Harvard Historical Studies, Vol. i. (New York,
London, and Bombay, 1896.)

---- Atlanta University Publications, _The Negro Common School._
(Atlanta, 1901.)

---- _The College-Bred Negro._ (Atlanta, 1900.)

---- _The Negro Church._ (Atlanta, 1903.)

---- and Dill, A.G. _The College-Bred Negro American._ (Atlanta,
1910.)

---- _The Common School and the Negro American._ (Atlanta, 1911.)

---- _The Negro American Artisan._ (Atlanta, 1912.)

ELLIOTT, REV. CHARLES. _History of the Great Secession from the
Methodist Episcopal Church, etc._

_Exposition of the Object and Plan of the American Union for the
Relief and Improvement of the Colored Race._ (Boston, 1835.)

FEE, JOHN G. _Anti-Slavery Manual._ (Maysville, 1848.)

FISH, C.R. _Guide to the Materials for American History in Roman and
Other Italian Archives._ (Washington, D.C., Carnegie Institution,
1911.)

FRANKLIN, BENJAMIN. _The Writings of Benjamin Franklin Collected and
Edited with a Life and Introduction by Albert Henry Smyth._ (New York,
1905-1907.)

FROST, W.G. "Appalachian America." In vol. i. of _The Americana_ (New
York, 1912.)

GARNETT, H.H. _The Past and Present Condition and the Destiny of the
Colored Race._ (Troy, 1848.)

GOODLOE, D.R. _The Southern Platform._ (Boston, 1858.)

GREGOIRE, BISHOP. _De la Litterature des Negres._ (Paris, 1808.)
Translated and published by D.B. Warden at Brooklyn, in 1810.

HARRISON, SAMUEL ALEXANDER. _Wenlock Christison, and the Early
Friends in Talbot County, Maryland._ A Paper read before the Maryland
Historical Society, March 9, 1874. (Baltimore, 1878.)

HENSON, JOSIAH. _The Life of Josiah Henson._ (Boston, 1849.)

HICKOK, CHARLES THOMAS. _The Negro in Ohio_, 1802-1870. (Cleveland,
1896.)

HODGKIN, THOMAS A. _Inquiry into the Merits of the American
Colonization Society and Reply to the Charges Brought against it, with
an Account of the British African Colonization Society_. (London,
1833.)

HOLLAND, EDWIN C. _Refutation of Calumnies Circulated against the
Southern and Western States_. (Charleston, 1822.)

HOWE, SAMUEL G. _The Refugees from Slavery in Canada West. Report to
the Freedmen's Inquiry Committee_. (Boston, 1864.)

INGLE, EDWARD. _The Negro in the District of Columbia_. (Johns Hopkins
Studies in Historical and Political Sciences, vol. xi., Baltimore,
1893.)

JAY, JOHN. _The Correspondence and Public Papers of John Jay, First
Chief Justice of the United States and President of the Continental
Congress, Member of the Commission to Negotiate the Treaty of
Independence, Envoy to Great Britain, Governor of New York, etc_.,
1782-1793. (New York and London, 1891.) Edited by Henry P. Johnson,
Professor of History in the College of the City of New York.

JAY, WILLIAM. _An Inquiry into the Character and Tendencies of the
American Colonization and American Anti-Slavery Societies_. Second
edition. (New York, 1835.)

JEFFERSON, THOMAS. The Writings of Thomas Jefferson. Memorial Edition.
Autobiography, Notes on Virginia, Parliamentary Manual, Official
Papers, Messages and Addresses, and Other Writings Official and
Private, etc. (Washington, 1903.)

Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science.
H.B. Adams, Editor. (Baltimore, Johns Hopkins Press.)

JONES, C.C. _A Catechism of Scripture, Doctrine, and Practice_.
(Philadelphia, 1852.)

KIRK, EDWARD E. _Educated Labor, etc_. (New York, 1868.)

LANGSTON, JOHN M. _From the Virginia Plantation to the National
Capital; or, The First and Only Negro Representative in Congress from
the Old Dominion_. (Hartford, 1894.)

_L'Esclavage dans les Etats Confederes par un missionaire_. Deuxieme
edition. (Paris, 1865.)

LOCKE, M.S. _Anti-Slavery in America, from the Introduction of African
Slaves to the Prohibition of the Slave Trade_, 1619-1808. Radcliffe
College Monographs, No. 11. (Boston, 1901.)

LONG, J.D. _Pictures of Slavery in Church and State, Including
Personal Reminiscences, Biographical Sketches, Anecdotes, etc., with
Appendix Containing the Views of John Wesley and Richard Watson on
Slavery_. (Philadelphia, 1857.)

LOWERY, WOODBURY. _The Spanish Settlements within the Present Limits
of the United States. Florida_, 1562-1574. (New York and London,
1905.)

MADISON, JAMES. _Letters and Other Writings of James Madison Published
by Order of Congress_. Four volumes. (Philadelphia, 1865.)

MALLARY, R.O. _Maybank: Some Memoirs of a Southern Christian
Household; Family Life of C.C. Jones_.

MAY, S.J. _Some Recollections of our Anti-Slavery Conflict_.

MCLEOD, ALEXANDER. _Negro Slavery Unjustifiable. A Discourse by the
Late Alexander McLeod, 1802, with an Appendix_. (New York, 1863.)

MEADE, BISHOP WILLIAM. _Old Churches, Ministers, and Families, of
Virginia_. (Philadelphia, 1897.)

MONROE, JAMES. _The Writings of James Monroe, Including a Collection
of his Public and Private Papers and Correspondence now for the First
Time Printed, Edited by S.M. Hamilton_. (Boston, 1900.)

MOORE, GEORGE H. _Notes on the History of Slavery in Massachusetts
by George H. Moore, Librarian of the New York Historical Society and
Corresponding Member of the Massachusetts Historical Society_. (New
York, 1866.)

MORGAN, THOMAS J. _The Negro in America_. (Philadelphia, 1898.)

NEEDLES, EDWARD. _Ten Years' Progress, or a Comparison of the State
and Condition of the Colored People in the City and County of
Philadelphia from 1837 to 1847_. (Philadelphia, 1849.)

OTHELLO (PSEUDONYM). "Essays on Negro Slavery." Published in _The
American Museum_ in 1788. Othello was a free Negro.

OVINGTON, M.W. _Half-a-Man_. (New York, 1911.) Treats of the Negro in
the State of New York. A few pages are devoted to the education of the
colored people.

PARRISH, JOHN. _Remarks on the Slavery of the Black People; Addressed
to the Citizens of the United States, Particularly to those who are in
Legislative or Executive Stations in the General or State Governments;
and also to Such Individuals as Hold them in Bondage_. (Philadelphia,
1806.)

PLUMER, W.S. _Thoughts on the Religious Instruction of the Negroes of
this Country_. (Savannah, 1848.)

Plymouth Colony, New. _Records of the Colony of New Plymouth in New
England_. Printed by Order of the Legislature of the Commonwealth
of Massachusetts. Edited by Nathaniel B. Shurtleff, Member of the
Massachusetts Historical Society, and Fellow of the Antiquarians of
London. (Boston, 1855.)

PORTEUS, BISHOP BEILBY. _The Works of the Rev. Beilby Porteus, D.D.,
Late Bishop of London, with his Life by the Rev. Robert Hodgson,
A.M., F.R.S., Rector of St. George's, Hanover Square, and One of the
Chaplains in ordinary to His Majesty_. A new edition in six volumes.
(London, 1816.)

POWER, REV. JOHN H. _Review of the Lectures of William A. Smith,
D.D., on the Philosophy and Practice of Slavery as Exhibited in the
Institution of Domestic Slavery in the United States, with the Duties
of Masters to Slaves in a Series of Letters addressed to the Author_.
(Cincinnati, 1859.)

Quaker Pamphlet.

RICE, DAVID. _Slavery Inconsistent with Justice and Good Policy:
Proved by a Speech Delivered in the Convention Held at Danville,
Kentucky_. (Philadelphia, 1792, and London, 1793.)

SCOBER, J. _Negro Apprenticeship in the Colonies_. (London, 1837.)

SECKER, THOMAS. _The Works of the Right Reverend Thomas Seeker,
Archbishop of Canterbury with a Review of his Life and Character by B.
Porteus_. (New edition in six volumes, London, 1811.)

SIEBERT, WILBUR H. _The Underground Railroad from Slavery to Freedom,
by W.H. Siebert, Associate Professor of History in the Ohio State
University, with an Introduction by A.B. Hart_. (New York, 1898.)

SMITH, WILLIAM A. _Lectures on the Philosophy and Practice of Slavery
as Exhibited in the Institution of Domestic Slavery in the United
States, with the Duties of Masters to Slaves_. (Nashville, Tenn.,
1856.) Doctor Smith was the President and Professor of Moral and
Intellectual Philosophy of Randolph-Macon College.

_Slavery and the Internal Slave Trade in the United States of America,
being Inquiries to Questions Transmitted by the Committee of the
British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society for the Abolition of Slavery
and the Slave Trade throughout the World. Presented to the General
Anti-Slavery Convention Held in London, June, 1840, by the Executive
Committee of the American Anti-Slavery Society._ (London, 1841.)

_The Enormity of the Slave Trade and the Duty of Seeking the Moral
and Spiritual Elevation of the Colored Race._ (New York.) This work
includes speeches of Wilberforce and other documents.

_The Jesuit Relations and Allied Documents, Travels, and Explorations
of the Jesuit Missionaries in New France, 1610-1791. The Original
French, Latin, and Italian Texts with English Translations and Notes;
Illustrated by Portraits, Maps, and Facsimiles. Edited by Reuben Gold
Thwaites, Secretary of the State Historical Society of Wisconsin._
(Cleveland, 1896.)

_The South Vindicated from the Treason and Fanaticism of the Northern
Abolitionists._ (Philadelphia, 1836.)

THOMPSON, GEORGE. _Speech at the Meeting for the Extinction of Negro
Apprenticeship._ (London, 1838.)

---- _The Free Church Alliance with Manstealers. Send Back the Money.
Great Anti-Slavery Meeting in the City Hall, Glasgow, Containing the
Speeches Delivered by Messrs. Wright, Douglass, and Buffum, from
America, and by George Thompson of London, with a Summary Account of
a Series of Meetings Held in Edinburgh by the Abovenamed Gentlemen._
(Glasgow, 1846.)

TORREY, JESSE, JR. _A Portraiture of Domestic Slavery in the United
States, with Reflections on the Practicability of Restoring the Moral
Rights of the Slave, without Impairing the Legal Privileges of the
Possessor, and a Project of a Colonial Asylum for Free Persons of
Color, Including Memoirs of Facts on the Interior Traffic in Slaves,
and on Kidnapping, Illustrated with Engravings by Jesse Torrey, Jr.,
Physician, Author of a Series of Essays on Morals and the Diffusion of
Knowledge._ (Philadelphia, 1817.)

---- _American Infernal Slave Trade; with Reflections on the Project
for forming a Colony of Blacks in Africa_. (London, 1822.)

TOWER, PHILO. _Slavery Unmasked: Being a Truthful Narrative of Three
Years' Residence and Journeying in Eleven Southern States; to which
is Added "The Invasion of Kansas," Including the Last Chapter of her
Wrongs_. (Rochester, 1856.)

TURNER, E.R. _The Negro in Pennsylvania_. (Washington, 1911.)

_Tyrannical Libertymen: a Discourse upon Negro Slavery in the United
States; Composed at---- in New Hampshire; on the Late Federal
Thanksgiving Day_. (Hanover, N.H., 1795.)

VAN EVRIE, JOHN H. _Negroes and Negro Slavery_, by J.H. Van Evrie,
M.D. _Introductory Chapter: Causes of Popular Delusion on the
Subject_. (Washington, 1853.)

---- _White Supremacy and Negro Subordination; or, Negroes a
Subordinate Race, and So-called Slavery its Normal Condition. With an
Appendix Showing the Past and Present Condition of the Countries South
of us_. (New York, 1868.)

WALKER, DAVID. _Walker's Appeal in Four Articles, together with a
Preamble, to the Colored Citizens of the World, but in Particular and
very Expressly to those of the United States of America. Written in
Boston, State of Massachusetts, September_ 28, 1820. Second edition.
(Boston, 1830.) Walker was a Negro who hoped to arouse his race to
self-assertion.

WASHINGTON, B.T. _The Story of the Negro_. Two volumes (New York,
1909.)

WASHINGTON, GEORGE. _The Writings of George Washington, being his
Correspondence, Addresses, Messages, and other Papers, Official and
Private, Selected and Published from the Original Manuscripts with
the Life of the Author, Notes and Illustrations, by Jared Sparks_.
(Boston, 1835.)

WEEKS, STEPHEN B. _Southern Quakers and Slavery. A Study in
Institutional History_. (Baltimore, The Johns Hopkins Press, 1896.)

---- _The Anti-Slavery Sentiment in the South; with Unpublished
Letters from John Stuart Mill and Mrs. Stowe_. (Southern History
Association Publications. Volume ii., No. 2, Washington, D. C, April,
1898.)

WESLEY, JOHN. _Thoughts upon Slavery. In the Potent Enemies of America
Laid Open.... London, printed: Reprinted in Philadelphia with Notes,
and Sold by Joseph Cruikshank_. 1774.

WIGHAM, ELIZA. _The Anti-Slavery Cause in America and its Martyrs_.
(London, 1863.)

WILLIAMS, GEORGE W. _History of the Negro Race in the United States
from 1619-1880. Negroes as Slaves, as Soldiers, and as Citizens:
together with a Preliminary Consideration of the Unity of the Human
Family, an Historical Sketch of Africa and an Account of the Negro
Governments of Sierra Leone and Liberia_. (New York, 1883.)

WOOLMAN, JOHN. _The Works of John Woolman. In two parts. Part I: a
Journal of the Life, Gospel-Labors, and Christian Experiences of that
Faithful Minister of Christ, John Woolman, Late of Mount Holly, in the
Province of New Jersey_. (London, 1775.)

---- _Same. Part Second. Containing his Last Epistle and other
Writings_. (London, 1775.)

---- _Some Considerations on the Keeping of Negroes. Recommended to
the Professors of Christianity of every Denomination_. (Philadelphia,
1754.)

---- _Considerations on Keeping Negroes; Recommended to the Professors
of Christianity of every Denomination. Part Second_. (Philadelphia,
1762.)

WRIGHT, R.R., JR. _The Negro in Pennsylvania_. (Philadelphia, 1912.)

MAGAZINES

_The Abolitionist, or Record of the New England Anti-Slavery Society_.
Edited by a committee. Appeared in January, 1833.

_The African Methodist Episcopal Church Review_. Valuable for the
following articles:

"The Colored Public Schools of Washington," by James Storum, vol. v.,
p. 279.

"The Negro as an Inventor," by R.R. Wright, vol. ii., p. 397. "Negro
Poets," vol. iv., p. 236.

"The Negro in Journalism," vols. vi., 309, and xx., 137.

_The African Repository_. Published by the American Colonization
Society from 1826 to 1832. A very good source for the development of
Negro education both in this country and Liberia. Some of its most
valuable articles are: "Learn Trades or Starve," by Frederick
Douglass, vol. xxix., pp. 136 and 137. Taken from Frederick Douglass's
Paper.

"Education of the Colored People," by a highly respectable gentleman
of the South, vol. xxx., pp. 194,195, and 196.

"Elevation of the Colored Race," a memorial circulated in North
Carolina, vol. xxxi., pp. 117 and 118.

"A Lawyer for Liberia," a sketch of Garrison Draper, vol. xxxiv., pp.
26 and 27.

Numerous articles on the religious instruction of the Negroes occur
throughout the foregoing volumes. Information about the actual
literary training of the colored people is given as news items.

_The American Museum_, or _Repository of Ancient and Modern Fugitive
Pieces, etc., Prose and Poetical_. Vols. i.-iv. (First and second
editions, Philadelphia, 1788. Third edition, Philadelphia, 1790.)
Contains some interesting essays on the intellectual status of the
Negroes, etc., contributed by "Othello," a free Negro.

_The Colonizationist and Journal of Freedom_. The author has been able
to find only the volume which contains the numbers for the year 1834.

_The Crisis_. A record of the darker races published by the National
Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

_The Maryland Journal of Colonization_. Published as the official
organ of the Maryland Colonization Society. Among its important
articles are: "The Capacities of the Negro Race," vol. iii., p. 367;
and "The Educational Facilities of Liberia," vol. vii., p. 223.

_The Non-Slaveholder_. Two volumes of this publication are now found
in the Library of Congress.

_The School Journal_.

_The Southern Workman_. Volume xxxvii. contains Dr. R.R. Wright's
valuable dissertation on "Negro Rural Communities in Indiana."

NEWSPAPERS

District of Columbia.
_The Daily National Intelligencer_.

Louisiana
_The New Orleans Commercial Bulletin._

Maryland.
_The Maryland Journal and Baltimore Advertiser._
_The Maryland Gazette._
_Dunlop's Maryland Gazette_ or _The Baltimore Advertiser._

Massachusetts.
_The Liberator._

New York.
_The New York Daily Advertiser._
_The New York Tribune._

North Carolina.
_The State Gazette of North Carolina._
_The Newbern Gazette._

Pennsylvania.
_The Philadelphia Gazette._

South Carolina.
_The City Gazette and Commercial Daily Advertiser._
_The State Gazette of South Carolina._
_The Charleston Courier._
_The South Carolina Weekly Advertiser._
_The Carolina Gazette._
_The Columbian Herald._

Virginia.
_The Richmond Enquirer._
_The Norfolk and Portsmouth Herald._
_The Virginia Herald._ (Fredericksburg.)
_The Norfolk and Portsmouth Chronicle._

LAWS, DIGESTS, CHARTERS, CONSTITUTIONS, AND REPORTS

GENERAL

Code Noir ou Recueil d'edits, declarations et arrets concernant la
Discipline et le commerce des esclaves Negres des isles francaises de
l'Amerique (in Recueils de reglemens, edits, declarations et arrets,
concernant le commerce, l'administration de la justice et la police
des colonies francaises de l'Amerique, et les engages avec le Code
Noir, et l'addition audit code). (Paris, 1745.)

GOODELL, WILLIAM. _The American Slave Code in Theory and Practice: Its
Distinctive Features Shown by its Statutes, Judicial Decisions, and
Illustrative Facts._ (New York, 1853.)

PETERS, RICHARD. _Condensed Reports of Cases Argued and Adjudged in
the Supreme Court of the United States._ Six volumes. (Philadelphia,
1830-1834.)

THORPE, F.N. _Federal and State Constitution, Colonial Charters, and
Other Organic Laws of the States, Territories, and Colonies now or
heretofore Forming the United States of America. Compiled and Edited
under an Act of Congress, June 30, 1906._ (Washington, 1909.)

STATE

Alabama.
_Acts of the General Assembly Passed by the State of Alabama._
CLAY, C.C. _Digest of the Laws of the State of Alabama to
1843._ (Tuscaloosa, 1843.)

Connecticut.
_Public Acts Passed by the General Assembly of Connecticut._

Delaware.
_Laws of the State of Delaware Passed by the General Assembly._

District of Columbia.
BURCH, SAMUEL. _A Digest of the Laws of the Corporation of
the City of Washington, with an Appendix of the Laws of the
United States Relating to the District of Columbia._ (Washington,
1823.)

Florida.
_Acts of the Legislative Council of the Territory of Florida._
_Acts and Resolutions of the General Assembly of the State of
Florida._

Georgia.
_Laws of the State of Georgia._
COBB, HOWELL. _A Digest of the Statutes of Georgia in General
Use to 1846._ (New York, 1846.)
DAWSON, WILLIAM. _A Compilation of the Laws of the State
of Georgia to 1831._ (Milledgeville, 1831.)
PRINCE, O.H. _A Digest of the Laws of the State of Georgia to
1837._ (Athens, 1837.)

Illinois.
_Laws of the State of Illinois Passed by the General Assembly._
STARR, M., and RUSSELL H. CURTIS. _Annotated Statutes of
Illinois in Force, January 1, 1885._

Indiana.
_Laws of a General Nature Passed by the State of Indiana._

Kentucky.
_Acts of the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Kentucky._

Louisiana.
_Acts Passed by the Legislature of the State of Louisiana._
BULLARD, HENRY A., and THOMAS CURRY. _A New Digest of
the Statute Laws of the State of Louisiana to 1842._ (New
Orleans, 1842.)

Maryland.
_Laws Made and Passed by the General Assembly of the State of
Maryland._

Massachusetts.
_Acts and Resolves Passed by the General Court of Massachusetts._
QUINCY, JOSIAH, JR. _Reports of Cases, Superior Court of
Judicature of the Province of Massachusetts Bay, 1761-1772._
(Boston, 1865.)

Mississippi.
_Laws of the State of Mississippi Passed at the Regular Sessions
of the Legislature._
POINDEXTER, GEORGE. _Revised Code of the Laws of Mississippi._
(Natchez, 1824.)
HUTCHINSON, A. _Code of Mississippi._ (Jackson, 1848.)

Missouri.
_Acts of the General Assembly of the State of Missouri._

New Jersey.
_Acts of the General Assembly of the State of New Jersey._

New York.
_Laws of the State of New York._

Ohio.
_Acts of a General Nature Passed by the General Assembly of
the State of Ohio._
_Acts of a Local Nature Passed by the General Assembly of the
State of Ohio._

Pennsylvania.
_Laws of the General Assembly of the State of Pennsylvania._
BRIGHTLY, FRANK F. _A Digest of the Laws of Pennsylvania._
STROUD, G.M. _Purdon's Digest of the Laws of Pennsylvania
from 1700 to 1851._ (Philadelphia, 1852.)

Rhode Island.
_Acts and Resolves Passed by the General Assembly of the State
of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations._

South Carolina.
_Acts and Resolutions of the General Assembly of the State of
South Carolina._
BREVARD, JOSEPH. _An Alphabetical Digest of the Public
Statute Laws of South Carolina from 1692 to 1813._ Three
volumes. (Charleston, 1814.)

Tennessee.
_Acts of the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee._

Virginia.
_Acts of the General Assembly of Virginia._
HENING, W.W. _Statutes at Large: A Collection of all the Laws
of Virginia from the First Session of the Legislature in the
Year 1816._ (Richmond, 1819 to 1823.) Published pursuant
to an act of the General Assembly of Virginia,
passed on the 5th of February, 1808. The work was extended
by S. Shepherd who published three additional
volumes in 1836. Chief source of historical material for
the history of Virginia.
TATE, Joseph. _A Digest of the Laws of Virginia._ (Richmond,
1841.)

INDEX

Abdy, E.S., learned that slaves were taught
Abolitionists, interested in the enlightenment of Negroes
Account of a pious Negro
Actual education after the revolutionary period
Adams, Rev. Henry, teacher at Louisville
Adams, John, report of James Otis's argument on the Writs of
Assistance; views on slavery
Address of the American Convention of Abolition Societies
African Benevolent Society of Rhode Island, school of
African Episcopalians of Philadelphia, school of
African Free School of Baltimore
African Free Schools of New York
African Methodist Episcopal Church, established Union Seminary;
purchased Wilberforce
Agricultural Convention of Georgia recommended that slaves be taught to
read
Alabama, law of 1832; provision for teaching Negroes at Mobile;
Presbyterians of, interested
Albany Normal School, colored student admitted
Alexandria, Virginia Quakers of, instructed Negroes; Benjamin Davis, a
teacher of
Allen, Richard, organized A.M.E. Church; author
Allen, W.H., teacher of Negroes
Ambush, James E., teacher in the District of Columbia
American Colonization Society, The, efforts of, to educate Negroes
American Convention of Abolition Societies, The, interested in the
education of Negroes; recommended industrial education; addresses of
American Union, The, organized; names of its promoters (see note 1 on
page 142)
Amherstburg, Canada, opened a colored school; established a mission
school
Anderson, John G., musician
Andrew, one of the first two colored teachers in Carolina
Andrews, C.C. principal of New York African Free Schools
Andrews, E.A., student of the needs of the Negroes
Anti-slavery agitation, effect of, on education in cities
Appalachian Mountains, settled by people favorable to Negroes
Appo, William, musician
Arnett, B.W., teacher in Pennsylvania
Ashmun Institute, founded; names of the trustees
Athens College, admitted colored students
Attainments of Negroes at the close of the eighteenth century
Auchmutty, Reverend, connected with the school established by Elias
Neau
Augusta, Dr. A.T., learned to read in Virginia
Avery College, established
Avery, Rev. Charles, donor of $300,000 for the education
and Christianization of the African race

Bacon, Rev. Thomas, sermons on the instruction of Negroes
Baldwin County, Alabama, provision for teaching Negroes
Baltimore, several colored churches; colored schools of; an adult
school of 180 pupils; Sunday-schools; day and night school; Bible
Society; African Free School; donation of Wells; donation of
Crane; school tax paid by Negroes, note on page----
Banks, Henry, learned to read in Virginia
Banneker, Benjamin, studied in Maryland; made a clock; took up
astronomy;
encouraged by Ellicott; corresponded with Thomas Jefferson
Baptist preacher, taught Negroes in South Carolina
Baptists, aided the education of Negroes; established school at
Bexley, Liberia; changed attitude toward the uplift of Negroes
Barclay, David, gave money to build school-house
Barclay, Reverend, instructed Negroes in New York
Barr, John W., taught M.W. Taylor in Kentucky
Baxter, Richard, instructed masters to enlighten their slaves
Beard, Simeon, had a school in Charleston
Becraft, Maria, established a school in the District of Columbia
Bell family, progress of
Bell, George, built first colored school-house in District of Columbia
Bell School established
Benezet, Anthony, advocated the education of Negroes; taught Negroes;
believed in western colonization; opinion on Negro intellect;
bequeathed wealth to educate Negroes; school-house built
with the fund;(see note giving sketch of his career)
Berea College, founded
Berkshire Medical School had trouble admitting Negroes; graduated
colored physicians
Berry's portraiture of the Negroes' condition after the reaction
Bibb, Mary E., taught at Windsor, Canada
Billings, Maria, taught in the District of Columbia
Birney, James G., criticized the church; helped Negroes on free soil
Bishop, Josiah, preached to white congregation in Portsmouth, Virginia
Bishop of London, declared that the conversion of slaves did not work
manumission
"Black Friday," Portsmouth, Ohio, Negroes driven out
Blackstone, studied to justify the struggle for the rights of man; his
idea of the body politic forgotten
Bleecker, John, interested in the New York African Free Schools
Boone, R.G., sketch of education in Indiana
Boston, Massachusetts, colored school opened; opened its first primary
school; school in African Church; several colored churches; struggle
for democratic education; (see also Massachusetts)
Boucher, Jonathan, interested in the uplift of Negroes; an advocate of
education; (see note on, 56); extract from address of
Boulder, J.F., student in a mixed school in Delaware
Bowditch, H.J., asked that Negroes be admitted to Boston public schools
Bowdoin College, admitted a Negro
Bradford, James T., studied at Pittsburgh
Branagan advocated colonization of the Negroes in the West
Bray, Dr. Thomas, a promoter of the education of Negroes; "Associates
of Dr. Bray,"; plan of, for the instruction of Negroes
Brearcroft, Dr., alluded to the plan for the enlightenment of Negroes
Breckenridge, John, contributed to the education of the colored people
of Baltimore
Bremer, Fredrika, found colored schools in the South; observed the
teaching of slaves
British American Manual Labor Institute, established at Dawn, Canada
Brown, a graduate of Harvard College, taught colored children in Boston
Brown County, Ohio, colored schools of, established
Brown, Jeremiah H., studied at Pittsburgh
Brown, J.M., attended school in Delaware
Brown, William Wells, author; leader and educator
Browning family, progress of
Bruce, B.K., learned to read,
Bryan, Andrew, preacher in Georgia
Buchanan, George, on mental capacity of Negroes
Buffalo, colored Methodist and Baptist churches of, lost
members
Burke, E.P., found enlightened Negroes in the South
mentioned case of a very intelligent Negro
Burlington, New Jersey, Quakers of, interested in the uplift
of the colored people
Butler, Bishop, urged the instruction of Negroes
Buxton, Canada, separate schools established in

Caesar, a Negro poet of North Carolina
Calvert, Mr., an Englishman who taught Negroes in the
District of Columbia
Camden Insurrection, effect of
Cameron, Paul C., sketch of John Chavis
Canaan, New Hampshire, academy broken up
Canada, education of Negroes in; names of settlements with schools;
difficulties of races; separate schools; mission schools; results
obtained; (see Drew's note on condition of)
Capers, Bishop William, opinion on reconstructing the policy of Negro
education; plan of, to instruct Negroes; work of, among the colored
people; catechism of
Cardozo, F.L., entered school in Charleston
Carey, Lott, educated himself
Cass County, Michigan, school facilities in the colored settlement of
Castleton Medical School, admitted Negroes
Catholics, interested in the education of Negroes
Catto, Rev. William T., author and preacher
Cephas, Uncle, learned from white children
Chandler, solicitor, of Boston, opinion on the segregation of
colored pupils
Channing, William, criticized the church for its lack of interest
in the uplift of the Negroes
Charleston, colored members of church of; Minor Society of;
colored schools of, attended by Bishop Daniel A. Payne;
insurrection of; theological seminary of, admitted a Negro
Charlton, Reverend, friend of Negroes in New York
Chatham, Canada, colored schools of
Chavis, John, educated at Princeton; a teacher of white youths
in North Carolina
Chester, T. Morris, student at Pittsburgh
Chicago, separate schools of; disestablished
Child, M.E., teacher in Canada
Churches, aided education through Sabbath-schools
Christians not to be held as slaves
Cincinnati, colored schools of; Negroes of; sought public support
for their schools; a teacher of, excluded a colored boy from a
public school; law of
City, the influences of, on the education of Negroes; attitude of
anti-slavery societies of, toward the education of the Negroes
Clapp, Margaret, aided Myrtilla Miner in the District of Columbia; (see
note 2)
Clarkson Hall Schools of Philadelphia
Clarkson, Matthew, a supporter of the New York African Free Schools
Cleveland, C.F., Argument of, in favor of Connecticut law against
colored schools
Cleveland, colored schools of
Code Noir, referred to; (see note, 23)
Co-education of the races
Coffin, Levi, taught Negroes in North Carolina; promoted the migration
of Negroes to free soil; traveled in Canada
Coffin, Vestal, assistant of his father in North Carolina
Cogswell, James, aided the New York African Free Schools
Coker, Daniel, a teacher in Baltimore
Colbura, Zerah, a calculator who tested Thomas Fuller
Colchester, Canada, mission school at
Cole, Edward, made settlement of Negroes in Illinois
Colgan, Reverend; connected with Neau's school in New York
College of West Africa established
Colleges, Negroes not admitted; manual labor idea of; change in
attitude of
Colonization scheme, influence of, on education
Colonizationists, interest of, in the education of Negroes
Colored mechanics, prejudice against; slight increase in
Columbia, Pennsylvania, Quakers of, interested in the uplift of Negroes
Columbian Institute established in the District of Columbia
Columbus, Ohio, colored schools of
Condition of Negroes, in the eighteenth century; at the close of the
reaction
Connecticut, defeated the proposed Manual Labor College at New Haven;
spoken of as place for a colored school of the American Colonization
Society; allowed separate schools at Hartford; inadequately supported
colored schools; struggle against separate schools of;
disestablishment of separate schools of
Convention of free people of color, effort to establish a college
Convent of Oblate Sisters of Providence, educated colored girls in
academy of
Cook, John F., teacher in the District of Columbia; forced by the Snow
Riot to go to Pennsylvania
Corbin, J.C. student at Chillicothe, Ohio
Cornish, Alexander, teacher in the District of Columbia
Costin, Louisa Parke, teacher in the District of Columbia
Cox, Ann, teacher in New York African Free Schools
Coxe, Eliza J., teacher in the New York African Free Schools
Coxe, General, of Fluvanna County, Virginia, taught his slaves to read
the Bible
Coxe, R.S., a supporter of Hays's school in the District of Columbia
Crandall, Prudence, admitted colored girls to her academy; opposed by
whites; law against her enacted; arrested, imprisoned, and tried;
abandoned her school
Crane, William, erected a building for the education of Negroes in
Baltimore
Crummell, Alexander, sought admission to the academy at Canaan, New
Hampshire
Cuffee, Paul, author

D'Alone, contributor to a fund for the education of Negroes
Dartmouth, theological school of, admitted Negroes
Davies, Reverend, teacher of Negroes in Virginia
Davis, Benjamin, taught Negroes in Alexandria, Virginia
Davis, Cornelius, teacher of New York African Free Schools
Davis, Rev. Daniel, interest of, in the uplift of the people of color
Dawn, Canada, colored schools of
Dawson, Joseph, aided colored schools
Dean, Rev. Philotas, principal of Avery College
De Baptiste, Richard, student in a school at his father's home in
Fredericksburg
De Grasse, Dr. John V., educated for Liberia
Delany, M.R., attended school at Pittsburgh
Delaware, abolition Society of, provided for the education of the
Negroes; law of 1831; law of 1863
Detroit, African Baptist Church of; separate schools of
Dialogue on the enlightenment of Negroes about 1800
District of Columbia, separate schools of; churches of, contributed to
education of Negroes
Douglass, Mrs., a white teacher of Negroes in Norfolk
Douglass, Frederick, learned to read; leader and advocate of education;
author; opinion of, on vocational education; extract from paper of
Douglass, Sarah, teacher of Philadelphia
Dove, Dr., owner of Dr. James Durham
Dow, Dr. Jesse E., co-worker of Charles Middleton of the District of
Columbia
Draper, Garrison, studied law after getting education at Dartmouth; an
account of
Drew, Benjamin, note of, on Canada; found prejudice in schools of
Canada
Duncan, Benedict, taught by his father
Durham, James, a colored physician of New Orleans
Dwight, Sarah, teacher of colored girls

_Edit du'roi_,
_Education of Colored People_,
Education of colored children at public expense,
(see also Chapter XIII,)
Edwards, Mrs. Haig, interest of, in the uplift of slaves,
Eliot, Rev. John, appeal in behalf of the conversion of slaves,
Ellis, Harrison, educated blacksmith,
Ellsworth, W.W., argument of, against the constitutionality of the
Connecticut law prohibiting the establishment of colored schools,
Emancipation of slaves, effects of, on education,
Emlen Institute established in Ohio,
Emlen, Samuel, philanthropist,
England, ministers of the Church of, maintained a school for colored
children at Newport,
English Colonial Church established mission schools in Canada,
English High School established at Monrovia,
Essay of Bishop Porteus,
Established Church of England directed attention to the uplift of the
slaves,
Everly, mentioned resolutions bearing on the instruction of slaves,
Evidences of the development of the intellect of Negroes,

Falmouth colored Sunday-school broken up,
Fawcett, Benjamin, address to Negroes of Virginia,
extract from,
Fee, Rev. John G., criticized church because it neglected the Negroes,
founded Berea College,
Fleet, Dr. John, educated for Liberia,
teacher in the District of Columbia,
Fleetwood, Bishop, urged that Negroes be instructed,
(see note on p.)
Fletcher, Mr. and Mrs., teachers in the District of Columbia,
Flint, Rev. James, received letters bearing on the teaching of Negroes,
Florida, law of, unfavorable to the enlightenment of Negroes,
a more stringent law of,
Foote, John P., praised the colored schools of Cincinnati,
Ford, George, a Virginia lady who taught pupils of color in the
District of Columbia,
Fort Maiden, Canada, schools of,
Fortie, John, teacher in Baltimore,
Fothergill, on colonization,
Fox, George, urged Quakers to instruct the colored people,
Franklin College, New Athens, Ohio, admitted colored students,
Franklin, Benjamin, aided the teachers of Negroes,
Franklin, Nicholas, helped to build first schoolhouse for colored
children in the District of Columbia,
Frederic, Francis, taught by his master,
Free schools not sought at first by Negroes,
Freeman, M.H., teacher; principal of Avery College
French, the language of, taught in colored schools; educated Negroes
Friends, minutes of the meetings of, bearing on the instruction of
Negroes
Fugitive Slave Law, effects of
Fuller, James C, left a large sum for the education of Negroes
Fuller, Thomas, noted colored mathematician

Gabriel's insurrection, effect of
Gaines, John I., led the fight for colored trustees in Cincinnati, Ohio
Gallia County, Ohio, school of
Gardner, Newport, teacher in Rhode Island
Garnett, H.H., was to be a student at Canaan, New Hampshire; author;
president of Avery College
Garrison, Wm. Lloyd, appeal of, in behalf of the education of Negroes;
speech of, on education; solicited funds for colored manual
labor school
Geneva College, change in attitude of
Georgetown, teachers and schools of
Georgia, prohibitive legislation of; objections of the people of,
to the education of Negroes; colored mechanics of, opposed;
Presbyterians of, taught Negroes; slaveholders of,
in Agricultural Convention urged the enlightenment of Negroes
Gettysburg Theological Seminary, admitted a Negro
Gibson, Bishop, of London, appeal in behalf of the neglected Negroes;
letters of
Giles County, Tennessee, colored preacher of, pastor of a white church
Gilmore, Rev. H., established a high school in Cincinnati
Gist, Samuel, made settlement of Negroes
Gloucester, New Jersey, Quakers of, interested in teaching Negroes
Gloucester, John, preacher in Philadelphia
Goddard, Calvin, argument of, against the constitutionality
of the law prohibiting colored schools in Connecticut
Goodwyn, Morgan, urged that Negroes be elevated
Grant, Nancy, teacher in the District of Columbia
Green, Charles Henry, studied in Delaware
Greenfield, Eliza, musician
Gregg of Virginia, settled his slaves on free soil
Gregoire, H., on the mental capacity of Negroes
Grimke brothers, students in Charleston

Haddonfield, New Jersey, Quakers of, instructed Negroes
Haiti and Santo Domingo, influence of the revolution of
Halgy, Mrs., teacher in the District of Columbia
Hall,
a graduate of Harvard University, teacher in the Boston colored
school,
Hall, Anna Maria, student in Alexandria,
teacher,
Hall, Primus, established a colored school at his home in Boston,
Hamilton, Alexander, advocate of the rights of man,
Hampton, Fannie, teacher in District of Columbia,
Hancock, Richard M., studied at Newberne,
Hanover College, Indiana, accepted colored students,
Harlan, Robert, learned to read in Kentucky,
Harper, Chancellor, views of, on the instruction of Negroes,
Harper, Frances E.W., poet,
Harper, John, took his slaves from North Carolina to Ohio and liberated
them,
Harry, one of the first two colored teachers in Carolina,
Hartford,
separate schools of,
dissatisfaction of the Negroes of,
with poor school facilities,
struggle of some citizens of,
against caste in education,
separate schools of, disestablished,
Haviland, Laura A., teacher in Canada,
Hays, Alexander, teacher in District of Columbia,
Haynes, Lemuel, pastor of a white church,
Heathenism, Negroes reduced to,
Henry, Patrick, views of, on the rights of man,
Henson, Rev. Josiah, leader and educator,
Higher education of Negroes urged by free people of color,
change in the attitude of some Negroes toward,
promoted in the District of Columbia,
in Pennsylvania,
in Ohio,
Hildreth, connected with Neau's school in New York,
Hill, Margaret, teacher in the District of Columbia,
Hillsborough, North Carolina, influence of the insurrection of,
Homeopathic College, Cleveland, admitted colored students,
Horton, George, poet,
Huddlestone, connected with Neau's school,
Humphreys, Richard, gave $10,000 to educate Negroes,
Hunter, John A., attended a mixed school,

Illinois, schools of, for benefits of whites,
separate schools of, a failure,
unfavorable legislation of,
separate schools of, disestablished,
Indiana, schools in colored settlements of,
attitude of, toward the education of the colored people,
prohibitive legislation of,
Industrial education recommended,
Industrial revolution, effect of, on education,
Inman, Anna, assistant of Myrtilla Miner,
Institute for Colored Youth established at Philadelphia,
Institute of Easton, Pennsylvania, admitted a Negro,
Instruction, change in meaning of the word
Inventions of Negroes; (see note 1)
Insurrections, slave, effect of
Iowa, Negroes of, had good school privileges

Jackson, Edmund, demanded the admission of colored pupils to Boston
schools
Jackson, Stonewall, teacher in a colored Sunday-school
Jackson, William, musician
Jay, John, a friend of the Negroes
Jay, William, criticized the Church for its failure to elevate the
Negroes;
attacked the policy of the colonizationists
Jefferson College, Pennsylvania, admitted Negroes
Jefferson, Thomas, views of, on the education of Negroes; (see note);
letter of, to Abbe H. Gregoire; letter to M.A. Julien; failed to
act as Kosciuszko's executor; corresponded with Banneker
Jesuits, French, instructed slaves
Jesuits, Spanish, teachers of Negroes
Johnson, Harriet C., assistant at Avery College
Johnson, John Thomas, teacher in the District of Columbia;
teacher in Pittsburgh
Jones, Alfred T., learned to read in Kentucky
Jones, Anna, aided Myrtilla Miner
Jones, Arabella, teacher in the District of Columbia
Jones, Rev. C.C., a white preacher among Negroes of Georgia;
Argument of,
for the religious instruction of Negroes; catechism of, for religious
instruction; estimate of those able to read
Jones, Matilda, supported Myrtilla Miner
Journalistic efforts of Negroes; (see note)
Judson, A.T., denounced Prudence Crandall's policy; upheld the law
prohibiting the establishment of colored schools in Connecticut

Keith, George, advocated religious training for the Negroes
Kemble, Frances Anne, discovered that the Negroes of some masters
were taught to read; (see note 4)
Kentucky, Negroes of, learned the rudiments of education; work of the
Emancipating Labor Society of; work of the Presbyterians of;
public opinion of; colored schools of
Kinkaid, J.B., taught M.W. Taylor of Kentucky
Knoxville, people of, favorable to the uplift of the colored race
Kosciuszko, T., plan of, to educate Negroes; (see note);
will of; fund of

Lafayette, Marquis de, visited New York African Free Schools;
said to be interested in a colored school in the West
Lancastrian method of instruction, effect of
Lane Seminary, students of, taught Negroes
Langston, J.M., student at Chillicothe and Oberlin
Latin, taught in a colored school
Law, Rev. Josiah, instructed Negroes in Georgia; (see note 1)
Lawrence, Nathaniel, supporter of New York colored schools
_Lawyer for Liberia_, a document
Lawyers, colored, recognized in the North; (see note 2)
Lay, Benjamin, advocate of the instruction of slaves
Leary, John S., went to private school
Lee, Thomas, a teacher in the District of Columbia
Leile, George, preacher in Georgia and Jamaica
Le Jeune, taught a little Negro in Canada
Le Petit instructed Negroes
Lewis, R.B., author
Lexington, Kentucky, colored school of; (see note 1, p. 223)
Liberia, education of Negroes for; education of Negroes in
Liberia College, founded
Liberty County, Georgia, instruction of Negroes in
Liverpool, Moses, one of the founders of the first colored school in
the District of Columbia
Livingston, W., teacher in Baltimore
Locke, John, influence of
Lockhart, Daniel J., instructed by white boys
London, Bishop of, formal declarations of, abrogating the law that a
Christian could not be held a slave
London, Canada, private school; mission school
Longworth, Nicholas, built a school-house for Negroes
Louisiana, education of Negroes in; hostile legislation of; Bishop Polk
of, on instruction of Negroes
Louisville, Kentucky, colored schools of
L'Ouverture, Toussaint, influence of
Lowell, Massachusetts, colored schools of; disestablished
Lowry, Rev. Samuel, taught by Rev. Talbot of Franklin College
Lowth, Bishop, interested in the uplift of the heathen
Lucas, Eliza, teacher of slaves
Lundy, Benjamin, helped Negroes on free soil
Lunenburg County, Virginia, colored congregation of

Madison, James, on the education of Negroes; letter of
Maine, separate school of
Malone, Rev. J.W., educated in Indiana
Malvin, John, organized schools in Ohio cities
Mangum, P.H., and W.P., pupils of John Chavis, a colored teacher
Manly, Gov. Charles, of North Carolina, taught by John Chavis
Mann, Lydia, aided Myrtilla Miner,
Manual Labor College, demand for,
Manumission, effect of the laws of,
Martin, Martha, sent to Cincinnati to be educated,
sister sent to a southern town to learn a trade,
Marechal, Rev. Ambrose, helped to maintain colored schools,
Maryland, Abolition Society of, to establish an academy for Negroes,
favorable conditions,
public opinion against the education of Negroes,
law of, against colored mechanics,
Maryville Theological Seminary, students of, interested in the uplift
of Negroes,
Mason, Joseph T. and Thomas H., teachers in the District of Columbia,
Massachusetts, schools of,
struggles for democratic education,
disestablishment of separate schools,
Mather, Cotton, on the instruction of Negroes,
resolutions of,
Matlock, White, interest of, in Negroes,
Maule, Ebenezer, helped to found a colored school in Virginia,
May, Rev. Samuel, defender of Prudence Crandall,
McCoy, Benjamin, teacher in the District of Columbia,
McDonogh, John, had educated slaves,
McIntosh County, Georgia, religious instruction of Negroes,
McLeod, Dr., criticized the inhumanity of men to Negroes,
Meade, Bishop William, interested in the elevation of Negroes,
work of, in Virginia,
followed Bacon's policy,
collected literature on the instruction of Negroes,
Means, supported Myrtilla Miner,
Mechanics, opposed colored artisans,
Medical School of Harvard University open to colored students,
Medical School of the University of New York admitted colored students,
Memorial to Legislature of North Carolina, the education of slaves
urged,
Methodist preacher in South Carolina, work of, stopped by the people,
Methodists, enlightened Negroes,
change in attitude of,
founded Wilberforce,
Michigan, Negroes admitted to schools of,
Middleton, Charles, teacher in the District of Columbia,
Miles, Mary E.. assistant of Gilmore in Cincinnati,
Milton, influence of,
Miner, Myrtilla, teacher in the District of Columbia,
founded a school,
Minor Society of Charleston established a school for Negroes,
Minority report of Boston School Committee opposed segregation of
colored pupils,
Minutes of Methodist Episcopal Conference, resolution
on the instruction of Negroes
Minutes of the Meetings of Friends,
action taken to elevate the colored people
Missionaries,
English, interested in uplift of Negroes
French
Spanish
Missouri, prohibitive legislation of
Mitchell, John G., student in Indiana
Mitchell, S.T., began his education in Indiana
Mobile, provision for the education of the Negroes
Montgomery, I.T., educated under the direction of his master
Moore, Edward W., teacher, and author of an arithmetic
Moore, Helen, helped Myrtilla Miner
Moorland, Dr. J.E., an uncle of, studied medicine
Moravian Brethren, instructed colored people
Morris, Dr. E. C, instructed by his father
Morris, J., taught by his white father
Morris, J.W., student in Charleston
Morris, Robert, appointed magistrate
Murray, John, interested in the New York African Free Schools

Nantucket, Massachusetts, colored schools of
Neau, Elias, founded a colored school in New York City
Negroes,
learning to read and write
free education of
learning in spite of opposition
instructing white persons
reduced to heathenism
Neill, Rev. Hugh, missionary teacher of Negroes in Pennsylvania
Nell, Wm., author
New Bedford, Massachusetts,
colored schools of
disestablished
Newbern, North Carolina, effects of insurrection of
New Castle, Presbytery of,
established Ashmun Institute
New England,
schools in Anti-Slavery Society of
planned to establish a manual labor college
sent colored students to Canaan, New Hampshire
Newhall, Isabella, excluded a colored boy from school
New Hampshire, academy of,
broken up
schools of, apparently free to all
New Haven, separate schools of
colored Manual Labor College not wanted
interested in the education of persons for Africa and Haiti
New Jersey, Quakers of,
endeavored to elevate colored people
law of, to teach slaves
Negroes of, in public schools
Presbyterians of, interested in Negroes
separate schools
caste in schools abolished
New Orleans, education of the Negroes of
Newport, Rhode Island, separate schools
New York, Quakers of,
taught Negroes
Presbyterians
of, interested in Negroes,
work of Anti-Slavery Society of,
separate schools of,
schools opened to all,
New York Central College, favorable to Negroes,
New York City, African Free Schools,
transfer to Public School Society,
transfer to Board of Education,
society of free people of color of, organized a school,
Newspapers, colored, gave evidence of intellectual progress,
(see note 1,)
North Carolina, Quakers of, instructed Negroes,
Presbyterians of, interested in the education of Negroes,
Tryon's instructions against certain teachers,
manumission societies of, promoting the education of colored people,
reactionary laws of,
memorial sent to Legislature of, for permission to teach slaves,
Northwest Territory, education of transplanted Negroes,
settlements of, with schools,
Noxon, connected with Neau's school in New York City,
Nutall, an Englishman, taught Negroes in New York,

Oberlin grew out of Lane Seminary,
Objections to the instruction of Negroes considered and answered,
Ohio, colored schools of (see Cincinnati, Columbus, Cleveland, and
Northwest Territory); struggle for education at public expense,
unfavorable legislation,
law of 1849,
Olmsted, P.L., found a plantation of enlightened slaves,
O'Neal of South Carolina Bar discussed with Chancellor Harper the
question of instructing Negroes,
Oneida Institute contributed to the education of Negroes,
Oregon, law of, hostile to Negroes,
Othello, a free Negro, denounced the policy of neglecting the Negroes,
Otis, James, on the rights of all men,

Palmer, Dr., catechism of,
Pamphlet, Gowan, a preacher in Virginia,
Parry, Alfred H., successful teacher,
Parsons, C.G., observed that some Negroes were enlightened,
_Pastoral Letters of Bishop Gibson of London_,
Patterson, Edward, learned to read in a Sabbath-school,
Payne, Dr. C.H., taught by his mother to read,
Payne, Bishop Daniel, student in Charleston,
agent to purchase Wilberforce,
Payne, Mrs. Thomas, studied under her master,
Pease, W., instructed by his owner,
Penn, William, believed in emancipation to afford Negroes an
opportunity for improvement,
Pennington, J. C, writer, teacher, and preacher of influence,
Pennsylvania, work of Quakers of,
favorable legislation,
law of,
against colored mechanics,
(see also Quakers, Friends, Presbyterians, and Philadelphia)
Perry, R.L., attended school at Nashville
Peterboro School of New York established
Petersburg, Virginia, colored schools of, colored churches
Pettiford, W.A., attended private school in North
Carolina
Philadelphia, Negroes of, taught by Quakers, early
colored schools, public aid secured for the education of Negroes,
names of teachers public and private, statistics of colored schools,
(see Quakers, Presbyterians, and Pennsylvania)
Phillips, Wendell, argument against the segregation of
colored people in Boston
Physicians, colored, (see note 3, 279)
Pinchback, P.B.S., studied in the Gilmore High School in
Cincinnati
Pinkney, William, views on the mental capacity of Negroes
_Pious Negro, True Account of_, a document
Pittsburgh, colored schools of
_Plan for the Improvement of the Free Black_, a document
Plantation system, the rise of,
effects of, on the enlightenment
of the Negroes
Pleasants, Robert, founder of a colored manual labor school
Polk, Bishop, of Louisiana, advocate of the instruction
of Negroes
Porteus, Bishop, a portion of his essay on the uplift of
Negroes (see also, note 2)
Portland, Maine, colored schools of
Potter, Henry, taught Negroesin the District of Columbia
Preachers, colored, preached to Negroes (see note 4). preached
to white people
Presbyterians, taught Negroes,
struggles of,
Acts of
Synods of, a document
_Presbyterian Witness_, criticized
churchmen neglectful of the
Negroes
_Proposition for encouraging the Christian education of
Indian and Mulatto children at Lambeth, Virginia_
Protestant Episcopal High School at Cape Palmas, Liberia
Prout, John, a teacher in the District of Columbia
Providence, Rhode Island, separate schools of
Providence Convent of Baltimore, influence of
Purcell, Jack, bearing of the confession of
Puritans, attitude of, toward the uplift of Negroes

Quakers, educational work among Negroes,
promoting education in the Northwest Territory,
(see also Friends)

Racial inferiority, the argument of
Randolph, John, slaves of, sent to Ohio
Raymond, Daniel, contributed to the education of Negroes
Reaction, the effect of
Reason, Chas. L., teacher in Institute for Colored Youth
Redmond, Sarah, denied admission to Boston School
Redpath, James, observation in the South
Refugees from Haiti and Santo Domingo, influence of;
bearing of, on insurrection
Refugees Home School established
Religious instruction discussed by Churchmen
Remond, C.L., lecturer and orator
Resolute Beneficial Society established a school
Revels, U.S. Senator Hiram, student in Quaker Seminary
Rhode Island, work of Quakers of; efforts of colored
people of; African Benevolent Society of; school laws of;
separate schools disestablished
Rice, Rev. David, complained that slaves were not enlightened
Rice, Rev. Isaac, mission of, in Canada
Richards, Fannie, teacher in Detroit
Riley, Mrs. Isaac, taught by master
Riots of cities, effect of
Roberts, Rev. D.R., attended school in Indiana
Rochester, Baptist Church of, lost members
Roe, Caroline, teacher in New York African Free Schools
Rush, Dr. Benjamin, desire to elevate the slaves; objections
of masters considered; interview with Dr. James Durham;
Rush Medical School admitted colored student
Russworm, John B., first colored man to graduate from college
Rutland College, Vermont, opened to colored students

Sabbath-schools, a factor in education; separation of the races
St. Agnes Academy established in the District of Columbia
St. Frances Academy established in Baltimore
Salem, Massachusetts, colored school of
Salem, New Jersey, work of Quakers of
Sampson, B.K., assistant teacher of Avery College
Samson, Rev. Dr., aided Hays, a teacher of Washington
Sanderson, Bishop, interest in the uplift of the heathen
Sandiford, Ralph, attacked slavery
Sandoval, Alfonso, opposed keeping slaves
Sandwich, Canada, separate school of
Sandy Lake Settlement broken up
Saunders of Cabell County, West Virginia, settled his slaves
on free soil
Savannah,
colored schools of
churches of
Scarborough, President W.S.,
early education of
Schoepf, Johann, found conditions favorable
Seaman, Jacob, interest of, in New York colored schools
Searing, Anna H., a supporter of Myrtilla Miner
Seaton, W.W., a supporter of Alexander Hays's School
Secker, Bishop,
plan of, for the instruction of Negroes
had Negroes educated for Africa
extract from sermon of
Settle, Josiah T., was educated in Ohio
Sewell, Chief Justice, on the instruction of Negroes
Shadd, Mary Ann, teacher in Canada
Shaffer, Bishop C.T., early education of, in Indiana
Sharp, Granville, on the colonization of Negroes
Sidney, Thomas, gave money to build school-house
Slave in Essex County, Virginia, learned to read
Slavery, ancient, contrasted with the modern
Small, Robert, student in South Carolina
Smedes, Susan Dabney, saw slaves instructed
Smith, Gerrit,
contributed money to the education of the Negro
founder of the Peterboro School
appeal in behalf of colored mechanics
Smith, Melancthon, interest of, in the New York African Free Schools
Smothers, Henry, founded a school in Washington
Snow riot, results of
Snowden, John Baptist, instructed by white children
Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts,
efforts of
South Carolina,
schools of unfavorable conditions
prohibitive legislation
governor of, discussed the Vesey insurrection
Spain, King of, desired trade in enlightened slaves only
Spanish missionaries taught Negroes in America
Springfield, colored schools of
Statistics on the intellectual condition of Negroes
Stewart, Rev., a missionary in North Carolina
Stewart, T. McCants, student in Charleston
Stokes, Richard, teacher in the District of Columbia
Storrs, C.B.,
advocate of free discussion
influence of
Stowe, H.B.,
assisted Myrtilla Miner
interest of, in industrial education
Stratton, Lucy, taught Negroes
Sturgeon, Rev. William, work of, in Philadelphia
Sumler, Jas. W., learned to read with difficulty
Sylvester, Elisha, efforts of, in Boston

Tabbs, Thomas, teacher in the District of Columbia
Talbot County, Maryland, the education of the Negro in
Talbot, Mr., tutor in the District of Columbia,
Talbot, Reverend, taught Samuel Lowry at Franklin College,
Tappan, Arthur, work of, in behalf of Negroes,
Tanner, Bishop Benjamin Tucker, attended school in Pennsylvania,
Tarborough, North Carolina, effect of the insurrection of,
Tatem, Isaac, instructed Negroes,
Taylor, M.W., taught by his mother,
Taylor, Dr. Wm., educated for service in Liberia,
Taylor, Reverend, interest of, in the enlightenment of Negroes,
Templeton, John N., educational efforts of,
Tennessee, education of the Negroes of,
legislation of,
Terrell, Mary Church, mother of, taught by white gentleman,
Terrell, Robert H., father of, learned to read,
Thetford Academy opened to Negroes,
Thomas, J.C. teacher of W.S. Scarborough,
Thomas, Rev. Samuel, teacher in South Carolina,
Thompson, Margaret, efforts of, in the District of Columbia,
Thornton, views of, on colonization,
Toop, Clara G., an instructor at Avery College,
Toronto, Canada, evening school organized,
Torrey, Jesse, on education and emancipation,
Trenton, New Jersey, Quakers of, interested,
Troumontaine, Julian, teacher in Savannah,
"True Bands," educational work of, in Canada,
(see also note 1,)
Trumbull, John, teacher in Philadelphia,
Tucker, Ebenezer, principal of Union Literary Institute,
Tucker, Judge St. George, discussed slave insurrections,
Turner, Bishop Henry M., early education of,
Turner, Nathaniel, the education of,
effects of the insurrection of,

Union College admitted a Negro,
Union Literary Institute, Indiana, favorable to the instruction of
Negroes,

Vanlomen, Father, aided Maria Becraft,
Vashon, George B., principal of Avery College,
Vermont, required practically no segregation,
Vesey, Denmark, effect of the insurrection of,
Vesey, Reverend, interest of, in Neau's school,
Virginia, question of instructing Negroes of,
education of Negroes of, given legal sanction,
colored schools of,
work of abolitionists of,
interest of Quakers of,
efforts of Presbyterians of,
prohibitive legislation of,
Vocational training emphasized by Frederick Douglass,
interest of H.B. Stowe in,

Wagoner, H.O., taught by his parents,
Walker, David, appeal of,
Wall, Mary, teacher in the District of Columbia,
(see note 1)
Ward, S.R., attainments of,
Warren, John W., studied under white children,
Warville, Brissot de, found desirable conditions,
Washington, George, attitude of,
will of,
Waterford, Ephraim, taught by his employer,
Watkins, Wm., teacher in Baltimore,
Watrum, Francois Philibert, inquiry of, about instructing Negroes,
Wattles, Augustus, philanthropist and educator,
Wayman, Reverend, advocate of the instruction of Negroes,
Wayman, Rev. Dr., interest of, in free schools,
Weaver, Amanda, assisted Myrtilla Miner,
Wells, Nelson, bequeathed $10,000 to educate Negroes,
Wesley, John, opinion of, on the intellect of Negroes,
Western Reserve converted to democratic education,
Wetmore, Reverend, a worker connected with Neau's school,
Wheatley, Phyllis, education of,
poetry of,
White, j. T., attended school in Indiana,
White, Dr. Thomas J., educated for Liberia,
White, W.J., educated by his white mother,
Whitefield, Rev. George, interest in the uplift of Negroes,
plan of, to establish a school,
Whitefield, Rev. James, promoted education in Baltimore,
Whitefield, James M., poet,
Wickham, executor of Samuel Gist,
Williams, Bishop, urged the duty of converting the Negroes,
Williamson, Henry, taught by his master,
Wilmington, Delaware, educational work of abolitionists of,
Wilson, Bishop of Sodor and Man, published a pamphlet on the uplift of
the Negroes,
contributed money to educate the Negroes of Talbot County, Maryland,
Wilson, Rev. Hiram, inspector of schools in Canada,
founder of a manual labor school,
Windsor, Canada, school privileges of,
Wing, Mr., teacher in Cincinnati,
Winslow, Parson, children of, indulgent to Uncle Cephas,
Wisconsin, equal school facilities of,
Woodson, Ann, taught by her young mistress,
Woodson, Emma J., instructor at Avery College,
Woodson, Louis, teacher in Pittsburgh,
Woolman, John, interest of,
Wormley, James, efforts of, in the District of Columbia,
(see note 1)
Wormley, Mary, teacher in the District of Columbia,
Wortham, Dr. James L., pupil of John Chavis
Wright, Rev. John F., one of the founders of Wilberforce University

Xenia, Ohio, settlement of, Wilberforce University established near

Zane, Jonathan, gave $18,000 for the education of Negroes

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