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The Complete PG Works of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. by Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. (The Physician and Poet)

Part 51 out of 51

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"One might well say of Motley precisely what he said of Prescott, in
a letter from Rome to our associate, Mr. William Amory, immediately
on hearing of Prescott's death: 'I feel inexpressibly disappointed--
speaking now for an instant purely from a literary point of view--
that the noble and crowning monument of his life, for which he had
laid such massive foundations, and the structure of which had been
carried forward in such a grand and masterly manner, must remain
uncompleted, like the unfinished peristyle of some stately and
beautiful temple on which the night of time has suddenly descended.
But, still, the works which his great and untiring hand had already
thoroughly finished will remain to attest his learning and genius,--
a precious and perpetual possession for his country."

.................................

The President now called on Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes, who said:--

"The thoughts which suggest themselves upon this occasion are such
as belong to the personal memories of the dear friends whom we have
lost, rather than to their literary labors, the just tribute to
which must wait for a calmer hour than the present, following so
closely as it does on our bereavement."

.................................

"His first literary venture of any note was the story called
'Morton's Hope; or, The Memoirs of a Provincial.' This first effort
failed to satisfy the critics, the public, or himself. His
personality pervaded the characters and times which he portrayed,
so that there was a discord between the actor and his costume.
Brilliant passages could not save it; and it was plain enough that
he must ripen into something better before the world would give him
the reception which surely awaited him if he should find his true
destination.

"The early failures of a great writer are like the first sketches
of a great artist, and well reward patient study. More than this,
the first efforts of poets and story-tellers are very commonly
palimpsests: beneath the rhymes or the fiction one can almost always
spell out the characters which betray the writer's self. Take these
passages from the story just referred to:

"'Ah! flattery is a sweet and intoxicating potion, whether we drink
it from an earthen ewer or a golden chalice. . . . Flattery from
man to woman is expected: it is a part of the courtesy of society;
but when the divinity descends from the altar to burn incense to the
priest, what wonder if the idolater should feel himself transformed
into a god!'

"He had run the risk of being spoiled, but he had a safeguard in his
aspirations.

"'My ambitious anticipations,' says Morton, in the story, were as
boundless as they were various and conflicting. There was not a
path which leads to glory in which I was not destined to gather
laurels. As a warrior, I would conquer and overrun the world; as a
statesman, I would reorganize and govern it; as a historian, I would
consign it all to immortality; and, in my leisure moments, I would
be a great poet and a man of the world.'

"Who can doubt that in this passage of his story he is picturing his
own visions, one of the fairest of which was destined to become
reality?

"But there was another element in his character, which those who
knew him best recognized as one with which he had to struggle hard,
--that is, a modesty which sometimes tended to collapse into self-
distrust. This, too, betrays itself in the sentences which follow
those just quoted:--

"'In short,' says Morton, 'I was already enrolled in that large
category of what are called young men of genius, . . . men of
whom unheard-of things are expected; till after long preparation
comes a portentous failure, and then they are forgotten. . . .
Alas! for the golden imaginations of our youth. . . . They are
all disappointments. They are bright and beautiful, but they fade.'"

...........................

The President appointed Professor Lowell to write the Memoir of Mr.
Quincy, and Dr. Holmes that of Mr. Motley, for the Society's
"Proceedings."

Professor William Everett then spoke as follows:

"There is one incident, sir, in Mr. Motley's career that has not
been mentioned to-day, which is, perhaps, most vividly remembered by
those of us who were in Europe at the outbreak of our civil war in
1861. At that time, the ignorance of Englishmen, friendly or
otherwise, about America, was infinite: they knew very little of us,
and that little wrong. Americans were overwhelmed with questions,
taunts, threats, misrepresentations, the outgrowth of ignorance, and
ignoring worse than ignorance, from every class of Englishmen.
Never was an authoritative exposition of our hopes and policy worse
needed; and there was no one to do it. The outgoing diplomatic
agents represented a bygone order of things; the representatives of
Mr. Lincoln's administration had not come. At that time of anxiety,
Mr. Motley, living in England as a private person, came forward with
two letters in the 'Times,' which set forth the cause of the United
States once and for all. No unofficial, and few official, men could
have spoken with such authority, and been so certain of obtaining a
hearing from Englishmen. Thereafter, amid all the clouds of
falsehood and ridicule which we had to encounter, there was one
lighthouse fixed on a rock to which we could go for foothold, from
which we could not be driven, and against which all assaults were
impotent.

"There can be no question that the effect produced by these letters
helped, if help had been needed, to point out Mr. Motley as a
candidate for high diplomatic place who could not be overlooked.
Their value was recognized alike by his fellow-citizens in America
and his admirers in England; but none valued them more than the
little band of exiles, who were struggling against terrible odds,
and who rejoiced with a great joy to see the stars and stripes,
whose centennial anniversary those guns are now celebrating, planted
by a hand so truly worthy to rally every American to its support."

G.

POEM BY WILLIAM CULLEN BRYANT.

I cannot close this Memoir more appropriately than by appending the
following poetical tribute:--

IN MEMORY OF JOHN LOTHROP MOTLEY.

BY WILLIAM CULLEN BRYANT.

Sleep, Motley, with the great of ancient days,
Who wrote for all the years that yet shall be.
Sleep with Herodotus, whose name and praise
Have reached the isles of earth's remotest sea.
Sleep, while, defiant of the slow delays
Of Time, thy glorious writings speak for thee
And in the answering heart of millions raise
The generous zeal for Right and Liberty.
And should the days o'ertake us, when, at last,
The silence that--ere yet a human pen
Had traced the slenderest record of the past
Hushed the primeval languages of men
Upon our English tongue its spell shall cast,
Thy memory shall perish only then.

ETEXT EDITOR'S BOOKMARKS:

An order of things in which mediocrity is at a premium
Better is the restlessness of a noble ambition
Blessed freedom from speech-making
Flattery is a sweet and intoxicating potion
Forget those who have done them good service
His dogged, continuous capacity for work
His learning was a reproach to the ignorant
History never forgets and never forgives
Mediocrity is at a premium
No great man can reach the highest position in our government
Over excited, when his prejudices were roughly handled
Plain enough that he is telling his own story
Republics are said to be ungrateful
They knew very little of us, and that little wrong
Visible atmosphere of power the poison of which
Wonders whether it has found its harbor or only lost its anchor

ETEXT EDITOR'S BOOKMARKS FOR THE COMPLETE MEMOIR OF MOTLEY BY HOLMES:

A great historian is almost a statesman
Admired or despised, as if he or she were our contemporary
Alas! one never knows when one becomes a bore
All classes are conservative by necessity
Already looking forward to the revolt of the slave States
American Unholy Inquisition
An order of things in which mediocrity is at a premium
Attacked by the poetic mania
Becoming more learned, and therefore more ignorant
best defence in this case is little better than an impeachment
Better is the restlessness of a noble ambition
Blessed freedom from speech-making
But not thoughtlessly indulgent to the boy
But after all this isn't a war It is a revolution
Can never be repaired and never sufficiently regretted
Cold water of conventional and commonplace encouragement
Considerations of state have never yet failed the axe
Considerations of state as a reason
Could paint a character with the ruddy life-blood coloring
Emulation is not capability
Everything else may happen This alone must happen
Excused by their admirers for their shortcomings
Excuses to disarm the criticism he had some reason to fear
Fear of the laugh of the world at its sincerity
Fitted "To warn, to comfort, and command"
Flattery is a sweet and intoxicating potion
Forget those who have done them good service
Fortune's buffets and rewards can take with equal thanks
He was not always careful in the construction of his sentences
His learning was a reproach to the ignorant
His dogged, continuous capacity for work
History never forgets and never forgives
How many more injured by becoming bad copies of a bad ideal
Ignoble facts which strew the highways of political life
In revolutions the men who win are those who are in earnest
Indoor home life imprisons them in the domestic circle
Intellectual dandyisms of Bulwer
Irresistible force in collision with an insuperable resistance
It is n't strategists that are wanted so much as believers
John Quincy Adams
Kindly shadow of oblivion
Manner in which an insult shall be dealt with
Mediocrity is at a premium
Misanthropical, sceptical philosopher
Most entirely truthful child whe had ever seen
Motley was twice sacrificed to personal feelings
Nearsighted liberalism
No great man can reach the highest position in our government
No two books, as he said, ever injured each other
No man is safe (from news reporters)
Not a single acquaintance in the place, and we glory in the fact
Only foundation fit for history,--original contemporary document
Our mortal life is but a string of guesses at the future
Over excited, when his prejudices were roughly handled
Plain enough that he is telling his own story
Played so long with other men's characters and good name
Progress should be by a spiral movement
Public which must have a slain reputation to devour
Radical, one who would uproot, is a man whose trade is dangerous
Reasonable to pay our debts rather than to repudiate them
Recall of a foreign minister for alleged misconduct in office
Republics are said to be ungrateful
Sees the past in the pitiless light of the present
Self-educated man, as he had been a self-taught boy
Shall Slavery die, or the great Republic?
Solitary and morose, the necessary consequence of reckless study
Spirit of a man who wishes to be proud of his country
Studied according to his inclinations rather than by rule
Style above all other qualities seems to embalm for posterity
Suicide is confession
Talked impatiently of the value of my time
The fellow mixes blood with his colors!
The loss of hair, which brings on premature decay
The personal gifts which are nature's passport everywhere
The nation is as much bound to be honest as is the individual
The dead men of the place are my intimate friends
They knew very little of us, and that little wrong
This Somebody may have been one whom we should call Nobody
Twenty assaults upon fame and had forty books killed under him
Unequivocal policy of slave emancipation
Vain belief that they were men at eighteen or twenty
Visible atmosphere of power the poison of which
Weight of a thousand years of error
Wonders whether it has found its harbor or only lost its anchor
Wringing a dry cloth for drops of evidence

ETEXT EDITOR'S BOOKMARKS FOR THE PG COMPLETE OLIVER WENDELL HOLMES

A great historian is almost a statesman
A nail will pick a lock that defies hatchet and hammer
A misprint kills a sensitive author
A little queer and uncertain in general aspect.
Absolute, peremptory facts are bullies
Admired or despised, as if he or she were our contemporary
Advised every literary man to have a profession.
Afraid of books who have not handled them from infancy
Age and neglect united gradually
Agreed on certain ultimata of belief
Alas! one never knows when one becomes a bore
Algebraic symbols of minds which have grown too weak
All classes are conservative by necessity
All men are bores, except when we want them
All the forms of moral excellence, except truth
All want to reach old age and grumble when they get it
All his geese are swans
All men love all women
Already looking forward to the revolt of the slave States
American Unholy Inquisition
An order of things in which mediocrity is at a premium
And now we two are walking the long path in peace together
Another privilege of talking is to misquote
Arc in the movement of a large intellect
As I understand truth
As a child, he should have tumbled about in a library
As to clever people's hating each other
Asked Solon what made him dare to be so obstinate
Assume a standard of judgment in our own minds
At the mercy of every superior mind
Attacked by the poetic mania
Audacious self-esteem, with good ground for it
Automatic and involuntary actions of the mind
Babbage's calculating machine
Be very careful to whom you trust one of these keys
Beautiful effects from wit,--all the prismatic colors
Becoming more learned, and therefore more ignorant
Been in the same precise circumstances before
Behave like men and gentlemen about it, if you know how.
Beliefs are rooted in human wants and weakness, and die hard
Bells which small trades-people connect with their shop-doors
best defence in this case is little better than an impeachment
Better too few words, from the woman we love
Better for mankind,--and all the worse for the fishes
Better is the restlessness of a noble ambition
Bewitching cup of self-quackery
Bill which will render pockets a superfluity in your next suit
Blank checks of intellectual bankruptcy
Blessed freedom from speech-making
Bowing and nodding over the music
Brain often runs away with the heart's best blood
Brilliant flashes--of silence!
Brute beasts of the intellectual domain
Bury in it beliefs, doubts, dreams, hopes, and terrors
But we must sail, and not drift, nor lie at anchor.
But it was in talking of Life that we came most nearly together
But not thoughtlessly indulgent to the boy
But after all this isn't a war It is a revolution
C'est le DERNIER pas qui co te
Called an old man for the first time
Can never be repaired and never sufficiently regretted
Character is distinctly shown at the age of four months.
Cigar
Clairvoyance which sees into things without opening them
Code of finalities is a necessary condition of profitable talk
Cold shower-bath the world furnishes gratis
Cold water of conventional and commonplace encouragement
Comfort is essential to enjoyment
Commerce is just putting his granite foot upon them
Common sense was good enough for him
Common sense, as you understand it.
Compare the racer with the trotter
Conceit is just a natural thing to human minds
Conceit has the virtue of making them cheerful
Conclusion that he or she is really dull
Conflicting advice of all manner of officious friends
Consciousness of carrying a "settler" in the form of a fact
Considerations of state have never yet failed the axe
Considerations of state as a reason
Controversy
Conversation which is suggestive rather than argumentative
Conversational blank checks or counters
Conversational soprano
Conversational bully
Conversational fungi spring up most luxuriantly
Could paint a character with the ruddy life-blood coloring
Creative action is not voluntary at all
Crippled souls
Crow with a king-bird after him
Cut your climate to your constitution
Dangerous subjects
Demand for intellectual labor is so enormous
Did I believe in love at first sight?
Didn't know Truth was such an invalid
Differ on the fundamental principles
Dishwater from the washings of English dandyism
Disputing about remainders and fractions
Do wish she would get well--or something
Do you ever wonder why poets talk so much about flowers?
Do you know how important good jockeying is to authors?
Do not be bullied out of your common sense by the specialist
Don't begin to pry till you have got the long arm on your side
Don't make your moral staple consist of the negative virtues
Don't believe any man ever talked like that in this world
Don't be in a hurry to choose your friends
Don't ever think the poetry is dead in an old man
Doomed to the pangs of an undeceived self-estimate
Dullest of teachers is the one who does not know what to omit
Dulness is not commonly a game fish
Earned your money by the dose you have taken
Easier to say this than to prove it
Easier to dispute it than to disprove it
Educational factory
Elysian abandonment of a huge recumbent chair.
Emulation is not capability
Every person's feelings have a front-door and a side-door
Everything else may happen This alone must happen
Excused by their admirers for their shortcomings
Excuses to disarm the criticism he had some reason to fear
Extra talent does sometimes make people jealous
Facts always yield the place of honor, in conversation
Fall silent and think they are thinking
Fear of the laugh of the world at its sincerity
Few, if any, were ruined by drinking
Fitted "To warn, to comfort, and command"
Flash terms for words which truly characterize their objects.
Flattery is a sweet and intoxicating potion
Forget those who have done them good service
Fortune is the measure of intelligence
Fortune had left her, sorrow had baptized her
Fortune's buffets and rewards can take with equal thanks
Friendship authorizes you to say disagreeable things
Gambling with dice or stocks
Gambling, on the great scale, is not republican
Generalize the disease and individualize the patient
Generally ruined before they became drunkards
Genius in an essentially common person is detestable
Gift of seeing themselves in the true light
Give it an intellectual shake and hold it up to the light
Give us the luxuries of life
Good for nothing until they have been long kept and used
Good feeling helps society to make liars of most of us
Good Americans, when they die, go to Paris
Got his hand up, as a pointer lifts his forefoot
Governed, not by, but according to laws
Grave without a stone where nothing but a man is buried
Great silent-moving misery puts a new stamp on us
Grow old early, if you would be old long
Grow we must, if we outgrow all that we love
Habit is a labor-saving invention
Habits are the crutches of old age
Half knowledge dreads nothing but whole knowledge
Half-censure divided between the parties
Hard it is for some people to get out of a room
He did not know so much about old age then as he does now
He who is carried by horses must deal with rogues
He was not always careful in the construction of his sentences
He that has once done you a kindness
Height of art to conceal art
Her breathing was somewhat hurried and high, or thoracic
Here lies buried the soul of the licentiate Pedro Garcias
Hire logic, in the shape of a lawyer
His learning was a reproach to the ignorant
His dogged, continuous capacity for work
History never forgets and never forgives
Hold their outspread hands over your head
Holes in all her pockets
Hoped he did deserve a little abuse occasionally
Hopelessly dull discourse acts inductively
How long will school-keeping take to kill you?
How many more injured by becoming bad copies of a bad ideal
Hung with moss, looking like bearded Druids
Hydrostatic paradox of controversy
I always believed in life rather than in books
I always break down when folks cry in my face
I allow no "facts " at this table
I show my thought, another his
I tell my secrets too easily when I am downhearted.
I replied with my usual forbearance
I think I have not been attacked enough for it
I never think I have hit hard unless it rebounds
I love horses
I have taken all knowledge to be my province
I have lived by the sea-shore and by the mountains
I hate books
I had not thought love was ever meant for me.
I am my own son, as it seems to me
If I thought I should ever see the Alps!
If they have run as well as they knew how!
If so and so, we should have been this or that
Ignoble facts which strew the highways of political life
Il faut ne pas BRUTALISER la machine
In revolutions the men who win are those who are in earnest
In what direction we are moving
Incipit Allegoria Senectutis.
Indoor home life imprisons them in the domestic circle
Infinite ocean of similitudes and analogies
Insanity is often the logic of an accurate mind overtasked
Insanity
Intellectual dandyisms of Bulwer
Intellectual companions can be found easily
Irresistible force in collision with an insuperable resistance
Is this the mighty occan?--is this all?
It is pleasant to be foolish at the right time
It is n't strategists that are wanted so much as believers
It is by little things that we know ourselves
John Quincy Adams
Judge men's minds by comparing with mine
Keep his wit in the background
Key to this side-door
Kindly shadow of oblivion
Knowledge and timber only useful when seasoned
La main de fer sous le gant de velours
Laid the egg of the Reformation which Luther hatched
Laughs at times at the grand airs "Science" puts on
Law of the road with regard to handsome faces
Leading a string of my mind's daughters to market
Leap at a single bound into celebrity
Learn anything twice as easily as in my earlier days
Leave your friend to learn unpleasant truths from his enemies
Lecturer is public property
Let us cry!
Liability of all men to be elected to public office
Life would be nothing without paper-credit
Life is maintained by the respiration of oxygen and of sentiment
Like taking the cat in your lap after holding a squirrel
Listen to what others say about subjects you have studied
Little narrow streaks of specialized knowledge
Little great man
Little muscle which knows its importance
Live on the reputation of the reputation they might have made
Living in a narrow world of dry habits
Logic
Logicians carry the surveyor's chain over the track
Long illness is the real vampyrism
Look through the silvered rings of the arcus senilis!
Love-capacity is a congenital endowment
Love must be either rich or rosy
Love is sparingly soluble in the words of men
Lying is unprofitable
Made up your mind to do when you ask them for advice
Man who means to be honest for a literary pickpocket
Man is father to the boy that was
Man of family
Man's and a woman's dusting a library
Man's first life-story shall clean him out, so to speak
Manner in which an insult shall be dealt with
Mathematical fact
May doubt everything to-day if I will only do it civilly
Meaningless blushing
Mechanical invention had exhausted itself
Mediocrity is at a premium
Memory is a net
Men of facts wait their turn in grim silence
Men who have found new occupations when growing old
Men grow sweet a little while before they begin to decay
Men that know everything except how to make a living
Men are fools, cowards, and liars all at once
Men that it weakens one to talk with an hour
Might have hired an EARTHQUAKE for less money!
Misanthropical, sceptical philosopher
Moralist and occasional sermonizer
Most entirely truthful child whe had ever seen
Most of our common, working beliefs are probabilities
Motley was twice sacrificed to personal feelings
Moved as if all her articulations were elbow-joints
Much ashamed of some people for retaining their reason
Must sail sometimes with the wind and sometimes against it
Must be weaned from his late suppers now
Must not read such a string of verses too literally
Napoleon's test
Nature, who always has her pockets full of seeds
Nature dresses and undresses them
Nearest approach to flying that man has ever made
Nearsighted liberalism
Neither make too much of flaws or overstatements
Never forget where they have put their money
No man knows his own voice
No great man can reach the highest position in our government
No two books, as he said, ever injured each other
No man is safe (from news reporters)
No fresh truth ever gets into a book
No families take so little medicine as those of doctors
Nobody is so old he doesn't think he can live a year
None of my business to inquire what other persons think
Not a single acquaintance in the place, and we glory in the fact
Nutritious diet of active sympathetic benevolence
Oblivion as residuary legatee
Oblivion's Uncatalogued Library
Odious trick of speech or manners must be got rid of.
Oh, so patient she is, this imperturbable Nature!
Old Age
Old age appear as a series of personal insults and indignities
Old jokes are dynamometers of mental tension
One very sad thing in old friendships
One whose patients are willing to die in his hands
One doesn't like to be cruel,--and yet one hates to lie
One that goes in a nurse may come out an angel
One can generally tell these wholesale thieves easily enough
Only foundation fit for history,--original contemporary document
Open patches where the sun gets in and goes to sleep
Oracle
Original, though you have uttered it a hundred times
Ought to produce insanity in every well-regulated mind
Our brains are seventy-year clocks
Our mortal life is but a string of guesses at the future
Over excited, when his prejudices were roughly handled
Overrate their own flesh and blood
Painted there by reflection from our faces
Passion never laughs
People that make puns are like wanton boys
People in the green stage of millionism
Person is really full of information, and does not abuse it
Personal incidents that call up single sharp pictures
Physical necessity to talk out what is in the mind
Picket-guard at the extreme outpost
Plagiarism
Plain enough that he is telling his own story
Played so long with other men's characters and good name
Pluck survives stamina
Poem must be kept and used, like a meersehaum, or a violin
Poetry of words is quite as beautiful as that of sentences
Poetry, instead of making one other heart happy
Poor creature that does not often repeat himself
Poverty is evidence of limited capacity
Power of music
Power of human beings is a very strictly limited agency
Pretensions of presumptuous ignorance
Pride, in the sense of contemning others
Probabilities
Progress should be by a spiral movement
Project a principle full in the face of obvious fact!
Provincial conceit, which some of us must plead guilty to.
Pseudo-science
Pseudological inanity
Public which must have a slain reputation to devour
Public itself, which insists on being poisoned
Pun is primŸ facie an insult
Put coppers on the railroad-tracks
Qu'est ce qu'il a fait? What has he done?
Quackery and idolatry are all but immortal
Question everything
Racing horses are essentially gambling implements
Radical, one who would uproot, is a man whose trade is dangerous
Rapidity with which ideas grow old in our memories
Rather longer than usual dressing that morning
Rather meet three of the scowlers than one of the smilers.
Reasonable to pay our debts rather than to repudiate them
Recall of a foreign minister for alleged misconduct in office
Regained my freedom with a sigh
Religious mental disturbances
Remarkably intelligent audience
Remarks like so many postage-stamps
Republics are said to be ungrateful
Returning thanks after a dinner of many courses
Ribbon which has strangled so many false pretensions
Sad thing to be born a sneaking fellow
Saddle-leather is in some respects even preferable
Saint may be a sinner that never got down to "hard pan"
Saturation-point of each mind differs from that of every other
Saying one thing about it and believing another
Scientific certainty has no spring in it
Scientific knowledge
Second story projecting
See if the ripe fruit were better or worse
Sees the past in the pitiless light of the present
Self-made men?
Self-unconsciousness of genius
Self-love is a cup without any bottom
Self-assertion, such as free suffrage introduces
Self-educated man, as he had been a self-taught boy
Sense of SMELL
Sentenced to capital punishment for the crime of living
Sentimentality, which is sentiment overdone
Settler in the form of a fact or a revolver
Several false premises
Shake the same bough again
Shall Slavery die, or the great Republic?
She always laughs and cries in the right places
She who nips off the end of a brittle courtesy
Shut out, not all light, but all the light they do not want
Shy of asking questions of those who know enough to destroy
SIN has many tools, but a lie is the handle which fits them all
Single combats between dead authors and living housemaids
Singular inability to weigh the value of testimony
Six persons engaged in every dialogue between two
Slow to accept marvellous stories and many forms of superstition
Small potatoes always get to the bottom.
Smiling at present follies
So much woman in it,--muliebrity, as well as femineity
So much must be pardoned to humanity
So long as a woman can talk, there is nothing she cannot bear
Society is a strong solution of books
Society of Mutual Admiration
Sold his sensibilities
Solitary and morose, the necessary consequence of reckless study
Some people think that truth and gold are always to be washed for
Some people that think everything pitiable is so funny
Somebody had been calling him an old man
Something she is ashamed of, or ought to be
Something better than flowers; it is a seed-capsule
Somewhere,-- somewhere,--love is in store for them
Spirit of a man who wishes to be proud of his country
Stages of life
Struggle with the ever-rising mists of delusion
Studied according to his inclinations rather than by rule
Stupidity often saves a man from going mad
Style is the man
Style above all other qualities seems to embalm for posterity
Sudden conviction that I had seen it somewhere
Suicide is confession
Takes very little to spoil everything for writer, talker, lover
Talk about those subjects you have had long in your mind
Talk without words is half their conversation
Talk, to me, is only spading up the ground for crops of thought
Talked impatiently of the value of my time
Talkers who have what may be called jerky minds
Talking with a dull friend affords great relief
Talking shapes our thoughts for us
Talking is like playing on the harp
Talking is one of the fine arts
Tears that we weep inwardly with unchanging features
Temptation of money and fame is too great for young people
Tepid and unstimulating expression of enthusiasm
Terrible smile
Thanklessness of critical honesty
That great procession of the UNLOVED
The loss of hair, which brings on premature decay
The personal gifts which are nature's passport everywhere
The nation is as much bound to be honest as is the individual
The fellow mixes blood with his colors!
The dead men of the place are my intimate friends
The way to argue down a vice is not to tell lies about it
The year eighteen hundred and ever-so-few
The race that shortens its weapons lengthens its boundaries
The Amen! of Nature is always a flower
The schoolmistress had tried life, too
The house is quite as much the body we live in
Their business is not a matter of sympathy, but of intellect
There is a higher law in grammar, not to be put down
There is almost always at least one key to this side-door
There is no elasticity in a mathematical fact
They knew very little of us, and that little wrong
Think of the griefs that die unspoken!
Think only in single file front this day forward
Third vowel as its center
This Somebody may have been one whom we should call Nobody
This is the shortest way,--she said
This is one of those cases in which the style is the man
Those who ask your opinion really want your praise
Time is a fact
To pay up, to own up, and to shut up, if beaten
To trifle with the vocabulary
Too late!---- "It might have been."----Amen!
Travellers change their guineas, but not their characters
Triumph of the ciphering hand-organ
True state of creative genius is allied to reverie, or dreaming
Truth must roll, or nobody can do anything with it
Truth is only safe when diluted
Truth's sharp corners get terribly rounded
Truths a man carries about with him are his tools
Turn over any old falsehood
Twenty assaults upon fame and had forty books killed under him
Unadorned and in plain calico
Undertakers
Unequivocal policy of slave emancipation
Unpacks and unfolds incidental illustrations
Unpretending mediocrity is good
Vain belief that they were men at eighteen or twenty
Virtually old when it first makes its appearance
Virtue passed through the hem of their parchment
Virtues of a sporting man
Visible atmosphere of power the poison of which
Vulgarism of language
Wait awhile!
Walls of that larger Inquisition which we call Civilization
Want of ideas, want of words, want of manners
We are all theological students
We carry happiness into our condition
We don't read what we don't like
We die out of houses, just as we die out of our bodies
We always compare ourselves with our contemporaries.
We never tell our secrets to people that pump for them.
Wedded, faded away, threw themselves away
Wedding-ring conveys a right to a key to this side-door
Weeded their circle pretty well of these unfortunates
Weight of a thousand years of error
What a satire, by the way, is that machine
What are the great faults of conversation?
Whether anything can be conscious of its own flavor??
Whether gifted with the accident of beauty or not
While she is silent, Nature is working for her
Who is in advance of it or even with it
Wholesale professional dealers in misfortune
Why authors and actors are ashamed of being funny?
Why did I not ask? you will say
Will you take the long path with me?
Winning-post a slab of white or gray stone
Wit knows that his place is at the tail of a procession.
Wonder how my great trees are coming on this summer.
Wonders whether it has found its harbor or only lost its anchor
World calls him hard names, probably
World has a million roosts for a man, but only one nest.
Wringing a dry cloth for drops of evidence
Yes, I am a man, like another
Young man knows the rules, but the old man knows the exceptions
Youth and age--something in the soul

*** END OF THE PG EBOOK OF THE COMPLETE WORKS OF OLIVE WENDELL HOLMES ***

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