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TOM SWIFT AND HIS WIZARD CAMERA OR Thrilling Adventures While Taking Moving Pictures

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caravan halted there, but, for the most part, they were alone.

"No danger of Eckert, or any of his spies coming here, I
guess," said Tom grimly as he blew on a portable forge, to weld
two pieces of iron together.

In due time they were again on the wing, and without further
incident they were soon in the vicinity of Stanley Falls. They
managed to locate a village where there were some American
missionaries established. They were friends of Mr. and Mrs.
Illington, the missionaries whom Tom had saved from the red
pygmies, as told in the "Electric Rifle" volume of this series,
and they made our hero and his friends welcome.

"Is it true?" asked Tom, of the missionaries who lived not far
from Stanley Falls, "that there is to be a native battle? Or are
we too late for it?"

"I am sorry to say, I fear there will be fighting among the
tribesmen," replied Mr. Janeway, one of the Christian workers.
"It has not yet taken place, though."

"Then I'm not too late!" cried Tom, and there was exultation in
his voice. "I don't mean to be barbarous," he went on, as he saw
that the missionaries looked shocked, "but as long as they are
going to fight I want to get the pictures."

"Oh, they'll fight all right," spoke Mrs. Janeway. "The poor,
ignorant natives here are always ready to fight. This time I
think it is about some cattle that one tribe took from another."

"And where will the battle take place?" asked Tom.

"Well, the rumors we have, seem to indicate that the fight will
take place about ten miles north of here. We will have notice of
it before it starts, as some of the natives, whom we have
succeeded in converting, belong to the tribe that is to be
attacked. They will be summoned to the defense of their town and
then it will be time enough for you to go. Oh, war is a terrible
thing! I do not like to talk about it. Tell me how you rescued
our friends from the red pygmies," and Tom was obliged to relate
that story, which I have told in detail elsewhere.

Several days passed, and Tom and his friends spent a pleasant
time in the African village with the missionaries. The airship
and camera were in readiness for instant use, and during this
period of idleness our hero got several fine films of animal
scenes, including a number of night-fights among the beasts at
the drinking pools. One tiger battle was especially good, from a
photographic standpoint.

One afternoon, a number of native bearers came into the town.
They preceded two white men, who were evidently sportsmen, or
explorers, and the latter had a well equipped caravan. The
strangers sought the advice of the missionaries about where big
game might be found, and Tom happened to be at the cottage of Mr.
Janeway when the strangers arrived.

The young inventor looked at them critically, as he was
introduced to them. Both men spoke with an English accent, one
introducing himself as Bruce Montgomery, and the other as Wade
Kenneth. Tom decided that they were of the ordinary type of
globe-trotting Britishers, until, on his way to his airship, he
passed the place where the native bearers had set down the
luggage of the Englishmen.

"Whew!" whistled Tom, as he caught sight of a peculiarly shaped
box. "See that, Ned?"

"Yes, what is it? A new kind of magazine gun?"

"It's a moving picture camera, or I lose my guess!" whispered
Tom. "One of the old fashioned kind. Those men are no more
tourists, or after big game, than I am! They're moving picture
men, and they're here to get views of that native battle! Ned,
we've got to be on our guard. They may be in the pay of that
Turbot and Eckert firm, and they may try to do us some harm!"

"That's so!" exclaimed Ned. "We'll keep watch of them, Tom."

As they neared their airship, there came, running down what
served as the main village street, an African who showed evidence
of having come from afar. As he ran on, he called out something
in a strange tongue. Instantly from their huts the other natives
swarmed.

"What's up now?" cried Ned.

"Something important, I'll wager," replied Tom. "Ned, you go
back to the missionaries house, and find out what it is. I'm
going to stand guard over my camera."

"It's come!" cried Ned a little later, as he hurried into the
interior of the airship, where Tom was busy working over a new
attachment he intended putting on his picture machine.

"What has?"

"War! That native, whom we saw running in, brought news that
the battle would take place day after to-morrow. The enemies of
his tribe are on the march, so the African spies say, and he came
to summon all the warriors from this town. We've got to get
busy!"

"That's so. What about those Englishmen?"

"They were talking to the missionaries when the runner came in.
They pretended to have no interest in it, but I saw one wink to
the other, and then, very soon, they went out, and I saw them
talking to their native bearers, while they were busy over that
box you said was a picture machine."

"I knew it, Ned! I was sure of it! Those fellows came here to
trick us, though how they ever followed our trail I don't know.
Probably they came by a fast steamer to the West Coast, and
struck inland, while we were delayed on the desert. I don't care
if they are only straight out-and-out rivals--and not chaps that
are trying to take an unfair advantage. I suppose all the big
picture concerns have a tip about this war, and they may have
representatives here. I hope we get the best views. Now come on,
and give me a hand. We've got our work cut out for us, all
right."

"Bless my red cross bandage!" cried Mr. Damon, when he heard
the news. "A native fight, eh? That will be something I haven't
seen in some time. Will there be any danger, Tom, do you think?"

"Not unless our airship tumbles down between the two African
forces," replied our hero, "and I'll take care that it doesn't do
that. "We'll be well out of reach of any of their blow guns, or
arrows."

"But I understand that many of the tribes have powder weapons,"
said Mr. Nestor.

"They have," admitted Tom, "but they are 'trader's' rifles, and
don't carry far. We won't run any risk from such old-fashioned
guns."

"A big fight; eh?" asked Koku when they told him what was
before them. "Me like to help."

"Yes, and I guess both sides would give a premium for your
services," remarked Tom, as he gazed at his big servant. "But
we'll need you with us, Koku."

"Oh, me stay with you, Mr. Tom," exclaimed the big man, with a
grin.

Somewhat to Tom's surprise the two Englishmen showed no further
interest in him and his airship, after the introduction at the
missionaries' bungalow.

With the stolidity of their race the Britishers did not show
any surprise, as, some time afterward, they strolled down toward
Tom's big craft, after supper, and looked it over. Soon they went
back to their own camp, and a little later, Koku, who walked
toward it, brought word that the Englishmen were packing up.

"They're going to start for the seat of war the first thing in
the morning," decided Tom. "Well, we'll get ahead of them. Though
we can travel faster than they can, we'll start now, and be on
the ground in good season. Besides, I don't like staying all
night in the same neighborhood with them. Get ready for a start,
Ned."

Tom did not stop to say good-bye to the Englishmen, though he
bade farewell to the missionaries, who had been so kind to him.
There was much excitement in the native town, for many of the
tribesmen were getting ready to depart to help their friends or
relatives in the impending battle.

As dusk was falling, the big airship arose, and soon her
powerful propellers were sending her across the jungle, toward
Stanley Falls in the vicinity of which the battle was expected to
take place.

CHAPTER XVIII - THE NATIVE BATTLE

"By Jove, Tom, here they come!"

"From over by that drinking pool?"

"Yes, just as the spies said they would. Wow, what a crowd of
the black beggars there are! And some of 'em have regular guns,
too. But most of 'em have clubs, bows and arrows, blow guns, or
spears."

Tom and Ned were standing on the forward part of the airship,
which was moving slowly along, over an open plateau, in the
jungle where the native battle was about to take place. Our
friends had left the town where the missionaries lived, and had
hovered over the jungle, until they saw signs of the coming
struggle. They had seen nothing of their English rivals since
coming away, but had no doubt but that the Britishers were
somewhere in the neighborhood.

The two forces of black men, who had gone to war over a dispute
about some cattle, approached each other. There was the beating
of tom-toms, and skin drums, and many weird shouts. From their
vantage point in the air, Tom and his companions had an excellent
view. The Wizard Camera was loaded with a long reel of film, and
ready for action.

"Bless my handkerchief!" cried Mr. Damon, as he looked down on
the forces that were about to clash. "I never saw anything like
this before!"

"I either," admitted Tom. "But, if things go right, I'm going
to get some dandy films!"

Nearer and nearer the rival forces advanced. At first they had
stared, and shouted in wonder at the sight of the airship,
hovering above them, but their anger soon drew their attention to
the fighting at hand, and, after useless gestures toward the
craft of the air, and after some of them had vainly fired their
guns or arrows at it, they paid no more attention, but rushed on
with their shouts and cries and amid the beating of their rude
drums.

"I think I'll begin to take pictures now," said Tom, as Ned, in
charge of the ship, sent it about in a circle, giving a general
view of the rival forces. "I'll show a scene of the two crowds
getting ready for business, and, later on, when they're actually
giving each other cats and dogs, I'll get all the pictures
possible."

The camera was started while, safe in the a those on the Flyer
watched what went on below them.

Suddenly the forward squads of the two small armies of blacks
met. With wild, weird yells they rushed at each other. The air
was filled with flying arrows and spears. The sound of the old-
fashioned muzzle-loading guns could he heard, and clouds of smoke
arose. Tilting his camera, and arranging the newly attached
reflecting mirrors so as to give the effect as if a spectator was
looking at the battle from in front, instead of from above, Tom
Swift took picture after picture.

The fight was now on. With yells of rage and defiance the
Africans came together, giving blow for blow. It was a wild
melee, and those on the airship looked on fascinated, though
greatly wishing that such horrors could be stopped.

"How about it, Tom?" cried Ned.

"Everything going good! I don't like this business, but now I'm
in it I'm going to stick. Put me down a little lower," answered
the young inventor.

"All right. I say Tom, look over there."

"Where?"

"By that lightning-struck gum tree. See those two men, and some
sort of a machine they've got stuck up on stilts? See it?"

"Sure. Those are the two Englishmen--my rivals! They're taking
pictures, too!"

And then, with a crash and roar, with wild shouts and yells,
with volley after volley of firearms, clouds of smoke and flights
of arrows and spears, the native battle was in full swing, while
the young inventor, sailing above it in his airship, reeled off
view after view of the strange sight.

CHAPTER XIX - A HEAVY LOSS

"Bless my battle axe, but this is awful!" cried Mr. Damon.

"War is always a fearful thing," spoke Mr. Nestor. "But this is
not as bad as if the natives fought with modern weapons. See!
most of them are fighting with clubs, and their fists. They don't
seem to hurt each other very much."

"That's so," agreed Mr. Damon. The two gentlemen were in the
main cabin, looking down on the fight below them, while Tom, with
Ned to help him change the reels of films, as they became filled
with pictures, attended to the camera. Koku was steering the
craft, as he had readily learned how to manage it.

"Are those Englishmen taking pictures yet?" asked Tom, too busy
to turn his head, and look for himself.

"Yes, they're still at," replied Ned. "But they seem to be
having trouble with their machine," he added as he saw one of the
men leave the apparatus, and run hurriedly back to where they had
made a temporary camp.

"I guess it's an old-fashioned kind," commented Tom. "Say, this
is getting fierce!" he cried, as the natives got in closer
contact with each other. It was now a hand-to-hand battle.

"I should say so!" yelled Ned. "It's a wonder those Englishmen
aren't afraid to be down on the same level with the black
fighters."

"Oh, a white person is considered almost sacred by the natives
here, so the missionaries told me," said Tom. "A black man would
never think of raising his hand to one, and the Englishmen
probably know this. They're safe enough. In fact I'm thinking of
soon going down myself, and getting some views from the ground."

"Bless my gizzard, Tom!" cried Mr. Damon. "Don't do it!"

"Yes, I think I will. Why, it's safe enough. Besides, if they
attack us we have the electric rifles. Ned, you tell Koku to get
the guns out, to have in readiness, and then you put the ship
down. I'll take a chance."

"Jove! You've been doing nothing but take chances since we came
on this trip!" exclaimed Ned, admiringly. "All right! Here we
go," and he went to relieve Koku at the wheel, while the giant,
grinning cheerfully at the prospect of taking part in the fight
himself, got out the rifles, including his own.

Meanwhile the native battle went on fiercely. Many on both
sides fell, and not a few ran away, when they got the chance,
their companions yelling at them, evidently trying to shame them
into coming back.

As the airship landed, Mr. Damon, Mr. Nestor, Ned and Koku
stood ready with the deadly electric rifles, in case an attack
should be made on them. But the fighting natives paid no more
attention to our friends than they did to the two Englishmen.
The latter moved their clumsy camera from place to place, in
order to get various views of the fighting.

"This is the best yet!" cried Tom, as, after a lull in the
fight, when the two opposing armies had drawn a little apart,
they came together again more desperately than before. "I hope
the pictures are being recorded all right. I have to go at this
thing pretty much in the dark. Say, look at the beggars fight!"
he finished.

But a battle, even between uncivilized blacks, cannot go on for
very long at a time. Many had fallen, some being quite severely
injured it seemed, being carried off by their friends. Then, with
a sudden rush, the side which, as our friends learned later, had
been robbed of their cattle, made a fierce attack, overwhelming
their enemies, and compelling them to retreat. Across the open
plain the vanquished army fled, with the others after them. Tom,
meanwhile, taking pictures as fast as he could.

"This ends it!" he remarked to Ned, when the warriors were too
far away to make any more good views. "Now we can take a rest."

"The Englishmen gave up some time ago," said his chum,
motioning to the two men who were taking their machine off the
tripod.

"Guess their films gave out," spoke Tom. "Well, you see it
didn't do any harm to come down, and I got some better views
here."

"Here they come back!" exclaimed Ned, as a horde of the black
fellows emerged f row the jungle, and came on over the plain.

"Hear 'em sing!" commented Tom, as the sound of a rude chant
came to their ears. "They must be the winners all right."

"I guess so," agreed Ned. "But what about staying here now?
Maybe they won't be so friendly to us when they haven't any
fighting to occupy their minds."

"Don't worry," advised Tom. "They won't bother us."

And the blacks did not. They were caring for their wounded, who
had not already been taken from the field, and they paid no
attention to our friends, save to look curiously at the airship.

"Bless my newspaper!" cried Mr. Damon, with an air of relief.
"I'm glad that's over, and we didn't have to use the electric
rifles, after all."

"Here come the Englishmen to pay us a visit," spoke Ned a
little later, as they sat about the cabin of the Flyer. The two
rival picture men soon climbed on deck.

"Beg pardon," said the taller of the two, addressing our hero,
"but could you lend us a roll of film? Ours are all used up, and
we want to get some more pictures before going back to our main
camp."

"I'm sorry," replied Tom, "but I use a special size, and it
fits no camera but my own."

"Ah! might we see your camera?" asked the other Englishman.
"That is, see how it works?"

"I don't like to be disobliging," was Tom's answer, "but it is
not yet patented and--well--" he hesitated.

"Oh, I see!" sneered the taller visitor. "You're afraid we
might steal some of your ideas. Hum!" Come on Montgomery," and,
swinging on his heels, with a military air, he hurried away,
followed by his companion.

"They don't like that, but I can't help it," remarked Tom to
his friends a little later. "I can't afford to take any chances."

"No, you did just right," said Mr. Nestor. "Those men may be
all right, but from the fact that they are in the picture taking
business I'd be suspicious of them."

"Well, what's next on the programme?" asked Ned as Tom put his
camera away.

"Oh, I think we'll stay here over night," was our hero's reply.
"It's a nice location, and the gas machine needs cleaning. We can
do it here, and maybe I can get some more pictures."

They were busy the rest of the day on the gas generator, but
the main body of natives did not come back, and the Englishmen
seemed to have disappeared.

Everyone slept soundly that night. So soundly, in fact, that
the sun was very high when Koku was the first to awaken, His head
felt strangely dizzy, and he wondered at a queer smell in the
room he had to himself.

"Nobody up yet," he exclaimed in surprise, as he staggered into
the main cabin. There, too, was the strange, sweetish, sickly
smell. "Mr. Tom, where you be? Time to get up!" the giant called
to his master, as he went in, and gently shook the young inventor
by the shoulder.

"Eh? What's that? What's the matter?" began Tom, and then he
suddenly sat up. "Oh, my head!" he exclaimed, putting his hands
to his aching temples.

"And that queer smell!" added Ned, who was also awake now.

"Bless my talcum powder!" cried Mr. Damon. "I have a splitting
headache."

"Hum! Chloroform, if I'm any judge!" called Mr. Nestor from his
berth.

"Chloroform!" cried Tom, staggering to his feet. "I wonder" He
did not finish his sentence, but made his way to the room where
his camera was kept. "It's gone!" he cried. "We have been
chloroformed in the night, and some one has taken my Wizard
Camera."

CHAPTER XX - AFTER THE ENGLISHMEN

"The camera gone!" gasped Ned.

"Did they chloroform us?" exclaimed Mr. Damon. "Bless my--" but
for one of the few times in his life, he did not know what to
bless.

"Get all the fresh air you can," hastily advised Mr. Nestor.
"Koku, open all the doors and windows," for, though it was hot
during the day in the jungle, the nights were cool, and the
airship was generally closed up. With the inrush of the fresh air
every one soon felt better.

"Is anything else gone?" asked Ned, as he followed Tom into the
camera room.

"Yes, several rolls of unexposed films. Oh, if only they
haven't got too much of a start! I'll get it away from them!"
declared Tom with energy.

"From who? Who took it?" asked Ned.

"Those Englishmen, of course! Who else? I believe they are in
the pay of Turbot and Eckert. Their taking pictures was only a
bluff! They got on my trail and stuck to it. The delays we had,
gave them a chance to catch up to us. They came over to the
airship, to pretend to borrow films, just to get a look at the
place, and size it up, so they could chloroform us, and get the
camera."

"I believe you're right," declared Mr. Nestor. "We must get
after those scoundrels as quickly as possible!"

"Bless my shoulder braces!" cried Mr. Damon. "How do you
imagine they worked that trick on us?"

"Easily enough," was Mr. Nestor's opinion. "We were all dead
tired last night, and slept like tops. They watched their chance,
sneaked up, and got in. After that it was no hard matter to
chloroform each one of us in turn, and they had the ship to
themselves. They looked around, found the camera, and made off
with it."

"Well, I'm going to get right after them!" cried Tom. "Ned,
start the motor. I'll steer for a while."

"Hold on! Wait a minute," suggested Mr. Nestor. "I wouldn't go
off in the ship just yet,~ Tom."

"Why not?"

"Because you don't know which way to go. We must find out which
trail the Englishmen took. They have African porters with them,
and those porters doubtless know some of the blacks around here.
We must inquire of the natives which way the porters went, in
carrying the goods of our rivals, for those Englishmen would not
abandon camp without taking their baggage with them."

"That's so," admitted the young inventor. "That will be the
best plan. Once I find which way they have gone I can easily
overtake them in the airship. And when I find 'em--" Tom paused
significantly.

"Me help you fix 'em!" cried Koku, clenching his big fist.

"They will probably figure it out that you will take after
them," said Mr. Nestor, "but they may not count on you doing it
in the Flyer, and so they may not try to hide. It isn't going to
be an easy matter to pick a small party out of the jungle though,
Tom."

"Well, I've done more difficult things in my airships," spoke
our hero. "I'll fly low, and use the glass. I guess we can pick
out their crowd of porters, though they won't have many. Oh, my
camera! I hope they won't damage it."

"They won't," was Ned's opinion. "It's too valuable. They want
it to take pictures with, themselves."

"Maybe. I hope they don't open it, and see how it's made. And
I'm glad I thought to hide the picture films I've taken so far.
They didn't get those away from us, only some of the blank.
ones," and Tom looked again in a secret closet. where he kept the
battle-films, and the others, in the dark, to prevent them from
being light-struck, by any possible chance.

"Well, if we're going to make some inquiries, let's do it,"
suggested Mr. Nestor. "I think I see some of the Africans over
there. They have made a temporary camp, it seems, to attend to
some of their wounded."

"Do you think we can make them understand what we want?" asked
Ned. "I don't believe they speak English."

"Oh these blacks have been trading with white men," said Tom,
"for they have 'trader's' guns, built to look at, and not to
shoot very well. I fancy we can make ourselves understood. If
not, we can use signs."

Leaving Koku and Mr. Damon to guard the airship, Tom, Ned and
Mr. Nestor went to the African camp. There was a large party of
men there, and they seemed friendly enough. Probably winning the
battle the day before had put them in good humor, even though
many of them were hurt.

To Tom's delight he found one native who could speak a little
English, and of him they made inquiries as to what direction the
Englishmen had taken. The black talked for a while among his
fellows, and then reported to our friends that, late in the
night, one of the porters, hired by Montgomery and Kenneth, had
come to camp to bid a brother good-bye. This porter had said that
his masters were in a hurry to get away, and had started west.

"That's it!" cried Mr. Nestor. "They're going to get somewhere
so they can make their way to the coast. They want to get out of
Africa as fast as they can."

"And I'm going to get after 'em as fast as I can!" cried Tom
grimly. "Come on!"

They hurried back to the airship, finding Koku and Mr. Damon
peacefully engaged in talk, no one having disturbed them.

"Start the motor, Ned!" called his chum. "We'll see what luck
we have!"

Up into the air went the Flyer, her great propellers revolving
rapidly. Over the jungle she shot, and then, when he found that
everything was working well, and that the cleaned gas generator
was operating as good as when it was new, the young inventor
slowed up, and brought the craft down to a lower level.

"For we don't want to run past these fellows, or shoot over
their heads in our hurry," Tom explained. "Ned, get out the
binoculars. They're easier to handle than the telescope. Then go
up forward, and keep a sharp lookout. There is something like a
jungle trail below us, and it looks to be the only one around
here. They probably took that." Soon after leaving the place
where they had camped after the battle, Tom had seen a rude path
through the forest, and had followed that lead.

On sped the Flyer, after the two Englishmen,
while Tom thought regretfully of his stolen
camera.

CHAPTER XXI - THE JUNGLE FIRE

"Well, Tom, I don't seem to see anything of them," remarked Ned
that afternoon, as he sat in the bow of the air craft, gazing
from time to time through the powerful glasses.

"No, and I can't understand it, either," responded the young
inventor, who had come for-ward to relieve his chum. "They didn't
have much the start of us, and they'll have to travel very
slowly. It isn't as if they could hop on a train; and, even if
they did, I could overtake them in a short time. But they have to
travel on foot through the jungle, and can't have gone far."

"'Maybe they have bullock carts," suggested
Mr. Damon.

'~The trail isn't wide enough for that," declared Tom. "We've
come quite a distance now, even if we have been running at low
speed, and we haven't seen even a black man on the trail," and he
motioned to the rude path below them.

"They may have taken a boat and slipped down that river we
crossed a little while ago," suggested Ned.

"That's so!" cried Tom. "Why didn't I think of it? Say! I'm
going to turn back."

"Turn back?"

"Yes, and go up and down the stream a way. We have time, for we
can easily run at top speed on the return trip. Then, if we don't
see anything of them on the water, we'll pick up the trail again.
Put her around, Ned, and I'll take the glasses for a while."

The Flyer was soon shooting back over the same trail our
friends had covered, and, as Ned set the propellers going at top
speed, they were quickly hovering over a broad but shallow river,
which cut through the jungle.

"Try it down stream first," suggested Tom, who was peering
through the binoculars. "They'd be most likely to go down, as it
would be easier."

Along over the stream swept the airship, covering several
miles.

"There's a boat!" suddenly exclaimed Mr. Nestor, pointing to a
native canoe below them.

"Bless my paddle wheel! So it is!" cried Mr. Damon. "I believe
it's them, Tom!"

"No, there are only natives in that craft," answered the young
inventor a moment later, as he brought the binoculars into focus.
"I wish it was them, though."

A few more miles were covered down stream, and then Tom tried
the opposite direction. But all to no purpose. A number of boats
were seen, and several rafts, but they had no white men on them.

"Maybe the Englishmen disguised themselves like natives, Tom,"
suggested Ned.

Our hero shook his head.

"I could see everything in the boats, through these powerful
glasses," he replied, "and there was nothing like my camera. "I'd
know that a mile off. No, they didn't take to this stream, though
they probably crossed it. We'll have to keep on the way we were
going. It will soon be night, and we'll have to camp. Then we'll
take up the search to-morrow."

It was just getting dusk, and Tom was looking about for a good
place to land in the jungle, when Ned, who was standing in the
bow, cried:

"I say, Tom, here's a native village just ahead. There's a good
place to stop, and we can stay there over night."

"Good!" exclaimed Tom. "And, what's more, we can make some
inquiries as to whether or not the Englishmen have passed here.
This is great! Maybe we'll come out all right, after all! They
can't travel at night--or at least I don't believe they will--and
if they have passed this village we can catch them to-morrow.
We'll go down."

They were now over the native town, which was in a natural
clearing in the jungle. The natives had by this time caught
sight of the big airship over them, and were running about in
terror. There was not a man, woman or child in sight when the
Flyer came down, for the inhabitants had all fled in fright.

"Not much of a chance to make inquiries of these folks," said
Mr. Nestor.

"Oh, they'll come back," predicted Tom. "They are naturally
curious, and when they see that the thing isn't going to blow up,
they'll gather around. I've seen the same thing happen before."

Tom proved a true prophet. In a little while some of the men
began straggling back, when they saw our friends walking about
the airship, as it rested on the ground. Then came the children,
and then the women, until the whole population was gathered about
the airship, staring at it wonderingly. Tom made signs of
friendship, and was lucky enough to find a native who knew a few
French words. Tom was not much of a French scholar, but he could
frame a question as to the Englishmen.

"Oui!" exclaimed the native, when he understood. Then he
rattled off something, which Tom, after having it repeated, and
making signs to the man to make sure he understood, said meant
that the Englishmen had passed through the village that morning.

"We're on the right trail!" cried the young inventor. "They're
only a day's travel ahead of us. We'll catch them to-morrow, and
get my camera back."

The natives soon lost all fear of the airship, and some of the
chief men even consented to come aboard. Tom gave them a few
trifles for presents, and won their friendship to such an extent
that a great feast was hastily gotten up in honor of the
travelers. Big fires were lighted, and fowls by the score were
roasted.

"Say, I'm glad we struck this place!" exclaimed Ned, as he sat
on the ground with the others, eating roast fowl. "This is all to
the chicken salad!"

"Things are coming our way at last," remarked Tom. "We'll start
the first thing in the morning. I wish I had my camera now. I'd
take a picture of this scene. Dad would enjoy it, and so would
Mrs. Baggert. Oh, I almost wish I was home again. But if I get my
camera I've got a lot more work ahead of me."

"What kind?" asked Ned.

"I don't know. I'm to stop in Paris for the next instructions
from Mr. Period. He is keeping in touch with the big happenings
of the world, and he may send us to Japan, to get some earthquake
pictures."

The night was quiet after the feast, and in the morning Tom and
his friends sailed off in their airship, leaving behind the
wondering and pleased natives, for our hero handed out more
presents, of small value to him, but yet such things as the
blacks prized highly.

Once more they were flying over the trail, and they put on more
speed now, for they were fairly sure that the men they sought
were ahead of them about a day's travel. This meant perhaps
twenty miles, and Tom figured that he could cover fifteen in a
hurry, and then go over the remaining five slowly, so as not to
miss his quarry.

"Say, don't you smell something?" asked Ned a little later,
when the airship had been slowed down. "Something like smoke?"

"Humph! I believe I do get an odor of something burning,"
admitted Tom, sniffing the atmosphere.

"Bless my pocket book!" exclaimed Mr. Damon, "look down there,
boys!" He pointed below, and, to the surprise of the lads, and no
less of himself, he saw many animals hurrying back along the
jungle trail.

There were scores of deer, leaping along, here and there a
tawny lion, and one or two tigers. Off to one side a rhinoceros
crashed his way through the tangle, and occasionally an elephant
was seen.

"That's queer," cried Ned. "And they're not paying any
attention to each other, either."

"Something is happening," was Mr. Nestor's opinion. "Those
animals are running away from something."

"Maybe it's an elephant drive," spoke Tom. "I think--"

But he did not finish. The smell of smoke suddenly became
stronger, and, a moment later, as the airship rose higher, in
response to a change in the angle of the deflecting rudder, which
Ned shifted, all on board saw a great volume of black smoke
rolling toward the sky.

"A jungle fire!" cried Tom. "The jungle is burning! That's why
the animals are running back this way."

"We'd better not go on!" shouted Ned, choking a bit, as the
smoke rolled nearer.

"No, we've got to turn back!" decided Tom. "Say, this will stop
the Englishmen! They can't go on. We'll go back to the village we
left, and wait for them. They're trapped!" And then he added
soberly: "I hope my camera doesn't get burnt up!"

CHAPTER XXII - A DANGEROUS COMMISSION

"Look at that smoke!" yelled Ned, as he sent the airship about
in a great circle on the backward trail.

"And there's plenty of blaze, too," added Tom. "See the flames
eating away! This stuff is as dry as tinder for there hasn't been
any rain for months."

"Much hot!" was the comment of the giant, when he felt the warm
wind of the fire.

"Bless my fountain pen!" gasped Mr. Damon, as he looked down
into the jungle. "See all those animals!"

The trail was now thick with deer, and many small beasts, the
names of which Tom did not know. On either side could be heard
larger brutes, crashing their way forward to escape the fire
behind them.

"Oh, if you only had your camera now!" cried Ned. "You could
get a wonderful picture, Tom."

"What's the use of wishing for it. Those Englishmen have it,
and--"

"Maybe they're using it!" interrupted Ned. "No, I don't think
they would know how to work it. Do you see anything of them,
Ned?"

"Not a sight. But they'll surely have to come back, just as you
said, unless they got ahead of the fire. They can't go on, and it
would be madness to get off the trail in a jungle like this."

"I don't believe they could have gotten ahead of the fire,"
spoke Tom. "They couldn't travel fast enough for that, and see
how broad the blaze is."

They were now higher up, well out of the heat and smoke of the
conflagration, and they could see that it extended for many miles
along the trail, and for a mile or so on either side of it.

"We're far enough in advance, now, to go down a bit, I guess,"
said Tom, a little later. "I want to get a good view of the path,
and I can't do that from up here. I have an idea that--"

Tom did not finish, for as the airship approached nearer the
ground, he caught up a pair of binoculars, and focussed them on
something on the trail below.

"What is it?" cried Ned, startled by something in his chum's
manner.

"It's them! The Englishmen!" cried Tom. "See, they are racing
back along the trail. Their porters have deserted them. But they
have my camera! I can see it! I'm going down, and get it! Ned,
stand by the wheel, and make a quick landing. Then we'll go up
again!"

Tom handed the glasses to his chum, and Ned quickly verified
the young inventor's statement. There were the two rascally
Englishmen. The fire was still some distance in the rear, but was
coming on rapidly. There were no animals to be seen, for they had
probably gone off on a side trail, or had slunk deeper into the
jungle. Above the distant roar of the blaze sounded the throb of
the airship's motor. The Englishmen heard it, and looked up.
Then, suddenly, they motioned to Tom to descend.

"That's what I'm going to do," he said aloud, but of course
they could not hear him.

"They're waiting for us!" cried Ned. "I wonder why?" for the
rascals had come to a halt, setting down the packs they carried
on the trail. One of the things they had was undoubtedly Tom's
camera.

"They probably want us to save their lives," said Tom. "They
know they can't out-run this fire. They've given up! We have them
now!"

"Are you going to save them?" asked Mr. Damon.

"Of course. I wouldn't let my worst enemy run the chances of
danger in that terrible blaze. I'd save them even if they had
smashed my camera. I'll go down, and get them, and take them back
to the native village, but that's as far as I will carry them.
They'll have to get away as best they can, after that."

It was the work of but a few minutes to lower the airship to
the trail. Fortunately it widened a bit at this point, or Tom
could never have gotten his craft down through the trees.

"Hand up that camera!" ordered our hero curtly, when he had
stopped near the Englishmen.

"Yes, my dear chap," spoke the tall Britisher, "but will you
oblige us, by taking us--"

"Hand up the camera first!" sharply ordered Tom again.

They passed it to him.

"I know we treated you beastly mean," went on Kenneth, "but, my
dear chap--"

"Get aboard," was all Tom said, and when the rascals, with
fearful glances back into the burning jungle, did so, our hero
sent his craft high into the air again.

"Where are you taking us, my dear chap?" asked the tall rascal.

"Don't 'dear chap' me!" retorted Tom. "I don't want to talk to
you. I'm going to drop you at the native village."

"But that will burn!" cried the Englishman.

"The wind is changing," was our hero's answer. "The fire won't
get to the village. You'll be safe. Have you damaged my camera?"
he asked as he began to examine it, while Ned managed the ship.

"No, my dear chap. You mustn't think too hard of us. We were
both down on our luck, and a chap offered us a big sum to get on
your trail, and secure the camera. He said you had filched it
from him, and that he had a right to it. Understand, we wouldn't
have taken it had we known--"

"Don't talk to me!" interrupted Tom, as he saw that his
apparatus had not been damaged. "The man who hired you was a
rascal--that's all I'll say. Put on a little more speed, Ned. I
want to get rid of these 'dear chaps' and take some pictures of
the jungle fire."

As Tom had said, the wind had changed, and was blowing the
flames away off to one side, so that the native village would be
in no danger. It was soon reached, and the Africans were
surprised to see Tom's airship back again. But he did not stay
long, descending only to let the Englishmen alight. They pleaded
to be taken to the coast, making all sorts of promises, and
stating that, had they known that Turbot and Eckert (for whom
they admitted they had acted) were not telling the truth, they
never would have taken Tom's camera.

"Don't leave us here!" they pleaded.

"I wouldn't have you on board my airship another minute for a
fortune!" declared Tom, as he signalled to Ned to start the
motor. Then the Flyer ascended on high, leaving the plotters and
started back for the fire, of which Tom got a series of fine
moving pictures.

A week later our friends were in Paris, having made a quick
trip, on which little of incident occurred, though Tom managed to
get quite a number of good views on the way.

He found a message awaiting him, from Mr. Period.

"Well, where to now?" asked Ned, as his chum read the
cablegram.

"Great Scott!" cried our hero. "Talk about hair-raising jobs,
this certainly is the limit!"

"Why, what's the matter?"

"I've got to get some moving pictures of a volcano in action,"
was the answer. "Say, if I'd known what sort of things 'Spotty'
wanted, I'd never have consented to take this trip. A volcano in
action, and maybe an earthquake on the side! This is certainly
going some!"

CHAPTER XXIII - AT THE VOLCANO

"And you've got to snap-shot a volcano?" remarked Ned to his
chum, after a moment of surprised silence. "Any particular one?
Is it Vesuvius? If it is we haven't far to go. But how does Mr.
Period know that it's going to get into action when we want it to?"

"No, it isn't Vesuvius," replied Tom. "We've got to take
another long trip, and we'll have to go by steamer again. The
message says that the Arequipa volcano, near the city of the same
name, in Peru, has started to 'erupt,' and, according to rumor,
it's acting as it did many years ago, just before a big
upheaval."

"Bless my Pumice stones!" cried Mr. Damon. "And are you
expected to get pictures of it shooting out flames and smoke,
Tom?"

"Of course. An inactive volcano wouldn't make much of a moving
picture. Well, if we go to Peru, we won't be far from the United
States, and we can fly back home in the airship. But we've got to
take the Flyer apart, and pack up again."

"Will you have time?" asked Mr. Nestor. "Maybe the volcano will
get into action before you arrive, and the performance will be
all over with."

"I think not," spoke Tom, as he again read the cablegram. "Mr.
Period says he has advices from Peru to the effect that, on other
occasions, it took about a month from the time smoke was first
seen coming from the crater, before the fireworks started up. I
guess we've got time enough, but we won't waste any."

"And I guess Montgomery and Kenneth won't be there to make
trouble for us," put in Ned. "It will be some time before they
get away from that African town, I think."

They began work that day on taking the airship apart for
transportation to the steamer that was to carry them across the
ocean. Tom decided on going to Panama, to get a series of
pictures on the work of digging that vast canal. On inquiry he
learned that a steamer was soon to sail for Colon, so he took
passage for his friends and himself on that, also arranging for
the carrying of the parts of his airship.

It was rather hard work to take the Flyer apart, but it was
finally done, and, in about a week from the time of arriving in
Paris, they left that beautiful city. The pictures already taken
were forwarded to Mr. Period, with a letter of explanation of
Tom's adventures thus far, and an account of how his rivals had
acted.

Just before sailing, Tom received another message from his
strange employer. The cablegram read:

"Understand our rivals are also going to try for volcano
pictures. Can't find out who will represent Turbot and Eckert,
but watch out. Be suspicious of strangers."

"That's what I will!" cried Tom. "If they get my camera away
from me again, it will be my own fault."

The voyage to Colon was not specially interesting. They ran
into a terrific storm, about half way over, and Tom took some
pictures from the steamer's bridge, the captain allowing him to
do so, but warning him to be careful.

"I'll take Koku up there with me," said the young inventor,
"and if a wave tries to wash me overboard he'll grab me."

And it was a good thing that he took this precaution, for,
while a wave did not get as high as the bridge, one big, green
roller smashed over the bow of the vessel, staggering her so that
Tom was tossed against the rail. He would have been seriously
hurt, and his camera might have been broken, but for the
quickness of the giant.

Koku caught his master, camera and all, in a mighty arm, and
with the other clung to a stanchion, holding Tom in safety until
the ship was on a level keel once more.

"Thanks, Koku!" gasped Tom. "You always seem to be around when
I need you." The giant grinned happily.

The storm blew out in a few days, and, from then on, there was
pleasant sailing. When Tom's airship had been reassembled at
Colon, it created quite a sensation among the small army of canal
workers, and, for their benefit, our hero gave several flying
exhibitions.

He then took some of the engineers on a little trip, and in
turn, they did him the favor of letting him get moving pictures
of parts of the work not usually seen.

"And now for the volcano!" cried Tom one morning, when having
shipped to Mr. Period the canal pictures, the Flyer was sent
aloft, and her nose pointed toward Arequipa. "We've got quite a
run before us."

"How long?" asked Ned.

"About two thousand miles. But I'm going to speed her up to the
limit." Tom was as good as his word, and soon the Flyer was
shooting along at her best rate, reeling off mile after mile,
just below the clouds.

It was a wild and desolate region over which the travelers
found themselves most of the time, though the scenery was
magnificent. They sailed over Quito, that city on the equator,
and, a little later, they passed above the Cotopaxi and
Chimbarazo volcanoes. But neither of them was in action. The
Andes Mountains, as you all know, has many volcanoes scattered
along the range. Lima was the next large city, and there Tom made
a descent to inquire about the burning mountain he was shortly to
photograph.

"It will soon be in action," the United States counsel said. "I
had a letter from a correspondent near there only yesterday, and
he said the people in the town were getting anxious. They are
fearing a shower of burning ashes, or that the eruption may be
accompanied by an earthquake."

"Good!" cried Tom. "Oh, I don't mean it exactly that way," he
hastened to add, as he saw the counsel looking queerly at him. "I
meant that I could get pictures of both earthquake and volcano
then. I don't wish the poor people any harm."

"Well, you're the first one I ever saw who was anxious to get
next door to a volcano," remarked the counsel. "Hold on, though,
that's not quite right. I heard yesterday that a couple of young
fellows passed through here on their way to the same place. Come
to think of it, they were moving picture men, also."

"Great Scott!" cried Tom. "Those must be my rivals, I'll wager.
I must get right on the job. Thanks for the information," and
hurrying front the office he joined his friends on the airship.
and was soon aloft again.

"Look, Tom, what's that?" cried Ned, about noon the next day
when the Flyer, according to their calculations must be nearing
the city of Arequipa. "See that black cloud over there. I hope
it isn't a tornado, or a cyclone, or whatever they call the big
wind storms down here."

Tom, and the others, looked to where Ned pointed. There was a
column of dense smoke hovering in the air, lazily swirling this
way and that. The airship was rapidly approaching it.

"Why that--" began Tom, but before he could complete the
sentence the smoke was blown violently upward. It became streaked
with fire, and, a moment later, there was the echo of a
tremendous explosion.

"The volcano!" cried Tom. "The Arequipa volcano! We're here
just in time, for she's in eruption now! Come on, Ned, help me
get out the camera! Mr. Damon, you and Mr. Nestor manage the
airship! Put us as close as you dare! I'm going to get some
crackerjack pictures!"

Once more came a great report.

"Bless my toothpick!" gasped Mr. Damon. "This is awful!" And
the airship rushed on toward the volcano which could be plainly
seen now, belching forth fire, smoke and ashes.

CHAPTER XXIV - THE MOLTEN RIVER

"Whew!" gasped Ned, as he stood beside Tom in the bow of the
airship. "What's that choking us, Tom?"

"Sulphur, I guess, and gases from the volcano. The wind blew
'em over this way. They're not dangerous, as long as there is no
carbonic acid gas given off, and I don't smell any of that, yet.
Say, Ned, it's erupting all right, isn't it?"

"I should say so!" cried his chum.

"Put us a little to one side, Mr. Damon," called Tom to his
friend, who was in the pilot house. "I can't get good pictures
through so much smoke. "It's clearer off to the left."

"Bless my bath robe!" cried the odd man. "You're as cool about
it, Tom, as though you were just in an ordinary race, at an
aeroplane meet."

"And why shouldn't I be?" asked our hero with a laugh, as he
stopped the mechanism of the camera until he should have a
clearer view of the volcano. "There's not much danger up here,
but I want to get some views from the level, later, and then--"

"You don't get me down there!" interrupted Mr. Nestor, with a
grim laugh.

They were now hovering over the volcano, but high enough up so
that none of the great stones that were being thrown out could
reach them. The column of black smoke, amid which could be seen
the gleams of the molten fires in the crater, rolled toward them,
and the smell of sulphur became stronger.

But when, in accordance with Tom's suggestion, the airship had
been sent over to one side, they were clear of the vapor and the
noxious gas. Then, too, a better view could be had of the volcano
below them.

"Hold her down!" cried Tom, as he got in a good position, and
the propellers were slowed down so that they just overcame the
influence of a slight wind. Thus the Flyer hovered in the air,
while below her the volcano belched forth red-hot rocks, some of
them immense in size, and quantities of hot ashes and cinders.
Tom had the camera going again now, and there was every prospect
of getting a startling and wonderful, as well as rare series of
moving pictures.

"Wow! That was a big one!" cried Ned, as an unusually large
mass of rocks was thrown out, and the column of fire and smoke
ascended nearly to the hovering craft. A moment later came an
explosion, louder than any that had preceded. "We'd better be
going up; hadn't we Tom?" his chum asked.

"A little, yes, but not too far. I want to get as many near
views as I can."

"Bless my overshoes!" gasped Mr. Damon, as he heard Tom say
that. Then he sent some of the vapor from the generating machine
into the gas bag, and the Flyer arose slightly.

Ned looked in the direction of the town, but could not see it,
on account of the haze. Then he directed his attention to the
terrifying sight below him.

"It's a good thing it isn't very near the city," he said to
Tom, who was engaged in watching the automatic apparatus of the
camera, to see when he would have to put in a fresh film. "It
wouldn't take much of this sort of thing to destroy a big city.
But I don't see any streams of burning lava, such as they always
say come out of a volcano."

"It isn't time for that yet," replied Tom. "The lava comes out
last, after the top layer of stones and ashes have been blown
out. They are a sort of stopper to the volcano, I guess, like the
cork of a bottle, and, when they're out of the way, the red-hot
melted rock comes out. Then there's trouble. I want to get
pictures of that."

"Well, keep far enough away," advised Mr. Nestor, who had come
forward. "Don't take any chances. I guess your rivals won't get
here in time to take any pictures, for they can't travel as fast
as we did."

"No," agreed the young inventor, "unless some other party of
them were here ahead of us. They'll have their own troubles,
though, making pictures anything like as good as we're getting."

"There goes another blast!" cried Ned, as a terrific explosion
sounded, and a shower of hot stuff was thrown high into the air.
"If I lived in Arequipa I'd be moving out about now."

"There isn't much danger I guess, except from showers of
burning ashes, and volcanic dust," spoke Mr. Nestor, "and the
wind is blowing it away from the town. If it continues this way
the people will be saved."

"Unless there is so much of the red-hot lava that it will bury
the city," suggested Tom. "I hope that doesn't happen," and he
could not repress a shudder as he looked down on the awful scene
below him.

After that last explosion the volcano appeared to subside
somewhat, though great clouds of smoke and tongues of fire leaped
upward.

"I've got to put in a new reel of film!" suddenly exclaimed
Tom. "While I stop the camera, Mr. Damon, I think you and Mr.
Nestor might put the airship down to the ground. I want some
views on the level."

"What! Go down to earth with this awful volcano spouting fire?"
cried Mr. Damon. "Bless my comb and brush!"

"We can get well down the side of the mountain," said Tom. "I
won't go into any danger, much less ask any one else to do so,
and I certainly don't want my ship damaged. We can land down
there," he said, pointing to a spot on the side of the volcanic
mountain, that was some distance removed from the mouth of the
crater. It won't take me long to get one reel of views, and then
I'll come up again."

The two men finally gave in to Tom's argument, that there was
comparatively little danger, for they admitted that they could
quickly rise up at the first sign of danger, and accordingly the
Flyer descended. Tom quickly had a fresh reel of film inserted,
and started his camera to working, standing it on a tripod some
distance from the airship.

Once more the volcano was "doing its prettiest," as Tom
expressed it. He glanced around, as another big explosion took
place, to see if any other picture men were on hand, but the
terrible mountain seemed deserted, though of course someone might
be on the other side.

"What's that?" suddenly cried Ned, looking apprehensively at
his chum. At the same time Tom jumped to his feet, for he had
been kneeling near the camera.

"Bless my--" began Mr. Damon, but he got no farther, for
suddenly the solid ground began to tremble and shake.

"An earthquake!" shouted Mr. Nestor. "Come, Tom! Get back to
the ship!" The young inventor and Ned had been the only ones to
leave it, as it rested on a spur of the mountain.

As Tom and Ned leaped forward to save the camera which was
toppling to one side, there came a great fissure in the side of
the volcano, and a stream of molten rock, glowing white with
heat, gushed out. It was a veritable river of melted stone, and
it was coming straight for the two lads.

"Run! Run!" cried Mr. Nestor. "We have everything ready for a
quick flight. "Run, Tom! Ned!"

The lads leaped for the Flyer, the molten rock coming nearer
and nearer, and then with a cry Koku sprang overboard and made a
dash toward his master.

CHAPTER XXV - THE EARTHQUAKE--CONCLUSION

"Here, Mr. Tom. Me carry you an' Ned. You hold picture machine!"
cried the giant. "Me run faster."

As he spoke he lifted Ned up under one arm, and caught Tom in
the other. For they were but as children to his immense strength.
Tom held on to his camera, and, thus laden down, Koku ran as he
had never run before, toward the waiting airship.

"Come on! Come on!" shouted Mr. Damon, for he could see what
Tom, Ned and Koku could not, that the stream of lava was nearing
them rapidly.

"It's hot!" cried Ned, as a wave of warm air fanned his cheek.

"I should say so!" cried Tom. "The volcano is full of red-hot
melted stone."

There came a sickening shake of the earth. Koku staggered as he
ran on, but he kept his feet, and did not fall. Again came a
tremendous explosion, and a shower of fine ashes sifted over the
airship, and on Koku and his living burdens.

"This is the worst ever!" gasped Tom. "But I've got some dandy
pictures, if we ever get away from here alive to develop them."

"Hurry, Koku! Hurry!" begged Mr. Nestor. "Bless my shoe laces!"
yelled Mr. Damon, who was fairly jumping up and down on the deck
of the Flyer. "I'll never go near a volcano again!"

Once more the ground shook and trembled, as the earthquake rent
it. Several cracks appeared in Koku's path, but he leaped over
them with tremendous energy. A moment later he had thrust Tom and
Ned over the rail, to the deck, and leaped aboard himself.

"Let her go!" cried Tom. "I'll do the rest of my moving picture
work, around volcanoes and earthquakes, from up in the air!"

The Flyer shot upward, and scarcely a moment too soon, for, an
instant after she left the ground, the stream of hot, burning and
bubbling lava rolled beneath her, and those on board could feel
the heat of it ascending.

"Say, I'm glad we got out of that when we did," gasped Ned, as
he looked down. "You're all right, Koku."

"That no trouble," replied the giant with a cheerful grin. "Me
carry four fellows like you," and he stretched out his big arms.
Tom had at once set his camera to working again, taking view
after view.

It was a terrifying but magnificent sight that our friends
beheld, for the earth was trembling and heaving. Great fissures
opened in many places. Into some of them streams of lava poured,
for now the volcano had opened in several places, and from each
crack the melted rocks belched out. The crater, however, was not
sending into the air such volumes of smoke and ashes as before,
as most of the tremendous energy had passed, or was being used to
spout out the lava.

The earthquake was confined to the region right about the
volcano, or there might have been a great loss of life in the
city. As it was, the damage done was comparatively slight.

Tom continued to take views, some showing the earth as it was
twisted and torn, and other different aspects of the crater.
Then, as suddenly as the earthquake had begun, it subsided, and
the volcano was less active.

"My! I'm glad to see that!" exclaimed Mr. Damon. "I've had
about enough of horrors!"

"And I have too," added Tom. "I'm on my last roll of film, and
I can't take many more pictures. But I guess I have all Mr.
Period needs, and we'll start for home, as soon as I finish the
next roll. But I'm going to save that for a night view. That will
he a novelty."

The volcano became active again after dark, and presented a
magnificent though terrifying aspect. As the airship hovered
above it, Tom got some of his best pictures, and then, as the
last bit of film slipped along back of the lens, the airship was
headed north.

"Now for Shopton!" cried Tom. "Our trip is ended."

"It's too had you didn't have more film," said Ned. "I thought
you had plenty."

"Well, I used more than I counted on, but there are enough
pictures as it is."

"Plenty," agreed Mr. Nestor. "I'm sure our company will be very
well satisfied with them, Tom. We can't get home any too soon to
suit me. I've had enough excitement."

"And we didn't see anything of those other fellows whom we
heard about," spoke Mr. Damon, as the big airship flew on.

"No," said Tom. "But I'm not worrying about them."

They made another stop in Lima, on their homeward trip, to
renew their supply of gasolene, and there learned that the rival
picture men had arrived at the volcano too late to see it in
operation. This news came to a relative of one of the two men who
lived in Lima.

"Then our views of the earthquake and the smoking mountain will
be the only ones, and your company can control the rights," said
Tom to Mr. Nestor, who agreed with him.

In due time, and without anything out of the ordinary happening
the Flyer reached Shopton, where Tom found a warm welcome
awaiting him, not only from his father, but from a certain young
lady, whose name I do not need to mention.

"And so you got everything you went after, didn't you, Tom,"
exclaimed Mr. Period, a few days later, when he had come from New
York to get the remainder of the films.

"Yes, and some things I didn't expect," replied Tom. "There
was--"

"Yes! Yes! I know!" interrupted the odd picture man. "It was
that jungle fire. That's a magnificent series. None better. And
those scoundrels took your camera; eh?"

"Yes. Could you connect them with Turbot and Eckert?" asked
Tom.

"No, but I'm sure they were acting for them just the same. I
had no legal evidence to act on, however, so I had to let it go.
Turbot and Eckert won't be in it when I start selling duplicates
of the films you have. And these last ought to be the best of
all. I didn't catch that fellow when I raced after him on the
dock. He got away, and has steered clear of me since," finished
Mr. Period.

"And our rivals didn't secure any views like ours," said Tom.

"I'm glad of it," spoke Mr. Period. "Turbot and Eckert bribed
one of my men, and so found out where I was sending messages to
you. They even got a copy of my cablegram. But it did them no
good."

"Were all the films clear that I sent you?" asked our hero.

"Every one. Couldn't be better. The animal views were
particularly fine. You must have had your nerve with you to get
some of 'em."

"Oh, Tom always has his nerve," laughed Ned.

"Well, how soon will you be ready to start out again?" asked
the picture man, as he packed up the last of the films which Tom
gave him. "I'd like to get some views of a Japanese earthquake,
and we haven't any polar views. I want some of them, taken as
near the North Pole as you can get."

Tom gently shook his head.

"What! You don't mean to say you won't get them for me?" cried
Mr. Period. "With that wonderful camera of yours you can get
views no one else ever could."

"Then some one else will have to take them," remarked the young
inventor. "I'll lend you the camera, and an airship, and you can
go yourself, Mr. Period. I'm going to stay home for a while. I
did what I set out to do, and that's enough."

"I'm glad you'll stay home, Tom," said his father. "Now perhaps
I'll get my gyroscope finished."

"And I, my noiseless airship," went on our hero. "No, Mr.
Period, you'll have to excuse me this time. Why don't you go
yourself?" he asked. "You would know just what kind of pictures
you wanted."

"No, I'm a promoter of the moving picture business, and I sell
films, but I don't know hew to take them," was the answer.
"Besides I--er--well, I don't exactly care for airships, Tom
Swift," he finished with a laugh. "Well, I can't thank you enough
for what you did for me, and I've brought you a check to cover
your expenses, and pay you as I agreed. All the same I'm sorry
you won't start for Japan, or the North Pole."

"Nothing doing," said Tom with a laugh; and Mr. Period
departed.

"Have you any idea what you will do next?" asked Ned, a day or
so later, when he and Tom were in the workshop.

"I can't tell until I finish my noiseless airship," was the
answer. "Then something may happen."

Something did, as I shall have the pleasure of telling you
about in the next volume of this series, to be called, "Tom Swift
and His Great Searchlight; or, On the Border for Uncle Sam," and
in it will be given an account of a great lantern our hero made,
and how he baffled the smugglers with it.

"Oh, Tom, weren't you dreadfully frightened when you saw that
burning river of lava coming toward you?" asked Mary Nestor, when
the young inventor called on her later and told her some of his
adventures. "I should have been scared to death."

"Well, I didn't have time to get scared," answered Tom. "It all
happened so quickly, and then, too I was thinking of my camera.
Next I knew Koku grabbed me, and it was all over."

"But those wild beasts! Didn't they frighten you, especially
when the rhinoceros charged you?"

"If you won't let it get out, I'll make a confession to you,"
said Tom, lowering his voice. "I was scared stiff that time, but
don't let Ned know it."

"I won't," promised Mary with a laugh. And now, when Tom is in
such pleasant company, we will take leave of him for a while,
knowing that. sooner or later, he will be seeking new adventures
as exciting as those of the past.

THE END
-----------------------------------------------------------------

THE TOM SWIFT SERIES

By VICTOR APPLETON
12mo. CLOTH. UNIFORM STYLE OF BINDING. COLORED WRAPPERS.

These spirited tales convey In a realistic way the wonderful
advances in land and sea locomotion. Stories like these are
impressed upon the memory and their reading Is productive only of
good.

TOM SWIFT AND HIS MOTOR CYCLE

Or Fun and Adventure on the Road
TOM SWIFT AND HIS MOTOR BOAT

Or The Rivals of Lake Carlopa
TOM SWIFT AND HIS AIRSHIP

Or The Stirring cruise of the Red Cloud
TOM SWIFT AND HIS SUBMARINE BOAT

Or Under the Ocean for Sunken Treasure
TOM SWIFT AND HIS ELECTRIC RUNABOUT

Or The Speediest car on the Road
TOM SWIFT AND HIS WIRELESS MESSAGE

Or The castaways of Earthquake Island
TOM SWIFT AMONG THE DIAMOND MAKERS

Or The Secret of Phantom Mountain
TOM SWIFT IN THE CAVES OF ICE

Or The Wreck of the Airship
TOM SWIFT AND HIS SKY RACER

Or The Quickest Flight on Record
TOM SWIFT AND HIS ELECTRIC RIFLE

Or Daring Adventures In Elephant Land
TOM SWIFT IN THE CITY OF GOLD

Or Marvelous Adventures Underground
TOM SWIFT AND HIS AIR GLIDER

Or Seeking the Platinum Treasure
TOM SWIFT IN CAPTIVITY

Or A Daring Escape by Airship
TOM SWIFT AND HIS WIZARD CAMERA

Or The Perils of Moving Picture Taking
TOM SWIFT AND HIS GREAT SEARCHLIGHT

Or On the Border for Uncle Sam
TOM SWIFT AND HIS GIANT CANNON

Or The Longest Shots on Record
TOM SWIFT AND HIS PHOTO TELEPHONE

Or The Picture that Saved a Fortune
TOM SWIFT AND HIS AERIAL WARSHIP

Or The Naval Terror of the Seas
TOM SWIFT AND HIS BIG TUNNEL

Or The Hidden city of the Andes

THE BUNNY BROWN SERIES

By LAURA LEE HOPE

Author of the Popular "Bobbsey Twins" Books

wrapper and text illustrations drawn by

FLORENCE ENGLAND NOSWORTHY
12mo. DURABLY BOUND. ILLUSTRATED. UNIFORM STYLE OF BINDING

These stories by the author of the "Bobbsey Twins" Books are
eagerly welcomed by the little folks from about five to ten years
of age. Their eyes fairly dance with delight at the lively doings
of inquisitive little Bunny Brown and his cunning, trustful
sister Sue.

Bunny was a lively little boy. very inquisitive. When he did
anything, Sue followed his leadership. They had many adventures,
some comical in the extreme.

BUNNY BROWN AND HIS SISTER SUE
BUNNY BROWN AND HIS SISTER SUE ON GRANDPA'S FARM
BUNNY BROWN AND HIS SISTER SUE PLAYING CIRCUS
BUNNY BROWN AND HIS SISTER SUE AT CAMP REST-A-WHILE
BUNNY BROWN AND HIS SISTER SUE AT AUNT LU'S CITY HOME
BUNNY BROWN AND HIS SISTER SUE IN THE BIG WOODS
BUNNY BROWN AND HIS SISTER SUE ON AN AUTO TOUR
BUNNY BROWN AND HIS SISTER SUE AND THEIR SHETLAND PONY
BUNNY BROWN AND HIS SISTER SUE GIVING A SHOW
BUNNY BROWN AND HIS SISTER SUE AT CHRISTMAS TREE COVE

THE BOBBSEY TWINS BOOKS

For Little Men and Women

By LAURA LEE HOPE

Author of 'The Bunny Brown" Series. Etc.
12mo. DURABLY BOUND. ILLUSTRATED. UNIFORM STYLE OF BINDING

Copyright publications which cannot be obtained elsewhere.
Books that charm the hearts of the little ones, and of which they
never tire.

THE BOBBSEY TWINS
THE BOBBSEY TWINS IN THE COUNTRY
THE BOBBSEY TWINS AT THE SEASHORE
THE BOBBSEY TWINS AT SCHOOL
THE BOBBSEY TWINS AT SNOW LODGE
THE BOBBSEY TWINS ON A HOUSEBOAT
THE BOBBSEY TWINS AT MEADOW BROOK
THE BOBBSEY TWINS AT HOME
THE BOBBSEY TWINS IN A GREAT CITY
THE BOBBSEY TWINS ON BLUEBERRY ISLAND
THE BOBBSEY TWINS ON THE DEEP BLUE SEA
THE BOBBSEY TWINS IN THE GREAT WEST

THE MOVING PICTURE GIRLS SERIES

By LAURA LEE HOPE

Author of "The Bobbsey Twins Series."

l2mo. BOUND IN CLOTH. ILLUSTRATED. UNIFORM STYLE OF BINDING

The adventures of Ruth and Alice DeVere. Their father, a widower,
is an actor who has taken up work for the "movies." Both girls
wish to aid him in his work and visit various localities to act
in all sorts of pictures.

THE MOVING PICTURE GIRLS
Or First Appearance in Photo Dramas.

Having lost his voice, the father of the girls goes into the
movies and the girls follow. Tells how many "parlor dramas" are
filmed.

THE MOVING PICTURE GIRLS AT OAK FARM
Or Queer Happenings While Taking Rural Plays.

Full of fun in the country, the haps and mishaps of taking film
plays, and giving an account of two unusual discoveries.

THE MOVING PICTURE GIRLS SNOWBOUND
Or The Proof on the Film.

A tale of winter adventures in the wilderness, showing how the
photo-play actors sometimes suffer.

THE MOVING PICTURE GIRLS UNDER THE PALMS
Or Lost in the Wilds of Florida.

How they went to the land of palms, played many parts in dramas
before the camera; were lost, and aided others who were also
lost.

THE MOVING PICTURE GIRLS AT ROCKY RANCH
Or Great Days Among the Cowboys.

All who have ever seen moving pictures of the rest west will
want to know just how they are made. This volume gives every
detail and is full of clean fun and excitement.

THE MOVING PICTURE GIRLS AT SEA
Or a Pictured Shipwreck that Became Real.

A thrilling account of the girls' experiences on the water.

THE MOVING PICTURE GIRLS IN WAR PLAYS
Or The Sham Battles at Oak Farm.

The girls play important parts in big battle scenes and have
plenty of hard work along with considerable fun.

THE OUTDOOR CHUMS SERIES

By CAPTAIN QUINCY ALLEN

The outdoor chums are four wide-awake lads, sons of wealthy men
of a small city located on a lake. The boys love outdoor life,
and are greatly interested in hunting, fishing, and picture
taking. They have motor cycles, motor boats, canoes, etc., and
during their vacations go everywhere and have all sorts of
thrilling adventures. The stories give full directions for
camping out, how to fish, how to hunt wild animals and prepare
the skins for stuffing, how to manage a canoe, how to swim, etc.
Full of the spirit of outdoor life,

THE OUTDOOR CHUMS
Or The First Tour of the Rod, Gun and Camera Club.

THE OUTDOOR CHUMS ON THE LAKE
Or Lively Adventures on Wildcat Island.

THE OUTDOOR CHUMS IN THE FOREST
Or Laying the Ghost of Oak Ridge.

THE OUTDOOR CHUMS ON THE GULF
Or Rescuing the Lost Balloonists.

THE OUTDOOR CHUMS AFTER BIG GAME.
Or Perilous Adventures in the Wilderness.

THE OUTDOOR CHUMS ON A HOUSEBOAT
Or The Rivals of the Mississippi.

THE OUTDOOR CHUMS IN THE BIG WOODS
Or The Rival Hunters at Lumber Run.

THE OUTDOOR CHUMS AT CABIN POINT
Or The Golden Cup Mystery.

12mo. Averaging 240 pages. Illustrated. Handsomely bound in
Cloth.

THE GIRLS OF CENTRAL HIGH SERIES

By GERTRUDE W. MORRISON

l2mo. BOUND IN CLOTH. ILLUSTRATED. UNIFORM STYLE OF BINDING.

Here is a series full of the spirit of high school life of today.
The girls are real flesh-and-blood characters, and we follow them
with interest in school and out. There are many contested matches
on track and field, and on the water, as well as doings in the
classroom and on the school stage. There it plenty of fun and
excitement, all clean, pure and wholesome.

THE GIRLS OF CENTRAL HIGH
Or Rivals for all Honors.

A stirring tale of high school life, full of fun, with a tomb
of mystery and a strange initiation.

THE GIRLS OF CENTRAL HIGH ON LAKE LUNA
Or The Crew That Won.

Telling of water sports and fun galore, and of fine times in
camp.

THE GIRLS OF CENTRAL HIGH AT BASKETBALL
Or The Great Gymnasium Mystery.

Here we have a number of thrilling contests at basketball and
in addition, the solving of a mystery which had bothered the high
school authorities for a long while,

THE GIRLS OF CENTRAL HIGH ON THE STAGE
Or The Play That Took the Prize.

How the girls went In for theatricals and how one of them wrote
a play which afterward was made over for the professional stage
and brought in some much-needed money.

THE GIRLS OF CENTRAL HIGH ON TRACK AND FIELD
Or The Girl Champions of the School League

This story takes in high school athletics In their most
approved and up-to-date fashion. Full of fun and excitement.

THE GIRLS OF CENTRAL HIGH IN CAMP
Or The Old Professor's Secret

The girls went camping on Acorn Island and had a delightful
time at boating, swimming and picnic parties.

THE BOYS OF COLUMBIA HIGH SERIES

By GRAHAM B. FORBES

Never was there a cleaner, brighter, more manly boy than Frank
Allen, the hero of this series of boys' tales, and never was
there a better crowd of lads to associate with than the students
of the School. All boys will read these stories with deep
interest. The rivalry between the towns along the river was of
the keenest, and plots and counterplot to win the champions, at
baseball, at football, at boat racing, at track athletics, and at
ice hockey, were without number. Any lad reading one volume of
this series will surely want the others.

THE BOYS OF COLUMBIA HIGH
Or The All Around Rivals of the School

THE BOYS OF COLUMBIA HIGH ON THE DIAMOND
Or Winning Out by Pluck

THE BOYS OF COLUMBIA HIGH ON THE RIVER
Or The Boat Race Plot that Failed

THE BOYS OF COLUMBIA HIGH ON THE GRIDIRON
Or The Struggle for the Silver Cup

THE BOYS OF COLUMBIA HIGH ON THE ICE
Or Out for the Hockey Championship

THE BOYS OF COLUMBIA HIGH IN TRACK ATHLETICS
Or A Long Run that Won

THE BOYS OF COLUMBIA HIGH IN WINTER SPORTS
Or Stirring Doings on Skates and Iceboats

I2mo. Illustrated. Handsomely bound In cloth, with cover design
and wrappers in color.

THE MOVING PICTURE BOYS SERIES

By VICTOR APPLETON

l2mo. BOUND IN CLOTH. ILLUSTRATED. UNIFORM STYLE OF BINDING.

Moving pictures and photo plays are famous the world over, and
in this line of books the reader is given a full description of
how the films are made--the scenes of little dramas, indoors and
out, trick pictures to satisfy the curious, soul-stirring
pictures of city affairs, life in the Wild West, among the
cowboys and Indians, thrilling rescues along the seacoast, the
daring of picture hunters in the jungle among savage beasts, and
the great risks run in picturing conditions in a land of
earthquakes. The volumes teem with adventures and will be found
interesting from first chapter to last.

THE MOVING PICTURE BOYS
Or Perils of a Great City Depicted.

THE MOVING PICTURE BOYS IN THE WEST
Or Taking Scenes Among the Cowboys and Indians.

THE MOVING PICTURE BOYS ON THE COAST
Or Showing the Perils of the Deep.

THE MOVING PICTURE BOYS IN THE JUNGLE
Or Stirring Times Among the Wild Animals.

THE MOVING PICTURE BOYS IN EARTHQUAKE LAND
Or Working Amid Many Perils.

THE MOVING PICTURE BOYS AND THE FLOOD
Or Perilous Days on the Mississippi.

THE MOVING PICTURE BOYS AT PANAMA
Or Stirring Adventures Along the Great Canal.

THE MOVING PICTURE BOYS UNDER THE SEA
Or The Treasure of the Lost Ship.

THE OUTDOOR GIRLS SERIES

By LAURA LEE HOPE
Author of the "Bobbsey Twin Books" and "Bunny Brown" Series.

These tales take in the various adventures participated in by
several bright, up-to-date girls who love outdoor life. They are
clean and wholesome, free from sensationalism, absorbing from the
first chapter to the last.

THE OUTDOOR GIRLS OF DEEPDALE
Or Camping and Tramping for Fun and Health.

Telling bow the girls organized their Camping and Tramping
Club, how they went on a tour, and of various adventures which
befell them.

THE OUTDOOR GIRLS AT RAINBOW LAKE
Or Stirring Cruise of the Motor Boat Gem.

One of the girls becomes the proud possessor of a motor boat
and invites her club members to take a trip down the river to
Rainbow Lake, a beautiful sheet of water lying between the
mountains.

THE OUTDOOR GIRLS IN A MOTOR CAR
Or The Haunted Mansion of Shadow Valley.

One of the girls has learned to run a big motor ear, and she
invited the club to go on a tour to visit some distant relatives.
On the way they stop at a deserted mansion and make a surprising
discovery.

THE OUTDOOR GIRLS IN A WINTER CAMP
Or Glorious Days on Skates and Ice Boats.

In this story, the scene is shifted to a winter season. The
girls have some jolly times skating and ice boating, and visit a
hunters ramp in the big woods.

THE OUTDOOR GIRLS IN FLORIDA,
Or Wintering in the Sunny South.

The parents of one of the girls have bought an orange grove in
Florida, and her companions are invited to visit the place. They
take a trip into the interior, where several unusual things
happen.

THE OUTDOOR GIRLS AT OCEAN VIEW
Or The Box that Was Found in the Sand.

The girls have great fun and solve a mystery while on an outing
along the New England coast.

THE OUTDOOR GIRLS ON PINE ISLAND
Or A Cave and What it Contained.

A bright, healthful story, full of good times at a bungalow
camp on Pine Island.

CHARMING BOOKS FOR GIRLS

WHEN PATTY WENT TO COLLEGE, By Jean Webster.
Illustrated by C. D. Williams.

One of the best stories of life in a girl's college that has
ever been written. It is bright, whimsical and entertaining,
lifelike, laughable and thoroughly human.

JUST PATTY, By Jean Webster.
Illustrated by C. M. Relyea.

Patty is full of the joy of living, fun-loving, given to
ingenious mischief for its own sake, with a disregard for pretty
convention which is an unfailing source of joy to her fellows.

THE POOR LITTLE RICH GIRL, By Eleanor Gates.
With four full page illustrations.

This story relates the experience of one of those unfortunate
children whose early days are passed in the companionship of a
governess, seldom seeing either parent, and famishing for natural
love and tenderness. A charming play as dramatized by the author.

REBECCA OF SUNNYBROOK FARM, By Kate Douglas Wiggin.

One of the most beautiful studies of childhood--Rebecca's
artistic, unusual and quaintly charming qualities stand out midst
a circle of austere New Englanders. The stage version is making a

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