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Specimens with Memoirs of the Less-known British Poets, Vol. 3 by George Gilfillan

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2 A wight there was, who single and alone
Had crept from vigorous youth to waning age,
Nor e'er was worth, nor e'er was beauty known
His heart to captive, or his thought engage:
Some feeble joyaunce, though his conscious mind
Might female worth or beauty give to wear,
Yet to the nobler sex he held confined
The genuine graces of the soul sincere,
And well could show with saw or proverb quaint
All semblance woman's soul, and all her beauty paint.

3 In plain attire this wight apparelled was,
(For much he conned of frugal lore and knew,)
Nor, till some day of larger note might cause,
From iron-bound chest his better garb he drew:
But when the Sabbath-day might challenge more,
Or feast, or birthday, should it chance to be,
A glossy suit devoid of stain he wore,
And gold his buttons glanced so fair to see,
Gold clasped his shoon, by maiden brushed so sheen,
And his rough beard he shaved, and donned his linen clean.

4 But in his common garb a coat he wore,
A faithful coat that long its lord had known,
That once was black, but now was black no more,
Attinged by various colours not its own.
All from his nostrils was the front embrowned,
And down the back ran many a greasy line,
While, here and there, his social moments owned
The generous signet of the purple wine.
Brown o'er the bent of eld his wig appeared,
Like fox's trailing tail by hunters sore affeared.

5 One only maid he had, like turtle true,
But not like turtle gentle, soft, and kind;
For many a time her tongue bewrayed the shrew,
And in meet words unpacked her peevish mind.
Ne formed was she to raise the soft desire
That stirs the tingling blood in youthful vein,
Ne formed was she to light the tender fire,
By many a bard is sung in many a strain:
Hooked was her nose, and countless wrinkles told
What no man durst to her, I ween, that she was old.

6 When the clock told the wonted hour was come
When from his nightly cups the wight withdrew,
Eight patient would she watch his wending home,
His feet she heard, and soon the bolt she drew.
If long his time was past, and leaden sleep
O'er her tired eyelids 'gan his reign to stretch,
Oft would she curse that men such hours should keep,
And many a saw 'gainst drunkenness would preach;
Haply if potent gin had armed her tongue,
All on the reeling wight a thundering peal she rung.

7 For though, the blooming queen of Cyprus' isle
O'er her cold bosom long had ceased to reign,
On that cold bosom still could Bacchus smile,
Such beverage to own if Bacchus deign:
For wine she prized not much, for stronger drink
Its medicine, oft a cholic-pain will call,
And for the medicine's sake, might envy think,
Oft would a cholic-pain her bowels enthral;
Yet much the proffer did she loathe, and say
No dram might maiden taste, and often answered nay.

8 So as in single animals he joyed,
One cat, and eke one dog, his bounty fed;
The first the cate-devouring mice destroyed,
Thieves heard the last, and from his threshold fled:
All in the sunbeams basked the lazy cat,
Her mottled length in couchant posture laid;
On one accustomed chair while Pompey sat,
And loud he barked should Puss his right invade.
The human pair oft marked them as they lay,
And haply sometimes thought like cat and dog were they.

9 A room he had that faced the southern ray,
Where oft he walked to set his thoughts in tune,
Pensive he paced its length an hour or tway,
All to the music of his creeking shoon.
And at the end a darkling closet stood,
Where books he kept of old research and new,
In seemly order ranged on shelves of wood,
And rusty nails and phials not a few:
Thilk place a wooden box beseemeth well,
And papers squared and trimmed for use unmeet to tell.

10 For still in form he placed his chief delight,
Nor lightly broke his old accustomed rule,
And much uncourteous would he hold the wight
That e'er displaced a table, chair, or stool;
And oft in meet array their ranks he placed,
And oft with careful eye their ranks reviewed;
For novel forms, though much those forms had graced,
Himself and maiden-minister eschewed:
One path he trod, nor ever would decline
A hair's unmeasured breadth from off the even line.

11 A Club select there was, where various talk
On various chapters passed the lingering hour,
And thither oft he bent his evening walk,
And warmed to mirth by wine's enlivening power.
And oft on politics the preachments ran,
If a pipe lent its thought-begetting fume:
And oft important matters would they scan,
And deep in council fix a nation's doom:
And oft they chuckled loud at jest or jeer,
Or bawdy tale the most, thilk much they loved to hear.

12 For men like him they were of like consort,
Thilk much the honest muse must needs condemn,
Who made of women's wiles their wanton sport,
And blessed their stars that kept the curse from them!
No honest love they knew, no melting smile
That shoots the transports to the throbbing heart!
Thilk knew they not but in a harlot's guile
Lascivious smiling through the mask of art:
And so of women deemed they as they knew,
And from a Demon's traits an Angel's picture drew.

13 But most abhorred they hymeneal rites,
And boasted oft the freedom of their fate:
Nor 'vailed, as they opined, its best delights
Those ills to balance that on wedlock wait;
And often would they tell of henpecked fool
Snubbed by the hard behest of sour-eyed dame.
And vowed no tongue-armed woman's freakish rule
Their mirth should quail, or damp their generous flame:
Then pledged their hands, and tossed their bumpers o'er,
And Io! Bacchus! sung, and owned no other power.

14 If e'er a doubt of softer kind arose
Within some breast of less obdurate frame,
Lo! where its hideous form a phantom shows
Full in his view, and Cuckold is its name.
Him Scorn attended with a glance askew,
And Scorpion Shame for delicts not his own,
Her painted bubbles while Suspicion blew,
And vexed the region round the Cupid's throne:
'Far be from us,' they cried, 'the treacherous bane,
Far be the dimply guile, and far the flowery chain!'

CARELESS CONTENT.

1 I am content, I do not care,
Wag as it will the world for me;
When fuss and fret was all my fare,
It got no ground as I could see:
So when away my caring went,
I counted cost, and was content.

2 With more of thanks and less of thought,
I strive to make my matters meet;
To seek what ancient sages sought,
Physic and food in sour and sweet:
To take what passes in good part,
And keep the hiccups from the heart.

3 With good and gentle-humoured hearts,
I choose to chat where'er I come,
Whate'er the subject be that starts;
But if I get among the glum,
I hold my tongue to tell the truth,
And keep my breath to cool my broth.

4 For chance or change of peace or pain,
For Fortune's favour or her frown,
For lack or glut, for loss or gain,
I never dodge, nor up nor down:
But swing what way the ship shall swim,
Or tack about with equal trim.

5 I suit not where I shall not speed,
Nor trace the turn of every tide;
If simple sense will not succeed,
I make no bustling, but abide:
For shining wealth, or scaring woe,
I force no friend, I fear no foe.

6 Of ups and downs, of ins and outs,
Of they're i' the wrong, and we're i' the right,
I shun the rancours and the routs;
And wishing well to every wight,
Whatever turn the matter takes,
I deem it all but ducks and drakes.

7 With whom I feast I do not fawn,
Nor if the folks should flout me, faint;
If wonted welcome be withdrawn,
I cook no kind of a complaint:
With none disposed to disagree,
But like them best who best like me.

8 Not that I rate myself the rule
How all my betters should behave
But fame shall find me no man's fool,
Nor to a set of men a slave:
I love a friendship free and frank,
And hate to hang upon a hank.

9 Fond of a true and trusty tie,
I never loose where'er I link;
Though if a business budges by,
I talk thereon just as I think;
My word, my work, my heart, my hand,
Still on a side together stand.

10 If names or notions make a noise,
Whatever hap the question hath,
The point impartially I poise,
And read or write, but without wrath;
For should I burn, or break my brains,
Pray, who will pay me for my pains?

11 I love my neighbour as myself,
Myself like him too, by his leave;
Nor to his pleasure, power, or pelf,
Came I to crouch, as I conceive:
Dame Nature doubtless has designed
A man the monarch of his mind.

12 Now taste and try this temper, sirs,
Mood it and brood it in your breast;
Or if ye ween, for worldly stirs,
That man does right to mar his rest,
Let me be deft, and debonair,
I am content, I do not care.

A PASTORAL.

1 My time, O ye Muses, was happily spent,
When Phoebe went with me wherever I went;
Ten thousand sweet pleasures I felt in my breast:
Sure never fond shepherd like Colin was blest!
But now she is gone, and has left me behind,
What a marvellous change on a sudden I find!
When things were as fine as could possibly be,
I thought 'twas the Spring; but alas! it was she.

2 With such a companion to tend a few sheep,
To rise up and play, or to lie down and sleep:
I was so good-humoured, so cheerful and gay,
My heart was as light as a feather all day;
But now I so cross and so peevish am grown,
So strangely uneasy, as never was known.
My fair one is gone, and my joys are all drowned,
And my heart--I am sure it weighs more than a pound.

3 The fountain that wont to run sweetly along,
And dance to soft murmurs the pebbles among;
Thou know'st, little Cupid, if Phoebe was there,
'Twas pleasure to look at, 'twas music to hear:
But now she is absent, I walk by its side,
And still, as it murmurs, do nothing but chide;
Must you be so cheerful, while I go in pain?
Peace there with your bubbling, and hear me complain.

4 My lambkins around me would oftentimes play,
And Phoebe and I were as joyful as they;
How pleasant their sporting, how happy their time,
When Spring, Love, and Beauty, were all in their prime!
But now, in their frolics when by me they pass,
I fling at their fleeces a handful of grass:
Be still, then, I cry, for it makes me quite mad,
To see you so merry while I am so sad.

5 My dog I was ever well pleased to see
Come wagging his tail to my fair one and me;
And Phoebe was pleased too, and to my dog said,
'Come hither, poor fellow;' and patted his head.
But now, when he's fawning, I with a sour look
Cry 'Sirrah;' and give him a blow with my crook:
And I'll give him another; for why should not Tray
Be as dull as his master, when Phoebe's away?

6 When walking with Phoebe, what sights have I seen,
How fair was the flower, how fresh was the green!
What a lovely appearance the trees and the shade,
The corn-fields and hedges, and everything made!
But now she has left me, though all are still there,
They none of them now so delightful appear:
'Twas nought but the magic, I find, of her eyes,
Made so many beautiful prospects arise.

7 Sweet music went with us both all the wood through,
The lark, linnet, throstle, and nightingale too;
Winds over us whispered, flocks by us did bleat,
And chirp went the grasshopper under our feet.
But now she is absent, though still they sing on,
The woods are but lonely, the melody's gone:
Her voice in the concert, as now I have found,
Gave everything else its agreeable sound.

8 Rose, what is become of thy delicate hue?
And where is the violet's beautiful blue?
Does ought of its sweetness the blossom beguile?
That meadow, those daisies, why do they not smile?
Ah! rivals, I see what it was that you dressed,
And made yourselves fine for--a place in her breast:
You put on your colours to pleasure her eye,
To be plucked by her hand, on her bosom to die.

9 How slowly Time creeps till my Phoebe return!
While amidst the soft zephyr's cool breezes I burn:
Methinks, if I knew whereabouts he would tread,
I could breathe on his wings, and 'twould melt down the lead.
Fly swifter, ye minutes, bring hither my dear,
And rest so much longer for't when she is here.
Ah, Colin! old Time is full of delay,
Nor will budge one foot faster for all thou canst say.

10 Will no pitying power, that hears me complain,
Or cure my disquiet, or soften my pain?
To be cured, thou must, Colin, thy passion remove;
But what swain is so silly to live without love!
No, deity, bid the dear nymph to return,
For ne'er was poor shepherd so sadly forlorn.
Ah! what shall I do? I shall die with despair;
Take heed, all ye swains, how ye part with your fair.

ODE TO A TOBACCO-PIPE.

Little tube of mighty power,
Charmer of an idle hour,
Object of my warm desire,
Lip of wax and eye of fire;
And thy snowy taper waist,
With my finger gently braced;
And thy pretty swelling crest,
With my little stopper pressed;
And the sweetest bliss of blisses,
Breathing from thy balmy kisses.
Happy thrice, and thrice again,
Happiest he of happy men;
Who when again the night returns,
When again the taper burns,
When again the cricket's gay,
(Little cricket full of play,)
Can afford his tube to feed
With the fragrant Indian weed:
Pleasure for a nose divine,
Incense of the god of wine.
Happy thrice, and thrice again,
Happiest he of happy men.

AWAY! LET NOUGHT TO LOVE DISPLEASING.

1 Away! let nought to love displeasing,
My Winifreda, move your care;
Let nought delay the heavenly blessing,
Nor squeamish pride, nor gloomy fear.

2 What though no grants of royal donors,
With pompous titles grace our blood;
We'll shine in more substantial honours,
And, to be noble, we'll be good.

3 Our name while virtue thus we tender,
Will sweetly sound where'er 'tis spoke;
And all the great ones, they shall wonder
How they respect such little folk.

4 What though, from fortune's lavish bounty,
No mighty treasures we possess;
We'll find, within our pittance, plenty,
And be content without excess.

5 Still shall each kind returning season
Sufficient for our wishes give;
For we will live a life of reason,
And that's the only life to live.

6 Through youth and age, in love excelling,
We'll hand in hand together tread;
Sweet-smiling peace shall crown our dwelling,
And babes, sweet-smiling babes, our bed.

7 How should I love the pretty creatures,
While round my knees they fondly clung!
To see them look their mother's features,
To hear them lisp their mother's tongue!

8 And when with envy Time transported,
Shall think to rob us of our joys;
You'll in your girls again be courted,
And I'll go wooing in my boys.

RICHARD BENTLEY'S SOLE POETICAL COMPOSITION.

1 Who strives to mount Parnassus' hill,
And thence poetic laurels bring,
Must first acquire due force and skill,
Must fly with swan's or eagle's wing.

2 Who Nature's treasures would explore,
Her mysteries and arcana know,
Must high as lofty Newton soar,
Must stoop as delving Woodward low.

3 Who studies ancient laws and rites,
Tongues, arts, and arms, and history;
Must drudge, like Selden, days and nights,
And in the endless labour die.

4 Who travels in religious jars,
(Truth mixed with error, shades with rays,)
Like Whiston, wanting pyx or stars,
In ocean wide or sinks or strays.

5 But grant our hero's hope, long toil
And comprehensive genius crown,
All sciences, all arts his spoil,
Yet what reward, or what renown?

6 Envy, innate in vulgar souls,
Envy steps in and stops his rise;
Envy with poisoned tarnish fouls
His lustre, and his worth decries.

7 He lives inglorious or in want,
To college and old books confined:
Instead of learned, he's called pedant;
Dunces advanced, he's left behind:
Yet left content, a genuine Stoic he,
Great without patron, rich without South Sea.

LINES ADDRESSED TO POPE.[1]

1 While malice, Pope, denies thy page
Its own celestial fire;
While critics and while bards in rage
Admiring, won't admire:

2 While wayward pens thy worth assail,
And envious tongues decry;
These times, though many a friend bewail,
These times bewail not I.

3 But when the world's loud praise is thine,
And spleen no more shall blame;
When with thy Homer thou shalt shine
In one unclouded fame:

4 When none shall rail, and every lay
Devote a wreath to thee;
That day (for come it will) that day
Shall I lament to see.

[1] Written by one Lewis, a schoolmaster, and highly commended by
Johnson.--_See_ Boswell.

THE END.

INDEX

VOL.
A Ballad upon a Wedding, SUCKLING, i.
Abel's Blood, VAUGHAN, ii.
A Character, Panegyric, and Description of the
Legion Club, SWIFT, iii.
A Cradle Hymn, WATTS, iii.
Address to the Nightingale, BARNFIELD, i.
A Description of Castara, HABINGTON, ii.
A Distempered Fancy, MORE, ii.
Admiral Hosier's Ghost, GLOVER, iii.
Address to the Moon, MACPHERSON, iii.
A Friend, PHILLIPS, ii.
A Fragment of Sappho, PHILIPS, iii.
Allegorical Characters from 'The Mirror for
Magistrates,' SACKVILLE, i.
ALEXANDER, WILLIAM, EARL OF STIRLING, i.
A Loose Saraband, LOVELACE, ii.
A Meditation, WOTTON, i.
An Epitaph, BEAUMONT, i.
An Heroic Epistle to Sir William Chambers, MASON, iii.
An Ode to the Right Hon. Lord Gower, FENTON, iii.
An American Love Ode, WARTON THE ELDER, iii.
Apostrophe to Freedom, BARBOUR, i.
A Praise to his Lady, ANONYMOUS, i.
A Pastoral Dialogue, CAREW, i.
A Pastoral, iii.
Apostrophe to Fletcher the Dramatist, VAUGHAN, ii.
A Persian Song of Hafiz, JONES, iii.
Arcadia, CHALKHILL, ii.
Argalia taken Prisoner by the Turks, CHAMBERLAYNE, ii.
Ascension-Day, VAUGHAN, ii.
A Vision upon the "Fairy Queen," RALEIGH, i.
A Valediction, BROWNE, i.
A Voyage to Ireland in Burlesque, COTTON, ii.
Away! Let nought to Love Displeasing, iii.

BAMPFYLDE, JOHN, iii.
BARBOUR, JOHN, i.
BARCLAY, ALEXANDER i.
BARNFIELD, RICHARD i.
Battle of Black Earnside BLIND HARRY, i.
Baucis and Philemon SWIFT, iii.
BEAUMONT, FRANCIS i.
BEAUMONT, DR JOSEPH ii.
BISHOP, SAMUEL iii.
BLACKMORE, SIR RICHARD iii.
BLACKSTONE, SIR WILLIAM iii.
BLACKLOCK, THOMAS iii.
BLAMIRE, SUSANNA iii.
BLIND HARRY i.
Breathing toward the Heavenly Country WATTS, iii.
Bristowe Tragedy CHATTERTON, iii.
BROWN, JOHN iii.
BROWNE, ISAAC HAWKINS iii.
BROWNE, WILLIAM i.
BROOKE, HENRY iii.
BRUCE, MICHAEL iii.
BURTON, ROBERT i.
Burial VAUGHAN, ii.
BOOTH, BARTON iii.
BRAMSTON iii.

Canace Condemned to Death by her Father LYDGATE, i.
Careless Content iii.
CAREW, THOMAS i.
CARTWRIGHT, WILLIAM i.
CAREY, HENRY iii.
Celia Singing STANLEY, ii.
CHALKHILL, JOHN ii.
CHAMBERLAYNE, WILLIAM ii.
CHATTERTON, THOMAS iii.
Cherry Ripe HERRICK, ii.
Cheerfulness VAUGHAN, ii.
CHESTERFIELD, LORD iii.
Childhood VAUGHAN, ii.
Close of 'Christ's Victory and Triumph' FLETCHER, i.
Cock-crowing VAUGHAN, ii.
COCKBURN, MRS iii.
Complaint of Nature LOGAN, iii.
CORBET, RICHARD i.
Corinna's Going a-Maying HERRICK, ii.
COOPER, JOHN GILBERT iii.
COTTON, CHARLES ii.
COTTON, NATHANIEL iii.
COWLEY, ABRAHAM ii.
CRAWFORD, ROBERT iii.
Creation, BLACKMORE, iii.
Cumnor Hall, MICKLE, iii.
CUNNINGHAM, JOHN, iii.

DANIEL, SAMUEL, i.
DAVIES, SIR JOHN, i.
Davideis--Book II., COWLEY, ii.
DAVENANT, SIR WILLIAM, ii.
Description of King's Mistress, JAMES I., i.
Death of Sir Henry de Bohun, BARBOUR, i.
Description of Morning, DRAYTON, i.
Description of Parthenia, FLETCHER, i.
Destruction and Renovation of all Things, DR H. MORE, ii.
Desolation of Balclutha, MACPHERSON, iii.
Dinner given by the Town Mouse to the Country
Mouse, HENRYSON, i.
Directions for Cultivating a Hop Garden, TUSSER, i.
DODSLEY, ROBERT, iii.
DONNE, JOHN, i.
DOUGLAS, GAVIN, i.
DRAYTON, MICHAEL, i.
DRUMMOND, WILLIAM, i.
DU BARTAS, i.
DUNBAR, WILLIAM, i.
Dwelling of the Witch Orandra, CHALKHILL, ii.

Early Love, DANIEL, i.
EDWARDS, RICHARD, i.
Elegy XIII., HAMMOND, iii.
Elegy written in Spring, BRUCE, iii.
ELLIOT, Miss JANE, iii.
End, DR BEAUMONT, ii.
Epitaph on the Countess of Pembroke, JONSON, i.
Epistle addressed to the Honourable W. E. HABINGTON, ii.
Epitaph on Mrs Mason, MASON, iii.
Evening, BROWNE, i.
Eve, DR BEAUMONT, ii.
Exordium of Third Part of 'Pyschozoia', DR H. MORE, ii.

FAIRFAX, EDWARD, i.
Farewell to the Vanities of the World, WOTTON, i.
FANSHAWE, SIR RICHARD, ii.
FAWKES, FRANCIS, iii.
FENTON, ELIJAH, iii.
Few Happy Matches, WATTS, iii.
February--an Elegy, CHATTERTON, iii.
FERGUSSON, ROBERT, iii.
Fingal and the Spirit of Loda, MACPHERSON, iii.
Fingal's Spirit-Home, MACPHERSON, iii.
FLETCHER, GILES
FLETCHER, PHINEAS
From 'The Phoenix' Nest' ANONYMOUS, i.
From the Same ANONYMOUS, i.
From 'Britannia's Pastorals' W. BROWNE, i.
From 'The Shepherd's Hunting' WITHER, i.
From the Same WITHER, ii.
From 'Gondibert,' Canto II. DAVENANT, ii.
From 'Gondibert,' Canto IV. DAVENANT, ii.
From 'An Essay on Translated Verse' EARL OF ROSCOMMON, ii.
From 'The Gentle Shepherd,' Act I., Scene II. RAMSAY, iii.
From 'The Monody' LYTTELTON, iii.
From 'The Country Justice' LANGHORNE, iii.
From the Same LANGHORNE, iii.
From 'Leonidas,' Book XII. GLOVER, iii.

GARTH, SIR SAMUEL iii.
GASCOIGNE, GEORGE i.
Gipsies--From 'The Country Justice' LANGHORNE, iii.
GLOVER, RICHARD iii.
Good-morrow GASCOIGNE, i.
Good-night GASCOIGNE, i.
GOULD iii.
GOWER, JOHN i.
Gratification which the Lover's Passion receives
from the Sense of Hearing GOWER, i.
GRAINGER, DR JAMES iii.
GREVILLE, MRS iii.

HABINGTON, WILLIAM ii.
HALL, JOSEPH, BISHOP OF NORWICH ii.
Hallo, my Fancy ii.
HAMMOND, JAMES iii.
HAMILTON, WILLIAM iii.
Happiness of the Shepherd's Life P. FLETCHER, i.
HARDING, JOHN i.
HARRINGTON, JOHN i.
Harpalus' Complaint of Phillida's Love
bestowed on Corin i.
HARTE, DR WALTER iii.
HAWES, STEPHEN i.
HENRYSON, ROBERT i.
Henry, Duke of Buckingham, in the Infernal
Regions T. SACKVILLE, i.
HERRICK, ROBERT ii.
Hell DR J. BEAUMONT, ii.
HEATH, ROBERT ii.
HEADLEY, HENRY iii.
Holy Sonnets, DONNE, i.
Housewifely Physic, TUSSER, i.
HUME, ALEXANDER, i.

Image of Death, SOUTHWELL, i.
Imperial Rome Personified, DR BEAUMONT, ii.
Imitation of Thomson, ISAAC BROWNE, iii.
Imitation of Pope, ISAAC BBOWNE, iii.
Imitation of Swift, ISAAC BROWNE, iii.
Instability of Human Greatness, P. FLETCHER, i.
Introduction to the Poem on the Soul of Man, DAVIES, i.
Invitation to Izaak Walton, COTTON, ii.
In praise of the renowned Lady Anne, Countess
of Warwick, TURBERVILLE, i.
Isaac's Marriage, VAUGHAN, ii.

JAGO, REV. RICHARD, iii.
JAMES I. OF SCOTLAND, i.
Jacob's Pillow and Pillar, VAUGHAN, ii.
Jephthah's Daughter, HERRICK, ii.
JOHN THE CHAPLAIN, i.
JONSON, BEN, i.
JONES, SIR WILLIAM, iii.
Joseph's Dream, DE BEAUMONT, ii.
Journey into France, CORBET, i.

KAY, JOHN, i.
Kenrick--translated from the Saxon, CHATTERTON, iii.
KING, DE HENRY, ii.

La Belle Confidante, STANLEY, ii.
LANGHORNE, JOHN, iii.
Life, COWLEY, ii.
Life, KING, ii.
Lines addressed to Pope, LEWIS, iii.
LLOYD, ROBERT, iii.
Lochaber no more, RAMSAY, iii.
LOGAN, JOHN, iii.
London Lyckpenny, The LYDGATE, i.
Look Home, SOUTHWELL, i.
Love's Servile Lot, SOUTHWELL, i.
Love admits no Rival, RALEIGH, i.
Love's Darts, CARTWRIGHT, i.
LOVELACE, RICHARD, ii.
Love-Sick, VAUGHAN, ii.
LOVIBOND, EDWARD, iii.
LOWE, JOHN, iii.
LYDGATE, JOHN, i.
LYNDSAY, SIR DAVID, i.
LYTTELTON, LORD, iii.

MACPHERSON, JAMES iii.
MAITLAND, SIR RICHARD, OF LETHINGTON i.
MALLETT, DAVID iii.
Man's Fall and Recovery VAUGHAN, ii.
Marriage of Christ and the Church P. FLETCHER, i.
MARGARET, DUCHESS OF NEWCASTLE ii.
Mary's Dream LOWE, iii.
MARVELL, ANDREW ii.
MASON, WILLIAM iii.
May-Eve; or, Kate of Aberdeen CUNNINGHAM, iii.
Meldrum's Duel with the English Champion
Talbert LYNDSAY, i.
Melancholy described by Mirth DUCHESS OF NEWCASTLE, ii.
Melancholy describing herself DUCHESS OF NEWCASTLE, ii.
MERRICK, JAMES iii.
MESTON, WILLIAM iii.
MICKLE, WILLIAM JULIUS iii.
Misery VAUGHAN, ii.
MONTGOMERY, ALEXANDER i.
MOORE, EDWARD iii.
MOORE, SIR JOHN HENRY iii.
MORE, DR HENRY ii.
Morning in May DOUGLAS, i.
Moral Reflections on the Wind TUSSER, i.
Mount of Olives VAUGHAN, ii.
My Mind to me a Kingdom is ii.

Note on Anacreon STANLEY ii.
NUGENT, LORD (ROBERT CRAGGS) iii.

Oberon's Palace HERRICK, ii.
Oberon's Feast HERRICK, ii.
OCCLEVE, THOMAS i.
Ode to Solitude GRAINGER, iii.
Ode on hearing the Drum JOHN SCOTT, iii.
Ode to Mankind NUGENT, iii.
Ode to Aurora BLACKLOCK, iii.
Ode to Fancy JOSEPH WARTON, iii.
Ode to a Tobacco-pipe iii.
Of Wit COWLEY, ii.
Of Solitude COWLEY, ii.
OLDYS, WILLIAM iii.
On Tombs in Westminster BEAUMONT, i.
On Man's Resemblance to God DU BARTAS, i.
On the Portrait of Shakspeare JONSON, i.
On Melancholy BURTON, i.
On the Death of Sir Bevil Granville CARTWRIGHT, i.
On the Praise of Poetry COWLEY, ii.
On Paradise Lost MARVELL, ii.
Love's Servile Lot, SOUTHWELL, i.

On a Charnel-house, VAUGHAN, ii.
On Gombauld's 'Endymion,' VAUGHAN, ii.
On Poetry, SWIFT, iii.
On the Death of Dr Swift, SWIFT, iii.
Opening of Second Part of 'Psychozoia,' DR MORE, ii.
Ossian's Address to the Sun, MACPHERSON, iii.

Palm-Sunday, VAUGHAN, ii.
Paradise, DR BEAUMONT, ii.
PENROSE, THOMAS, iii.
Persuasions to Love, CAREW, i.
PHILIPS, AMBROSE, iii.
PHILIPS, JOHN, iii.
PHILLIPS, CATHERINE, ii.
Picture of the Town, VAUGHAN, ii.
POMFRET, JOHN, iii.
POPE, DR WALTER, iii.
Power of Genius over Envy, W. BROWNE, i.
Priestess of Diana, CHALKHILL, ii.
Protest of Love, HEATH, ii.
Providence, VAUGHAN, ii.
Psalm CIV., VAUGHAN, ii.

RALEIGH, SIR WALTER, i.
RAMSAY, ALLAN, iii.
RANDOLPH, THOMAS, i.
Regeneration, VAUGHAN, ii.
Repentance, VAUGHAN, ii.
Resurrection and Immortality, VAUGHAN, ii.
Richard II. the Morning before his Murder
in Pomfret Castle, DANIEL, i.
Richard Bentley's Sole Poetical Composition, iii.
Righteousness, VAUGHAN, ii.
Rinaldo at Mount Olivet, FAIRFAX, i.
ROBERTS, WILLIAM HAYWARD, iii.
ROSCOMMON, THE EARL OF, ii.
ROSS, ALEXANDER, iii.
Rules and Lessons, VAUGHAN, ii.

SACKVILLE, THOMAS, LORD BUCKHURST AND EARL OF DORSET, i.
SACKVILLE, CHARLES, EARL OF DORSET, iii.
Sally in our Alley, CAREY, iii.
Satire I., HALL, ii.
Satire VII., HALL, ii.
Satire on Holland, MARVELL, ii.
SAVAGE, RICHARD, iii.
SCOTT, JOHN, iii.
SCOTT, THOMAS, iii.
Selections from Sonnets, DANIEL, i.
SEDLEY, SIR CHARLES, iii.
SEWELL, DR GEORGE, iii.
SHAW, CUTHBERT, iii.
Sic Vita, KING, ii.
SIDNEY, SIR PHILIP, i.
SKELTON, JOHN, i.
SMART, CHRISTOPHER, iii.
Song of Sorceress seeking to Tempt
Jesus, G. FLETCHER, i.
Song, CAREW, i.
Song, CAREW, i.
Song, CAREW, i.
Song, SUCKLING, i.
Song, SUCKLING, i.
Song, W. BROWNE, i.
Song, W. BROWNE, i.
Song to Althea from Prison, LOVELACE, ii.
Song, LOVELACE, ii.
Song, HERRICK, ii.
Song, KING, ii.
Song, WILMOT, ii.
Song, WILMOT, ii.
Song, C. SACKVILLE, iii.
Song, SEDLEY, iii.
Song to David, SMART, iii.
Song, ANONYMOUS, iii.
Sonnet on Isabella Markham, HARRINGTON, i.
Sonnet, WATSON, i.
Sonnet, ALEXANDER, i.
Sonnets, SIDNEY, i.
Sonnets, DRUMMOND, i.
Soul compared to a Lantern, DR H. MORE, ii.
SOUTHWELL, EGBERT, i.
Spiritual Poems, DRUMMOND, i.
Spirituality of the Soul, DAVIES, i.
St Mary Magdalene, VAUGHAN, ii.
STANLEY, THOMAS, ii.
STEVENS, GEORGE ALEXANDER, iii.
STORRER, THOMAS, i.
SUCKLING, SIR JOHN, i.
Supplication in Contemption of Side-tails, LYNDSAY, i.
SYLVESTER, JOSHUA, i.
SWIFT, JONATHAN, iii.
SCOTT, ALEXANDER, i.

That all things sometimes find Ease of their
Pain save only the Lover, UNKNOWN, i.
Thanks for a Summer's Day, HUME, i.
The Angler's Wish, WALTON, ii.
The Author's Picture BLACKLOCK, iii.
The Birks of Invermay MALLETT, iii.
The Bastard SAVAGE, iii.
The Braes of Yarrow HAMILTON, iii.
The Bush aboon Traquair CRAWFORD, iii.
The Brown Jug FAWKES, iii.
The Cave MACPHERSON, iii.
The Choice POMFRET, iii.
The Chameleon MERRICK, iii.
The Chariot of the Sun DU BARTAS, i.
The Chariot of the Sun GOWER, i.
The Chronicle: A Ballad COWLEY, ii.
The Country's Recreations RALEIGH, i.
The Country Life HERRICK, ii.
The Complaint COWLEY, ii.
The Constellation VAUGHAN, ii.
The Dance of the Seven Deadly Sins through Hell DUNBAR, i.
The Dawning VAUGHAN, ii.
The Death of Wallace BLIND HARRY, i.
The Despair COWLEY, ii.
The Dispensary GARTH, iii.
The Emigrants MARVELL, ii.
The Farmer's Ingle FERGUSSON, iii.
The Feast VAUGHAN, ii.
The Flowers of the Forest MISS ELLIOT, iii.
The Same MRS COCKBURN, iii.
The Fairy Queen ii.
The Garland VAUGHAN, ii.
The Garment of Good Ladies HENRYSON, i.
The Golden Age VAUGHAN, ii.
The Inquiry C. PHILLIPS, ii.
The Jews VAUGHAN, ii.
The Kiss: A Dialogue HERRICK, ii.
The Lawyer's Farewell to his Muse BLACKSTONE, iii.
The Last Time I came o'er the Moor RAMSAY, iii.
The Loss STANLEY, ii.
The Lovers LOGAN, iii.
The Mad Maid's Song HERRICK, ii.
The Mariner's Wife MICKLE, iii.
The Merle and the Nightingale DUNBAR, i.
The Miseries of a Poet's Life LLOYD, iii.
The Motto--'Tentanda via est,' &c. COWLEY, ii.
The Nativity G. FLETCHER, i.
The Nabob BLAMIRE, iii.
The Nymph complaining of the Death of her Fawn MARVELL, ii.
The Nymphs to their May Queen WATSON, i.
The Old Bachelor, ANONYMOUS, iii.
The Old and Young Courtier, ii.
The Palm-Tree, VAUGHAN, ii.
The Passion, VAUGHAN, ii.
The Picture of the Body, JONSON, i.
The Plagues of Egypt, COWLEY, ii.
The Praise of Woman, RANDOLPH, i.
The Progress of the Soul, DONNE, i.
The Rainbow, VAUGHAN, ii.
The River Forth Feasting, DRUMMOND, i.
The Rock an' the wee pickle Tow, A. ROSS, iii.
The Rose, WATTS, iii.
The Seed growing secretly (Mark iv. 26), VAUGHAN, ii.
The Search, VAUGHAN, ii.
The Self-subsistence of the Soul, DAVIES, i.
The Shepherd's Resolution, WITHER, ii.
The Steadfast Shepherd, WITHER, ii.
The Silent Lover, RALEIGH, i.
The Sluggard, WATTS, iii.
The Shower, VAUGHAN, ii.
The Story of William Canynge, CHATTERTON, iii.
The Splendid Shilling, J. PHILIPS, iii.
The Spring: A Sonnet from the Spanish, FANSHAWE, ii.
The Tale of the Coffers or Caskets, &c., GOWER, i.
The Tears of Old May-day, LOVIBOND, iii.
The Tempest, VAUGHAN, ii.
The Tempestuous Evening: An Ode, J. SCOTT, iii.
The Timber, VAUGHAN, ii.
The Waterfall, VAUGHAN, ii.
The Wish, COWLEY, ii.
The World, VAUGHAN, ii.
Thealma: A Deserted Shepherdess, CHALKHILL, ii.
Thealma in Full Dress, CHALKHILL, ii.
There is a Garden in her Face, ii.
TICKELL, THOMAS, iii.
Times go by Turns, SOUTHWELL, i.
THOMPSON, EDWARD, iii.
Thoughts in a Garden, MARVELL, ii.
To a Lady admiring herself in a
Looking-glass, RANDOLPH, i.
To a very young Lady, SEDLEY, iii.
To Ben Jonson, BEAUMONT, i.
To Blossoms, HERRICK, ii.
To Clarastella, HEATH, ii.
To Daffodils, HERRICK, ii.
To his noblest Friend, J. C., Esq., HABINGTON, ii.
To my Mistress, sitting by a River's side, CAREW, i.
To my Picture, RANDOLPH, i.
To Mrs Bishop, BISHOP, iii.
To the Same BISHOP, iii.
To Penshurst JONSON, i.
To Primroses HERRICK, ii.
To Religion SYLVESTER, i.
To the Cuckoo BRUCE, iii.
To the Rev. J. Howe WATTS, iii.
To the Memory of my beloved Master, William
Shakspeare, and what he left us JONSON, i.
To the Memory of his Wife DR BEAUMONT, ii.
To the Earl of Warwick on the Death of Mr
Addison TICKELL, iii.
TUSSER, THOMAS i.
TURBERVILLE, THOMAS i.

UNKNOWN i.
Upon the Shortness of Man's Life COWLEY, ii.

VANBRUGH, SIR JOHN iii.
Variety WHITEHEAD, iii.
VAUX, THOMAS, LORD i.
VAUGHAN, HENRY ii.
VERE, EDWARD i.
Verses on a most stony-hearted Maiden HARRINGTON, i.
Verses written after seeing Windsor Castle T. WARTON, iii.
Verses ANONYMOUS, iii.

WALSH iii.
WALTON, IZAAK ii.
WARD, EDWARD iii.
WARTON, THOMAS, THE ELDER iii.
WARTON, JOSEPH iii.
WATSON, THOMAS i.
WATTS, ISAAC iii.
WEEKES, JAMES EYRE iii.
WEST, RICHARD iii.
What is Love? HEATH, ii.
What Ails this Heart o' mine? BLAMIRE, iii.
WHITEHEAD, WILLIAM iii.
WILMOT, JOHN, EARL OF ROCHESTER ii.
William and Margaret MALLETT, iii.
WITHER, GEORGE ii.
Woo'd, and Married, and a' A. ROSS, iii.
WOTTON, SIR HENRY i.
Written on a Visit to the Country in Autumn LOGAN, iii.
WYNTOUN, ANDREW i.

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