Full Text Archive logoFull Text Archive — Free Classic E-books

Spalding's Baseball Guide and Official League Book for 1889 by edited by Henry Chadwick

Part 4 out of 5

Adobe PDF icon
Download this document as a .pdf
File size: 0.5 MB
What's this? light bulb idea Many people prefer to read off-line or to print out text and read from the real printed page. Others want to carry documents around with them on their mobile phones and read while they are on the move. We have created .pdf files of all out documents to accommodate all these groups of people. We recommend that you download .pdfs onto your mobile phone when it is connected to a WiFi connection for reading off-line.

of the Home Base, shall be termed a Foul Tip.

BALLS BATTED OUTSIDE THE GROUNDS.

RULE 39. When a batted ball passes outside the grounds, the Umpire shall
decide it Fair should it disappear within, or Foul should it disappear
outside of the range of the Foul Lines, and Rules 37 and 38 are to be
construed accordingly.

RULE 40. A Fair batted ball that goes over the fence at a less distance
than two hundred and ten feet from Home Base shall entitle the Batsman to
two bases and a distinctive line shall be marked on the fence at this
point.

STRIKES.

RULE 41. A Strike is

SEC. 1. A ball struck at by the Batsman without its touching his bat; or

SEC. 2. A fair ball, legally delivered by the Pitcher, but not struck at
by the Batsman.

SEC. 3. Any obvious attempt to make a foul hit.

RULE 42. A foul strike is a ball batted by the Batsman when any part of
his person is upon ground outside the lines of the Batsman's position.

THE BATSMAN IS OUT.

RULE 43. The Batsman is out:

SEC. 1. If he fails to take his position at the bat in his order of
batting, unless the error be discovered and the proper Batsman takes his
position before a fair hit has been made, and in such case the balls and
strikes called must be counted in the time at bat of the proper Batsman:
_Provided_, this rule shall not take effect unless _the out_ is declared
before the ball is delivered to the succeeding Batsman.

SEC. 2. If he fails to take his position within one minute after the
Umpire has called for the Batsman.

SEC. 3. If he makes a foul hit, other than a foul tip as defined in Rule
38 and the ball be momentarily held by a Fielder before touching the
ground, provided it be not caught in a Fielder's hat or cap, or touch some
object other than a Fielder before being caught.

SEC. 4. If he makes a foul strike.

SEC. 5. If he attempts to hinder the Catcher from fielding the ball,
evidently without effort to make a fair hit.

SEC. 6. If, while the first base be occupied by a base runner, three
strikes be called on him by the Umpire, except when two men are already
out.

SEC. 7. If, while making the third strike, the ball hits his person or
clothing.

SEC. 8. If, after two strikes have been called, the Batsman obviously
attempts to make a foul hit, as in Section 3, Rule 41.

BASE RUNNING RULES.

WHEN THE BATSMAN BECOMES A BASE RUNNER.

RULE 44. The Batsman becomes a Base Runner:

SEC. 1. Instantly after he makes a fair hit.

SEC. 2. Instantly after four Balls have been called by the Umpire.

SEC. 3. Instantly after three strikes have been declared by the Umpire.

SEC. 4. If, while he be a Batsman, his person or clothing be hit by a
ball from the pitcher, unless--in the opinion of the Umpire--he
intentionally permits himself to be so hit.

SEC. 5. Instantly after an illegal delivery of a ball by the pitcher.

BASES TO BE TOUCHED.

RULE 45. The Base Runner must touch each Base in regular order, viz.:
First, Second, Third and Home Bases; and when obliged to return (except on
a foul hit) must retouch the base or bases in reverse order. He shall only
be considered as holding a base after touching it, and shall then be
entitled to hold such base until he has legally touched the next base in
order, or has been legally forced to vacate it for a succeeding Base
Runner.

ENTITLED TO BASES.

RULE 46. The Base Runner shall be entitled, without being put out, to
take one Base in the following cases:

SEC. 1. If, while he was Batsman, the Umpire called four Balls.

SEC. 2. If the Umpire awards a succeeding Batsman a base on four balls,
or for being hit with a pitched ball, or in case of an illegal delivery--
as in Rule 44, Sec. 5--and the Base Runner is thereby forced to vacate the
base held by him.

SEC. 3. If the Umpire calls a "balk."

SEC. 4. If a ball delivered by the Pitcher pass the Catcher and touch the
Umpire or any fence or building within ninety feet of the Home Base.

SEC. 5. If upon a fair hit the Ball strikes the person or clothing of the
Umpire on fair ground.

SEC. 6. If he be prevented from making a base by the obstruction of an
adversary.

SEC. 7. If the Fielder stop or catch a batted ball with his hat or any
part of his dress.

RETURNING TO BASES.

RULE 47. The Base Runner shall return to his Base, and shall be entitled
to so return without being put out.

SEC. 1. If the Umpire declares a Foul Tip (as defined in Rule 38) or any
other Foul Hit not legally caught by a Fielder.

SEC. 2. If the Umpire declares a Foul Strike.

SEC. 3. If the Umpire declares a Dead Ball, unless it be also the fourth
Unfair Ball, and he be thereby forced to take the next base, as provided
in Rule 46, Sec. 2.

SEC. 4. If the person or clothing of the Umpire is struck by a ball
thrown by the Catcher to intercept a Base Runner.

WHEN BASE RUNNERS ARE OUT.

RULE 48. The Base Runner is out:

SEC. 1. If, after three strikes have been declared against him while
Batsman, and the Catcher fail to catch the third strike ball, he plainly
attempts to hinder the Catcher from fielding the ball.

SEC. 2. If, having made a Fair Hit while Batsman, such fair hit ball be
momentarily held by a Fielder, before touching the ground or any object
other than a Fielder. _Provided_, it be not caught in a Fielder's hat or
cap.

SEC. 3. If, when the Umpire has declared three strikes on him, while
batsman, the third strike ball be momentarily held by a Fielder before
touching the ground. _Provided_, it be not caught in a Fielder's hat or
cap, or touch some object other than a Fielder before being caught.

SEC. 4. If, after Three Strikes or a Fair Hit, he be touched with the
ball in the hand of a Fielder before such Base Runner touches First Base.

SEC. 5. If, after Three Strikes or a Fair Hit, the ball be securely held
by a Fielder, while touching First Base with any part of his person,
before such Base Runner touches First Base.

SEC. 6. If, in running the last half of the distance from Home Base to
First Base, he runs outside the Three Feet Lines, as defined in Rule 10;
except that he must do so if necessary to avoid a Fielder attempting to
field a batted ball, and in such case shall not be declared out.

SEC. 7. If, in running from First to Second Base, from Second to Third
Base, or from Third to Home Base, he runs more than three feet from a
direct line between such bases to avoid being touched by the ball in the
hands of a Fielder; but in case a Fielder be occupying the Base Runner's
proper path, attempting to field a batted ball, then the Base Runner shall
run out of the path and behind said Fielder, and shall not be declared out
for so doing.

SEC. 8. If he fails to avoid a Fielder attempting to field a batted ball,
in the manner prescribed in Sections 6 and 7 of this Rule; or if he, in
any way, obstructs a Fielder attempting to field a batted ball, or
intentionally interferes with a thrown ball: _Provided_, That if two or
more Fielders attempt to field a batted ball, and the Base Runner comes in
contact with one or more of them, the Umpire shall determine which Fielder
is entitled to the benefit of this Rule, and shall not decide the Base
Runner out for coming in contact with any other Fielder.

SEC. 9. If, at any time while the ball is in play, he be touched by the
ball in the hands of a Fielder, unless some part of his person is touching
a base he is entitled to occupy: _Provided_, The ball be held by the
Fielder after touching him; but (exception as to First Base), in running
to First Base, he may overrun said base without being put out for being
off said base, after first touching it, provided he returns at once and
retouches the base, after which he may be put out as at any other base.
If, in overrunning First Base, he also attempts to run to Second Base, or,
after passing the base he turns to his left from the foul line, he shall
forfeit such exemption from being put out.

SEC. 10. If, when a Fair or Foul Hit ball, other than a foul tip as
referred to in Rule 38, is legally caught by a Fielder, such ball is
legally held by a Fielder on the base occupied by the Base Runner when
such ball was struck (or the Base Runner be touched with the ball in the
hands of a Fielder), before he retouches said base after such Fair or Foul
Hit ball was so caught. _Provided_, That the Base Runner shall not be out
in such case, if, after the ball was legally caught as above, it be
delivered to the bat by the Pitcher before the Fielder holds it on said
base, or touches the Base Runner with it; but if the Base Runner in
attempting to reach a base, detaches it before being touched or forced out
he shall be declared safe.

SEC. 11. If, when a Batsman becomes a Base Runner, the First Base, or the
First and Second Bases, or the First, Second and Third Bases, be occupied,
any Base Runner so occupying a base shall cease to be entitled to hold it,
until any following Base Runner is put out and may be put out at the next
base or by being touched by the ball in the hands of a Fielder in the same
manner as in running to First Base, at any time before any following Base
Runner is put out.

SEC. 12. If a Fair Hit ball strike him _before touching the fielder_ and
in such case no base shall be run unless forced by the Batsman becoming a
Base Runner, and no run shall be scored.

SEC. 13. If when running to a base or forced to return to a base, he fail
to touch the intervening base or bases, if any, in the order prescribed in
Rule 45, he may be put out at the base he fails to touch, or by being
touched by the ball in the hands of a Fielder, in the same manner as in
running to First Base.

SEC. 14. If, when the Umpire calls "Play," after any suspension of a
game, he fails to return to and touch the base he occupied when "Time" was
called before touching the next base.

WHEN BATSMAN OR BASE RUNNER IS OUT.

RULE 49. The Umpire shall declare the Batsman or Base Runner out, without
waiting for an appeal for such decision, in all cases where such player is
put out in accordance with these rules, except as provided in Rule 48,
Sections 10 and 14.

COACHING RULES.

RULE 50. The Captains and Coachers are restricted in coaching to the Base
Runner only, and are not allowed to address any remarks except to the Base
Runner, and then only in words of necessary direction; and no player shall
use language which will in any manner refer to or reflect upon a player of
the opposing club, or the audience. To enforce the above, the Captain of
the opposite side may call the attention of the Umpire to the offence, and
upon a repetition of the same the club shall be debarred from further
coaching during the game.

THE UMPIRE.

RULE 51. The Umpire shall not be changed during the progress of a game,
except for reasons of illness or injury.

HIS POWERS AND JURISDICTION.

RULE 52. SEC. 1. The Umpire is master of the Field from the commencement
to the termination of the game, and is entitled to the respect of the
spectators, and any person offering any insult or indignity to him must be
promptly ejected from the grounds.

SEC. 2. He must compel the players to observe the provisions of all the
Playing Rules, and he is hereby invested with authority to order any
player to do or omit to do any act as he may deem necessary, to give force
and effect to any and all of such provisions.

SPECIAL DUTIES.

RULE 53. The Umpire's duties shall be as follows:

SEC. 1. The Umpire is the sole and absolute judge of play. In no instance
shall any person be allowed to question the correctness of any decision
made by him except the Captains of the contending nines, and no other
player shall at such time leave his position in the field, his place at
the bat, on the bases or players' bench, to approach or address the Umpire
in word or act upon such disputed decision. Neither shall any Manager or
other officers of either club--except the Captains as before mentioned--
be permitted to go upon the field or address the Umpire in regard to such
disputed decision, under a penalty of a forfeiture of the game to the
opposing club. The Umpire shall in no case appeal to any spectator for
information in regard to any case, and shall not reverse his decision on
any point of play on the testimony of any player or bystander.

SEC. 2. Before the commencement of a Game, the Umpire shall see that the
rules governing all the materials of the game are strictly observed. He
shall ask the Captain of the Home Club whether there are any special
ground rules to be enforced, and if there are, he shall see that they are
duly enforced, provided they do not conflict with any of these Rules. He
shall also ascertain whether the fence in the rear of the Catcher's
position is distant ninety feet from the Home Base.

SEC. 3. The Umpire must keep the contesting nines playing constantly from
the commencement of the game to its termination, allowing such delays only
as are rendered unavoidable by accident, injury or rain. He must, until
the completion of the game, require the players of each side to promptly
take their positions in the field as soon as the the third man is put out,
and must require the first striker of the opposite side to be in his
position at the bat as soon as the fielders are in their places.

SEC. 4. The Umpire shall count and call every "unfair ball" delivered by
the Pitcher, and every "dead ball," if also an unfair ball, as a "ball,"
and he shall also count and call every "strike." Neither a "ball" nor a
"strike" shall be counted or called until the ball has passed the home
base. He shall also declare every "Dead Ball," "Block," "Foul Hit," "Foul
Strike," and "Balk."

RULE 54. For the special benefit of the patrons of the game, and because
the offences specified are under his immediate jurisdiction, and not
subject to appeal by players, the attention of the Umpire is particularly
directed to possible violations of the purpose and spirit of the Rules of
the following character:

SEC. 1. Laziness or loafing of players in taking their places in the
field, or those allotted them by the Rules when their side is at the bat,
and especially any failure to keep the bats in the racks provided for
them; to be ready (two men) to take position as Batsmen, and to remain
upon the Players' Bench, except when otherwise required by the Rules.

SEC. 2. Any attempt by players of the side at bat, by calling to a
Fielder, other than the one designated by his Captain, to field a ball, or
by any other equally disreputable means seeking to disconcert a Fielder.

SEC. 3. The Rules make a marked distinction between hindrance of an
adversary in fielding a batted or thrown ball. This has been done to rid
the game of the childish excuses and claims formerly made by a Fielder
failing to hold a ball to put out a Base Runner. But there may be cases of
a Base Runner so flagrantly violating the spirit of the Rules and of the
Game in obstructing a Fielder from fielding a thrown ball that it would
become the duty of the Umpire, not only to declare the Base Runner "out"
(and to compel any succeeding Base Runners to hold their bases), but also
to impose a heavy fine upon him. For example: If the Base Runner plainly
strike at the ball while passing him, to prevent its being caught by a
Fielder; if he holds a Fielder's arms so as to disable him from catching
the ball, or if he run against or knock the Fielder down for the same
purpose.

CALLING "PLAY" AND "TIME."

RULE 55. The Umpire must call "Play," promptly at the hour designated by
the Home Club, and on the call of "Play" the game must immediately begin.
When he calls "Time," play shall be suspended until he calls "Play" again,
and during the interim no player shall be put out, base be run, or run be
scored. The Umpire shall suspend play only for an accident to himself or a
player (but in case of accident to a Fielder, "Time" shall not be called
until the ball be returned to, and held by the Pitcher, standing in his
position), or in case rain falls so heavily that the spectators are
compelled, by the severity of the storm, to seek shelter, in which case he
shall note the time of suspension, and should such rain continue to fall
thirty minutes thereafter, he shall terminate the game; or to enforce
order in case of annoyance from spectators.

RULE 56. The Umpire is only allowed, by the Rules, to call "Time" in case
of an accident to himself or a player, a "Block," as referred to in Rule
35, Sec. 3, or in case of rain, as defined by the Rules. The practice of
players suspending the game to discuss or contest a discussion with the
Umpire, is a gross violation of the Rules, and the Umpire must promptly
fine any player who interrupts the game in this manner.

INFLICTING FINES.

RULE 57. The Umpire is empowered to inflict fines of not less than $5.00
nor more than $25.00 for the first offence on players during the progress
of a game, as follows:

SEC 1. For indecent or improper language addressed to the audience, the
Umpire or any player.

SEC. 2. For the Captain or Coacher willfully failing to remain within the
legal bounds of his position, except upon an appeal by the Captain from
the Umpire's decision upon a misinterpretation of the rules.

SEC. 3. For the disobedience by a player of any other of his orders, or
for any other violation of these Rules.

SEC. 4. In case the Umpire imposes a fine on a player, he shall at once
notify the Captain of the offending player's side, and shall transmit a
written notice thereof to the President of the Association or League
within twenty-four hours thereafter, under the penalty of having said fine
taken from his own salary.

SEC. 5. A repetition of any of the above offences shall, at the
discretion of the Umpire, subject the offender either to a repetition of
the fine or to removal from the field and the immediate substitution of
another player then in uniform.

FIELD RULES.

RULE 58. No Club shall allow open betting or pool selling upon its
grounds, nor in any building owned or occupied by it.

RULE 59. No person shall be allowed upon any part of the field during the
progress of the game, in addition to the players in uniform, the Manager
on each side and the Umpire; except such officers of the law as may be
present in uniform, and such officials of the Home Club as may be
necessary to preserve the peace.

RULE 60. No Umpire, Manager, Captain or Player shall address the audience
during the progress of a game, except in case of necessary explanation.

RULE 61. Every Club shall furnish sufficient police force upon its own
grounds to preserve order, and in the event of a crowd entering the field
during the progress of a game, and interfering with the play in any
manner, the Visiting Club may refuse to play further until the field be
cleared. If the ground be not cleared within fifteen minutes thereafter,
the Visiting Club may claim, and shall be entitled to, the game by a score
of nine runs to none (no matter what number of innings have been played).

GENERAL DEFINITIONS.

RULE 62. "Play" is the order of the Umpire to begin the game or to resume
play after its suspension.

RULE 63. "Time" is the order of the Umpire to suspend play. Such
suspension must not extend beyond the day of the game.

RULE 64. "Game" is the announcement by the Umpire that the game is
terminated.

RULE 65. "An Inning" is the term at bat of the nine players representing
a Club in a game, and is completed when three of such players have been
put out as provided in these Rules.

RULE 66. "A Time at Bat" is the term at bat of a Batsman. It begins when
he takes his position, and continues until he is put out or becomes a Base
Runner; except when, because of being hit by a pitched ball, or in case of
an illegal delivery by the Pitcher, as in Rule 44.

RULE 67. "Legal" or "Legally" signifies as required by these Rules.

SCORING.

RULE 68. In order to promote Uniformity in Scoring Championship Games,
the following instructions, suggestions and definitions are made for the
benefit of scorers, and they are required to make all scores in accordance
therewith.

BATTING.

SEC. 1. The first item in the tabulated score, after the player's name
and position, shall be the number of times he has been at bat during the
game. The time or times where the player has been sent to base by being
hit by a pitched ball, by the pitcher's illegal delivery, or by a base on
balls shall not be included in this column.

SEC. 2. In the second column should be set down the runs made by each
player.

SEC. 3. In the third column should be placed the first base hits made by
each player. A base hit should be scored in the following cases:

When the ball from the bat strikes the ground within the foul lines, and
out of reach of the fielders.

When a hit ball is partially or wholly stopped by a fielder in motion,
but such player cannot recover himself in time to handle the ball before
the striker reaches First Base.

When a hit ball is hit so sharply to an infielder that he cannot handle
it in time to put out the batsman. In case of doubt over this class of
hits, score a base hit, and exempt the fielder from the charge of an error.

When a ball is hit so slowly towards a fielder that he cannot handle it
in time to put out the batsman.

That in all cases where a base runner is retired by being hit by a batted
ball, the batsman should be credited with a base hit.

When a batted ball hits the person or clothing of the Umpire, as defined
in Rule 37.

SEC. 4. In the fourth column shall be placed Sacrifice Hits, which shall
be credited to the batsman, who when but one man is out advances a runner
a base on a fly to the outfield or a ground hit, which results in putting
out the batsman, or would so result if handled without error.

FIELDING.

SEC. 5. The number of opponents put out by each player shall be set down
in the fifth column. Where a striker is given out by the Umpire for a foul
strike, or because he struck out of his turn, the put-out shall be scored
to the Catcher.

SEC. 6. The number of times the player assists shall be set down in the
sixth column. An assist should be given to each player who handles the
ball in assisting a run out or other play of the kind.

An assist should be given to a player who makes a play in time to put a
runner out, even if the player who should complete the play fails, through
no fault of the player assisting.

And generally an assist should be given to each player who handles the
ball from the time it leaves the bat until it reaches the player who makes
the put out, or in case of a thrown ball, to each player who throws or
handles it cleanly and in such a way that a put-out results, or would
result if no error were made by the receiver.

ERRORS.

SEC. 7. An error shall be given in the seventh column for each misplay
which allows the striker or base runner to make one or more bases when
perfect play would have insured his being put out, except that "wild
pitches," "bases on balls," "bases on the batsman being struck by a
pitched ball," or case of illegal pitched ball, balks and passed balls,
shall not be included in said column. In scoring errors of batted balls
see Section 3 of this Rule.

STOLEN BASES.

SEC. 8. Stolen bases shall be scored as follows:

Any attempt to steal a base must go to the credit of the base runner,
whether the ball is thrown wild or muffed by the fielder, but any manifest
error is to be charged to the fielder making the same. If the base runner
advances another base he shall not be credited with a stolen base, and the
fielder allowing the advancement is also to be charged with an error. If a
base runner makes a start and a battery error is made, the runner secures
the credit of a stolen base, and the battery error is scored against the
player making it. Should a base runner overrun a base and then be put out,
he should receive the credit for the stolen base.

EARNED RUNS.

SEC. 9. An earned run shall be scored every time the player reaches the
home base unaided by errors before chances have been offered to retire the
side.

THE SUMMARY.

RULE 69. The Summary shall contain:

SEC. 1. The number of earned runs made by each side.

SEC. 2. The number of two-base hits made by each player.

SEC. 3. The number of three-base hits made by each player.

SEC. 4. The number of home runs made by each player.

SEC. 5. The number of bases stolen by each player.

SEC. 6. The number of double and triple plays made by each side, with the
names of the players assisting in the same.

SEC. 7. The number of men given bases on called balls, by each Pitcher.

SEC. 8. The number of men given bases from being hit by pitched balls.

SEC. 9. The number of men struck out.

SEC. 10. The number of passed balls by each Catcher.

SEC. 11. The number of wild pitches by each Pitcher.

SEC. 12. The time of game.

SEC. 13. The name of the Umpire.

AMENDMENTS.

RULE 70. No Amendment or change of any of these National Playing Rules
shall be made, except by a joint committee on rules, consisting of three
members from the National League and three members from the American
Association. Such committee to be appointed at the annual meetings of each
of said bodies to serve one year from the twentieth day of December of
each year. Such committee shall have full power to act, provided that such
amendments shall be made only by an affirmative vote of the majority of
each delegation.

[Illustration: HENRY CHADWICK--"Father of Base Ball."]

Henry Chadwick, the veteran journalist, upon whom the honored sobriquet
of "Father of Base Ball" rests so happily and well, appears in
portraiture, and so well preserved in his physical manhood that his
sixty-three years rest lightly upon his well timed life. Since the age
of thirteen he has resided in Brooklyn, New York, and is an honored member
of the distinguished society of old Brooklynites. He entered upon the
journalistic career in which he has attained eminent distinction in 1856,
his first work finding a ready field on the New York _Times_. In 1857 he
associated himself with the New York _Clipper_, and was identified with
that journal steadily for thirty-one years. After twenty-nine years of
remarkable devotion to the interests of morning journalism in the
metropolis Mr. Chadwick retired in 1886 to accept an editorial position on
the _Outing Magazine_, which, together with his work on the Brooklyn
_Eagle_, keeps his ready pen busy. He is one of the most valued
contributors on _The Sporting Life_ staff, and his work in other journals
has made his name a household word as the "Father of Base Ball." He comes
from a famous family of English birth, his brother, Mr. Edwin Chadwick,
being the noted sanitary philosopher of England. Mr. Chadwick has edited
our League GUIDE since 1880.

A. G. SPALDING & BROS., Chicago and New York.

AN EXPLANATORY APPENDIX
TO THE
NEW CODE OF RULES FOR 1889.

The experience of each season in regard to the conflicting opinions of
umpires and players in their interpretation of the code of playing rules,
has made it a necessity on the part of the editor of the GUIDE, to devote
a special chapter each year to the subject of properly interpreting every
important rule of the game. This year we make up this special chapter in
the form of an _Explanatory Appendix_ to the new code, which is officially
indorsed by the President of the National League, and the Secretary of the
Joint Committee on Rules of the League and the American Association.
Taking up the rules of the new code in their regular order we proceed to
give the official interpretation of the practical application of each
newly amended rule, as also of every rule, of the correct definition of
which there is likely to arise any question.

THE PLAYERS ON EACH SIDE.

"In no case shall less than nine men be allowed to play on each side." So
says Rule 14. The practical application of the rule is that if a club has
not nine men ready to take the field at the hour appointed for beginning a
regularly scheduled championship-game, the club short handed must forfeit
the game. Moreover, if they begin play with the required complement of
men, and one of the number becomes injured and disabled from service in
the field, and they have no legal substitute player to take the disabled
man's place, the game cannot be continued with but eight men in the field,
and therefore it must be similarly forfeited.

PLAYERS MUST BE IN UNIFORM.

Rule 17 requires that "every club shall be required to adopt uniforms for
the players;" and Rule 28 renders it necessary that at least one
substitute player shall be ready "in uniform" to take the place of a
disabled player, or to become the tenth player of the team in accordance
with section 2 of Rule 28.

A TENTH MAN AS SUBSTITUTE.

Besides the regular substitute player required to be ready to take the
place of a disabled player, Rule 28--a new amendment--admits of an
_independent substitute player_ on each side, whose services in the field
are held subject to the requirement of either of the two Captains whenever
he shall deem it advisable to remove any player, who, though not disabled
"by illness or injury," is not doing the work in the field to the
Captain's satisfaction. But such substitute can only replace another
player at the close of a regular innings play; and, moreover, the player
whose place the extra substitute takes, cannot again take part in the game
then being played.

It should be borne in mind that this special rule was adopted not only to
enable the Captain of a team to strengthen a weak point discovered during
the progress of the game, but also to enable him to utilize new talent
when the game has been virtually won, as the experience in such instances
is especially valuable to young players, notably so in the case of battery
players. It also enables the Captain to save the work of a valuable
battery player from a prolonged strain rendered unnecessary by the winning
lead obtained.

PUTTING A NEW BALL IN PLAY.

Rule 12, Sec. 2, requires the Umpire to call for the putting in play of
the substitute ball whenever the ball previously in play, is batted foul
over the fence or the grand stands, "_out of the sight of the players_."
Also in case the ball in play becomes "_unfit for fair use_," as to which
the Umpire is the sole judge.

A new ball can only be called for in case neither of the two balls in use
are legally available for service.

THE NEW RULE FOR PITCHERS.

The amended rule governing the delivery of the ball by the pitcher--Rule
18 of the new code--has had the words "his left foot in front of the
right, and to the left of an imaginary line from his right foot to the
center of the home base" eliminated from it, and in consequence the
pitcher is not now required to abide by that portion of the rule, which
governed his movements in 1888. The pitcher's position, when he prepares
to deliver the ball to the bat, must be that in which he stands with both
feet squarely on the ground, and with one foot--left or right--placed on
the rear line of his position. While thus standing ready to deliver the
ball, he must hold it before him in full sight of the Umpire. The words
"in the act of delivering the ball" refer to the very last motion in
delivery, and in making this motion the rear foot is of necessity placed
on the ground, as it is from this standpoint that the power to give the
last impetus to the ball in delivery is derived. Consequently the foot
cannot be lifted from the ground entirely until the ball leaves his hand.
In making his regular motions to deliver while he is prohibited from
lifting the entire foot in the rear line from the ground, he is not
debarred from lifting the heel of the foot an inch or so. In making the
preliminary movements, too, he cannot take but one forward step, though he
can make this single step in any way he chooses, provided it be a regular
and habitual motion of his delivery.

FEIGNING TO THROW TO A BASE.

When the pitcher feigns to throw to a base prior to delivering the ball
to the bat, in every such instance after making the feint to throw, he
must resume his original position, "facing the batsman," and "holding the
ball fairly in front of his body," and "momentarily pause before
delivering the ball to the bat." If he makes a feint to throw and then
delivers the ball with one apparent motion, without pausing to stand, he
commits a balk.

THE ORDER OF BATTING.

Rule 19 says that "Batsmen must take their position at the bat in the
order in which they are named on _the score_." This _score_ is not
sufficiently defined in the rule, but it means the printed or written
order of batting, which each captain of the contesting team presents to
the umpire prior to the commencement of the game; and such order, on
approval of the umpire, should be copied verbatim in the score book of the
official scorer of the home club, who alone is authorized to send a copy
of the score of the game, as the official copy, to the secretary of the
League or Association the club belongs to.

After the order of batting has been submitted to the umpire, it becomes
the official order, and after being thus indorsed it cannot be changed
except in the case of a substitute player taking the place either of a
disabled player, or that of a removed player--under the new rule--and in
such case the incoming substitute player takes the place in the order of
batting of the disabled or removed player.

THE CAPTAIN CAN PLACE HIS MEN AS HE LIKES.

The captain of a nine can place his nine men in any position of the field
he chooses. There is in fact no arbitrary rule governing the placing of
the men except in the case of the pitcher, and he of course must always
occupy the pitcher's box. Under Rule 15, the captain can place his
infielders, in close within the diamond, or all outside of it, also the
outfielders, either in close to the infielders, or lying out deep or close
to the foul line, etc. But the pitcher of the ball must always be in the
"box" when delivering the ball.

THE DEFINITION OF THE BALK.

Rule 32, Section I, defines a balk as "Any motion made by the pitcher to
deliver the ball to the bat without delivering it." This definition
embraces every one of the motions the pitcher is accustomed to make
preliminary to the actual delivery of the ball, whether of his hands,
arms, or feet, or any motion of his body. He cannot therefore make any
pretense of delivering the ball while not having the ball in his hand
ready to deliver it as in the case of a base player hiding the ball while
the pitcher acts as if he himself had possession of it--without his making
a balk.

The words "any motion calculated to deceive a base runner," refer to
pretended movements to deliver outside of those referred to in the first
portion of the rule.

TAKING A BASE ON A BALK.

There is an important distinction between a "_balk_" and an "_illegal
delivery_." A "_balk_" is made when the pitcher makes a motion to deliver
the ball to the bat without following such motion with actual delivery, or
if he holds the ball in his hand long enough to unnecessarily delay the
game. An "_illegal delivery_" is made when the pitcher steps out of his
"box" in delivery, or lifts his rear foot from the ground before the ball
leaves his hand--his lifting his foot afterward is of no account--or if he
fails to pause before delivery after making a feint to throw to a base. In
the case of a "balk," every occupant of a base, as a base runner, becomes
entitled to one base, whether forced by the batsman or not. But the
batsman cannot take a base on a "balk." In the case of an "illegal
delivery," however, while occupants of bases can only take a base on such
delivery in case of being "forced off," the batsman is given a base on
such illegal delivery. While an "illegal delivery" is in the nature of a
balk, it is not an actual "balk" as technically termed in the rules.

DEAD BALLS.

The ball cannot be used to put a player on the batting side out, either
in the case of a batted ball to foul ground not caught on the fly; a
called _foul strike_; a runner being hit by a batted ball; a pitched ball
striking the batsman, or striking his bat without being intentionally
struck at; or from the ball striking the umpire while he is on foul
ground, before it passes the catcher; or, in the case of a called block
ball, until said ball is _first held by the pitcher while standing within
his position_.

THE FOUL TIP CATCH.

The elimination of the sharp foul-tip catch from the rules will
necessitate the placing of a white line, forming a half circle, within a
radius of ten feet from the home base, and located on foul ground, as it
is only foul tips caught within ten feet of the home base which do not put
the batsman out.

THE BLOCKING OF BALLS.

Any interference with the progress of a batted or thrown ball by any
person not one of the contesting players in a game, is what is termed
_blocking the ball_. Suppose a ball is batted to the short stop, and that
fielder overthrows the ball to first base, and it goes toward the crowd
and is there stopped or touched by an outsider, the moment this stoppage
of the ball or interference with it occurs, the umpire must call "Block
ball," and until the ball is returned to the field and held by the pitcher
while in his "box," it is _dead_ for putting out any base runner; and such
runners are permitted to run all the bases they can until the ball is thus
put legally into play. But should such overthrown ball, in addition to its
being stopped or diverted from its course by any outsider, be also kicked
aside or picked up and thrown out of reach by a fielder, the umpire must
in addition call "Time," in which case runners shall only be entitled to
hold such bases as they had touched before the ball had been so kicked or
thrown out of reach, the ball, as in the prior case, not being in play
until held by the pitcher while in his box.

HITTING BALLS FOUL INTENTIONALLY.

Rule 42, Section III, requires the umpire to call a strike on the batsman
every time he makes "an obvious attempt to make a foul hit." Rule 43,
Section XIII, states that "If, after two strikes have been called, the
batsman _obviously attempts to make a foul hit_" he is out. Last year
these rules were both misinterpreted by umpires. In the first place, in
both cases the _intention_ of the batsman must be plainly manifest; and to
judge of this the circumstances of the case must be taken into
consideration. For instance, if the batsman _bunts_ a ball foul when a
runner is on abase, it is evident that he does so unintentionally, for no
point of play is to be gained by such a foul hit. Then, too, the hitting
of a foul ball must be repeatedly done before such hitting can be adjudged
as otherwise than accidental.

BATTING OUT OF ORDER.

Rule 43 states that the batsman who fails to bat in his proper turn
according to the approved order of batting, must be decided out by the
umpire, unless the error in question be discovered and the right batsman
be sent to the bat in the regular order "_before a fair hit has been
made_." If, before the mistake is discovered, "strikes" or "balls" be
called upon the batsman who is out of his order of batting, such strikes
and balls shall be counted against the batsman who should have gone to the
bat in the regular order. But the violation of the rule must be declared
by the field Captain before the ball is delivered to a succeeding batsman,
or the penalty of an out cannot be enforced, the mistake, of course, being
at once corrected, without the enforcement of the penalty.

RETURNING TO BASES ON FOUL BALLS.

The change made in Rule 45 is to the effect that base runners required to
return to bases which they had left on a hit ball, can, if the ball be hit
foul and not caught on the fly, return to their respective bases directly.
For instance, suppose the batsman hits a long fly ball to right field, on
which he runs to third base before the ball falls on foul ground, under
the old rule he would be required to return to home base after retouching
second and first bases; but under the new rule he can in such case return
to home base direct from third, instead of returning around the diamond.
The object of the amended rule was to save loss of time by a runner's
leisurely return to the base he had left.

HOLDING BASES AFTER TOUCHING THEM.

Rule 45, in its reference to a base runner having the right to hold a
base after touching it, is to be thus defined: Suppose that base runners
are on third and second bases, and that the runner on third is trying to
steal home, and in doing so vacates third base and runs for home base, the
occupant of second base in the meantime running to third base and holding
that base; and suppose that in such case the runner from third to home
finds himself likely to be put out at home base, and then returns to third
base, he still has the right to that base, and having such right, the
runner from second to third must give up holding third base and try and
get back to second, failing which, and preferring to hold third base, he
can be put out there even while standing on third base, provided the legal
occupant of that base is also standing on that base, but not otherwise.

OBSTRUCTING BASE RUNNERS.

Rule 46, Section VI, states that a base runner is entitled to the base he
is running to "_if he be prevented from making that base by the
obstruction of an adversary._" Now the correct interpretation of this rule
is that such obstruction as that in question must be that at the hands of
a fielder who has not the ball in hand ready to touch the runner. Of
course if the runner is met by the fielder with ball in hand ready to
touch the runner, and thus stands directly in the path of the runner, no
legal obstruction has been presented, though in fact he is obstructed.
But the "obstruction" meant by the rule is that presented by a fielder who
has not the ball in hand at the time.

A THROWN BALL HITTING THE UMPIRE ON FAIR GROUND.

Rule 47, Section IV, states that "The base runner shall return to his
base and be entitled to so return without being put out, if the person or
clothing of the umpire is struck by a ball thrown by the catcher to
intercept a base runner." Rule 46, in referring to base runners entitled
to take bases without being put out, states that "if a fair hit ball
strikes the person or clothing of the umpire, the batsman making the hit,
or a base runner running a base upon such a hit, shall be entitled to the
base he is running for without being put out." For instance, suppose there
is a runner at first base trying to steal second, and the catcher throws
the ball to the second baseman to cut him off, and that the ball thus
thrown hits the umpire and glances off out of the reach of the fielders,
the runner in such case, while being debarred from making second base by
the accident, is allowed to return to the base he left without being put
out. But the umpire must see to it that the ball is not intentionally
thrown to hit the umpire with a view of preventing what would otherwise be
a successful steal. In other words, the throw in question must be an
accidental one, or it must be judged as an illegal play.

THE COACHING RULE.

Umpires must enforce the rule governing the "coaching" of base runners in
accordance with the spirit as well as the letter of the law, and this
forbids the addressing of any remarks except to the base runner, and then
only in words of necessary direction. Moreover, no coacher is allowed to
use any language, in his position either as player or coacher, "which
shall in anyway" refer to or reflect upon a player of the opposing club.
The noisy, vulgar yelling of some coachers is in direct violation of the
spirit of the rule, as it is done, not to coach the runner, but to confuse
the pitcher or catcher, and distract their attention. The penalty for
violating the rule is the suspension of all coaching by the offending club
during the remainder of the game.

PLAYERS MUST BE SEATED ON THEIR BENCH.

Rule 54, Section I, requires that all the players of the batting side
when not actually engaged in batting, base running or in coaching--as in
the case of the two appointed coachers--must remain seated on the bench
until called in their turn to go to the bat. The umpire too must see to it
that the requirements of this same rule be strictly enforced in regard to
keeping the bats in the racks, and not allow them to be laid on the ground
in the way of the catcher running to catch foul balls.

REMOVING A PLAYER FOR KICKING.

The most important change in the rules affecting the duties of the umpire
is that made in Rule 57, Section V, which gives the umpire the
discretionary power to remove an offending player from the field who is
found violating Rule 57.

It should be borne in mind, however, that the rule is not compulsory, for
if it were so, a captain desirous of substituting another player for one
in the field, after he had availed himself of the tenth man rule, might
conspire with a player to violate the rule intentionally to aid the
captain in getting in an extra man.

ON CALLED STRIKES.

In the case of a called third strike when two men are out, Rule 43,
Section VI., requires the ball to be held on the fly whether first base be
occupied or not, in order to put the batsman out. But in the case of the
first base being occupied by a base runner, when only one man is out, when
the third strike is called, in such case the batsman is out on called
strikes, whether the ball on the third called strike is held on the fly or
not. The batsman is out too,--under the new rule--if, _when the thud
strike is called, the pitched ball hits him or touches his clothing_.

ON FORFEITED GAMES.

The Joint Rules Committee have decided that an umpire cannot declare any
game forfeited of his own motion, though in Rule 26 it states that
forfeited games are incurred under several conditions, one of which
definitely states is the wilful violation of any one rule of the code. But
he can declare a game forfeited under any one of the specified conditions
in Rule 26 if requested to do so by the captain of the club at fault.
Section IV of Rule 26 gives the umpire the discretionary power to declare
any game forfeited in which he is personally cognizant of the fact of any
single rule having been wilfully violated, the offending team forfeiting
the game then and there. But only in very rare cases should this power be
used in opposition to the wishes of the captain of the team not in fault.
When the rules have been plainly violated and the captain of the team not
in fault claims forfeit, the umpire must enforce the penalty.

THE UMPIRE'S POWER.

Under Section II of Rule 52 the umpire _is invested with the
authority to order any player to do, or to omit to do, any act, as he may
deem it necessary_, to give force or effect to any or all of the
provisions of the code of playing rules. This gives him the authority to
decide all disputed points in a game not expressly covered by the rules,
subject, of course, to legal protest.

JUDGING THE CONDITION OF THE FIELD.

Rule 29 gives the captain of the home club the sole power to decide
whether the field is in condition for play at the hour appointed for
beginning a game. But after a game has been commenced, and it be
interrupted by rain, the umpire alone decides whether the field is in fair
condition for resuming play after such suspension of the game.

THE UMPIRE SOLE JUDGE OF ILLNESS OR INJURY.

Rule 28 makes the umpire the sole judge as to the nature and extent of
the "illness or injury" claimed to disable a player from service on the
field. The captains have nothing to say in the matter. All they can do is
to appeal to the umpire, and abide by his decision.

GAMES STOPPED BY RAIN.

Rule 55 the umpire is prohibited from suspending play in a match game on
account of rain, unless "_rain falls so heavily that the spectators are
compelled by the severity of the storm_, to seek shelter." If the rain is
light, or an ordinary drizzle, it is not sufficient to legalize the
suspension of the play.

THE CAPTAIN ONLY CAN ADDRESS THE UMPIRE.

Rules 53 and 57 are explicit in prohibiting any player, except the
captain of the nine, from addressing the umpire in regard to any decision
he may make; and even the captain can only do so in the case of a question
involving an error in misinterpreting the rules. If the decision disputed
involves only an error of judgment, even the captain has no right to
question the decision. In every case of a violation of this rule, the
umpire must fine the offender _five dollars_, or he himself be liable to
immediate dismissal for violating the rules.

BATSMEN CHANGING POSITION.

Last season a custom came into vogue which virtually violated Section V
of Rule 43. It was the habit some batsmen had of jumping from one batting
position to the other just as the pitcher was about to deliver the ball to
the bat, this act virtually hindering the catcher from properly fielding
the pitched ball. While no rule should prevent a batsman from batting from
either the left or the right batting position at his option it certainly
was never intended to allow the change to be made while play was in
progress: and it therefore becomes the duty of the umpire to interpret
this rule according to its spirit, and to regard the action of a batsman
in jumping from one position to the other while the ball is in play from
pitcher to catcher as hindering the catcher, and in such case he should
declare him out.

INTERFERING WITH A BATTED OR THROWN BALL.

Rule 48 prohibits a base runner from interfering with a fielder
attempting to field a batted ball. The runner has no right to the line of
the base when a fielder is occupying it in the effort to catch a fly ball,
or to field a batted ball; nor can a base runner make any attempt to
hinder or obstruct a fielder from fielding a thrown ball without his being
promptly decided out. In all cases the base runner must run off the line
of the bases to avoid interfering with a fielder standing on the line of
the bases to field a batted ball. Section VIII of Rule 28 says, "_Or
intentionally interferes with a thrown ball_," and the intention is judged
by his effort to avoid interference or not.

PASSED BALLS WHICH GIVE A BASE.

Rule 46, Section IV., states that in the case of a pitched ball which
passes the catcher and then touches the umpire; or if such passed ball
touches any fence or building within ninety feet of the home base, the
runner is entitled to one base without being put out, and can of course
take more at his own risk.

OVERRUNNING FIRST BASE.

The base runner, in running to first base, is only exempt from being
touched out after overrunning the base, when he turns to the right after
overrunning the base. If he crosses the foul line after overrunning,
toward second base, that is tantamount to turning to the left, but so long
as he is on foul ground after overrunning the base, it is immaterial
whether he turns to the left or to the right. The leaving foul ground in
overrunning decides the point against him. It is best, however, always to
turn to the right in returning.

DOUBTFUL DECISIONS IN FAVOR OF THE BATTING SIDE.

The rules expressly make a distinction in favor of the batting side in
all cases where there is any doubt as to the player being fairly out.
Especially is this the case in the case of the batsman's being put out at
first base, for Section IV. of Rule 48 requires the ball to be securely
held by the base player "_before_" the runner touches the base in order to
put him out, and the rub applies to the touching out of all base runners
on bases; the words being "_before_" the runner reaches the base, if at
the same time, he--the runner--is not out. Time and again were base
runners unfairly decided out last season in cases where the ball was held
by the base player simultaneously with the runner's touching the base,
every such decision being illegal.

In regard to the umpire's enforcement of Rule 48, President Young says,
"Too many base runners are decided out when the ball is held by the base
player simultaneously with the runner's reaching the base, which decisions
are illegal." If umpires will strictly enforce the rule it will greatly
increase the chances for base running and team work at the bat.

Mr. Byrne, of the Joint Rules Committee, in joining with Mr. Young in
having this rule enforced, says: "We are doing all we can to encourage
base stealing and a proper attention to the rule, by more frequently
deciding men safe at first, as it will add interest to the game. I
believe, too, that it would be wise in all cases of decision on first base
points for the Umpire to give the base runner the benefit of the doubt."

BATTED BALLS HITTING THE BASES.

Since the first and third bases were placed entirely on fair ground and
within the foul lines, every batted ball touching either the first or
third base bag, must be declared a fair ball no matter where it strikes
after touching either bag. It would be better to have the bags in question
on foul ground, so as to make every batted ball foul that strikes them;
but until this is done, all such batted balls must be declared fair.

COACHERS MUST KEEP WITHIN THEIR LINES.

Captains or their assistants who engage in "coaching" base runners, must
keep within the lines of their designated position, or if they attempt to
coach a runner while standing outside of their position, or to run toward
home base outside the lines of their position, they must be fined five
dollars for each violation of the rule.

OPEN BETTING PROHIBITED.

Rule 58 prohibits open betting on all ball grounds of clubs governed by
the rules of the _National Agreement_. The penalty for a violation of this
rule is the forfeiture of the game which is being played when the rule is
violated; and the Umpire must enforce this rule or be amenable to a
prompt removal from his position.

NO UMPIRE TO BE INSULTED.

Rule 52 states that "the umpire is master of the field from the
commencement to the termination of the game; and he is entitled to the
respect of the spectators, and _any person offering any insult or
indignity to him must be promptly ejected from the grounds_," under the
penalty of a forfeiture of the game.

[**Proofreaders note: the chart has been reformatted to improve
readability**].

NATIONAL LEAGUE SCHEDULE OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES FOR 1889.

Boston
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
At |At |At |At |At |At |At
New York|Philadelp'a|Washingt'n|Chicago |Cleveland|Pittsburg|Indianapl's
--------+-----------+----------+--------+---------+---------+------------
April 24|April 29 |May 3 |June 28|July 4,|June 19 |June 24
| | | | a.m. | |
" 25| " 30 | " 4 | " 29| " 4,| " 20 | " 25
| | | | p.m. | |
" 26|May 1 | " 6 |July 1| " 5 | " 21 | " 26
" 27| " 2 | " 7 | " 2| " 6 | " 22 | " 27
June 10|July 25 |Aug. 1 |Aug. 8|Aug. 15 |Aug. 12 |Aug. 5
" 11| " 26 | " 2 | " 9| " 16 | " 13 | " 6
" 12| " 27 | " 3 | " 10| " 17 | " 14 | " 7
Aug. 29|Aug. 26 |Sept. 19 |Sept. 23|Sept. 30 |Oct. 3 |Sept. 26
" 30| " 27 | " 20 | " 24|Oct. 1 | " 4 | " 27
" 31| " 28 | " 21 | " 25| " 2 | " 5 | " 28
------------------------------------------------------------------------

New York
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
-----
At |At |At |At |At |At |At
Boston |Philadelp'a|Washingt'n|Chicago |Cleveland|Pittsburg|Indianapl's
--------+-----------+----------+--------+---------+---------+------------
May 8|May 3 |June 1 |June 24|June 19 |July 4, |June 28
| | | | | a.m. |
" 9| " 4 | " 3 | " 25| " 20 | " 4, | " 29
| | | | | p.m. |
" 10| " 6 | " 4 | " 26| " 21 | " 5 |July 1
" 11| " 7 | " 5 | " 27| " 22 | " 6 | " 2
June 6|July 22 |July 29 |Aug. 5|Aug. 12 |Aug. 15 |Aug. 8
" 7| " 23 | " 30 | " 6| " 13 | " 16 | " 9
" 8| " 24 | " 31 | " 7| " 14 | " 17 | " 10
Aug. 19|Sept. 19 |Sept. 16 |Sept. 26|Oct. 3 |Sept. 30 |Sept. 23
" 20| " 20 | " 17 | " 27| " 4 |Oct. 1 | " 24
" 21| " 21 | " 18 | " 28| " 5 | " 2 | " 25
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Philadelphia
---------------------------------------------------------------------
At |At |At |At |At |At |At
Boston |New York|Washingt'n|Chicago |Cleveland|Pittsburg|Indianapl's
--------+--------+----------+--------+---------+---------+------------
June 1|June 13|April 24 |June 19|June 24 |June 28 |July 4,
| | | | | | a.m.
" 3| " 14| " 25 | " 20| " 25 | " 29 | " 4,
| | | | | | p.m.
" 4| " 15| " 26 | " 21| " 26 |July 1 |" 5
" 5| " 17| " 27 | " 22| " 27 | " 2 |" 6
July 29|Aug. 1|June 10 |Aug. 12|Aug. 8 |Aug. 5 |Aug. 15
" 30| " 2| " 11 | " 13| " 9 | " 6 | " 16
" 31| " 3| " 12 | " 14| " 10 | " 7 | " 17
Sept. 16| " 22|Aug. 29 |Oct. 3|Sept. 23 |Sept. 26 |Sept. 30
" 17| " 23| " 30 | " 4| " 24 | " 27 |Oct. 1
" 18| " 24| " 31 | " 5| " 25 | " 28 | " 2
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Washington
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
At |At |At |At |At |At |At
Boston |New York|Philadelp'a|Chicago |Cleveland|Pittsburg|Indianapl's
--------+--------+-----------+--------+---------+---------+------------
June 13|April 29|May 8 |July 4,|June 28 |June 24 |June 19
| | | a.m. | | |
" 14| " 30| " 9 | " 4,| " 29 | " 25 | " 20
| | | p.m. | | |
" 15|May 1| " 10 | " 5|July 1 | " 26 | " 21
" 17| " 2| " 11 | " 6| " 2 | " 27 | " 22
July 22|July 25|June 6 |Aug. 15|Aug. 5 |Aug. 8 |Aug. 12
" 23| " 26| " 7 | " 16| " 6 | " 9 | " 13
" 24| " 27| " 8 | " 17| " 7 | " 10 | " 14
Aug. 22|Aug. 26|Aug. 19 |Sept. 30|Sept. 26 |Sept. 23 |Oct. 3
" 23| " 27| " 20 |Oct. 1| " 27 | " 24 | " 4
" 24| " 28| " 21 | " 2| " 28 | " 25 | " 5
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Chicago
------------------------------------------------------------------------
At |At |At |At |At |At |At
Boston |New York |Philadelp'a|Washingt'n|Cleveland|Pittsburg|Indianapl's
-------+---------+-----------+----------+---------+---------+------------
May 28|May 22|May 13 |May 17 |May 3 |Apr. 24 |Apr. 29
" 29| " 23| " 14 | " 18 | " 4 | " 25 | " 30
May 30| " 24| " 15 | " 20 | " 6 | " 26 |May 1
a.m.| | | | | |
" 30| " 25| " 16 | " 21 | " 7 | " 27 | " 2
p.m.| | | | | |
July 18|July 15|July 11 |July 8 |June 14 |July 29 |July 25
" 19| " 16| " 12 | " 9 | " 15 | " 30 | " 26
" 20| " 17| " 13 | " 10 | " 17 | " 31 | " 27
Sept. 9| Sept. 12|Sept. 2 |Sept. 5 |Aug. 26 |Aug. 29 |Aug. 19
" 10| " 13| " 3 | " 6 | " 27 | " 30 | " 20
" 11| " 14| " 4 | " 7 | " 28 | " 31 | " 21
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Cleveland
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
At |At |At |At |At |At |At
Boston |New York|Philadelp'a|Washingt'n|Chicago |Pittsburg|Indianapl's
-------+---------+-----------+----------+---------+---------+------------
May 17|May 13|May 22 |May 28 |May 3| Apr. 24 |Apr. 29
" 18| " 14| " 23 | " 29 | " 4| " 25 | " 30
" 20| " 15| " 24 |May 30 | " 6| " 26 |May 1
| | | a.m. | | |
" 21| " 16| " 25 | " 30 | " 7| " 27 | " 2
| | | p.m. | | |
July 8|July 11|July 15 |July 18 | June 14| July 29 | July 25
" 9| " 12| " 16 | " 19 | " 15| " 30 | " 26
" 10| " 13| " 17 | " 20 | " 17| " 31 | " 27
Sept. 12|Sept. 9|Sept. 5 |Sept. 2 | Aug. 26| Aug. 29 | Aug. 19
" 13| " 10| " 6 | " 3 | " 27| " 30 | " 20
" 14| " 11| " 7 | " 4 | " 28| " 31 | " 21
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Pittsburg
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
At |At |At |At |At |At |At
Boston |New York|Philadelp'a|Washingt'n|Chicago |Cleveland|Indianapl's
-------+---------+-----------+----------+--------+---------+------------
May 13|May 17|May 28 |May 22 |June 1|Apr. 29 |Apr. 24
" 14| " 18| " 29 | " 23 | " 3| " 30 | " 25
" 15| " 20|May 30 | " 24 | " 4|May 1 | " 26
| | a.m. | | | |
" 16| " 21| " 30 | " 25 | " 5| " 2 | " 27
| | p.m. | | | |
July 11|July 8|July 18 |July 15 |Aug. 1|July 25 |June 11
" 12| " 9| " 19 | " 16 | " 2| " 26 | " 12
" 13| " 10| " 20 | " 17 | " 3| " 27 | " 13
Sept. 5|Sept. 2|Sept. 9 |Sept. 12 |Sept. 19|Sept. 16 |Aug. 22
| a.m. | | | | |
" 6| " 2| " 10 | " 13 | " 20| " 17 | " 23
| p.m. | | | | |
" 7| " 3| " 11 | " 14 | " 21| " 18 | " 24
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Indianapolis
----------------------------------------------------------------------
At |At |At |At |At |At |At
Boston |New York|Philadelp'a|Washingt'n|Chicago |Cleveland|Pittsburg
-------+---------+-----------+----------+--------+---------+------------
May 22|May 28 |May 17 |May 13 |June 6|May 8 |June 1
" 23| " 29 | " 18 | " 14 | " 7| " 9 | " 3
" 24|May 30 | " 20 | " 15 | " 8| " 10 | " 4
| a.m. | | | | |
" 25| " 30 | " 21 | " 16 | " 10| " 11 | " 5
| p.m. | | | | |
July 15|July 18 |July 8 |July 11 |July 22|July 29 |Aug. 1
" 16| " 19 | " 9 | " 12 | " 23| " 30 | " 2
" 17| " 20 | " 10 | " 13 | " 24| " 31 | " 3
Sept. 2|Sept. 5 |Sept. 12 |Sept. 9 |Sept. 16|Aug. 29 | " 26
a.m. | | | | | |
" 2| " 6 | " 13 | " 10 | " 17| " 30 | " 27
p.m. | | | | | |
Sept. 8| " 7 | " 14 | " 11 | " 18| " 31 | " 28
----------------------------------------------------------------------

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION SCHEDULE OF CHAMPIONSHIOP GAMES FOR 1889

Brooklyn
In |In |In |In |In |In |In
Philadelphia|Baltimore.|Columbus.|Cincinnati.|Louisville|St. |Kansas
| | | | | Louis.| City
------------+----------+---------+-----------+----------+--------+-------
April 17 |April 22 |May 25 |May 11 |May 7 |May 16 |May 20
| | [1] | [1] | | |
" 18 | " 23 | " 26 | " 12 | " 8 | " 17 | " 21
| | [2] | [2] | | |
" 20 | " 24 | " 27 | " 13 | " 9 | " 18 | " 22
[1] | | | | | [1] |
" 21 |Aug. 27 | " 28 | " 14 | " 10 | " 19 | " 23
[2] | | | | | [2] |
June 29 | " 28 |Aug. 6 |July 13 |July 10 |July 3 |July 6
[1] | | | [1] | | | [1]
" 30 | " 29 | " 7 | " 14 | " 11 | " 4 | "7
| | | | | [2]
[2] | | | [2] | | |
July 1 |Oct. 8 | " 8 | " 15 | " 12 | " 4 | " 8
Sept. 17 | " 9 |Oct. 12 |Aug. 22 |Aug. 17 |Aug. 10 |Aug.13
| | [1] | | [1] | [1] |
" 18 | " 10 | " 13 | " 24 | " 18 | " 11 | " 14
| | [2] | [1] | [2] | [2] |
" 19 | " 11 | " 14 | " 25 | " 20 | " 12 | " 15
| | | [2] | | |
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
[Footnote 1: Saturday]
[Footnote 2: Sunday]

Athletics
In |In |In |In |In |In |In
Brooklyn.|Baltimore.|Columbus.|Cincinnati.|Louisville|St. |Kansas
| | | | | Louis.| City
---------+----------+---------+-----------+----------+--------+---------
May 2 |April 25 |April 28 |May 7 |May 11 |May 20 |May 16
| | [2] | | [1] | |
" 3 | " 26 | " 29 | " 8 | " 12 | " 21 | " 17
| | | | [2] | |
" 4 | " 27 | " 30 | " 9 | " 13 | " 22 | " 18
[1] | [1] | | | | | [1]
" 5 |May 25 |Aug. 27 | " 10 | " 14 | " 23 | " 19
[2] | [1] | | | | | [2]
July 18 | " 27 | " 28 |July 6 |July 3 |July 10 |July 13
| | | [1] | | | [1]
" 20 | " 28 | " 29 | " 7 | " 4 | " 11 | " 14
[1] | | | [2] | | | [2]
" 21 | " 29 |Oct. 8 | " 8 | " 4 | " 12 | " 15
[2] | | | | | |
Oct. 3 |Sept. 21 | " 9 |Aug. 13 |Aug. 10 |Aug. 17 |Aug. 22
| [1] | | | [1] | [1] |
" 5 | " 23 | " 10 | " 14 | " 11 | " 18 | " 24
[1] | | | | [2] | [2] | [1]
" 6 | " 24 | " 11 | " 15 | " 12 | " 20 | " 25
[2] | | | | | | [2]
---------------------------------------------------------------------
[Footnote 1: Saturday]
[Footnote 2: Sunday]

Baltimore
In |In |In |In |In |In |In
Brooklyn.|Philadelphia|Columbus.|Cincinnati.|Louisville|St. |Kansas
| | | | | Louis.| City
---------+------------+---------+-----------+----------+--------+---------
--
April 28 |June 23 |May 2 |May 16 |May 20 |May 11 |May 7
[2] | [2] | | | | [1] |
" 29 | " 24 | " 3 | " 17 | " 21 | " 12 | " 8
| | | | | [2] |
" 30 | " 25 | " 4 | " 18 | " 22 | " 13 | " 9
| | [1] | [1] | | |
May 1 | " 26 | " 5 | " 19 | " 23 | " 14 | " 10
| | [2] | [2] | | |
June 19 |Aug. 6 |July 18 |July 3 |July 6 |July 13 |July 10
| | | | [1] | [1] |
" 20 | " 7 | " 20 | " 4 | " 7 | " 14 | " 11
| | [1] | | [2] | [2] |
" 22 | " 8 | " 21 | " 4 | " 8 | " 15 | " 12
[1] | | [2] | | | |
Sept. 27 | Oct. 12 |Sept. 17 |Aug. 10 |Aug. 13 |Aug. 22 |Aug. 17
| [1] | | [1] | | | [1]
" 28 | " 13 | " 18 | " 11 | " 14 | " 24 | " 18
[1] | [2] | | [2] | | [1] | [2]
" 29 | " 14 | " 19 | " 12 | " 15 | " 25 | " 20
[2] | | | | | [2] |
------------------------------------------------------------------------
[Footnote 1: Saturday]
[Footnote 2: Sunday]

Columbus
In |In |In |In |In |In |In
Brooklyn.|Philadelphia|Baltimore.|Cincinnati.|Louisville|St. |Kansas
| | | | |Louis. |City
---------|------------|----------|-----------|----------|--------|-------
April 25|April 22 |April 17 |May 20 |May 16 |May 7 |May 11
| | | | | | [1]
" 26 | " 23 | " 18 | " 21 | " 17 | " 8 | " 12
| | | | | | [2]
" 27 | " 24 | " 19 | " 22 | " 18 | " 9 | " 13
[1] | | | | [1] | |
June 23 |June 19 | " 20 | " 23 | " 19 | " 10 | " 14
[2] | | [1] | | [2] | |
" 24 | " 20 |June 27 |July 10 |July 13 |July 6 |July 3
| | | | [1] | [1] |
" 25 | " 21 | " 28 | " 11 | " 14 | " 7 | " 4
| | | | [2] | [2] |
" 26 | " 22 | " 29 | " 12 | " 15 | " 8 | " 4
| [1] | [1] | | | |
Sept. 21 |Sept. 28 |Oct. 3 |Aug. 17 |Aug. 22 |Aug. 13 |Aug. 10
[1] | [1] | | [1] | | | [1]
" 22 | " 29 | " 4 | " 18 | " 24 | " 14 | " 11
[2] | [2] | | [2] | [1] | | [2]
" 24 | " 30 | " 5 | " 20 | " 25 | " 15 | " 12
| | [1] | | [2] | |
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
[Footnote 1: Saturday]
[Footnote 2: Sunday]

Cincinnati
In |In |In |In |In |In |In
Brooklyn.|Philadelphia|Baltimore.|Columbus.|Louisville|St. |Kansas
| | | | | Louis. |City.
---------+------------+----------+---------+----------+---------+------
June 13 |May 30 |June 3 |June 8 |May 25 |April 25 |April 29
| | | [1] | [1] | |
" 14 | " 30 | " 4 | " 9 | " 26 | " 26 | " 30
| | | [2] | [2] | |
" 15 |June 1 | " 5 | " 10 | " 27 | " 27 |May 1
[1] | [1] | | | | [1] |
" 16 | " 2 | " 6 | " 11 | " 28 | " 28 | " 2
[2] | [2] | | | | [2] |
July 26 |July 23 |Aug. 2 |July 29 |Aug. 7 |June 25 |June 29
| | | | | | [1]
" 27 | " 24 | " 3 | " 30 | " 8 | " 26 | " 30
[1] | | [1] | | | | [2]
" 28 | " 25 | " 5 | " 31 | " 9 | " 27 |July 1
[2] | | | | | |
Sept. 2 |Aug. 30 |Sept. 7 |Sept. 12 |Sept. 17 |Sept. 21 |Sept. 26
| | [1] | | | [1] |
" 2 | " 31 | " 9 | " 14 | " 18 | " 22 | " 28
| [1] | | [1] | | [2] | [1]
" 4 |Sept. 1 | " 10 | " 15 | " 19 | " 23 | " 29
| [2] | | [2] | | | [2]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
[Footnote 1: Saturday]
[Footnote 2: Sunday]

Louisville
In |In |In |In |In |In |In
Brooklyn.|Philadelphia|Baltimore.|Columbus.|Cincinnati.|St. |Kansas
| | | | |Louis. |City.
---------+------------+----------+---------+-----------+---------+--------
June 8 |June 3 |June 13 |May 30 |May 4 |April 29 |April 25
[1] | | | | [1] | |
" 9 | " 4 | " 14 | " 30 | " 5 | " 30 | " 26
[2] | | | | [2] | |
" 10 | " 5 | " 15[1]|June 1 | " 6 |May 1 | " 27
| | | [1] | | | [1]
" 11 | " 6 | " 17 | " 2 |Aug. 26 | " 2 | " 28
| | | [2] | | | [2]
July 30 |Aug. 2 |July 23 |July 26 | " 27 |June 29 |June 26
| | | | | [1] |
" 31 | " 3 | " 24 | " 27 | " 28 | " 30 | " 27
| [1] | | [1] | | [2] |
Aug 1 | " 4 | " 25 | " 28 |Oct. 3 |July 1 | " 28
| [2] | | [2] | | |
Sept. 12 |Sept. 7 |Aug. 30 |Sept. 3 | " 4 |Sept. 26 |Sept. 21
| [1] | | | | | [1]
" 14 | " 8 | " 31 | " 4 | " 5 | " 28 | " 22
[1] | [2] | [1] | | [1] | [1] | [2]
" 15 | " 9 |Sept. 2 | " 5 | " 6 | " 29 | " 23
[2] | | | | [2] | [2] |
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
[Footnote 1: Saturday]
[Footnote 2: Sunday]

St. Louis
In |In |In |In |In |In |In
Brooklyn. |Philadelphia|Baltimore.|Columbus.|Cincinnati.|Louisville|Kansas
| | | | | |City.
----------+------------+----------+---------+-----------+----------+------
----
May 30 |June 13 |June 8 |June 3 |April 17 |April 21 |May
3
| | [1] | | | [2] |
" 30 | " 15 | " 10 | " 4 | " 18 | " 22 | "
4
| [1] | | | | | [1]
June 1 | " 16 | " 11 | " 5 | " 19 | " 23 | "
5
[1] | [2] | | | | | [2]
" 2 | " 17 | " 12 | " 6 | " 20 |June 20 | "
6
[2] | | | | [1] | |
Aug. 2 |July 30 |July 26 |July 22 |July 18 | " 22 |Aug.
7
| | | | | [1] |
" 3 | " 31 | " 27 | " 23 | " 20 | " 23 | "
8
[1] | | [1] | | [1] | [2] |
" 4 |Aug. 1 | " 29 | " 24 | " 21 | " 24 | "
9
[2] | | | | [2] | |
Sept. 7 |Sept. 12 |Sept. 3 |Aug. 30 |Oct. 12 |Oct. 8 |Sept.
18
[1] | | | | [1] | |
" 8 | " 14 | " 4 | " 31 | " 13 | " 9 | "
19
[2] | [1] | | [1] | [2] | |
" 10 | " 15 | " 5 |Sept. 1 | " 14 | " 10 | "
20
| [2] | | [2] | | |
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
------
[Footnote 1: Saturday]
[Footnote 2: Sunday]

Kansas City
In |In |In |In |In |In |In
Brooklyn.|Philadelphia|Baltimore.|Columbus.|Cincinnati.|Louisville.|St.
| | | | | |Louis.
---------+------------+----------+---------+-----------+-----------+------
---
June 3 |June 8 |May 30 |June 13 |April 21 |April 17 |May 24
| [1] | | | [2] | |
" 4 | " 9 | " 30 | " 14 | " 22 | " 18 | " 25
| [2] | | | | | [1]
" 5 | " 10 | " 31 | " 15 | " 23 | " 19 | " 26
| | | [1] | | | [2]
" 6 | " 11 |June 1 | " 16 |June 20 | " 20 | " 27
| | [1] | [2] | | [1] |
July 23 |July 27 |July 30 |Aug. 2 | " 21 |July 18 |Aug. 26
| [1] | | | | |
" 24 | " 28 | " 31 | " 3 | " 22 | " 20 | " 27
| [2] | | [1] | [1] | [1] |
" 25 | " 29 |Aug. 1 | " 4 | " 23 | " 21 | " 28
| | | [2] | [2] | [2] |
Aug. 30 |Sept. 2 |Sept. 12 |Sept. 7 |Oct. 8 |Oct.12 |Oct. 3
| | | [1] | | [1] |
" 31 | " 3 | " 13 | " 8 | " 9 | " 13 | " 5
[1] | | | [2] | | [2] | [1]
Sept. 1 | " 4 | " 14 | " 9 | " 10 | " 14 | " 6
[2] | | [1] | | | | [2]
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
[Footnote 1: Saturday]
[Footnote 2: Sunday]

* * * * *

READY APRIL 10TH.

Spalding's Minor League Guide for 1889
--AND--
College and Amateur Club Annual.
--CONTAINING--
The Statistics of the Championship Contests of the Season of 1888
--OF THE--
INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION, CENTRAL LEAGUE, WESTERN ASSOCIATION, TRI-STATE
LEAGUE, SOUTHERN AND TEXAS LEAGUES, NEW ENGLAND LEAGUE, CALIFORNIA LEAGUE,
etc.
--ALSO--
THE OFFICIAL AVERAGES
-OF THE--
AMERICAN COLLEGE LEAGUE, THE INTER-COLLEGIATE ASSOCIATION, MAINE COLLEGE
LEAGUE, NEW YORK STATE LEAGUE, AMATEUR LEAGUE, CHICAGO AMATEUR LEAGUE

--TOGETHER WITH--

The Revised National Agreement for 1889 and the New National Code of
Playing Rules, Schedules, etc.

PRICE 10 CENTS.

PUBLISHERS:

A. G. SPALDING & BROS.
CHICAGO.--------------------------NEW YORK.

* * * * *

A TOUR OF THE WORLD,

as made by

SPALDING'S AMERICAN BASE BALL TEAMS.

A Complete and Interesting History of the Great Trip of the

CHICAGO AND ALL AMERICAN BASE BALL TEAMS,

From CHICAGO to SAN FRANCISCO, to the SANDWICH ISLANDS, to NEW ZEALAND,
to the AUSTRALIAN COLONIES, to CEYLON, INDIA, EGYPT, THE HOLY LAND, and
the great Cities of EUROPE, is being compiled by

HARRY PALMER,

The Official Scorer of the Tour, and will be placed in the hands of the
publishers immediately upon the return of the party to America.

The volume will consist of from 400 to 450 pages, and will be profusely
illustrated.

Seldom, if ever, has the tour of the Globe been made by so large a party
of Americans. The public and private receptions tendered them at every
point have been most brilliant in character, and the trip has abounded
with humorous and interesting incidents, which every American, whether or
not he be a lover of the national game, will enjoy.

The first edition of the book will be limited. Orders for the same will
be placed on file, and the book sent by express to any address C. O. D.,
charges prepaid, and with the privilege of examination.

PRICE:

CLOTH, $3.50
MOROCCO, 5.00

ADDRESS ALL ORDERS TO

HARRY PALMER,
Care Evening Journal,
CHICAGO, ILL.

* * * * *

FROM CHICAGO, EAST AND SOUTH
take the
PENNSYLVANIA LINES,
PITTSBURGH, FT. WAYNE AND CHICAGO RAILWAY,
(Fort Wayne Route.)

to Pittsburgh, Baltimore, Philadelphia, Harrisburgh, Washington, New
York, And All Eastern Points,

and the

CHICAGO, ST. LOUIS & PITTSBURGH R.R.
(Pan Handle Route,)

to

Columbus, Cincinnati, Indianapolis, Louisville, And All Points South,
and Pittsburgh, and All Points East.

JAS. McCREA, Gen'l Manager, E. A. FORD, Gen'l Pass. Agt.,
Pittsburgh, PA.

C. W. ADAMS, Ass't Gen. Pass. Agt.,
Chicago, ILL.

* * * * *

MICHIGAN CENTRAL

"The Niagara Falls Route."

[Illustration: SOLID VESTIBULED TRAINS]

Solid vestibuled trains run over the Michigan Central, "The Niagara Falls
Route." between Chicago and Buffalo. These trains are not only equipped
with the finest Wagner Palace Sleeping-Cars, but are made thoroughly
complete by having Vestibuled Dining, Smoking, First-Class and Baggage
Cars, and although constituting the famous "Limited" of the Michigan
Central, carry all classes of passengers without extra charge. These
trains carry through vestibuled Sleeping Cars between Chicago and New
York, via New York Central & Hudson River Railroad, and between Chicago
and Boston, via New York Central and Boston & Albany Railroads. The
eastbound "Limited" also carries a through Sleeper, Chicago & Toronto (via
Canadian Pacific), where connection is made with Parlor Car for Montreal.
Accommodations secured at the Michigan Central Ticket Offices, No. 67
Clark Street, corner Randolph, and Depot, foot of Lake Street, Chicago.

ASHLAND
M.LS. & W.RY.
ROUTE

The Milwaukee, Lake Shore and Western Railway.

THROUGH PALACE SLEEPING AND PARLOR CAR LINE

-BETWEEN-

CHICAGO and MILWAUKEE, and APPLETON,
WAUSAU, and ASHLAND, the GOGEBIC,
PENOKEE and MONTREAL IRON and
MINERAL RANGES, HURLEY,
IRONWOOD, BESSEMER
and WAKEFIELD.

THE DIRECT LIKE TO DULUTH,

And the Manufacturing Centers and Lumbering Districts of Central and
Northern Wisconsin, SHEBOYGAN, MANITOWOC, KAUKAUNA, APPLETON and WAUSAU.
Special Inducements and Facilities offered for the Location of
Manufacturing Establishments. Close Connections at Ashland and Duluth for
Northern Pacific and Pacific Coast Points.

* * * * *

SPORTSMEN:

The best Fishing and Hunting in the Northwest is reached by the ASHLAND
ROUTE, and Excursion Tickets are sold at reduced rates during proper
seasons.

For MUSCALLONGE, BASS, PIKE, and other varieties, go to the Eagle Waters,
Twin Lakes, and Lake St. Germain, Tomahawk and Pelican Lakes, and all
headquarters of the Wisconsin River.

For BROOK TROUT, go to Watersmeet, Great Trout Brook, the Brule, the
Ontonagon, and Lake Gogebic.

For BLACK BASS, go to Lake Gogebic, the best Bass Fishing in the country.

For MACKINAW TROUT, LANDLOCKED SALMON, go to Island Lake, Black Oak Lake,
Trout Lake.

Send to the General Passenger and Ticket Agent for Descriptive and
Illustrated Publications, Maps, Folders, Game Laws, Time Cards and General
Information.

C.L. RYDER, General Agent.,
114 Clark St., Chicago.

ERNEST VLIET, Gen'l Pass. & Tkt. Agt.,
Milwaukee, Wis.

* * * * *

Chicago and North-Western Railway.

OVER 7,000 MILES
Of steel track in Illinois, Iowa, Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota,
Nebraska, Dakota and Wyoming, penetrates the Agricultural, Mining and
Commercial Centres of the WEST and NORTHWEST

The Unrivaled Equipment of the Line embraces Sumptuous Dining Cars, New
Wagner and Pullman Sleepers, Superb day Coaches and FAST VESTIBULED TRAINS

Running direct between Chicago, St, Paul and Minneapolis, Council Bluffs
and Omaha, connecting for Portland, Denver, San Francisco and all Pacific
Coast Points.

ONLY LINE TO THE BLACK HILLS

For Tickets, Rates, Maps, Time Tables and full information, apply to any
Ticket Agent or address the Gen'l Passenger Agent, Chicago, Ill.

J. M. WHITMAN,
General Manager.

H. C. WICKER,
Traffic Manager.

E. P. WILSON,
Gen'l Pass. Agt.

OFFICES:

MINNEAPOLIS OFFICE--13 Nicollet House, and C., St. P. M. & O. Depot.

ST. PAUL TICKET OFFICES--159 East Third St., Western Ave. Station,
Palmer House, Grand Pacific Hotel, Wells Street Depot.

DENVER OFFICE--8 Windsor Hotel Block.

COUNCIL BLUFFS TICKET OFFICES--421 Broadway, at Union Pacific
Depot, and C. & N. W. Railway Depot.

OMAHA TICKET OFFICES--1401 Farnam St., and U. P. Depot.

MILWAUKEE TICKET OFFICE--102 Wisconsin St.

DULUTH, MINN.--112 West Superior St.

* * * * *

PURCHASE YOUR TICKETS

VIA THE

Burlington Route
C.B.& Q.R.R.

FROM CHICAGO, PEORIA OR ST. LOUIS TO ST. PAUL AND MINNEAPOLIS, CONNECTING
AT MINNEAPOLIS AND ST. PAUL FOR ALL POINTS NORTHWEST. TO COUNCIL BLUFFS
AND INTERMEDIATE POINTS IN IOWA, OR TO OMAHA IT IS THE POPULAR LINE. TO
CHEYENNE IT HAS A DIRECT THROUGH LINE. TO ST. JOSEPH AND TO ATCHISON OR
KANSAS CITY IT IS THE DIRECT LINE. TO DENVER

IT RUNS THREE DAILY THROUGH TRAINS FROM CHICAGO, TWO FROM PEORIA, AND ONE
FROM ST. LOUIS.

* * * * *

Tickets via the Burlington Route can be obtained of any coupon Ticket
Agent of connecting lines.

P. S. EUSTIS,
Gen. Passenger & Ticket Agent, Chicago.

THE CHICAGO AND ALTON R.R. IS THE ONLY LINE RUNNING PULLMAN VESTIBULED
TRAINS

--TO--

KANSAS CITY AND ST. LOUIS.

* * * * *

Palace Reclining Chair Cars and Ladies' Palace Day Cars Free of Extra
Charge.

Pullman Palace Buffet Sleeping Cars, Pullman Palace Compartment Buffet
Sleeping Cars, Palace Dining Cars, and Smoking Cars.

For Tickets and all information call on or address

R. SOMERVILLE,
City Passenger and Ticket Agent,
195 SOUTH CLARK STREET,--CHICAGO, ILL.

GRAND UNION PASSENGER DEPOT,
Canal Street, between Adams and Madison Streets

CHICAGO, MILWAUKEE & ST. PAUL R'Y.

Electric Lighted Vestibuled Trains to St. Paul and Minneapolis.
Finest Dining Cars in the World.
Through Sleeping Cars to Denver.
The route of the first "Golden Gate Special"
Excursion Tickets to Colorado.
Excursion Tickets to California.
Everything First-Class.
First Class people patronize First-Class Lines.

Ticket Agents everywhere sell Tickets over the Chicago, Milwaukee & St.
Paul Railway.

* * * * *

SEASON OF 1889.
BASE BALL POSTERS,
WINDOW HANGERS,
Colored Score Cards,

Again Adopted by

The National Leape and All Principal Associations.

Inclose 25 Cents in Stamps for Sample Set of Twenty-Four Designs.

JOHN B. SAGE, -- Buffalo, N. Y.

The Pullman Buffet Sleeping Car Line

--between--

THE WINTER CITIES OF THE SOUTH

--and--

THE NORTHWESTERN SUMMER RESORTS,

THE MONON ROUTE GIVES

CHOICE OF 21 INTERESTING TOURIST LINES

VIA

Chicago or Michigan City to Cincinnati, Indianapolis, Louisville Burgin,
and the South.

For further information and descriptive pamphlets of Fishing and Hunting
Resorts, etc., address

E. 0. McCORMICK, Gen'l Passenger Agent.

186 Dearborn St., Chicago, Ill.

* * * * *

THE SPORTING TIMES

A JOURNAL DEVOTED TO

BASEBALL, THE TURF, AND ALL MANLY SPORTS.

PUBLISHED EVERY SUNDAY BY THE

SPORTING TIMES PUBLISHING CO.,
P.O. BOX 611,
No. 73 Park Row, New York.

IT COVEKS THE ENTIRE COUNTRY.

DeWITT RAY, Editor and Manager.

TERMS:

SUBSCRIPTION, ONE YEAR $2.00
SUBSCRIPTION, SIX MONTHS 1.00

ALWAYS IN ADVANCE.

ADVERTISING RATES:

OUTSIDE PAGE, 20 CENTS A LINE EACH INSERTION.
INSIDE PAGES, 15 CENTS A LINE EACH INSERTION.
READING NOTICES, 50 CENTS A LINE EACH INSERTION

DISCOUNTS:

Advertisements running 6 months 15 per cent.
Advertisements running 12 months 25 per cent.

The Guaranteed Circulation of THE SPORTING TIMES is

35,000 COPIES EVERY ISSUE.

THE REPRESENTATIVE B. B. PAPER OF AMERICA

THE SPORTING LIFE

Recognized by all Organizations, all Players, and the entire Base Ball
loving public as the BEST BASE BALL JOURNAL PUBLISHED.

It chronicles all sporting events. Nothing escapes it, and it leads in
news gathering. It has the best corps of editors and correspondents ever
organized, and contains more reading matter than any similar paper in the
world.

Has a larger sworn and proved circulation than any other sporting or base
ball paper, or indeed, any number of similar papers combined, in the
country, if not in the world.

The only sporting paper in America which has all the mechanical work
performed under its own roof, and which is printed on its own Web
Perfecting Press, with a capacity of 15,000 printed, cut and folded
complete, papers per hour.

To read It Once Is to Swear by It Forever.

-PUBLISHED BY-

SPORTING LIFE PUBLISHING COMPANY,

34 SOUTH THIRD ST.,
P. O. Box 948, Philadelphia, Pa.
F. C. RICHTER, Editor,
SUBSCRIPTION TERMS:

IN ADVANCE.

ONE YEAR $ 2.25
SIX MONTHS 1.25
THREE MONTHS .65
SINGLE COPIES .O5

For sale by all Newsdealers in the United States and Canada.

Sample Copies Free. Send for one.

* * * * *

THE INTER OCEAN

IS PUBLISHED

EVERY DAY IN THE YEAR

--AND--

HOLDS THE FIRST PLACE IN PUBLIC FAVOR.

The Sporting Hews and Dramatic Departments of the INTER OCEAN are the
Ablest and Most Complete of any paper in Chicago.

THE SUNDAY INTER OCEAN

IS THE

Best Literary Publication in America.

The Daily Inter Ocean, per Year, $8.00
The Sunday Inter Ocean, Per Year, 2.00

ADDRESS

THE INTER OCEAN,

CHICAGO

The Inter Ocean gives a Prize of $100 to the person or persons guessing
the correct standing of the League Clubs at the end of the season. For
blanks apply to the Inter Ocean.

* * * * *

THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE.

THE WESTERN SPORTING AUTHORITY.

THE SUNDAY EDITION OF THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE and the DAILY EDITION
throughout the playing season of 1889, will be found, as heretofore,
indispensable to those who desire accurate, reliable and comprehensive
base ball records and reports.

Every club and club-room should keep THE SUNDAY TRIBUNE on file.

THE TURF DEPARTMENT

Of THE TRIBUNE is universally admitted to be without an equal, and during
1889 it will be still further improved. Special telegraphic reports of the
principal running and trotting meetings will be furnished, and particular
attention be given to the performances of the American horses in England.

In other departments of sport THE TRIBUNE will maintain the superiorly it
has so long enjoyed.

SUNDAY EDITION, 24 Pages, per year, $2.00
DAILY TRIBUNE, including Sunday, 8.00

Address

THE TRIBUNE,

CHICAGO, ILL.

* * * * *

TREMONT HOUSE,

CHICAGO.

Book of the day: