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Spalding's Baseball Guide and Official League Book for 1889 by edited by Henry Chadwick

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5 |Cincinnati | 136 | 4762 | 734| 1143 | 464 | .240
6 |Cleveland | 134 | 4560 | 641| 1073 | 399 | .235
7 |Baltimore | 137 | 4654 | 653| 1073 | 379 | .231
8 |Kansas City| 132 | 4582 | 578| 1011 | 266 | .221
+--------+------+----+-------+------+------
|Total | 1092 |37787 |5659| 9123 | 3383 | .241

CLUB FIELDING RECORD.

Rank|Clubs |Number|Put |Assists.|Errors.|Total |Per c.
| |Of |Outs.| | |Chances |Chances
| |Games | | | |Offered.|Accepted.
----+------------+------+-----+--------+-------+--------+---------
1|Cincinnati | 136 | 3671| 2266 | 445 | 6382 | .940
2|Athletic | 136 | 3623| 2315 | 422 | 6360 | .934
3|St. Louis | 137 | 3635| 2092 | 432 | 6159 | .930
4|Baltimore | 137 | 3597| 2226 | 452 | 6269 | .928
5|Brooklyn | 143 | 3851| 2318 | 508 | 6677 | .924
6|{Kansas City| 132 | 3471| 2321 | 500 | 6292 | .921
|{Cleveland | 134 | 3484| 2217 | 487 | 6188 | .921
7|Louisville | 137 | 3631| 2307 | 566 | 6504 | .913
+-----+--------+-------+--------+-------
|Total | | 8963| 18056 | 3812 | 50831 | .927

CHICAGO GAMES.

The following is the record of the "Chicago" games played in the American
Association championship arena in 1888, games in which the defeated nine
fails to score a single run:

CLUBS. | | | | | | | | K ||
| | | | C | | | L | a ||
| S | | | i | B | C | o | n || V
| t | B | A | n | a | l | u | s || i
| . | r | t | c | l | e | i | a || c
| | o | h | i | t | v | s | s || t
| L | o | l | n | i | e | v | || o
| o | k | e | n | m | l | i | C || r
| u | l | t | a | o | a | l | i || i
| i | y | i | t | r | n | l | t || e
| s | n | c | i | e | d | e | y || s
| . | . | . | . | . | . | . | . || .
-----------+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---++--
St. Louis | --| 3| 2| 0| 2| 4| 1| 0||12
Brooklyn | 1| --| 1| 1| 0| 3| 1| 1|| 8
Athletic | 1| 1| --| 2| 2| 1| 1| 5||13
Cincinnati | 1| 1| 1| --| 1| 2| 1| 2|| 9
Baltimore | 0| 0| 1| 1| --| 0| 0| 1|| 3
Cleveland | 1| 0| 0| 2| 1| --| 0| 2|| 6
Louisville | 0| 2| 0| 1| 1| 2| --| 0|| 6
Kansas City| 0| 2| 0| 0| 1| 0| 1| --|| 4
+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---++---
Defeats | 4| 9| 5| 7| 8| 12| 5| 11||61

EXTRA INNINGS GAME.

The ganes-victories, defeats and drawn-which required extra innings to be
played, were as follows:

Clubs | | | | | | | | K || |
| | | | C | | | L | a || |
| S | | | i | B | C | o | n ||V |
| t | B | A | n | a | l | u | s ||I |
| . | r | t | c | l | e | i | a ||c |
| | o | h | i | t | v | s | s ||t |
| L | o | l | n | i | e | v | ||o | D
| o | k | e | n | m | l | i | C ||r | r
| u | l | t | a | o | a | l | I ||i | a
| i | y | i | t | r | n | l | t ||e | w
| s | n | c | i | e | d | e | y ||s | n
| . | . | . | . | . | . | . | . ||. | .
-----------+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---++--+---
St. Louis | --| 2| 2| 0| 1| 0| 1| 0|| 5| 2
Brooklyn | 2| --| 2| 3| 0| 0| 2| 1||10| 2
Athletic | 1| 1| --| 2| 1| 0| 2| 0|| 7| 2
Cincinnati | 3| 2| 2| --| 1| 2| 1| 0||11| 2
Baltimore | 2| 0| 0| 0| --| 0| 1| 0|| 3| 0
Cleveland | 0| 0| 1| 1| 0| --| 0| 0|| 2| 1
Louisville | 0| 0| 2| 0| 0| 0| --| 1|| 3| 1
Kansas City| 0| 0| 0| 1| 0| 0| 0| --|| 1| 0
+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---++--+---
Defeats | 8| 5| 9| 7| 3| 2| 6| 2||42| 10

The record of the series of games won and lost by each club with every
other club in the American Association championship arena in 1888 is as
follows:

| | | | | | | | K ||
| | | | C | | L | | a ||
| | S | | i | B | o | C | n ||
| B | t | A | n | a | u | l | s ||
| r | . | t | c | l | i | e | a ||
| o | | h | i | t | s | v | s ||
| o | L | l | n | i | v | e | ||
| k | o | e | n | m | i | l | C ||
| l | u | t | a | o | l | a | i ||
| y | I | i | t | r | l | n | t ||
| n | s | c | i | e | e | d | y ||Series
Clubs | . | . | . | . | . | . | . | . ||Totals.
-----------+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----++--------
|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.||W.|L.
-----------+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--++--+-----
Brooklyn |--|--|10|10|12| 8|14| 6|12| 8|13| 8|16| 4|11| 9|| 6| 0
St. Louis |10|10|--|--|10| 7|10| 8|15| 5|16| 4|16| 4|16| 4|| 4| 0
Athletic | 8|12| 7|10|--|--|10|10|15| 5|15| 5|13| 7|11| 3|| 4| 1
Cincinnati | 6|14| 8|10|10|10|--|--|14| 6|17| 3|10| 7|15| 4|| 3| 1
Baltimore | 8|12| 5|15| 5|15| 6|14|--|--|11| 9|10| 9|11| 9|| 2| 4
Louisville | 8|13| 4|16| 5|15| 3|17| 9|11|--|--| 8| 9|11| 6|| 1| 5
Cleveland | 4|16| 4|16| 7|13| 7|10| 9|10| 9| 8|--|--| 9| 9|| 0| 3
Kansas City| 9|11| 4|16| 3|14| 4|15| 9|11| 6|11| 9| 9|--|--|| 0| 6

The St. Louis, Brooklyn, Athletic and Cincinnati Clubs, each had one
series tied; while the Baltimore Club had four unfinished series; the St.
Louis and Cincinnati Clubs two each, and the Athletic, Baltimore,
Louisville and Kansas City Clubs one each, The Brooklyn Club playing their
full quota of scheduled games.

THE YEARLY RECORD.

The appended table gives the number of games won by all the clubs which
have competed for the American Association championship from 1882 to 1888
inclusive:

Clubs |1882|1883|1884|1885|1886|1887|1888|Yrs.||Total
| | | | | | | | ||Vict'r's
------------+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----++---------
St. Louis | 37| 65| 67| 79| 92| 94| 92| 7|| 526
Cincinnati | 55| 62| 68| 63| 64| 80| 80| 7|| 472
Athletic | 41| 66| 61| 55| 60| 64| 81| 7|| 428
Baltimore | 19| 28| 63| 41| 48| 76| 57| 7|| 332
Louisville | 42| 52| 68| 53| 66| 76| 48| 7|| 405
Metropolitan| --| 54| 75| 44| 53| 43| --| 6|| 269
Pittsburg | 39| 30| 30| 56| 78| --| --| 5|| 233
Brooklyn | --| --| 40| 53| 76| 59| 88| 5|| 316
Columbus | --| 32| 69| --| --| --| --| 2|| 104
Cleveland | --| --| --| --| --| 38| 50| 2|| 88
Indianapolis| --| --| 29| --| --| --| --| 1|| 29
Washington | --| --| 12| --| --| --| --| 1|| 12
Virginia | --| --| 12| --| --| --| --| 1|| 12
Kansas City | --| --| --| --| --| --| 43| 1|| 43
Toledo | --| --| 46| --| --| --| --| 1|| 46
+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----------
Total | 233| 389| 640| 444| 537| 530| 539|

A COMPARATIVE RECORD.

The following table gives the comparative figures of the League and the
Association in their Championship contests in 1888:

Clubs |Vic.|Def |Pct. ||Clubs |Vic.|Def.|Pct.
-------------+----+----+------++-----------+----+----+------
New York | 84 | 47 | .641 ||St. Louis | 92 | 43 | .681
Chicago | 77 | 58 | .570 ||Brooklyn | 88 | 52 | .629
Philadelphia | 69 | 61 | .531 ||Athletic | 82 | 52 | .612
Boston | 70 | 64 | .522 ||Cincinnati | 80 | 54 | .597
Detroit | 68 | 63 | .519 ||Baltimore | 57 | 81 | .413
Pittsburg | 66 | 68 | .493 ||Cleveland | 50 | 82 | .379
Indianapolis | 50 | 85 | .370 ||Louisville | 48 | 87 | .356
Washington | 48 | 86 | .358 ||Kansas City| 43 | 89 | .328

NEW YORK AND BROOKLYN RECORDS.

The New York League Club and the Brooklyn American Association Club
closed the first six years of their existence in 1888. The New York Club
joined the League in 1883, and won the championship in 1888. The principal
statistics of the club's work on the diamond field during that period is
shown in the appended table:

Years |Won. |Lost.|Drawn.|Played.|Batting |Fielding
| | | | |Average.|Average
------+-----+-----+------+-------+--------+--------
1883 | 46 | 50 | 2 | 98 | .256 | .825
1884 | 62 | 50 | 4 | 116 | .257 | .816
1885 | 85 | 27 | 0 | 112 | .269 | .866
1886 | 75 | 44 | 5 | 124 | .269 | .853
1887 | 68 | 55 | 6 | 129 | .331 | .886
1888 | 84 | 47 | 7 | 138 | .240 | .918
+-----+-----+------+-------+--------+------
Totals| 420 | 273 | 24 | 717 | .270 | .860

During these six seasons the New Yorks played 398 games with the
Chicagos, Detroits, Bostons and Philadelphias, winning 223 and losing 175.
Of these four clubs the New Yorks found the Chicagos to be their strongest
opponents, and the Bostons their weakest. One hundred games were played
with each of the two clubs, the New Yorks winning sixty-one from Boston,
and only forty-one from Chicago.

The Brooklyn Club began its career in 1883 by winning the championship of
the Interstate Association of that year, and in 1884 the club entered the
American Association.

The following is the record of the Brooklyn Club's field work in the
first six years of its history:

Years. |Victories.|Defeats.|Games |Drawn.|Pr. Ct. of
| | |Played.| |Champ. Victs.
---------+----------+--------+-------+------+------------
1883 | 65 | 33 | 101 | 3 | .643
1884 | 57 | 75 | 136 | 4 | .384
1885 | 83 | 67 | 142 | 2 | .473
1886 | 91 | 63 | 160 | 6 | .557
1887 | 78 | 80 | 156 | 4 | .448
1888 | 88 | 52 | 160 | 3 | .629
Totals +----------+--------+-------+------+---------
six years| 462 | 370 | 875 | 22

Each club won championship honors in but one season out of six, the
Brooklyns beginning by winning a pennant, and the New Yorkers ending with
championship honors.

THE PHILADELPHIA CITY CHAMPIONSHIP.

The Philadelphia League Club and the American Association Athletic Club
played a spring and fall exhibition game series for the professional
championship of Philadelphia, the result of which was a victory for the
American teams, as will be seen by the appended record:

ATHLETIC VICTORIES.

ATHLETIC VS. PHILADELPHIA.
-------------------------------------
DATE. PITCHERS. Score.
-------------------------------------
April 9 Seward, Gleason 4-2
April 11 Seward, Sanders 15-4
April 12 Weyhing Casey 7-1
April 14 Seward, Gleason 3-1
April 16 Weyhing, Tyng 13-7
October 18 Seward, Sanders 8-5
-------------------------------------

PHILADELPHIA VICTORIES.

PHILADELPHIA VS. ATHLETIC.
----------------------------------------
DATE. PITCHERS. Score.
---------------------------------------
April 13 Gleason, Mattimore 8-2
April 17 Buffinton, Blair 7-1
October 19 Casey, Weyhing 8-0
October 20 Buffinton, Smith 12-0

THE EXHIBITION GAME CAMPAIGN.

The experience of the season of 1888 in the playing of exhibition games
during the spring and fall between League and American Clubs, shows that
while the spring series prove attractive, owing to the desire of the
patrons of the game to see how the club teams of the two organizations
compare with each other in relative strength, preparatory to the opening
of the championship campaign in each arena; those played in the fall,
after the two championships have been decided, have ceased to draw paying
patronage. This decrease of interest in the fall exhibition games, too,
has been largely due to the introduction of the World's Championship
series, which now monopolize public interest after the regular
championship season has ended. It has been proposed to substitute a series
of regular championship matches, on the basis of the series of the world's
championship contests for the old time fall exhibition games, the plan in
question including not only games between the championship teams of the
League and the Association, but also between all the eight clubs of each
organization, so as to show which are the eight leading club teams of the
League, and the American Association. Had this plan been carried out in
1888, we should not only have had the interesting series between the two
champion teams of New York and St. Louis, but also those between Chicago
and Brooklyn, Philadelphia and Athletic, Boston and Cincinnati, Detroit
and Baltimore, Pittsburg and Cleveland, Indianapolis and Louisville, and
Washington and Kansas City. It is to be hoped that a grand test series of
games of this character will mark the closing professional campaign of
1889, for such a series would substitute very interesting championship
matches for October in the place of the unmeaning and useless exhibition
games of the past fall campaigns.

THE WORLD'S CHAMPIONSHIP.

THE FULL RECORD OF THE SERIES.

It has now become an established rule of the National League and the
American Association, to close each season with a supplementary
championship series of games between the teams of the two leading clubs
winning the respective championships of the two organizations each year,
to decide as to which of the two champion clubs is entitled to the honor
of being the champion club of the United States, and consequently the
world's champions in base ball. This supplementary series of games has
grown in importance each year since the inaugural trial games of 1884,
when a short series of games of this character took place on the Polo
Grounds in October, 1884, between the League championship team of the
Providence Club and the American championship team of the Metropolitan
Club. It was a short series of best two games of the three played, the
result being an easy victory for the League team, as the appended record
shows:

THE SERIES OF 1884.

Oct. 23, Providence vs. Metropolitan, at the Polo Grounds 6--0
Oct. 24, Providence vs. Metropolitan, at the Polo Grounds 3--1
Oct. 25, Providence vs. Metropolitan, at the Polo Grounds 12--2
Total 21--3

THE SERIES OF 1885.

In 1885 the St. Louis Club first won the honors in the American pennant
race, and the Chicago team in that of the League, and in October of that
year the rival teams contested for the United States championship in a
series of best four out of seven games. Though the series was a far more
important one than that of 1884, still the rules governing the special
games were not what they should have been, and consequently the result was
not satisfactory, as a dispute, followed by a forfeited game, led to a
draw contest and an equal division of the gate receipts.

In this series $1,000 was the prize competed for, and as neither team won
the series, each club received $500 of the prize money, each winning three
games after the first game had been drawn. The record of these games is
appended:

Oct. 14, St, Louis vs. Chicago, at Chicago (8 innings) 5-5
Oct. 15, Chicago vs. St. Louis, at St. Louis (6 innings) forfeited 5-4
Oct. 16, St. Louis vs. Chicago, at St. Louis 7-4
Oct. 17, St. Louis vs. Chicago, at St.Louis 3-2
Oct. 22, Chicago vs. St. Louis, at Pittsburg (7 innings) 9-2
Oct 23, Chicago vs. St. Louis, at Cincinnati 9-2
Oct. 24, St. Louis vs. Chicago, at Cincinnati 13-4

Total victories for Chicago, 3: for St. Louis, 3, with one game drawn
Total runs scored by Chicago, 43: by St. Louis, 41.

THE SERIES OF 1886.

In 1886 the Chicago and St. Louis club teams again won the championship
honors of their respective associations, and they again entered the lists
for the "world's championship," this series being best out of six games,
three being played at Chicago, and three at St. Louis; the winner of the
series taking ail the gate receipts. The result was the success of the St.
Louis team, the scores being as follows:

Oct. 18, Chicago vs. St. Louis, at Chicago 6-0
Oct. 19, St. Louis vs. Chicago, at Chicago (8 innings) 12-0
Oct. 20, Chicago vs. St. Louis, at Chicago (8 innings) 11-4
Oct. 21, St. Louis vs. Chicago, at St. Louis (7 innings) 8-5
Oct. 22, St. Louis vs. Chicago, at St. Louis (6 innings) 10-3
Oct. 23, St. Louis vs. Chicago, at St. Louis (10 innings) 4-3

Total runs for St. Louis, 38; for Chicago, 29.

THE SERIES OF 1887.

In 1887 the world's championship series had become an established
supplementary series of contests, and in this year these contests excited
more interest than had previously been manifested in regard to them, the
demands made upon the two contesting teams--the Detroit champions of the
League and the St. Louis champions of the American Association--for a
game of the series from the large cities of the East and West being such
as to lead the two clubs to extend the series to one of best out of
fifteen games. These were played at St. Louis, Detroit, Chicago, and
Pittsburg in the W st, and at New York, Brooklyn, Boston, Philadelphia,
and Baltimore in the East. The series began in St. Louis, and the eighth
victory of the Detroits was won at Baltimore, St. Louis winning the last
game of the series at St. Louis. The record of the fifteen games, showing
the pitchers in each contest, is as follows:

Date. |Contesting |Cities. |Pitchers. |Innings.|Score.
|Clubs. | | | |
-------+-------------+------------+--------------+--------+------
Oct. 10|St. Louis v. |St. Louis |Carruthers, | 9 | 6-1
| Detroit | |Getzein | |
" 11|Detroit v. |St. Louis |Conway, Foutz | 9 | 5-3
| St. Louis | | | |
" 12| " " " |Detroit |Getzein, | 13 | 2-1
| | |Carruthers | |
" 13| " " " |Pittsburg |Baldwin, King | 9 | 8-0
" 14|St. Louis v. |Brooklyn |Carruthers, | 9 | 5-2
| Detroit | |Conway | |
" 15|Detroit v. |New York |Getzein, Foutz| 9 | 9-0
| St. Louis | | | |
" 17|" " " |Philadelphia|Baldwin, | 9 | 3-1
| | |Carruthers | |
" 18| " " " |Boston |Baldwin, | 9 | 9-2
| | |Carruthers | |
" 19| " " " |Philadelphia|Conway, King | 9 | 4-2
" 21|St. Louis v. |Washington |Carruthers, | 9 | 11-4
[1] | Detroit | |Getzein | |
" 21|Detroit v. |Baltimore |Baldwin, Foutz| 9 | 13-3
[2] | St. Louis | | | |
" 22|" " " |Baltimore |Baldwin, Foutz| 9 | 13-3
" 24|" " " |Detroit |Baldwin, | 9 | 6-3
| | |Carruthers | |
" 25|" " " |Chicago |Getzein, King | 9 | 4-3
" 26|St. Louis v. |St. Louis |Carruthers, | 6 | 9-2
| Detroit | |Baldwin | |
----------------------------------------------------------------
[Footnote 1: A.M.]
[Footnote 2: P.M.]

THE SERIES OF 1888.

The contest for the world's championship in 1888 was the most exciting
and important of any yet played; and the public attention given to the
series throughout the entire base ball world, was such as to show that it
would be a paying policy on the part of the League and the Association to
establish a supplementary championship season, to begin on the first of
October each year, the series of games to be played including not only
that for the world's championship, but also to include contests between
the other clubs of each organization so as to settle the question as to
which were the eight leading professional teams of the country.

Prior to 1888 but three clubs had participated in the regular series, and
these were: St. Louis on the one hand, and Chicago (twice) and Detroit on
the other. In 1888, however, a new League candidate entered the field
against the St. Louis champions, and that was the New York club team, it
being the first time the two clubs had ever encountered each other. The
series arranged between the two clubs was one of ten games, the first six
victories to decide the contest. They were commenced at the Polo Grounds
on October 16, and the opening contest gave promise of a very interesting
series of games, and when the St. Louis team "Chicagoed" their League
adversaries the next day the interest in the matches doubled. But the
close of the first week's games left New York in the van with a credit of
four victories out of the five games played. The contest of the 19th took
place in Brooklyn, but the other four were played at the Polo Grounds, the
largest attendance of the whole series being that of Saturday, Oct. 20,
when the receipts exceeded $5,000. At the four games played at the Polo
Grounds the aggregate of receipts was $15,405, while the aggregate of
receipts at the four games at St. Louis, was but $5,612, less than that at
the Saturday game at the Polo Grounds the previous week. The game at
Brooklyn was marred by the bad weather, while that at Philadelphia was
dampened by the lead the New York team had previously attained. The series
virtually ended at St. Louis on October 25, when New York won their sixth
victory and the championship. After that Ward left the New York team to
join the Australian tourists, and the interest in the games ended, the
receipts falling off from $2,365 on October 25 to $411 on October 26. The
last game of the series was a mere ordinary exhibition game, Titcomb
pitching in four innings and Hatfield in four. The player's game on the
28th was even less attractive, the St. Louis team winning easily by 6 to
0, Keefe, Welch and George taking turns in the box for New York. The
record of the series in full is as follows:

Date. |Contesting |Cities. |Pitchers. |In's.|Scr. |Rec
|Clubs. | | | | |
-------+-------------+----------+------------+-----+------+
Oct 16 |N. York v. |New York |Keefe | | |
| St. Louis | |King | 9 | 2-1 | $2,876
" 17 |St. Louis v. | " " |Chamberlain | | |
| N. York | |Welch | 9 | 3-0 | 3,375
" 18 |N. York v. | " " |Keefe | | |
| St. Louis | |King | 9 | 4-2 | 3,530
" 19 | " " " |Brooklyn |Crane | | |
| | |Chamberlain | 9 | 6-3 | 1,502
" 20 | " " " |New York |Keefe | | |
| | |King | 8 | 6-4 | 5,624
" 22 | " " " |Phild'l'a |Welch | | |
| | |Chamberlain | 8 | 12-5 | 1,781
" 24 |St. Louis v. |St. Louis |King | | |
| N. York | |Crane | 8 | 7-5 | 2,624
" 25 |N. York v. | " " |King | | |
| St. Louis | |Chamberlain | 9 | 11-3 | 2,365
" 26 |St. Louis v. | " " |King | | |
| N. York | |George | 10 | 14-11| 411
" 27 | " " " | " " |Chamberlain,| | |
| | |Titcomb | 9 | 18-7 | 212
Hatfeld, |
-------+-------------+----------+------------+-----+------+------------
Total | | | | | | $24,362
Total Runs--New York, 64; St. Louis, 60.

Pitchers' Victories--Keefe, 4; Welch, 1; King, 2; Chamberlain, 2; Crane, 1.

Pitchers' Defeats--Keefe, 0; Welch, 1; Crane, 1; Titcomb, 1; King, 3;
Chamberlain, 3.

THE STATISTICS OF THE GAMES.

THE BATTING FIGURES.

The batting figures of those of the New York team who played in five
games and over, are as follows:

PLAYERS. |Games.|A.B.|R. |B.H.|S.B.|Per ct.
| | | | | |B.H.
-----------+------+----+---+----+----+------
Ward | 8 | 28 | 4 | 11 | 6 | .393
Ewing | 7 | 26 | 5 | 9 | 5 | .346
Tiernan | 10 | 38 | 8 | 13 | 5 | .342
O'Rourke | 10 | 36 | 4 | 12 | 3 | .333
Whitney | 10 | 37 | 7 | 11 | 3 | .297
Connor | 7 | 24 | 7 | 6 | 4 | .250
Slattery | 10 | 39 | 6 | 8 | 5 | .205
Richardson | 9 | 36 | 6 | 6 | 2 | .167
------------------------------------------

Of those who played in less than five games, the batting figures were as
follows:

PLAYERS. |Games.|A.B.|R. |B.H.|S.B.|Per cent.
| | | | | |B.H.
| | | | | |
---------+------+----+---+----+----+-----
Titcomb | 1 | 4 | 1 | 1 | O | .500
Gore | 3 | 11 | 5 | 5 | 2 | .454
Brown | 2 | 8 | 1 | 3 | 0 | .375
George | 2 | 9 | 2 | 3 | 0 | .333
Welch | 2 | 7 | 2 | 2 | 0 | .286
Hatfield | 2 | 8 | 2 | 2 | 1 | .250
Crane | 2 | 7 | 2 | 2 | 0 | .143
Murphy | 3 | 10 | 1 | 1 | 0 | .100
Keefe | 4 | 11 | 2 | 2 | 0 | .090
------------------------------------------

Of those of the St. Louis team who took part in five games and over, the
batting figures were as follows:

PLAYERS. |Games.|A.B.| R. |B.H.|S.B.|Per cent.
| | | | | |B.H.
------------+------+----+----+----+----+-------
Milligan | 8 | 25 | 5 | 10 | 0 | .400
Comiskey | 10 | 38 | 6 | 10 | 4 | .263
Robinson | 10 | 38 | 7 | 10 | 2 | .263
O'Neil | 10 | 38 | 9 | 10 | 0 | .263
McCarthy | 10 | 41 | 10 | 10 | 4 | .244
Latham | 10 | 41 | 10 | 9 | 10 | .219
White | 10 | 35 | 4 | 5 | 1 | .143
Lyons | 5 | 18 | 0 | 2 | 0 | .111
King | 5 | 16 | 1 | 1 | 0 | .063
Chamberlain | 5 | 13 | 3 | 0 | 1 | .000
---------------------------------------------

Of those who played in less than five games, the batting figures were as
follows:

PLAYERS.|Games.|A.B.|R. |B.H.|S.B.|Per ct.
| | | | | |B.H.
--------+------+----+---+----+----+-------
Boyle | 4 | 16 | 4 | 6 | 3 | .375
Herr | 3 | 11 | 2 | 0 | 1 | .000
Devlin | 1 | 3 | 0 | 0 | 0 | .000

THE PITCHERS' FIGURES

The pitchers' figures showing their work in the box, are as follows:

NEW YORK.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
PLAYERS. |Games.|At |Runs.|Earned|Hits.|Totals.|Wild |Struck |Bases
| |Bat. | |Runs. | | |Pitches.|Out. |on
| | | | | | | | |Balls.
---------+------+-----+-----+------+-----+-------+--------+-------+-------
Keefe | 4 | 123 | 10 | 2 | 18 | 19 | 0 | 32 | 9
Welch | 2 | 56 | 8 | 2 | 10 | 14 | 1 | 3 | 6
Crane | 2 | 62 | 10 | 3 | 14 | 17 | 3 | 12 | 6
+------+-----+-----+------+-----+-------+--------+-------+----
Total | 8 | 241 | 28 | 7 | 42 | 50 | 4 | 47 | 21
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

ST. LOUIS.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
PLAYERS. |Games.|At |Runs.|Earned|Hits.|Totals.|Wild |Struck |Bases
| |Bat. | |Runs. | | |Pitches.|Out. |on
| | | | | | | | |Balls.
-----------+------+-----+-----+------+-----+-------+--------+-------+-----
--
King | 5 | 137 | 25 | 8 | 34 | 43 | 2 | 11 | 9
Chamberlain| 4 | 210 | 43 | 22 | 64 | 94 | 7 | 14 | 20
+------+-----+-----+------+-----+-------+--------+-------+-----
---
Total | 10 | 347 | 68 | 30 | 98 | 137 | 9 | 25 | 29
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
---

In the fielding figures of pitchers the assistances on strikes were mixed
up with the fielding assistances which rendered them useless.

The record of the batting and fielding of the two club teams as a whole,
is as follows:

CLUB BATTING.
CLUBS. |Games.|At Bat.|Runs.|Base |S.B.|Average.
| | | |Hits.| |
----------+------+-------+-----+-----+----+--------
New York | 10 | 366 | 64 | 96 | 37 | .289
St. Louis | 10 | 333 | 61 | 73 | 26 | .219

CLUBS. |Games | P.O. | A. | E.|Total |Per Cent
| | | | |Chances.|Accepted.
----------+------+------+----+---+--------+--------
New York | 10 | 213 | 174| 40| 427| .906
St. Louis | 10 | 249 | 157| 42| 449| .906

THE FINANCIAL RECORD.

The appended figures showing the gate receipts of each day in
each city, are as follows:

Where Played.|When Played. |Receipts.
-------------+---------------------+----------
New York City|Tuesday, October 16 | $2,876.50
|Wednesday, October 17| 3,375.50
|Thursday, October 18 | 3,530.00
Brooklyn |Friday, October 19 | 1,562.00
New York City|Saturday, October 20 | 5,624.50
Philadelphia |Monday, October 22 | 1,781.60
|Wednesday, October 24| 2,024.00
St. Louis |Thursday, October 25 | 2,365.00
|Friday, October 26 | 411.00
|Saturday, October 27 | 212.00
+-----------
Total | $24,362.10
Total expenses | 8,000.00
Total amount divided | 16,362.10
Fifty per cent. each amounted to | 8,181.05

Of the New York's share of the receipts, $200 was paid to each of their
eighteen players, reducing the club's profits by some $3,600. The general
expense account includes traveling expenses and advertising for both
clubs. The following table shows the figures for the series between St.
Louis and Detroit in 1887:

RECEIPTS.--At St. Louis, $9,000; Detroit, $6,750; Pittsburgh, $2,300;
Brooklyn, $5,800; New York, $4,100; Philadelphia, $8,000; Washington,
$800; Boston, $3,100; Baltimore, $2,000; Chicago, $200; total $42,000. The
expenses of the trip was $18,000, leaving a balance of $24,000. This was
divided evenly, so that St. Louis received $12,000 and Detroit $12,000.

The St. Louis papers complimented the visiting New York team highly. In
fact, the St. Louis _Post-Dispatch_ said that no more gentlemanly
appearing or behaving set of men belonging to a ball club ever played in
St. Louis. Messrs. Von der Ahe and the secretary of his club, Mr. George
Munson, did everything in their power for the visiting newspaper men.

THE FIELDING FIGURES.

NEW YORK.
PLAYERS. |Positions.|Games.|Fielding
| | |Average.
-----------+----------+------+--------
Ewing |C | 7| .875
Brown |C | 2| 1.000
Murphy |C | 3| .759
Connor |1B | 7| .975
Richardson |2B | 9| .978
Whitney |3B | 10| .862
Ward |S S | 8| .919
O'Rourke |L F | 10| .955
Slattery |C F | 10| .826
Tiernan |R F | 10| .783

ST. LOUIS.
PLAYERS. |Positions.|Games.|Fielding
| | |Average.
---------+----------+------+-------
Milligan |C | 8| .932
Comiskey |1B | 10| .966
Robinson |2B | 10| .891
Latham |3B | 10| .923
White |S S | 10| .796
O'Neill |L F | 10| .885
Lyons |C F | 5| .941
McCarthy |R F | 10| .765

THE AMERICAN PENNANT HOLDERS OF
1886, 1887 AND 1888.

An interesting chapter of American club history is the record made by the
four leading clubs of the Association in their games together during the
seasons of 1886, 1887 and 1888. In each year the St. Louis Club occupied
the leading position at the end of the season, while the other three
followed close after the champions. Here is the record of 1886:

1886. |St. Louis.|Brooklyn.|Athletic.|Cincinnati.||Won.
----------+----------+---------+---------+-----------++-----
St. Louis | --| 13| 15| 15|| 43
Brooklyn | 7| --| 12| 13|| 32
Athletic | 5| 7| --| 10|| 22
Cincinnati| 5| 7| 10| --|| 22
+----------+---------+---------+-----------++---
Lost | 17| 27| 37| 38|| 119

It will be seen that while St. Louis led in 1886 Brooklyn stood second,
with the Athletics third, and Cincinnati fourth. The record of 1887 is
appended:

1887. |Cincinnati.|Brooklyn.|Athletic.|St. Louis.||Won.
-----------+-----------+---------+---------+----------++-----
Cincinnati | --| 12| 11| 13|| 36
St. Louis | 6| --| 12| 16|| 34
Athletic | 9| 8| --| 8|| 25
Brooklyn | 4| 4| 10| --|| 18
+-----------+---------+---------+----------++---
Lost | 19| 24| 33| 37|| 113

This year, though St. Louis won the pennant, it will be seen that in
their games together Cincinnati held the lead, the Athletics being second,
the St. Louis third and Brooklyn last, the season being a very hard one
for Brooklyn through the drinking habits of the players, which the
management failed to repress. The record for 1888 is as follows:

1888. |Brooklyn.|St. Louis.|Athletic.|Cincinnati.||Won.
-----------+-----------+---------+---------+----------++-----
Brooklyn | --| 10| 12| 14|| 36
St. Louis | 10| --| 10| 9|| 29
Athletic | 7| 8| --| 10|| 25
Cincinnati | 7| 6| 10| --|| 23
+-----------+---------+---------+----------++-----
Lost | 24| 24| 32| 33|| 113

Last season, it will be seen, that while St. Louis again won the pennant,
in their games together Brooklyn took the lead, St. Louis being second,
the Athletics third, and Cincinnati last.

EAST vs. WEST.

THE LEAGUE GAMES.

The contests between the four clubs of the East and the four of the West
in the League in 1888 ended in favor of the East, as will be seen by the
appended record:

EAST VS. WEST.

CLUBS. | | | | I || | G |
| | | | n || | a |
| | | P | d || | m | P
| | | i | i || G | e | e
| | | t | a || a | s | r
| C | D | t | n || m | | c
| h | e | s | a || e | P | e
| I | t | b | p || s | l | n
| c | r | u | o || | a | t
| a | o | r | l || W | y | a
| g | i | g | i || o | e | g
| o | t | h | s || n | d | e
| . | . | . | . || . | . | .
------------+---+---+---+---++----+---+---
Philadelphia| 10| 7| 14| 13|| 44| 73|.693
New York | 8| 11| 10| 14|| 43| 73|.589
Boston | 7| 10| 10| 11|| 38| 75|.567
Washington | 6| 7| 9| 8|| 30| 76|.359
----+---+---+---++----+---+
Games lost | 31| 35| 43| 46|| 155|297|

WEST VS. EAST.

CLUBS. | P | | | || | G |
| h | | | || | a |
| i | | | W || | m | P
| l | | | a || G | e | e
| a | N | | s || a | s | r
| d | e | | h || m | | c
| e | w | B | i || e | P | e
| l | | o | n || s | l | n
| p | Y | s | g || | a | t
| h | o | t | t || W | y | a
| i | r | o | o || o | e | g
| a | k | n | n || n | d | e
| . | . | . | . || . | . | .
------------+---+---+---+---++----+---+-----
Chicago | 8| 11| 12| 13|| 44| 76|.587
Detroit | 11| 7| 8| 11|| 37| 72|.614
Pittsburg | 6| 1| 8| 10|| 31| 74|.419
Indianapolis| 4| 5| 9| 12|| 30| 76|.305
+---+---+---+---++----+---+
Games lost | 29| 30| 37| 46|| 142|297|

It will be seen that the four Eastern clubs won 155 victories to 142 by
the four Western clubs.

THE AMERICAN GAMES.

The struggle between the East and the West in the American arena in 1888
resulted as follows:

EAST VS. WEST.

CLUBS. | | | K | || | G |
| | C | a | L || | a |
| S | i | n | o || | m | P
| t | n | s | u || G | e | e
| . | c | a | i || a | s | r
| | i | s | s || m | | c
| L | n | | v || e | P | e
| o | n | C | i || s | l | n
| u | a | i | l || | a | t
| i | t | t | l || W | y | a
| s | i | y | e || o | e | g
| . | . | . | . || n | d | e
| | | | || . | . | .
----------+---+---+---+---++----+----+-----
Athletic | 7| 10| 14| 15|| 46| 74|.622
Brooklyn | 10| 14| 11| 13|| 48| 80|.600
Baltimore | 6| 6| 11| 11|| 34| 79|.430
Cleveland | 4| 7| 10| 9|| 30| 73|.411
+---+---+---+---++----+----+
Games lost| 27| 37| 40| 48|| 158| 306|

WEST VS. EAST.

CLUBS. | | | | || | G |
| | | | || | a |
| | | | || | m | P
| | | B | C || G | e | e
| A | B | a | l || a | s | r
| t | r | l | e || m | | c
| h | o | t | v || e | P | e
| l | o | i | e || s | l | n
| e | k | m | l || | a | t
| t | l | o | a || W | y | a
| i | y | r | n || o | e | g
| c | n | e | d || n | d | e
| . | . | . | . || . | . | .
------------+---+---+---+---++----+----+-----
St. Louis | 10| 10| 14| 16|| 50| 77|.649
Cincinnati | 10| 6| 14| 10|| 40| 77|.519
Kansas City | 3| 9| 8| 9|| 29| 75|.387
Louisville | 5| 7| 9| 8|| 29| 77|.377
+---+---+---+---++----+----+-----
Games lost | 28| 32| 45| 43|| 148| 306|

It will be seen that the East won by 158 to 148.

PHENOMENAL CONTEST.

The most noteworthy contest of the season in the League championship
arena in 1888, was the game played at the Polo Grounds on September 4,
between the New York and Philadelphia teams. In this game eleven innings
had been completed without either side being able to score a single run
when sunset obliged the umpire to call the game on account of darkness.
The turnstile count showed that 9,505 people had passed through the gates.

It was a pitchers' contest from start to finish, both Keefe and Sanders
doing great work in the curving line. But ten base hits were made in the
eleven innings, six against Sanders and but four against Keefe. O'Rourke,
Richardson and Andrews led the little batting that was done.

The fielding play was of a phenomenal order, brilliant stops, catches and
throws occurring in every inning, and being loudly applauded.

The Philadelphians all but had the game in the tenth inning, but over
anxiety lost them the chance. Farrar was on third and might have scored on
Mulvey's fly to Slattery. He left the base, however, before the ball was
caught, and was promptly declared out. The score was:

NEW YORK.
| T.| R.| B.| P.| A.| E.
--------------+---+---+---+---+---+---
Slattery, cf | 5| 0| 0| 1| 1| 0
Ewing, c | 5| 0| 0| 8| 3| 0
Tiernan, rf | 5| 0| 0| 1| 0| 0
Connor, 1b | 3| 0| 0| 15| 0| 0
Ward, ss | 4| 0| 0| 2| 3| 1
Richardson, 2b| 4| 0| 2| 3| 2| 0
Whitney, 3b | 3| 0| 1| 1| 5| 1
O'Rourke, lf | 4| 0| 2| 1| 1| 0
Keefe, p | 4| 0| 1| 1| 10| 0
+---+---+---+---+---+---
Totals | 37| 0| 6| 33| 25| 2

PHILADELPHIA.
| T.| R.| B.| P.| A.| E.
-------------+---+---+---+---+---+---
Andrew, 3 cf | 5| 0| 2| 1| 0| 0
Fogarty, rf | 4| 0| 1| 1| 0| 0
Farrar, 1b | 4| 0| 0| 12| 1| 0
Delahanty, lf| 4| 0| 0| 2| 0| 0
Mulvey, 3b | 4| 0| 0| 0| 2| 0
Sanders, p | 4| 0| 0| 1| 7| 0
Schriver, c | 4| 0| 1| 9| 4| 0
Irwin, ss | 4| 0| 0| 5| 4| 0
Bastian, 1b | 3| 0| 0| 2| 3| 0

+---+---+---+---+---+---
Totals | 36| 0| 4| 33| 18| 0

Philadelphia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0--0
NewYork 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0--0

Two-base hit--O'Rourke. Double plays--Keefe and Connor, Farrar and
Sanders. First base on balls--Connor, Whitney, Bastain. First base on
errors--Philadelphia, 1. Struck out--Tiernan, Whitney, Keefe, 2; Andrews,
Fogarty, 2: Delehanty, Mulvey, Sanders, Schriver, Irwin. Wild pitches--
Keefe, 2; Sanders, 1. Time--Two hours. Umpire--Kelly.

REMARKABLE EVENTS.

LONGEST GAME.--Played at Boston May 11, 1877, between the Harvard College
nine and the Manchester professional team, twenty-four innings, score 0 to
0.

BEST LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP MATCH.--Played August 17, 1882, at Providence,
between the Providence and Detroit teams, eighteen innings, score 1 to 0--
_seventeen innings without a run!_

NEXT BEST LEAGUE CLUB GAME.--Played at St. Louis on May 1, 1877, between
the St. Louis team and the Syracuse Stars, fifteen innings, score 0 to 0--
a drawn match.

BEST INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION GAME.--Played May 7, 1878, at Lynn, Mass.,
between the Live Oak team of Lynn, and the Crickets of Binghamton, fifteen
innings, score 1 to 0.

BEST JUNIOR GAME.--Played at Hoboken, August 19, 1878, fifteen innings,
score 1 to 0.

SHORTEST GAME.--Excelsior vs. Field in Brooklyn on Excelsior's grounds,
in May, 1861--50 minutes, 9 innings.

LONGEST THROW.--By John Hatfield, made at Union Grounds, Brooklyn, Oct.
15, 1872. Distance 133 yards, 1 foot, 7 inches-- over 400 feet.

GREATEST SCORE.--In match between the Niagara Club, of Buffalo, and a
visiting nine at Buffalo in 1864, score 202 to 26.

THE THROWING CONTESTS RECORDS.

The longest throw of a baseball on record up to 1872 was that made in
1868 by John Hatfield, then a member of the Cincinnati team, he then
throwing a ball 132 yards. In October, 1872, a throwing contest took place
on the old Union ball grounds, Brooklyn, in which John Hatfield--then of
the Mutuals--threw the ball 133 yds, 1 ft 7-1/2 in., the distance being
officially measured. The contest was also participated in by Andy Leonard,
whose record was 119 yds. 1 ft. 10 in.; George Wright, 117 yds. 1 ft. 1
in.; Billy Boyd, 115 yds. 1 ft. 7 in.; Fisler, 112 yds. 6 in., and Anson,
110 yds. 6 in. This throw of Hatfield's--over 400 ft.--has never been
equaled in any regular throwing contest.

On September 9, 1882, a throwing match took place on the Chicago ball
grounds between E. Williamson of the Chicago Club and Pfeffer of the
Troys. Three trials were had and Pfeffer's best throw was 132 yards and 5
inches. Williamson's best throw was 132 yards, 1 foot, or four feet seven
and one half inches short of Hatfield's champion throw.

In 1884, while connected with the Boston Union Association Club, Ed
Crane, while in Cincinnati October 12 of that year, was credited with
throwing a baseball 135 yards, 1 foot, and 1/2 inch, and also again at St.
Louis on October 19, he was credited with throwing a ball 134 yards, 5
inches. But the circumstances attendant upon both trials were not such as
to warrant an official record, so the _Clipper_ says, through its editor
for 1888, Mr. A. H. Wright, in his answer to a query on the subject. At
any rate, Crane has not since reached such figures, and he is as swift a
thrower now as ever.

The throwing contest which took place at Cincinnati in 1888, at intervals
through the summer and fall, failed to result in the record being beaten,
though some very good long distance throwing was done, as will be seen by
the appended record:

Rank| PLAYERS. |CLUB. | Distance Thrown.
----+------------+-----------+------------------
1 | Williamson |Chicago | 399 feet 11 inches.
2 | Griffin |Baltimore | 372 " 8 "
3 | Stovey |Athletic | 369 " 2 "
4 | Vaughn |Louisville | 366 " 9 "
5 | Burns |Brooklyn | 364 " 6 "
6 | O'Brien |Brooklyn | 361 " 5 "
7 | Collins |Brooklyn | 354 " 6 "
8 | Tebeau |Cincinnati | 353 " 0 "
9 | Gilks |Cleveland | 343 " 11 "
10 | Reilly |Cincinnati | 341 " 6 "
11 | Brennan |Kansas City| 339 " 6 "
12 | Stricker |Cleveland | 337 " 8 "
13 | Foutz |Brooklyn | 335 " 4 "
14 | Davis |Kansas City| 333 " 6 "
15 | O'Connor |Cincinnati | 330 " 0 "
16 | McTamany |Kansas City| 327 " 6 "

When Williamson threw, the grounds were slippery, but he managed to
easily win the $100 prize money and diamond locket. One hundred and thirty-
three yards eight inches, was the distance Williamson threw, and he would
have done still better and beaten Hatfield's throw, had the conditions
been more favorable.

The best throw of a cricket ball on record is that of W. F. Torbes, of
Eton College, England, in March, 1876, the distance foeing 132 yards.

The longest throw of a lacrosse ball is that made by W. B. Kenny, at
Melbourne, Australia, in September, 1886, the ball being thrown from his
lacrosse stick 446 feet. The longest in America was that of Ross McKenzie,
in Montreal, on October, 1882, he throwing the ball 422 feet.

THE TRIP TO ENGLAND IN 1874.

Mr. Spalding made an effort to introduce base ball in England in 1874,
but the experiment proved to be a costly one financially, and it did not
result favorably in popularizing the American game in England. The two
teams who visited England in July, 1874, included the following players of
the Boston and Athletic clubs of that year:

BOSTON. POSITIONS. ATHLETIC.
-------------------------------------------------
James White Catcher James E. Clapp.
A.G. Spalding Pitcher James D. McBride.
James O'Rourke First Base West D. Fisler.
Ross C. Barnes Second Base Joseph Battin.
Henry Shafer Third Base Edward B. Sutton.
George Wright Short Stop M.H. McGeary.
And. J. Leonard Left Field Albert W. Gedney.
Harry Wright Center Field James F. McMullen.
Col. C. McVey Right Field A.C. Arisen.
George W. Hall Substitute Al. J. Reach.
Thomas L. Beals Substitute J.P. Sensenderfer.
Sam Wright, Jr Substitute Thomas Murnan.[A]

[**Proofreaders note A: "Murnan" might be a typo, as it appears as
"Murnam" later on the page.]

The record of the games played in England on the trip is as follows:

DATE. |CONTESTING CLUBS. |CITIES. |PITCHERS. |SCORES.
-------+-------------------+----------+----------+-------
July 30|Athletic vs. Boston|Liverpool |McBride, |
| | |Spalding |
| | |10in. | 14-11
" 31|Boston vs. Athletic| " |Spalding, |
| | |McBride | 23-18
Aug. 1 |Athletic vs. Boston|Manchester|McBride, |
| | |Spalding | 13-12
" 3 |Boston vs. Athletic|London |Spalding, |
| | |McBride | 24-7
" 6 | " " " | " |Spalding, |
| | |McMullen | 14-11
" 8 |Athletic vs. Boston|Richmond |McBride, |
| | |Spalding | 11-3
" 10|Boston vs. Athletic|Crystal |Spalding, |
| | Pal. |McBride | 17-8
" 11|Athletic vs. Boston| " |McBride, |
| | |Spalding | 19-8
" 13|Boston vs. Athletic|Kensington|Spalding, |
| | |McBride | 16-6
" 14|Spalding's Nine vs.| " |Spalding, |
|McMullen's Nine | |McMullen | 14-11
" 15|Boston vs. Athletic|Sheffield | " , " | 19-8
" 17| " " " | " | " , " | 18-17
" 20|Athletic vs. Boston|Manchester|McBride, |
| | |Spalding | 7-2
" 24|Boston vs. Athletic|Dublin |Spalding, |
| | |McBride | 12-7
" 25|Athletic vs. Boston| " |McMullen, |
| | |H. Wright | 13-4

Boston victories 8, Athletic victories 6.

In the percentage of base hits of those who played in a majority of the
games on the Boston side McVey led with .435, Leonard being second, with
.418, and George Hall third, with .364, Barnes, O'Rourke, Schafer, Harry
and George Wright and Spalding following in order. On the Athletic side
Anson led with .437, McGeary being second, with .388, and McMullen third,
with .367. McBride, Clapp, Murnam, Sutter, Gedner and Battin following in
order, the latter having a percentage of .323. Sensenderfer only played in
9 games, Kent in 8, Fisler in 5, and Beals in 4. All the others played in
10 games and over.

In the description of the players of the team given in the London papers
at the time of their visit the following paragraph appeared, quoted from
Mr. Chadwick's comments in the _Clipper_:

"Spalding is justly regarded as one of the most successful of the
strategic class of pitchers. In judgment, command of the ball, pluck,
endurance, and nerve, in his position he has no superior; while his
education and gentlemanly qualities place him above the generality of base-
ball pitchers. As a batsman he now equals the best of what are called
'scientific' batsmen--men who use their heads more than their muscle in
handling the ash. His force in delivery is the success with which he
disguises a change of pace from swift to medium, a great essential in
successful pitching. Spalding is a thorough representative of the spirited
young men of the Western States, he being from Illinois."

Of George Wright the same writer said: "George Wright is generally
regarded as a model base-ball player, especially in his responsible
position of short-stop; and until he injured his leg he had no equal in
the position. He is a jolly, good-natured youth full of life and spirit,
up to all the dodges of the game, and especially is he noted for his sure
catching of high balls in the infield, and for his swift and accurate
throwing. At the bat, too, he excels; while as a bowler, fielder, and
batsman, in cricket, he ranks with the best of American cricketers. He
comes of real old English stock, his father being a veteran English
cricketer, and formerly the professional of the St. George Cricket Club of
New York."

Besides the base-ball matches played during the tour, the following table
shows what the two clubs combined did on the cricket field, against the
strongest players of London, Sheffield, Manchester and Dublin. The sides
in each contest were eighteen Americans against twelve British cricketers:

|AMERICANS vs. |AMERICANS. |OPPONENTS.
-----------+-------------------+----------------+------------
| |1st.|2d. |Total|1st.|2d. ||Total
-----------+-------------------+----+----+-----+----+----++------
Aug. 3,4 |12 Marylebone | 107| ---| 107 | 105| ---|| 105
|Club on Ground at | | | | | ||
|Lords | | | | | ||
Aug. 6,7 |11 Prince's C. C. | 110| ---| 110 | 21| 39|| 60
|at Prince's | | | | | ||
Aug. 8 |13 Richmond C at | 45| ---| 45 | 108| ---|| 108
|Richmond[1] | | | | | ||
Aug. 13,14 |11 Surrey C. S. at | 100| 111| 211 | 27| 2|| 29
|Ovalt[2] | | | | | ||
Aug. 15,17 |12 Sheffield, at | 130| ---| 130 | 43| 45|| 88
|Sheffield | | | | | ||
Aug. 20, 21|11 Manchester, at | 121| 100| 221 | 42| 53|| 95
|Manchester | | | | | ||
Aug. 24, 25|11 All Ireland, at | 71| 94| 165 | 47| 32|| 79
|Dublin |____|____|_____|____|____||____
|Totals | 684| 305| 989 | 393| 171 || 564

[Footnote 1: Unfinished innings, only six wickets down.]
[Footnote 2: Second innings unfinished, only four wickets down.]

The ball players did not lose a single game, and had the best of it in
the games which were drawn from not having time to put them out. The trip
cost the two clubs over $2,000, exclusive of the amount received at the
gate. In fact, the Britishers did not take to the game kindly at all.

To show what the All England eleven could do in the way of playing base
ball, the score of a game played in Boston in October, 1868, after the
All England eleven had played their cricket match there, is given below:

American Nine 3 2 0 0 1 6 3 5 0 || 20
English Cricketers' Nine 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 || 4

George Wright pitched for the cricketers, the nine including Smith c;
Tarrant 1b; Peeley 2b; Shaw 3b; Humphrey ss; Jupp lf; Clarkwood cf, and
Rowbotham rf.

The American nine was a weak picked nine, including O'Brien--a Boston
cricketer--and Archy Buch, of Harvard, as the battery; Shaw, Barrows and
Lowell on the bases; Pratt as short stop, and Smith Rogers and Conant in
the out field.

In all the base-ball games in which the English professional cricketers
took part during their visits to America from 1859 to 1880, they failed to
begin to equal in their ball play the work done by the ball players in
cricket in England.

* * * * *

THE GREAT BASE BALL TRIP AROUND THE
WORLD IN 1888-'89.

[Illustration: ALL AMERICA.
BROWN FOGARTY CARROLL WARD HEALY HANLON WOOD CRANE MANNING EARLE.]

[Illustration: CHICAGO TEAM.]

The greatest historical event recorded in the annals of the national game
was undoubtedly the journey to Australia, which began in November, 1888,
and ended in March, 1889, on a trip around the world. While in 1874 Mr. A.
G. Spalding was the _avant cornier_ of the visiting party of base ball
players to England, and also one of the most prominent of the victorious
team players; in 1888 Mr. Spalding was the originator of the trip, the
master spirit of the remarkable enterprise, and the leader of the band of
base ball missionaries to the antipodes. Of course, in recording the
Australian trip in the GUIDE for 1889, only a cursory glance can be taken
of the trip, as it would require a volume of itself to do the tour
justice. Suffice it to say that the pluck, energy and business enterprise
which characterized the unequaled event reflected the highest credit not
only on Mr. Albert G. Spalding, as the representative spirit of Western
business men, but also on the American name in every respect, and it did
for the extension of the popularity of our national game in six short
months what as many years of effort under ordinary circumstances would
have failed to do.

The party of tourists which started on their journey to Australia on
October 20, 1888, met with an enthusiastic welcome on their route to San
Francisco, and in that city they were given a reception on their arrival
and a send-off on their departure for Australia, unequaled in the history
of the game on the Pacific coast. The record of the series of games played
by the two teams--Chicago and All America--en route to San Francisco and
while in that city, is appended:

DATE |CLUBS. |CITIES. |PITCHERS. |SCORE.
-------+------------+--------------+----------------+-------
Oct. 20|Chicago vs. |Chicago |Spalding, | 11--6
|America. | |Hutchinson |
" 21|" " "|St. Paul |Baldwin, Healy | 8--5
" 22|" " "|Minneapolis |Baldwin, Duryca | 1--0
" 22|America vs. | " |Van Haltren, | 6--3
|Chicago. | |Tener |
" 23|Chicago vs. |Cedar Rapids |Tener, | 6--5
|America. | |Hutchinson |
" 24|America vs. |Des Moines |Hutchinson, | 3--2
|Chicago. | |Baldwin. |
" 25|" " "|Omaha |Healy, Ryan | 12--2
" 26|Chicago vs. |Hastings |Baldwin, | 8--4
|America. | | Van Haltren |
" 27|" " "|Denver |Tener, Healy | 16--2
" 28|America vs. | " |Crane, Baldwin | 9--8
|Chicago. | | |
" 29|Chicago vs. |Colorado |Ryan, Healy | 3--9
|America. | Spr's | |
" 31|America vs. |Salt Lake |Crane, Tener | 19--3
|Chicago. | City | |
Nov. 1|" " " | " " " |Healy, Baldwin | 10--3
" 4|" " " |San Francisco.| " " | 4--4
" 11|" " " | " " |Van Haltren, | 9--6
| | |Tener |
" 14|Chicago vs. |Los Angeles |Baldwin, Healy | 5--0
|America. | | |
" 15|America vs. | " " |Crane, Tener | 7--4
|Chicago. | | |

The teams, when they left San Francisco on November 18, 1888, included
the following players:

CHICAGO TEAM.
A. C. Anson, Capt. and 1st baseman.
N. F. Pfeffer, 2d baseman.
Thos. Burns, 3d baseman.
E. N. Williamson, .short stop.
M. Sullivan, left fielder.
Jas. Ryan, center fielder.
R. Pettitt, right fielder.
Thos. P. Daly, catcher.
J. K. Tener, .pitcher.
M. Baldwin, pitcher.

ALL AMERICA TEAM.
J. M. Ward, Capt. and short stop.
G. A. Wood, 1st baseman.
H. C. Long, 2d baseman.
H. Manning, 3d baseman.
J. Fogarty, left fielder.
E. Hanlon, center fielder.
J. C. Earl, right fielder.
F. H. Carroll, catcher.
John Healy, pitcher.
F. N. Crane, pitcher.

Earl also acted as change catcher. The All America team included players
from the League clubs of New York, Philadelphia, Detroit, Pittsburg and
Indianapolis, and from the American Association clubs of Cincinnati and
Kansas City. Mr. Spalding stood at the head of the tourist party, with Mr.
Leigh S. Lynch as his business manager, and H. H. Simpson as assistant,
Mr. J. K. Tener being the treasurer and cashier.

The record of the games played by the two teams with outside clubs en
route to San Francisco and in California is as follows:

DATE. |CLUBS. |CITIES. |PITCHERS. |SCORE.
-------+--------------------+-------------+---------------+-------
Oct. 21|St. Paul vs. Chicago|St. Paul |Duryea, Tener | 8-5
Nov. 6|Haverly vs. America |San Francisco|Anderson, Crane| 12-5
" 8|Chicago vs. Stockton|Stockton |Tener, Harper | 2-2
" 8|Pioneer vs. America |San Francisco|Purcell, Healy | 9-4
" 9|America vs. Stockton|Stockton |Crane, Baker | 16-1
" 10|Chicago vs. Haverly |San Francisco|Baldwin Inal | 6-1

While en route to Australia the tourists stopped at Honolulu, where they
were given a public reception, by King Kalakaua, but their first game
played after they had left California was at Auckland, where they first
realized what a cordial reception the Australians had prepared for them.
On their arrival at Sydney, and afterward at Melbourne, the hearty welcome
accorded them, not only as ball players but as representatives of the
great Western Republic, was such as to surpass all their anticipations,
the heartiness of the greeting, the boundless hospitality and the crowded
attendance at their games imparting to their visit a brilliancy of success
which fully remunerated Mr. Spalding for all the pecuniary risks he had
incurred by the trip. It was originally intended to have made the tour of
the colonies a more extended one than was afterward found possible, and so
the sojourn of the players on the Australian continent ended sooner than
anticipated, only four cities being visited, instead of eight or ten, as
laid out. The record of the games played in Australia is as follows:

DATE. |CLUBS. |CITIES. |PITCHERS. |Score.
-------+-------------------+---------+--------------+-------
Dec. 10|Chicago vs. America|Auckland |Baldwin, Crane| 22-13
" 15|America vs. Chicago|Sydney |Healy, Tener | 5-4
" 17| " " " | " |Healy, Baldwin| 7-5
" 18| " " " | " |Healy, Tener | 6-3
" 22|Chicago vs. America|Melbourne|Tener, Crane | 5-3
" 24|America vs. Chicago| " |Healy, Ryan | 10-13
" 26| " " " |Adelaide |Healy, Tener | 19-14
" 27|Chicago vs. America| " |Baldwin, Healy| 12-9
" 28| " " " | " |Ryan, Simpson | 11-4
Dec. 29|America vs. Chicago|Ballarat |Healy, Baldwin| 11-7
Jan. 1 |Chicago vs. America|Melbourne|Tener, Healy | 14-7
" 1 | " " " | " |Baldwin, Crane| 9-4
" 5 | " " " | " |Baldwin, Crane| 5-0
" 26 |America vs. Chicago|Colombo |Crane, Baldwin| 3-3

After leaving Australia the tourists called at Colombo, Ceylon, and from
thence went to Cairo, and while in that city visited the Pyramids, and
they managed to get off a game on the sands in front of the Pyramid Cheops
on Feb. 9. Their first game in Europe was played at Naples on Feb. 19, and
from there they went to Rome, Florence and Nice, the teams reaching Paris
on March 3. The record of their games in Europe is as follows:

DATE. |CLUBS. |CITIES. |PITCHERS. |Score.
-------+-------------------+--------+---------------+-------
Feb. 9|America vs. Chicago|Ghiz eh |Healy, Tener | 9-1
" 19| " " " |Naples |Healy, Baldwin | 8-2
" 23|Chicago vs. America|Rome |Tener, Crane | 3-2
" 25|America vs. Chicago|Florence|Healy, Baldwin | 7-4
March 3| |Paris

In commenting on the physique of the American ball players, the editor of
the Melbourne _Argus_ says:

"Right worthy of welcome did those visitors appear-stalwarts every man,
lumps of muscle showing beneath their tight fitting jersey garments, and a
springiness in every movement which denoted grand animal vigor and the
perfection of condition. We could not pick eighteen such men from the
ranks of all our cricketers, and it is doubtful if we could beat them by a
draft from the foot ballers. If base ball has anything to do with building
up such physique we ought to encourage it, for it must evidently be above
and beyond all other exercises in one at least of the essentials of true
athletics."

The Melbourne _Sporteman_ in its report of the inaugural game in that
city, said: "The best evidence offered that Melbournites were pleased and
interested in the exhibition lies in the fact that the crowd of nearly ten
thousand people remained through not only nine but twelve innings of play,
and then many of them stayed to see a four inning game between the Chicago
team and a nine composed mainly of our local cricket players, who made a
very creditable show, considering the strength of the team they were
playing against, and the fact that they were almost utter strangers to
base ball. Not only did the spectators remain upon the ground but they
heartily applauded the heavy batting, the base running and base sliding
and the brilliant fielding executed by our Yankee visitors. Perhaps the
truest realization of just how difficult it is to play a finished game of
base ball was obtained by the cricketers who went in against the Chicagos.
A man may be able to guard a wicket with a degree of skill that would win
him wide fame in cricket circles, but when it comes to standing beside the
home plate of a base ball diamond, and mastering the terrific delivery of
an American professional pitcher, the average cricketer is compelled to
acknowledge the wide difference existing between the two positions. Then
again, the quick handling of a batted or thrown ball, that it may be
returned with all accuracy and lightning like rapidity to the waiting
basemen are points which our cricketers are deficient in, when compared
with the American professional ball player. It can be seen at a glance
that the game is prolific of opportunities for quick and brilliant
fielding."

The following is the score of the first match at cricket played by the
base ball tourists with Australian cricketers in Sydney on December 18,
1888:

BASE BALL EIGHTEEN.

Anson, b. Charlton 15
Williamson, c. Woolcott, b. Charlton 0
Ward, b. Charlton 1
Spalding, b. Charlton 0
Wright, b. Gregory 11
Pfeffer, b. Gregory 16
Wood, b. Gregory 0
Carroll, c. Robinson, b. Gregory 0
Earle, st. Crane, b. Gregory 0
Fogarty, b. Charlton 0
Burns, b. Charlton 10
Hanlon, hit wicket, b. Gregory 2
Manning, c. Woolcott, b. Gregory 14
Pettit, b. Gregory 3
Ryan, c. Robinson, b. Gregory 3
Sullivan, c. Halligan, b. Gregory, 0
Baldwin, not out 0
Sundries 5
----
Total 81

SYDNEY ELEVEN.

Robinson, l. b. w., b. Earle 1
Halligan, c. Burns, b. Anson 21
Kidman, c. Pfeffer, b. Anson 19
Woolcott, c. and b. Anson 4
Crane, c. Williamson b. Earle 14
A. Gregory, c. Burns, b. Wright 35
Hemsley, not out 18
Sundries 3
-----
Total for six wickets 115

We are compelled to omit the National Agreement for want of space. It
will be given in the Official League Book.

[Illustration: A. G. MILLS.]

Mr. A. G. Mills was connected with the Chicago Club at the organization
of the National League, and he participated in the legislative work of the
League from 1876 to 1885 when he resigned his position as President, to
which position he was unanimously elected on the death of President
Hulbert. To his efficient services as President and one of the Board of
Directors is the success of the League after the death of its founder
largely due. He was the originator of the National Agreement which has so
firmly bound together the National League and the American Association.
Since he resigned his position as President of the League in 1885, he has
been practically out of Base Ball, although he still takes a deep interest
in the game. He was succeeded by the worthy President, Mr. N. E. Young.

* * * * *

INDEX TO RULES AND REGULATIONS

* * * * *
RULE.
The Ground 1
The Infield 2
The Bases 3
Number of (1) 3
The Home Bases (2) 3
First, Second and Third (3) 3
Position (4) 3
Foul Lines 4
Pitcher's Lines 5
Catcher's Lines 6
Captain's Lines 7
Player's Lines 8
Batman's Lines 9
Three Feet Lines 10
Lines must be Marked 11
The Ball 12
Weight and Size (1) 12
Number Balls Furnished (2) 12
Furnished by Home Club (3) 12
Replaced if Injured (4) 12
The Bat 13
Material of (1) 13
Shape of (2) 13

THE PLAYERS AND THEIR POSITIONS.

Number of Players in Game 14
Players' Positions 15
Players not to Sit with Spectators 16
Club Uniforms 17
The Pitcher's Position 18
The Batsman's Position 19
Order of Batting 20
Where Players Must Remain (1) 20
Space Reserved for Umpire (2) 20
Space Allotted Players "at Bat" (3) 20
The Players' Benches 21

THE GAME.

Time of Championship Game (1) 22
Number of Innings (2) 22
Termination of Game (a) 22
The Winning Run (b) 22
A Tie Game 23
A Drawn Game 24
A Called Game 25
A Forfeited Game 26
Failure of the Nine to Appear (1) 26
Refusal of One Side to Play (2) 26
Failure to Resume Playing (3) 26
Willful Violation (4) 26
Disobeying Order to Remove Player (5) 26
Written Notice to President (6) 26
No Game 27
Substitutes 28
One or More Substitute Players (1) 28
Extra Player (2) 28
Base Runner (3) 28
Choice of Innings 29
A Fair Ball 30
An Unfair Ball 31
A Balk 32
Motion to Deceive (1) 32
Delay by Holding (2) 32
Pitcher Outside of Lines (3) 32
A Dead Ball 33
A Foul Strike 34
Block Balls 35
Stopped by Person Not in Game (1) 35
Ball Returned (2) 35
Base Runner Must Stop (3) 35
The Scoring of Runs 36
A Fair Hit 37
A Foul Hit 38
Batted Ball Outside Grounds 39
A Fair Batted Ball 40
Strikes 41
Ball Struck at by Batsman (1) 41
A Fair Ball Delivered by Pitcher (2) 41
Attempt to Make Foul Hit (3) 41
A Foul Strike 42
The Batsman is Out 43
Failure to Take Position at Bat in Order (1) 43
Failure to Take Position Within One Minute
after Being Called (2) 43
If He Makes a Foul Hit (3) 43
If He Makes a Foul Strike (4) 43
Attempt to Hinder Catcher (5) 43
Three Strikes Called by Umpire (6) 43
If Ball Hits Him while Making Third Strike (7) 43
Attempted Foul Hit after Two Strikes (8) 43
The Batsman Becomes a Base Runner 44
After a Fair Hit (1) 44
After Four Balls are Called (2) 44
After Three Strikes are Declared (3) 44
If Hit by Ball While at Bat (4) 44
After Illegal Delivery of Ball (5) 44
Bases to be Touched 45
Entitled to Base 46
If Umpire Call Four Balls (1) 46
If Umpire Award Succeeding Batsman Base (2) 46
If Umpire Calls Balk (3) 46
If Pitcher's Ball Passes Catcher (4) 46
Ball Strikes Umpire (5) 46
Prevented from Making Base (6) 46
Fielder Stops Ball (7) 46
Returning to Bases 47
If Foul Tip (1) 47
If Foul Strike (2) 47
If Dead Ball (3) 47
Ball Thrown to Intercept Base Runner (4) 47
Base Runner Out 48
Attempt to Hinder Catcher from Fielding Ball (1) 48
If Fielder Hold Fair Hit Ball (2) 48
Third Strike Ball Held by Fielder (3) 48
Touched with Ball after Three Strikes (4) 48
Touching First Base (5) 48
Running from Home Base to First Base (6) 48
Running from First to Second Base (7) 48
Failure to Avoid Fielder (8) 48
Touched by Ball While in Play (9) 48
Fair or Foul Hit Caught by Fielder (10) 48
Batsman Becomes a Base Runner (11) 48
Touched by Hit Ball before Touching Fielder (12) 48
Running to Base (13) 48
Umpire Calls Play (14) 48
When Batsman or Base Runner is Out 49
Coaching Rules 50

THE UMPIRE.

Umpire's Power 51, 52
When Master of the Field (1) 52
Must Compel Observance of Playing Rules (2) 52
Special Duties 53
Is Sole Judge of Play (1) 53
Shall see Rules Observed Before Commencing Game (2) 53
Must Keep Contesting Nines Playing (3) 53
Must Count and Call Balls (4) 53
Attention of Umpire is Directed Against 54
Laziness or Loafing , (1) 54
Seeking to Disconcert Fielder (2) 54
Violation of Rules by Base Runner (3) 54
Umpire Must Call Play 55
Umpire Allowed to Call Time 56
Umpire is Empowered to Inflict Fines 57
For Indecent Language (1) 57
Wilful Failure of Captain to Remain within Bounds
(2) 57
Disobedience of a Player (3) 57
Shall Notify Captain (4) 57
Repetition of Offenses (5) 57

FIELD RULES.

No Club Shall Allow Open Betting 58
Who Shall be Allowed in the Field 59
Audience Shall Not be Addressed 60
Every Club Shall Furnish Police Force 61

GENERAL DEFINITIONS.

Play 62
Time 63
Game 64
An Inning 65
A Time at Bat 66
Legal 67
Scoring 68
Batting (1) 68
Runs Made (2) 68
Base Hits (3) 68
Sacrifice Hits (4) 68
Fielding (5) 68
Assists (6) 68
Error (7) 68
Stolen Bases (8) 68
Runs Earned (9) 68
The Summary 69
Number of Earned Runs (1) 69
Number of Two Base Hits (2) 69
Number of Three Base Hits (3) 69
Number of Home Runs (4) 69
Number of Stolen Bases (5) 69
Number of Double and Triple Plays (6) 69
Bases on Called Balls (7) 69
Bases from Being Hit (8) 69
Men Struck Out (9) 69
Passed Balls (10) 69
Wild Pitches (11) 69
Time of Game (12) 69
Name of Umpire (13) 69
Amendments 70

NATIONAL PLAYING RULES OF

Professional Base Ball Clubs

AS ADOPTED JOINTLY BY THE NATIONAL LEAGUE AND AMERICAN ASSOCIATION,
AND GOVERNING ALL CLUBS PARTIES TO THE NATIONAL AGREEMENT.

1889.

* * * * *

THE BALL GROUND.

RULE 1. The Ground must be an enclosed field, sufficient in size to
enable each player to play in his position as required by these Rules.

RULE 2. The Infield must be a space of ground thirty yards square.

THE BASES.

RULE 3. The Bases must be

SEC. 1. Four in number, and designated as First Base, Second Base, Third
Base and Home Base.

SEC. 2. The Home Base must be of whitened rubber twelve inches square, so
fixed in the ground as to be even with the surface, and so placed in the
corner of the infield that two of its sides will form part of the
boundaries of said infield.

SEC. 3. The First, Second and Third Bases must be canvas bags, fifteen
inches square, painted white, and filled with some soft material, and so
placed that the center of the second base shall be upon its corner of the
infield, and the center of the first and third bases shall be on the lines
running to and from second base and seven and one-half inches from the
foul lines, providing that each base shall be entirely within the foul
lines.

SEC. 4. All the bases must be securely fastened in their positions, and
so placed as to be distinctly seen by the Umpire.

THE FOUL LINES.

RULE 4. The Foul Lines must be drawn in straight lines from the outer
corner of the Home Base, along the outer edge of the First and Third
Bases, to the boundaries of the Ground.

THE POSITION LINES.

RULE 5. The Pitcher's Lines must be straight lines forming the boundaries
of a space of ground, in the infield, five and one-half feet long by four
feet wide, distant fifty feet from the center of the Home Base, and so
placed that the five and one half feet lines would each be two feet
distant from and parallel with a straight line passing through the center
of the Home and Second Bases. Each corner of this space must be marked by
a flat iron plate or stone six inches square, fixed in the ground even
with the surface.

RULE 6. The Catcher's Lines must be drawn from the outer corner of the
Home Base, in continuation of the Foul Lines, straight to the limits of
the Ground back of Home Base.

RULE 7. The Captain's or Coacher's Lines must be a line fifteen feet from
and parallel with the Foul Lines, said lines commencing at a line parallel
with and seventy-five feet distant from the catcher's lines, and running
thence to the limits of the grounds.

RULE 8. The Players' Lines must be drawn from the Catcher's Lines to the
limits of the Ground, fifty feet distant from and parallel with, the foul
lines.

RULE 9. The Batsman's Lines must be straight lines forming the boundaries
of a space on the right, and of a similar space on the left of the Home
Base, six feet long by four feet wide, extending three feet in front of
and three feet behind the center of the Home Base, and with its nearest
line distant six inches from the Home Base.

RULE 10. The Three Feet Lines must be drawn as follows: From a point on
the Foul Line from Home Base to First Base, and equally distant from such
bases, shall be drawn a line on Foul Ground, at a right angle to said Foul
Line, and to a point three feet distant from it; thence running parallel
with said Foul Line, to a point three feet distant from the First Base;
thence in a straight line to the Foul Line, and thence upon the Foul Line
to point of beginning.

RULE 11. The lines designated in Rules 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10 must be
marked with chalk or other suitable material, so as to be distinctly seen
by the Umpire. They must all be so marked their entire length, except the
Captain's and Player's Lines, which must be so marked for a distance of at
least thirty-five yards from the Catcher's Lines.

THE BALL.

RULE 12. The Ball.

SEC. 1. Must not weigh less than five or more than five and one-quarter
ounces avoirdupois, and measure not less than nine nor more than nine and
one-quarter inches in circumference. The Spalding League Ball, or the
Reach American Association Ball must be used in all games played under
these rules.

SEC. 2. For each championship game two balls shall be furnished by the
Home Club to the Umpire for use. When the ball in play is batted over the
fence or stands, on to foul ground out of sight of the players, the other
ball shall be immediately put into play by the Umpire. As often as one of
the two in use shall be lost, a new one must be substituted, so that the
Umpire may at all times, after the game begins, have two for use. The
moment the Umpire delivers the alternate ball to the catcher or pitcher it
comes into play, and shall not be exchanged until it, in turn, passes out
of sight on to foul ground.

SEC. 3. In all games the ball or balls played with shall be furnished by
the Home Club, and the last ball in play becomes the property of the
winning club. Each ball to be used in championship games shall be
examined, measured and weighed by the Secretary of the Association,
inclosed in a paper box and sealed with the seal of the Secretary, which
seal shall not be broken except by the Umpire in the presence of the
captains of the two contesting nines after play has been called.

SEC. 4. Should the ball become out of shape, or cut or ripped so as to
expose the yarn, or in any way so injured as to be--in the opinion of the
Umpire--unfit for fair use, the Umpire, on being appealed to by either
captain, shall at once put the alternate ball into play and call for a new
one.

THE BAT.

RULE 13. The Bat.

SEC. 1. Must be made wholly of wood, except that the handle may be wound
with twine or a granulated substance applied, not to exceed eighteen
inches from the end.

SEC. 2. It must be round, except that a portion of the surface may be
flat on one side, but it must not exceed two and one-half inches in
diameter in the thickest part, and must not exceed forty-two inches in
length.

THE PLAYERS AND THEIR POSITIONS.

RULE 14. The players of each club in a game shall be nine in number, one
of whom shall act as Captain, and in no case shall less than nine men be
allowed to play on each side.

RULE 15. The players' positions shall be such as may be assigned them by
their Captain, except that the Pitcher must take his position within the
Pitcher's Lines, as defined in Rule 5. When in position on the field, all
players will be designated "Fielders" in these rules.

RULE 16. Players in uniform shall not be permitted to seat themselves
among the spectators.

RULE 17. Every Club shall be required to adopt uniforms for its players,
and each player shall be required to present himself upon the field during
said game in a neat and cleanly condition, but no player shall attach
anything to the sole or heel of his shoes other than the ordinary base
ball shoe plate.

THE PITCHER'S POSITION.

RULE 18. The pitcher shall take his position facing the batsman with both
feet square on the ground, one foot on the rear line of the "box." He
shall not raise either foot, unless in the act of delivering the ball, nor
make more than one step in such delivery. He shall hold the ball, before
the delivery, fairly in front of his body, and in sight of the Umpire.
When the pitcher feigns to throw the ball to a base he must resume the
above position and pause momentarily before delivering the ball to the bat.

THE BATSMEN'S POSITION--ORDER OF BATTING.

RULE 19. The batsmen must take their positions within the Batsmen's
Lines, as defined in Rule 9, in the order in which they are named on _the
score_, which must contain the batting order of both nines, and be
submitted by the Captains of the opposing teams to the Umpire before the
game, and when approved by him THIS SCORE must be followed except in the
case of a substitute player, in which case the substitute must take the
place of the original player in the batting order. After the first inning
the first striker in each inning shall be the batsman whose name follows
that of the last man who has completed his turn--time at bat--in the
preceding inning.

RULE 20. SEC. 1. When their side goes to the bat the players must
immediately return to and seat themselves upon the players' bench and
remain there until the side is put out, except when batsman or base
runner. All bats not in use must be kept in the bat racks, and the two
players next succeeding the batsman, in the order in which they are named
on the score, must be ready with bat in hand to promptly take position as
batsman; provided, that the Captain and one assistant only may occupy the
space between the players' lines and the Captain's lines to coach base
runners.

SEC. 2. No player of the side at bat, except when Batsman, shall occupy
any portion of the space within the Catcher's Lines, as defined in Rule 6.
The triangular space behind the Home Base is reserved for the exclusive
use of the Umpire, Catcher and Batsman, and the Umpire must prohibit any
player of the side "at bat" from crossing the same at any time while the
ball is in the hands of, or passing between, the Pitcher and Catcher,
while standing in their positions.

SEC. 3. The players of the side "at bat" must occupy the portion of the
field allotted them, but must speedily vacate any portion thereof that may
be in the way of the ball, or of any Fielder attempting to catch or field
it.

PLAYERS' BENCHES.

RULE 21. The Players' Benches must be furnished by the home club, and
placed upon a portion of the ground outside the Players' Lines. They must
be twelve feet in length, and must be immovably fastened to the ground. At
the end of each bench must be immovably fixed a bat rack, with fixtures
for holding twenty bats; one such rack must be designated for the
exclusive use of the Visiting Club, and the other for the exclusive use of
the Home Club.

THE GAME.

RULE 22 SEC. I. Every Championship Game must be commenced not later than
two hours before sunset.

SEC. 2. A Game shall consist of nine innings to each contesting nine,
except that,

(a) If the side first at bat scores less runs in nine innings than the
other side has scored in eight innings, the game shall then terminate.

(b) If the side last at bat in the ninth inning scores the winning run
before the third man is out, the game shall terminate, upon the return of
the ball to the pitcher.

A TIE GAME.

RULE 23. If the score be a tie at the end of nine innings to each side,
play shall only be continued until the side first at bat shall have scored
one or more runs than the other side, in an equal number of innings, or
until the other side shall score one or more runs than the side first at
bat.

A DRAWN GAME.

RULE 24. A Drawn Game shall be declared by the Umpire when he terminates
a game on account of darkness or rain, after five equal innings have been
played, if the score at the time is equal on the last even innings played;
but if the side that went second to bat is then at the bat, and has scored
the same number of runs as the other side, the Umpire shall declare the
game drawn, without regard to the score of the last equal innings.

A CALLED GAME.

RULE 25 If the Umpire calls "Game" on account of darkness or rain at any
time after five innings have been completed by both sides, the score shall
be that of the last equal innings played, unless the side second at bat
shall have scored one or more runs than the side first at bat, in which
case the score of the game shall be the total number of runs made.

A FORFEITED GAME.

RULE 26. A Forfeited Game shall be declared by the Umpire in favor of the
club not in fault, at the request of such club, in the following cases:

SEC. 1. If the nine of a club fail to appear upon the field, or being
upon the field, fail to begin the game within five minutes after the
Umpire has called "Play," at the hour appointed for the beginning of the
game, unless such delay in appearing or in commencing the game be
unavoidable.

SEC. 2. If, after the game has begun, one side refuses or fails to
continue playing, unless such game has been suspended or terminated by the
Umpire

SEC. 3. If, after play has been suspended by the Umpire, one side fails
to resume playing within five minutes after the Umpire has called "Play."

SEC. 4. If, in the opinion of the Umpire, any one of these rules is
willfully violated.

SEC. 5. If, after ordering the removal of a player, as authorized by Rule
57, Sec. 5, said order is not obeyed within five minutes.

SEC. 6. In case the Umpire declares a game forfeited, he shall transmit a
written notice thereof to the President of the Association within twenty
four hours thereafter.

NO GAME.

RULE 27. "No Game" shall be declared by the Umpire if he shall terminate
play on account of rain or darkness, before five innings on each side are
completed.

SUBSTITUTES.

RULE 28. SEC. 1. In every championship game each team shall be required
to have present on the field, in uniform, at least one or more substitute
players.

SEC. 2. One player, whose name shall be printed on the score card as an
extra player, may be substituted at the end of any completed innings by
either club, but the player retired shall not thereafter participate in
the game In addition thereto a substitute may be allowed at any time in
place of a player disabled in the game then being played, by reason of
illness or injury, of the nature and extent of which the Umpire shall be
the sole judge.

SEC. 3. The Base Runner shall not have a substitute run for him, except
by consent of the Captains of the contesting teams.

CHOICE OF INNINGS--CONDITION OF GROUND.

RULE 29. The choice of innings shall be given to the Captain of the Home
Club, who shall also be the sole judge of the fitness of the ground for
beginning a game after rain.

THE DELIVERY OF THE BALL--FAIR AND UNFAIR BALLS.

RULE 30. A Fair Ball is a ball delivered by the Pitcher while standing
wholly within the lines of his position, and facing the batsman, the ball,
so delivered to pass over the home base, not lower than the batsman's
knee, nor higher than his shoulder.

RULE 31. An Unfair Ball is a ball delivered by the Pitcher, as in Rule
30, except that the ball does not pass over the Home Base, or does pass
over the Home Base above the batsman's shoulder, or below the knee.

BALKING.

RULE 32. A Balk is

SEC. 1. Any motion made by the Pitcher to deliver the ball to the bat
without delivering it, and shall be held to include any and every
accustomed motion with the hands, arms or feet, or position of the body
assumed by the Pitcher in his delivery of the ball, and any motion
calculated to deceive a base runner, except the ball be accidentally
dropped.

SEC. 2. The holding of the ball by the Pitcher so long as to delay the
game unnecessarily; or

SEC. 3. Any motion to deliver the ball, or the delivering the ball to the
bat by the Pitcher when any part of his person is upon ground outside of
the lines of his position, including all preliminary motions with the
hands, arms and feet.

DEAD BALLS.

RULE 33. A Dead Ball is a ball delivered to the bat by the Pitcher that
touches the Batsman's bat without being struck at, or any part of the
Batsman's person or clothing while standing in his position without being
struck at; or any part of the Umpire's person or clothing, while on foul
ground, without first passing the Catcher.

RULE 34. In case of a Foul Strike, Foul Hit ball not legally caught out,
Dead Ball, or Base Runner put out for being struck by a fair hit ball, the
ball shall not be considered in play until it is held by the Pitcher
standing in his position.

BLOCK BALLS.

RULE 35. SEC. 1. A Block is a batted or thrown ball that is stopped or
handled by any person not engaged in the game.

SEC. 2. Whenever a Block occurs the Umpire shall declare it, and Base
Runners may run the bases, without being put out, until the ball has been
returned to and held by the Pitcher standing in his position.

SEC. 3. In the case of a Block, if the person not engaged in the game
should retain possession of the ball, or throw or kick it beyond the reach
of the Fielders, the Umpire should call "Time," and require each base
runner to stop at the last base touched by him until the ball be returned
to the Pitcher standing in his position.

THE SCORING OF RUNS.

RULE 36. One Run shall be scored every time a Base Runner, after having
legally touched the first three bases, shall touch the Home Base before
three men are put out. If the third man is forced out, or is put out
before reaching First Base, a run shall not be scored.

THE BATTING RULES.

RULE 37. A Fair Hit is a ball batted by the batsman, standing in his
position, that first touches the ground, the First Base, the Third Base,
any part of the person of a player, Umpire, or any other object that is in
front of or on either of the Foul Lines, or batted directly to the ground
by the Batsman, standing in his position, that (whether it first touches
Foul or Fair Ground) bounds or rolls within the Foul Lines, between Home
and First, or Home and Third Bases, without interference by a player.

RULE 38. A Foul Hit is a ball batted by the Batsman, standing in his
position, that first touches the ground, any part of the person of a
player, or any other object that is behind either of the Foul Lines, or
that strikes the person of such Batsman, while standing in his position,
or batted directly to the ground by the Batsman, standing in his position,
that (whether it first touches Foul or Fair Ground) bounds or rolls
outside the Foul Lines, between Home and First or Home and Third Bases,
without interference by a player. Provided, that a Foul Hit not rising
above the Batsman's head and caught by the Catcher playing within ten feet

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