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Sinking of the Titanic and Great Sea Disasters

Part 3 out of 6

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TEARS THEIR ONLY RELIEF

Mrs. Jacques Futrelle, wife of the novelist, herself a writer
of note, sat dry eyed in the saloon, telling her friends that she
had given up hope for her husband. She joined with the rest
in inquiries as to the chances of rescue by another ship, and
no one told her what soon came to be the fixed opinion of the
men--that all those saved were on the Carpathia.

"I feel better," Mrs. Futrelle said hours afterward, "for
I can cry now."

Among the men conversation centered on the accident
and the responsibility for it. Many expressed the belief
that the Titanic, in common with other vessels, had had
warning of the ice packs, but that in the effort to establish
a record on the maiden run sufficient heed had not been paid
to the warnings

"God knows I'm not proud to be here," said a rich New
York man. "I got on a boat when they were about to lower
it and when, from delays below, there was no woman to take
the vacant place. I don't think any man who was saved is
deserving of censure, but I realize that, in contrast with those
who went down, we may be viewed unfavorably." He showed
a picture of his baby boy as he spoke.

PITIFUL SCENES OF GRIEF

As the day passed the fore part of the ship assumed some
degree of order and comfort, but the crowded second sabin
and rear decks gave forth the incessant sound of lamentation.
A bride of two months sat on the floor and moaned her widowhood.
An Italian mother shrieked the name of her lost son.

A girl of seven wept over the loss of her Teddy bear and
two dolls, while her mother, with streaming eyes, dared not
tell the child that her father was lost too, and that the money
for which their home in England had been sold had gone down
with him. Other children clung to the necks of the fathers
who, because carrying them, had been permitted to take the
boats.

In the hospital and the public rooms lay, in blankets, several
others who had been benumbed by the water. Mrs.
Rosa Abbott, who was in the water for hours, was restored
during the day. K. Whiteman, the Titanic's barber, who
declared he was blown off the ship by the second of the two
explosions after the crash, was treated for bruises. A passenger,
who was thoroughly ducked before being picked up,
caused much amusement on this ship, soon after the doctors
were through with him, by demanding a bath.

SURVIVORS AID THE DESTITUTE

Storekeeper Prentice, the last man off the Titanic to reach
this ship, was also soon over the effects of his long swim in
the icy waters into which he leaped from the poop deck.

The physicians of the Carpathia were praised, as was Chief
Steward Hughes, for work done in making the arrivals comfortable
and averting serious illness.

Monday night on the Carpathia was one of rest. The wailing
and sobbing of the day were hushed as widows and orphans
slept. Tuesday, save for the crowded condition of the ship,
matters took somewhat their normal appearance.

The second cabin dining room had been turned into a
hospital to care for the injured, and the first, second and third
class dining rooms were used for sleeping rooms at night for
women, while the smoking rooms were set aside for men.
All available space was used, some sleeping in chairs and some
on the floor, while a few found rest in the bathrooms.

Every cabin had been filled, and women and children were
sleeping on the floors in the dining saloon, library and smoking
rooms. The passengers of the Carpathia had divided their
clothes with the shipwrecked ones until they had at least
kept warm. It is true that many women had to appear on
deck in kimonos and some in underclothes with a coat thrown
over them, but their lives had been spared and they had not
thought of dress. Some children in the second cabin were
entirely without clothes, but the women had joined together,
and with needles and thread they could pick up from passenger
to passenger, had made warm clothes out of the blankets
belonging to the Carpathia.

WOMEN BEFRIENDED ONE ANOTHER

The women aboard the Carpathia did what they could by
word and act to relieve the sufferings of the rescued. Most
of the survivors were in great need of clothing, and this the
women of the Carpathia supplied to them as long as their
surplus stock held out.

J. A. Shuttleworth, of Louisville, Ky., befriended Mrs.
Lucien Smith, whose husband went down with the Titanic.
Mrs. Smith was formerly Miss Eloise Hughes, daughter of
Representative and Mrs. James A. Hughes, of Huntington, W.
Va., and was on her wedding trip. Mr. Shuttleworth asked
her if there wasn't something he could do for her. She said
that all the money she had was lost on the Titanic, so
Mr. Shuttleworth gave her $500

DEATHS ON THE CARPATHIA

Two of the rescued from the Titanic died from shock and
exposure before they reached the Carpathia, and another
died a few minutes after being taken on board. The dead
were W. H. Hoyte, first cabin; Abraham Hormer, third
class, and S. C. Sirbert, steward, and they were buried at
sea the morning of April 15th, latitude 41.14 north,
longitude 51.24 west. P. Lyon, able seaman, died and
was buried at sea the following morning.

An assistant steward lost his mind upon seeing one of the
Titanic's rescued firemen expire after being lifted to the deck
of the Carpathia.

An Episcopal bishop and a Catholic priest from Montreal
read services of their respective churches over the dead.

The bodies were sewed up in sacks, heavily weighted at the
feet, and taken to an opening in the side of the ship on the
lower deck not far above the water line. A long plank tilted
at one end served as the incline down which the weighted
sacks slid into the sea.

"After we got the Titanic's passengers on board our ship,"
said one of the Carpathia's officers, "it was a question as to
where we should take them. Some said the Olympic would
come out and meet us and take them on to New York, but
others said they would die if they had to be lowered again
into small boats to be taken up by another, so we finally
turned toward New York, delaying the Carpathia's passengers
eight days in reaching Gibraltar."

SURVIVORS WATCH NEW BOATS

There were several children on board, who had lost their
parents--one baby of eleven months with a nurse who, coming
on board the Carpathia with the first boat, watched with
eagerness and sorrow for each incoming boat, but to no avail.
The parents had gone down.

There was a woman in the second cabin who lost seven
children out of ten, and there were many other losses quite as
horrible.

MR. ISMY "PITIABLE SIGHT"

Among the rescued ones who came on board the Carpathia
was the president of the White Star Line.

"Mr. Ismay reached the Carpathia in about the tenth
life-boat," said an officer. "I didn't know who he was, but
afterward heard the others of the crew discussing his desire
to get something to eat the minute he put his foot on deck.
The steward who waited on him, McGuire, from London,
says Mr. Ismay came dashing into the dining room, and throwing
himself in a chair, said: `Hurry, for God's sake, and get
me something to eat; I'm starved. I don't care what it
costs or what it is; bring it to me.'

"McGuire brought Mr. Ismay a load of stuff and when he
had finished it, he handed McGuire a two dollar bill. `Your
money is no good on this ship,' McGuire told him. `Take it,'

{illust. caption = DIAGRAM OF THE TITANIC'S ARRANGEMENT AND EQUIPMENT

The Titanic was far and away the largest and finest vessel ever built,
excepting only her sister-ship, the Olympic. Her dimensions were: Length,
882 1/2 feet; Beam, 92 feet, Depth (from keel to tops of funnels), 175 feet
Tonnage, 45,000. Her huge hull, divided into thirty watertight compartments,
contained nine steel decks, and provided accommodation for 2,500
passengers, besides a crew of 890.}

{illust. caption = UPPER DECK OF THE TITANIC, LOOKING FORWARD}

insisted Mr. Ismay, shoving the bill in McGuire's hand. I
am well able to afford it. I will see to it that the boys of the
Carpathia are well rewarded for this night's work.' This
promise started McGuire making inquiries as to the identity
of the man he had waited on. Then we learned that he was
Mr. Ismay. I did not see Mr. Ismay after the first few hours.
He must have kept to his cabin."

A passenger on the Carpathia said there was no wonder
that none of the wireless telegrams addressed to Mr. Ismay
were answered until the one that he sent yesterday afternoon
to his line, the White Star.

"Mr. Ismay was beside himself," said this woman passenger,
"and on most of the voyage after we had picked him up
he was being quieted with opiates on orders of the ship's
doctor.

FIVE DOGS AND ONE PIG SAVED

"Five women saved their pet dogs, carrying them in their
arms. Another woman saved a little pig, which she said
was her mascot. Though her husband is an Englishman and
she lives in England she is an American and was on her way
to visit her folks here. How she cared for the pig aboard ship
I do not know, but she carried it up the side of the ship in a
big bag. I did not mind the dogs so much, but it seemed to
me to be too much when a pig was saved and human beings
went to death.

"It was not until noon on Monday that we cleared the last
of the ice, and Monday night a dense fog came up and con-
tinued until the following morning, then a strong wind, a
heavy sea, a thunderstorm and a dense fog Tuesday night,
caused some uneasiness among the more unnerved, the fog
continuing all of Tuesday.

"A number of whales were sighted as the Carpathia was
clearing the last of the ice, one large one being close by, and
all were spouting like geysers."

VOTE OF THANKS TO CARPATHIA

"On Tuesday afternoon a meeting of the uninjured survivors
was called in the main saloon for the purpose of devising
means of assisting the more unfortunate, many of whom had
lost relatives and all their personal belongings, and thanking
Divine Providence for their deliverance. The meeting was
called to order and Mr. Samuel Goldenberg was elected chairman.
Resolutions were then passed thanking the officers, surgeons,
passengers and crew of the Carpathia for their splendid
services in aiding the rescued and like resolutions for the
admirable work done by the officers, surgeons and crew of the
Titanic.

"A committee was then appointed to raise funds on board
the Carpathia to relieve the immediate wants of the destitute
and assist them in reaching their destinations and also
to present a loving cup to the officers of the Carpathia and also
a loving cup to the surviving officers of the Titanic.

"Mr. T. G. Frauenthal, of New York, was made chairman
of the Committee on Subscriptions.

"A committee, consisting of Mrs. J. J. Brown, Mrs William
Bucknell and Mrs. George Stone, was appointed to look after
the destitute. There was a subscription taken up and up
to Wednesday the amount contributed totaled $15,000.

"The work of the crew on board the Carpathia in rescuing
was most noble and remarkable, and these four days that the
ship has been overcrowded with its 710 extra passengers
could not have been better handled. The stewards have
worked with undying strength--although one was overcome
with so much work and died and was put to his grave at sea.

"I have never seen or felt the benefits of such royal treatment.
I have heard the captain criticised because he did not
answer telegrams, but all that I can say is that he showed us
every possible courtesy, and if we had been on our own boats,
having paid our fares there, we could not have had better
food or better accommodations.

"Men who had paid for the best staterooms on the
Carpathia left their rooms so that we might have them. They
fixed up beds in the smoking rooms, and mattresses everywhere.
All the women who were rescued were given the best
staterooms, which were surrendered by the regular passengers.
None of the regular passengers grumbled because their trip
to Europe was interrupted, nor did they complain that they
were put to the inconvenience of receiving hundreds of strangers.

"The women on board the Carpathia were particularly
kind. It shows that for every cruelty of nature there is a
kindness, for every misfortune there is some goodness. The
men and women took up collections on board for the rescued
steerage passengers. Mrs. Astor, I believe, contributed $2000,
her check being cashed by the Carpathia. Altogether something
like $15,000 was collected and all the women were provided
with sufficient money to reach their destination after
they were landed in New York."

Under any other circumstances the suffering would
have been intolerable. But the Good Samaritans on the
Carpathia gave many women heart's-ease.

The spectacle on board the Carpathia on the return trip
to New York at times was heartrending, while at other times
those on board were quite cheerful.

CHAPTER XI

PREPARATIONS ON LAND TO RECEIVE THE SUFFERERS

POLICE ARRANGEMENTS--DONATIONS OF MONEY AND SUPPLIES
--HOSPITALS AND AMBULANCES MADE READY--PRIVATE
HOUSES THROWN OPEN--WAITING FOR THE CARPATHIA TO
ARRIVE--THE SHIP SIGHTED!

NEW YORK CITY, touched to the heart by the great
ocean calamity and desiring to do what it could
to lighten the woes and relieve the sufferings of
the pitiful little band of men and women rescued from the
Titanic, opened both its heart and its purse.

The most careful and systematic plans were made for the
reception and transfer to homes, hotels or institutions of the
Titanic's survivors. Mayor Gaynor, with Police Commissioner
Waldo, arranged to go down the bay on the police boat
Patrol, to come up with the Carpathia and take charge of
the police arrangements at the pier.

In anticipation of the enormous number that would, for
a variety of reasons, creditable or otherwise, surge about the
Cunard pier at the coming of the Carpathia, Mayor Gaynor
and the police commissioner had seen to it that the streets
should be rigidly sentineled by continuous lines of policemen
Under Inspector George McClusky, the man of most experience,
perhaps, in handling large crowds, there were 200 men,
including twelve mounted men and a number in citizens'
clothes. For two blocks to the north, south and east of the
docks lines were established through which none save those
bearing passes from the Government and the Cunard Line
could penetrate.

With all arrangements made that experience or information
could suggest, the authorities settled down to await the docking
of the Carpathia. No word had come to either the White
Star Line or the Cunard Line, they said, that any of the Titanic's
people had died on that ship or that bodies had been
recovered from the sea, but in the afternoon Mayor Gaynor
sent word to the Board of Coroners that it might be well for
some of that body to meet the incoming ship. Coroners
Feinberg and Holtzhauser with Coroner's Physician Weston
arranged to go down the bay on the Patrol, while Coroner
Hellenstein waited at the pier. An undertaker was notified
to be ready if needed. Fortunately there was no such need.

EVERY POSSIBLE MEASURE THOUGHT OF

Every possible measure of relief for the survivors that
could be thought of by officials of the city, of the Federal
Government, by the heads of hospitals and the Red Cross
and relief societies was arranged for. The Municipal Lodging
House, which has accommodations for 700 persons, agreed
to throw open its doors and furnish lodging and food to any
of the survivors as long as they should need it. Commis-
sioner of Charities Drummond did not know, of course,
just how great the call would be for the services of his
department. He went to the Cunard pier to direct his part
of the work in person. Meanwhile he had twenty ambulances
ready for instant movement on the city's pier at the
foot of East Twenty-sixth Street. They were ready to take
patients to the reception hospital connected with Bellevue
or the Metropolitan Hospital on Blackwell's Island.
Ambulances from the Kings County Hospital in Brooklyn were
also there to do their share. All the other hospitals in the
city stood ready to take the Titanic's people and those that
had ambulances promised to send them. The Charities
ferryboat, Thomas S. Brennan, equipped as a hospital craft,
lay off the department pier with nurses and physicians ready
to be called to the Cunard pier on the other side of the city.
St. Vincent's Hospital had 120 beds ready, New York Hospital
twelve, Bellevue and the reception hospital 120 and Flower
Hospital twelve.

The House of Shelter maintained by the Hebrew Sheltering
and Immigrant Aid Society announced that it was able to
care for at least fifty persons as long as might be necessary.
The German Society of New York, the Irish Immigrant
Society, the Italian Society, the Swedish Immigrant Society
and the Young Men's Christian Association were among the
organizations that also offered to see that no needy survivor
would go without shelter.

Mrs. W. A. Bastede, whose husband is a member of the
staff of St. Luke's Hospital, offered to the White Star Line
the use of the newly opened ward at St. Luke's,
which will accommodate from thirty to sixty persons. She
said the hospital would send four ambulances with nurses
and doctors and that she had collected clothing enough for
fifty persons. The line accepted her offer and said that the
hospital would be kept informed as to what was needed.
A trustee of Bellevue also called at the White Star offices to
offer ambulances. He said that five or six, with two or three
doctors and nurses on each, would be sent to the pier if required.

Many other hospitals as well as individuals called at the
mayor's office, expressing willingness to take in anybody
that should be sent to them. A woman living in Fiftieth
Street just off Fifth Avenue wished to put her home at
the disposal of the survivors. D. H. Knott, of 102 Waverley
Place, told the mayor that he could take care of 100 and give
them both food and lodging at the Arlington, Holly and Earl
Hotels. Commissioner Drummond visited the City Hall
and arranged with the mayor the plans for the relief to be
extended directly by the city. Mr. Drummond said that
omnibuses would be provided to transfer passengers from the
ship to the Municipal Lodging House.

MRS. VANDERBILT'S EFFORTS

Mrs. W. K. Vanderbilt, Jr., spent the day telephoning to
her friends, asking them to let their automobiles be used to
meet the Carpathia and take away those who needed surgical
care. It was announced that as a result of Mrs.
Vanderbilt's efforts 100 limousine automobiles and all the Fifth
Avenue and Riverside Drive automobile buses would be at
the Cunard pier.

Immigration Commissioner Williams said that he
would be at the pier when the Carpathia came in. There
was to be no inspection of immigrants at Ellis Island. Instead,
the commissioner sent seven or eight inspectors to
the pier to do their work there and he asked them to do it
with the greatest possible speed and the least possible bother
to the shipwrecked aliens. The immigrants who had no
friends to meet them were to be provided for until their cases
could be disposed of. Mr. Williams thought that some of
them who had lost everything might have to be sent back
to their homes. Those who were to be admitted to the United
States were to be cared for by the Women's Relief Committee.

RED CROSS RELIEF

Robert W. de Forest, chairman of the Red Cross Relief
Committee of the Charity Organization Society, after
conferring with Mayor Gaynor, said that in addition to an
arrangement that all funds received by the mayor should
be paid to Jacob H. Schiff, the New York treasurer of
the American Red Cross, the committee had decided
that it could turn over all the immediate relief work to the
Women's Relief Committee.

The Red Cross Committee announced that careful plans
had been made to provide for every possible emergency.

The emergency committee received a telegram that Ernest
P. Bicknell, director of the American Red Cross, was coming
from Washington. The Red Cross Emergency Relief Committee
was to have several representatives at the pier to look
out for the passengers on the Carpathia. Mr. Persons and Dr.
Devine were to be there and it was planned to have others.

The Salvation Army offered, through the mayor's office,
accommodation for thirty single men at the Industrial Home,
533 West Forty-eighth Street, and for twenty others at its
hotel, 18 Chatham Square. The army's training school at
124 West Fourteenth Street was ready to take twenty or
thirty survivors. R. H. Farley, head of the White Star
Line's third class department, said that the line would give all
the steerage passengers railroad tickets to their destination.

Mayor Gaynor estimated that more than 5000 persons
could be accommodated in quarters offered through his orders.
Most of these offers of course would have to be rejected.
The mayor also said that Colonel Conley of the Sixty-ninth
Regiment offered to turn out his regiment to police the pier,
but it was thought that such service would be unnecessary.

CROWDS AT THE DOCKS

Long before dark on Thursday night a few people passed
the police lines and with a yellow card were allowed to go on
the dock; but reports had been published that the Carpathia
would not be in till midnight, and by 8 o'clock there were
not more than two hundred people on the pier. In the next
hour the crowd with passes trebled in number. By 9 o'clock
the pier held half as many as it could comfortably contain.
The early crowd did not contain many women relatives of the
survivors. Few nervous people could be seen, but here and
there was a woman, usually supported by two male escorts,
weeping softly to herself.

On the whole it was a frantic, grief-crazed crowd. Laborers
rubbed shoulders with millionaires.

The relatives of the rich had taxicabs waiting outside the
docks. The relatives of the poor went there on foot in the
rain, ready to take their loved ones.

A special train was awaiting Mrs. Charles M. Hays, widow
of the president of the Grand Trunk Railroad. A private
car also waited Mrs. George D. Widener.

EARLY ARRIVALS AT PIER

Among the first to arrive at the pier was a committee from
the Stock Exchange, headed by R. H. Thomas, and composed
of Charles Knoblauch, B. M. W. Baruch, Charles Holzderber
and J. Carlisle. Mr. Thomas carried a long black
box which contained $5000 in small bills, which was to be
handed out to the needy steerage survivors of the Titanic
as they disembarked.

With the early arrivals at the pier were the relatives of
Frederick White, who was not reported among the survivors,
though Mrs. White was; Harry Mock, who came to look
for a brother and sister; and Vincent Astor, who arrived in a
limousine with William A. Dobbyn, Colonel Astor's secretary,
and two doctors. The limousine was kept waiting outside
to take Mrs. Astor to the Astor home on Fifth Avenue.

EIGHT LIMOUSINE CARS

The Waldorf-Astoria had sent over eight limousine car
to convey to the hotel these survivors:

Mrs. Mark Fortune and three daughters, Mrs. Lucien P.
Smith, Mrs. J. Stewart White, Mrs. Thornton Davidson, Mrs.
George C. Douglass, Mrs. George D. Widener and maid, Mrs.
George Wick, Miss Bonnell, Miss E. Ryerson, Mrs. Susan
P. Ryerson, Mrs. Arthur Ryerson, Miss Mary Wick, the Misses
Howell, Mrs. John P. Snyder and Mr. and Mrs. D. H. Bishop.

THIRTY-FIVE AMBULANCES AT THE PIER

At one time there were thirty-five ambulances drawn up;
outside the Cunard pier. Every hospital in Manhattan,
Brooklyn and the Bronx was represented. Several of the
ambulances came from as far north as the Lebanon Hospital,
in the Bronx, and the Brooklyn Hospital, in Brooklyn.

Accompanying them were seventy internes and surgeons
from the staffs of the hospitals, and more than 125 male and
female nurses.

St. Vincent's sent the greatest number of ambulances, at
one time, eight of them from this hospital being in line at the
pier.

Miss Eva Booth, direct head of the Salvation Army, was
at the pier, accompanied by Miss Elizabeth Nye and a corps
of her officers, ready to aid as much as possible. The Sheltering
Society and various other similar organizations also were
represented, all ready to take care of those who needed them.

An officer of the Sixty-ninth Regiment, N. G. N. Y., offered
the White Star Line officials, the use of the regiment's armory
for any of the survivors.

Mrs. Thomas Hughes, Mrs. August Belmont and Mgrs.
Lavelle and McMahon, of St. Patrick's Cathedral, together
with a score of black-robed Sisters of Charity, representing
the Association of Catholic Churches, were on the pier long
before the Carpathia was made fast, and worked industriously
in aiding the injured and ill.

The Rev. Dr. William Carter, pastor of the Madison Avenue
Reformed Church, was one of those at the pier with a
private ambulance awaiting Miss Sylvia Caldwell, one of
the survivors, who is known in church circles as a mission
worker in foreign fields

FREE RAILROAD TRANSPORTATION

The Pennsylvania Railroad sent representatives to the pier,
who said that the railroad had a special train of nine cars in
which it would carry free any passenger who wanted to go
immediately to Philadelphia or points west. The Pennsylvania
also had eight taxicabs at the pier for conveyance of
the rescued to the Pennsylvania Station, in Thirty-third
Street.

Among those who later arrived at the pier before the Carpathia
docked were P. A. B. Widener, of Philadelphia, two
women relatives of J. B. Thayer, William Harris, Jr., the
theatrical man, who was accompanied by Dr Dinkelspiel, and
Henry Arthur Jones, the playwright.

RELATIVES OF SAVED AND LOST

Commander Booth, of the Salvation Army, was there
especially to meet Mrs. Elizabeth Nye and Mrs. Rogers
Abbott, both Titanic survivors. Mrs. Abbott's two sons were
supposed to be among the lost. Miss Booth had received a
cablegram from London saying that other Salvation Army
people were on the Titanic. She was eager to get news of
them.

Also on the pier was Major Blanton, U. S. A., stationed at
Washington, who was waiting for tidings of Major Butt,
supposedly at the instance of President Taft.

Senator William A. Clark and Mrs. Clark were also in the
company. Dr. John R. MacKenty was waiting for Mr. and
Mrs. Henry S. Harper. Ferdinand W. Roebling and Carl G.
Roebling, cousins of Washington A. Roebling, Jr., whose
name is among the list of dead, went to the pier to see what
they could learn of his fate.

J. P. Morgan, Jr., arrived at the pier about half an hour
before the Carpathia docked. He said he had many friends
on the Titanic and was eagerly awaiting news of all of them.

Fire Commissioner Johnson was there with John Peel, of
Atlanta, Gal, a brother of Mrs. Jacques Futrelle. Mrs. Futrelle
has a son twelve years old in Atlanta, and a daughter
Virginia, who has been in school in the North and is at present
with friends in this city, ignorant of her father's death.

A MAN IN HYSTERICS

There was one man in that sad waiting company who
startled those near him about 9 o'clock by dancing across the
pier and back. He seemed to be laughing, but when he was
stopped it was found that he was sobbing. He said that he
had a relative on the Titanic and had lost control of his nerves.

H. H. Brunt, of Chicago, was at the gangplank waiting
for A. Saalfeld, head of the wholesale drug firm of Sparks,
White & Co., of London, who was coming to this country on
the Titanic on a business trip and whose life was saved.

WAITING FOR CARPATHIA

During the afternoon and evening tugboats, motor boats
and even sailing craft, had been waiting off the Ambrose
Light for the appearance of the Carpathia.

Some of the waiting craft contained friends and anxious
relatives of the survivors and those reported as missing.

The sea was rough and choppy, and a strong east wind was
blowing. There was a light fog, so that it was possible to
see at a distance of only a few hundred yards. This lifted
later in the evening.

First to discover the incoming liner with her pitiful cargo
was one of the tugboats. From out of the mist there loomed
far out at sea the incoming steamer.

RESCUE BOAT SIGHTED

"Liner ahead!" cried the lookout on the tug to the captain.

"She must be the Carpathia," said the captain, and then
he turned the nose of his boat toward the spot on t he horizon.

Then the huge black hull and one smokestack could be
distinguished.

"It's the Carpathia," said the captain. "I can tell her
by the stack."

The announcement sent a thrill through those who heard
it. Here, at the gate of New York, was a ship whose record
for bravery and heroic work would be a famuliar{sic} name in
history.

{illust. caption = Copyright by G. V. Buck.
MRS. LUCIEN P. SMITH

Formerly Miss Eloise Hughes, daughter of Representative and Mrs.
James A. Hughes, of West Virginia. Mrs. Smith and her husband were
passengers on the Titanic. Mrs. Smith was saved, but her husband went
to a watery grave. Mr. and Mrs. Smith were married only a few months
ago.}

{illust. caption = MAJOR ARCHIBALD BUTT

Military Aide to President Taft. Of Major Butt, who was one of the
victims of the Titanic, one of the survivors said: "Major Butt was the real
leader in all of that rescue work. He made the men stand back and helped
the women and children into the boats. He was surely one of God's
noblemen."}

CHAPTER XII

THE TRAGIC HOME-COMING

THE CARPATHIA REACHES NEW YORK--AN INTENSE AND
DRAMATIC MOMENT--HYSTERICAL REUNIONS AND CRUSHING
DISAPPOINTMENTS AT THE DOCK--CARING FOR THE SUFFERERS
--FINAL REALIZATION THAT ALL HOPE FOR OTHERS IS
FUTILE--LIST OF SURVIVORS--ROLL OF THE DEAD

IT was a solemn moment when the Carpathia heaved in
sight. There she rested on the water, a blur of black--
huge, mysterious, awe-inspiring--and yet withal a thing
to send thrills of pity and then of admiration through the
beholder.

It was a few minutes after seven o'clock when she arrived
at the entrance to Ambrose Channel. She was coming fast
steaming at better than fifteen knots an hour, and she was
sighted long before she was expected. Except for the usual
side and masthead lights she was almost dark, only the upper
cabins showing a glimmer here and there.

Then began a period of waiting, the suspense of which
proved almost too much for the hundreds gathered there
to greet friends and relatives or to learn with certainty at
last that those for whom they watched would never come
ashore.

There was almost complete silence on the pier. Doctors
and nurses, members of the Women's Relief Committee, city
and government officials, as well as officials of the line, moved
nervously about.

Seated where they had been assigned beneath the big
customs letters corresponding to the initials of the names of
the survivors they came to meet, sat the mass of 2000 on the
pier.

Women wept, but they wept quietly, not hysterically, and
the sound of the sobs made many times less noise than the
hum and bustle which is usual on the pier among those
awaiting an incoming liner.

Slowly and majestically the ship slid through the water,
still bearing the details of that secret of what happened and
who perished when the Titanic met her fate.

Convoying the Carpathia was a fleet of tugs bearing men
and women anxious to learn the latest news. The Cunarder
had been as silent for days as though it, too, were a ship of
the dead. A list of survivors had been given out from its
wireless station and that was all. Even the approximate
time of its arrival had been kept a secret.

NEARING PORT

There was no response to the hail from one tug, and as
others closed in, the steamship quickened her speed a little
and left them behind as she swung up the channel.

There was an exploding of flashlights from some of the
tugs, answered seemingly by sharp stabs of lightning in the
northwest that served to accentuate the silence and absence
of light aboard the rescue ship. Five or six persons, apparently
members of the crew or the ship's officers, were seen along
the rail; but otherwise the boat appeared to be deserted.

Off quarantine the Carpathia slowed down and, hailing
the immigration inspection boat, asked if the health officer
wished to board. She was told that he did, and came to a
stop while Dr. O'Connell and two assistants climbed on
board. Again the newspaper men asked for some word of
the catastrophe to the Titanic, but there was no answer,
and the Carpathia continued toward her pier.

As she passed the revenue cutter Mohawk and the derelict
destroyer Seneca anchored off Tompkinsville the wireless on
the Government vessels was seen to flash, but there was no
answering spark from the Carpathia. Entering the North
River she laid her course close to the New Jersey side in
order to have room to swing into her pier.

By this time the rails were lined with men and women.
They were very silent. There were a few requests for news
from those on board and a few answers to questions shouted
from the tugs.

The liner began to slacken her speed, and the tugboat soon
was alongside. Up above the inky blackness of the hull
figures could be made out, leaning over the port railing, as
though peering eagerly at the little craft which was bearing
down on the Carpathia.

Some of them, perhaps, had passed through that inferno
of the deep sea which sprang up to destroy the mightiest
steamship afloat.

"Carpathia, ahoy!" was shouted through a megaphone.

There was an interval of a few seconds, and then, "Aye,
aye," came the reply.

"Is there any assistance that can be rendered?" was the
next question.

"Thank you, no," was the answer in a tone that carried
emotion with it. Meantime the tugboat was getting nearer
and nearer to the Carpathia, and soon the faces of those leaning
over the railing could be distinguished.

TALK WITH SURVIVORS

More faces appeared, and still more.

A woman who called to a man on the tugboat was asked?
"Are you one the Titanic survivors?"

"Yes," said the voice, hesitatingly.

"Do you need help?"

"No," after a pause.

"If there is anything you want done it will be attended to."

"Thank you. I have been informed that my relatives will
meet me at the pier."

"Is it true that some of the life-boats sank with the Titanic?"

"Yes. There was some trouble in manning them. They
were not far enough away from her."

All of this questioning and receiving replies was carried
on with the greatest difficulty. The pounding of the liner's
engines, the washing of the sea, the tugboat's engines, made it
hard to understand the woman's replies.

ALL CARED FOR ON BOARD

"Were the women properly cared for after the crash?"
she was asked.

"Oh, yes," came the shrill reply. "The men were brave--
very brave." Here her voice broke and she turned and left
the railing, to reappear a few moments later and cry:

"Please report me as saved."

"What name?" was asked. She shouted a name that could
not be understood, and, apparently believing that it had been,
turned away again and disappeared.

"Nearly all of us are very ill," cried another woman. Here
several other tugboats appeared, and those standing at the
railing were besieged with questions.

"Did the crash come without warning?" a voice on one of
the smaller boats megaphoned.

"Yes," a woman answered. "Most of us had retired. We
saved a few of our belongings."

"How long did it take the boat to sink?" asked the voice.

TITANIC CREW HEROES

"Not long," came the reply? "The crew and the men were
very brave. Oh, it is dreadful--dreadful to think of!"

"Is Mr. John Jacob Astor on board?"

"No."

"Did he remain on the Titanic after the collision?"

"I do not know."

Questions of this kind were showered at the few survivors
who stood at the railing, but they seemed too confused to
answer them intelligibly, and after replying evasively to some
they would disappear.

RUSHES ON TO DOCK

"Are you going to anchor for the night?" Captain Rostron
was asked by megaphone as his boat approached Ambrose
Light. It was then raining heavily.

"No," came the reply. "I am going into port. There
are sick people on board."

"We tried to learn when she would dock," said Dr. Walter
Kennedy, head of the big ambulance corps on the mist-
shrouded pier, "and we were told it would not be before midnight
and that most probably it would not be before dawn
to-morrow. The childish deception that has been practiced
for days by the people who are responsible for the Titanic has
been carried up to the very moment of the landing of the
survivors."

She proceeded past the Cunard pier, where 2000 persons
were waiting her, and steamed to a spot opposite the White
Star piers at Twenty-first Street.

The ports in the big inclosed pier of the Cunard Line were
opened, and through them the waiting hundreds, almost
frantic with anxiety over what the Carpathia might reveal,
watched her as with nerve-destroying leisure she swung about
in the river, dropping over the life-boats of the Titanic that
they might be taken to the piers of the White Star Line.

THE TITANIC LIFE-BOATS

It was dark in the river, but the lowering away of the life-
boats could be seen from the Carpathia's pier, and a deep
sigh arose from the multitude there as they caught this first
glance of anything associated with the Titanic.

Then the Carpathia started for her own pier. As she
approached it the ports on the north side of pier 54 were
closed that the Carpathia might land there, but through the
two left open to accommodate the forward and after gangplanks
of the big liner the watchers could see her looming
larger and larger in the darkness till finally she was directly
alongside the pier.

As the boats were towed away the picture taking and shouting
of questions began again. John Badenoch, a buyer for
Macy & Co., called down to a representative of the firm that
neither Mr. nor Mrs. Isidor Straus were among the rescued
on board the Carpathia. An officer of the Carpathia called
down that 710 of the Titanic's passengers were on board, but
refused to reply to other questions.

The heavy hawsers were made fast without the customary
shouting of ship's officers and pier hands. From the
crowd on the pier came a long, shuddering murmur. In it
were blended sighs and hundreds of whispers. The burden
of it all was: "Here they come."

ANXIOUS MEN AND WOMEN

About each gangplank a portable fence had been put in
place, marking off some fifty feet of the pier, within which
stood one hundred or more customs officials. Next to the
fence, crowded close against it, were anxious men and women,
their gaze strained for a glance of the first from the ship,
their mouths opened to draw their breaths in spasmodic,
quivering gasps, their very bodies shaking with suppressed
excitement, excitement which only the suspense itself was
keeping in subjection.

These were the husbands and wives, children, parents,
sweethearts and friends of those who had sailed upon the
Titanic on its maiden voyage.

They pressed to the head of the pier, marking the boats
of the wrecked ship as they dangled at the side of the Carpathia
and were revealed in the sudden flashes of the photographers
upon the tugs. They spoke in whispers, each group
intent upon its own sad business. Newspaper writers, with
pier passes showing in their hat bands, were everywhere.

A sailor hurried outside the fence and disappeared,
apparently on a mission for his company. There was a deep-
drawn sigh as he walked away, shaking his head toward
those who peered eagerly at him. Then came a man and
woman of the Carpathia's own passengers, as their orderly
dress showed them to be.

Again a sigh like a sob swept over the crowd, and again
they turned back to the canopied gangplank.

THE FIRST SURVIVORS

Several minutes passed and then out of the first cabin
gangway; tunneled by a somber awning, streamed the first
survivors. A young woman, hatless, her light brown hair
disordered and the leaden weight of crushing sorrow heavy
upon eyes and sensitive mouth, was in the van. She stopped,
perplexed, almost ready to drop with terror and exhaustion,
and was caught by a customs official.

"A survivor?" he questioned rapidly, and a nod of the
head answering him, he demanded:

"Your name."

The answer given, he started to lead her toward that section
of the pier where her friends would be waiting.

When she stepped from the gangplank there was quiet
on the pier. The answers of the woman could almost be
heard by those fifty feet away, but as she staggered, rather
than walked, toward the waiting throng outside the fence, a
low wailing sound arose from the crowd.

"Dorothy, Dorothy!" cried a man from the number. He
broke through the double line of customs inspectors as though
it was composed of wooden toys and caught the woman to
his breast. She opened her lips inarticulately, weakly raised
her arms and would have pitched forward upon her face had
she not been supported. Her fair head fell weakly to one
side as the man picked her up in his arms, and, with tears
streaming down his face, stalked down the long avenue of
the pier and down the long stairway to a waiting taxicab.

The wailing of the crowd--its cadences, wild and weird--
grew steadily louder and louder till they culminated in a
mighty shriek, which swept the whole big pier as though at
the direction of some master hand.

RUMORS AFLOAT

The arrival of the Carpathia was the signal for the most
sensational rumors to circulate through the crowd on the
pier.

First, Mrs. John Jacob Astor was reported to have died
at 8.06 o'clock, when the Carpathia was on her way up the
harbor.

Captain Smith and the first engineer were reported to
have shot themselves when they found that the Titanic was
doomed to sink. Afterward it was learned that Captain
Smith and the engineer went down with their ship in perfect
courage and coolness.

Major Archibald Butt, President Taft's military aide, was
said to have entered into an agreement with George D.
Widener, Colonel John Jacob Astor and Isidor Straus to
kill them first and then shoot himself before the boat sank.
It was said that this agreement had been carried out.
Later it was shown that, like many other men on the ship,
they had gone down without the exhibition of a sign of fear.

MRS. CORNELL SAFE

Magistrate Cornell's wife and her two sisters were among
the first to leave the ship. They were met at the first cabin
pier entrance by Magistrate Cornell and a party of friends.
None of the three women had hats. One of those who met
them was Magistrate Cornell's son. One of Mrs. Cornell's
sisters was overheard to remark that "it would be a dreadful
thing when the ship began really to unload."

The three women appeared to be in a very nervous state.
Their hair was more or less dishevelled. They were apparently
fully dressed save for their hats. Clothing had been
supplied them in their need and everything had been done
to make them comfortable. One of the party said that the
collision occurred at 9.45.

Following closely the Cornell party was H. J. Allison of
Montreal, who came to meet his family. One of the party,
who was weeping bitterly as he left the pier, explained that
the only one of the family that was rescued was the young
brother.

MRS. ASTOR APPEARED

In a few minutes young Mrs. Astor with her maid
appeared. She came down the gangplank unassisted. She
was wearing a white sweater. Vincent Astor and William
Dobbyn, Colonel Astor's secretary, greeted her and hurried
her to a waiting limousine which contained clothing and
other necessaries of which it was thought she might be in
need. The young woman was white-faced and silent.
Nobody cared to intrude upon her thoughts. Her stepson
said little to her. He did not feel like questioning her at
such a time, he said.

LAST SEEN OF COLONEL ASTOR

Walter M. Clark, a nephew of the senator, said that he
had seen Colonel Astor put his wife in a boat, after assuring
her that he would soon follow her in another. Mr. Clark
and others said that Colonel and Mrs. Astor were in their
suite when the crash came, and that they appeared quietly
on deck a few minutes afterward.

Here and there among the passengers of the Carpathia
and from the survivors of the Titanic the story was gleaned
of the rescue. Nothing in life will ever approach the joy
felt by the hundreds who were waiting in little boats on the
spot where the Titanic foundered when the lights of the
Carpathia were first distinguished. That was at 4 o'clock
on Monday morning.

DR. FRAUENTHAL WELCOMED

Efforts were made to learn from Dr. Henry Franenthal{sic}
something about the details of how he was rescued. Just
then, or as he was leaving the pier, beaming with evident
delight, he was surrounded by a big crowd of his friends.

"There's Harry! There he is!" they yelled and made a
rush for him.

All the doctor's face that wasn't covered with red beard
was aglow with smiles as his friends hugged him and slapped
him on the back. They rushed him off bodily through the
crowd and he too was whirled home.

A SAD STORY

How others followed--how heartrending stories of partings
and of thrilling rescues were poured out in an amazing stream--
this has all been told over and over again in the news that
for days amazed, saddened and angered the entire world.
It is the story of a disaster that nations, it is hoped, will make
impossible in the years to come.

In the stream of survivors were a peer of the realm, Sir
Cosmo Duff Gordon, and his secretary, side by side with
plain Jack Jones, of Birmingham, able seaman, millionaires
and paupers, women with bags of jewels and others with nightgowns
their only property.

MORE THAN SEVENTY WIDOWS

More than seventy widows were in the weeping company.
The only large family that was saved in its entirety was that
of the Carters, of Philadelphia. Contrasting with this remarkable
salvage of wealthy Pennsylvanians was the sleeping
eleven-months-old baby of the Allisons, whose father, mother
and sister went down to death after it and its nurse had been
placed in a life-boat.

Millionaire and pauper, titled grandee and weeping immigrant,
Ismay, the head of the White Star Company, and Jack
Jones from the stoke hole were surrounded instantly. Some
would gladly have escaped observation. Every man among
the survivors acted as though it were first necessary to explain
how he came to be in a life-boat. Some of the stories smacked
of Munchausen. Others were as plain and unvarnished as
a pike staff. Those that were most sincere and trustworthy
had to be fairly pulled from those who gave their sad testimony.

Far into the night the recitals were made. They were
told in the rooms of hotels, in the wards of hospitals and upon
trains that sped toward saddened homes. It was a symposium
of horror and heroism, the like of which has not been known
in the civilized world since man established his dominion over
the sea.

STEERAGE PASSENGERS

The two hundred and more steerage passengers did not
leave the ship until 11 o'clock. They were in a sad condition.
The women were without wraps and the few men there were
wore very little clothing. A poor Syrian woman who said
she was Mrs. Habush, bound for Youngstown, Ohio, carried
in her arms a six-year-old baby girl. This woman had lost
her husband and three brothers. "I lost four of my men
folks," she cried.

TWO LITTLE BOYS

Among the survivors who elicited a large measure of sympathy
were two little French boys who were dropped, almost
naked, from the deck of the sinking Titanic into a life-boat.
From what place in France did they come and to what place
in the New World were they bound? There was not one iota
of information to be had as to the identity of the waifs of the
deep, the orphans of the Titanic.

The two baby boys, two and four years old, respectively,
were in charge of Miss Margaret Hays, who is a fluent speaker
of French, and she had tried vainly to get from the lisping lips
of the two little ones some information that would lead to
the finding of their relatives.

Miss Hays, also a survivor of the Titanic, took charge of
the almost naked waifs on the Carpathia. She became
warmly attached to the two boys, who unconcernedly played
about, not understanding the great tragedy that had come
into their lives.

The two little curly-heads did not understand it all. Had
not their pretty nineteen-year-old foster mother provided
them with pretty suits and little white shoes and playthings
a-plenty? Then, too, Miss Hays had a Pom dog that she
brought with her from Paris and which she carried in her
arms when she left the Titanic and held to her bosom
through the long night in the life-boat, and to which the
children became warmly attached. All three became aliens
on an alien shore.

Miss Hays, unable to learn the names of the little fellows,
had dubbed the older Louis and the younger "Lump."
"Lump" was all that his name implies, for he weighed almost
as much as his brother. They were dark-eyed and brown
curly-haired children, who knew how to smile as only French
children can.

On the fateful night of the Titanic disaster and just as the
last boats were pulling away with their human freight, a
man rushed to the rail holding the babes under his arms.
He cried to the passengers in one of the boats and held the
children aloft. Three or four sailors and passengers held up
their arms. The father dropped the older boy. He was
safely caught. Then he dropped the little fellow and saw
him folded in the arms of a sailor. Then the boat pulled
away.

The last seen of the father, whose last living act was
to save his babes, he was waving his hand in a final parting.
Then the Titanic plunged to the ocean's bed.

BABY TRAVERS

Still more pitiable in one way was the lot of the baby survivor,
eleven-months-old Travers Allison, the only member
of a family of four to survive the wreck. His father, H. J.
Allison, and mother and Lorraine, a child of three, were
victims of the catastrophe. Baby Travers, in the excitement
following the crash, was separated from the rest of the family
just before the Titanic went down. With the party were
two nurses and a maid.

Major Arthur Peuchen, of Montreal, one of the survivors,
standing near the little fellow, who, swathed in blankets,
lay blinking at his nurse, described the death of Mrs. Allison.
She had gone to the deck without her husband, and, frantically
seeking him, was directed by an officer to the other
side of the ship.

She failed to find Mr. Allison and was quickly hustled
into one of the collapsible life-boats, and when last seen by
Major Peuchen she was toppling out of the half-swamped
boat. J. W. Allison, a cousin of H. J. Allison, was at the
pier to care for Baby Travers and his nurse. They were
taken to the Manhattan Hotel.

Describing the details of the perishing of the Allison family,
the rescued nurse said they were all in bed when the Titanic
hit the berg.

"We did not get up immediately," said she, "for we had

{illust. caption = WHITE STAR STEAMER TITANIC GYMNASIUM}

{illust. caption =
Copyright, 1912, Underwood & Underwood.
CAPTAIN A. H. ROSTROM

Commander of the Carpathia, which rescued the survivors of the Titanic
from the life-boats in the open sea and brought them to New York. After
the Senatorial Investigating Committee had examined Captain Rostrom, at
which time this specially posed photograph was taken, Senator William
Alden Smith, chairman of the committee, said of Captain Rostrom: "His
conduct of the rescue shows that he is not only an efficient seaman, but one
of nature's noblemen."}

not thought of danger. Later we were told to get up, and
I hurriedly dressed the baby. We hastened up on deck,
and confusion was all about. With other women and children
we clambered to the life-boats, just as a matter of precaution,
believing that there was no immediate danger. In
about an hour there was an explosion and the ship appeared
to fall apart. We were in the life-boat about six hours before
we were picked up."

THE RYERSON FAMILY

Probably few deaths have caused more tears than Arthur
Ryerson's, in view of the sad circumstances which called him
home from a lengthy tour in Europe. Mr. Ryerson's eldest
son, Arthur Larned Ryerson, a Yale student, was killed in
an automobile accident Easter Monday, 1912.

A cablegram announcing the death plunged the Ryerson
family into mourning and they boarded the first steamship
for this country. If{sic} happened to be the Titanic, and the
death note came near being the cause of the blotting out of
the entire family.

The children who accompanied them were Miss Susan P.
Ryerson, Miss Emily B. Ryerson and John Ryerson. The
latter is 12 years old.

They did not know their son intended to spend the Easter
holidays at their home at Haverford, Pa. until they were
informed of his death. John Lewis Hoffman, also of Haverford
and a student of Yale, was killed with young Ryerson.

The two were hurrying to Philadelphia to escort a fellow-
student to his train. In turning out of the road to pass a cart
the motor car crashed into a pole in front of the entrance to the
estate of Mrs. B. Frank Clyde. The college men were picked
up unconscious and died in the Bryn Mawr Hospital.

G. Heide Norris of Philadelphia, who went to New York
to meet the surviving members of the Ryerson family, told
of a happy incident at the last moment as the Carpathia
swung close to the pier. There had been no positive information
that young "Jack" Ryerson was among those saved--
indeed, it was feared that he had gone down with the Titanic,
like his father, Arthur Ryerson.

Mr. Norris spoke of the feeling of relief that came over
him as, watching from the pier, he saw "Jack" Ryerson
come from a cabin and stand at the railing. The name of
the boy was missing from some of the lists and for two days
it was reported that he had perished.

CAPTAIN ROSTRON'S REPORT

Less than 24 hours after the Cunard Line steamship Carpathia
came in as a rescue ship with survivors of the Titanic
disaster, she sailed again for the Mediterranean cruise which
she originally started upon last week. Just before the liner
sailed, H. S. Bride, the second Marconi wireless operator of
the Titanic, who had both of his legs crushed on a life-boat,
was carried off on the shoulders of the ship's officers to St.
Vincent's Hospital.

Captain A. H. Rostron, of the Carpathia, addressed an
official report, giving his account of the Carpathia's rescue
work, to the general manager of the Cunard Line, Liverpool.
The report read: "I beg to report that at 12.35 A. M. Monday
18th inst. I was informed of urgent message from Titanic
with her position. I immediately ordered ship turned around
and put her in course for that position, we being then 58
miles S. 52--E. `T' from her; had heads of all departments
called and issued what I considered the necessary orders, to
be in preparation for any emergency.

"At 2.40 A. M. saw flare half a point on port bow. Taking
this for granted to be ship, shortly after we sighted our first
iceberg. I had previously had lookouts doubled, knowing
that Titanic had struck ice, and so took every care and precaution.
We soon found ourselves in a field of bergs, and had
to alter course several times to clear bergs; weather fine, and
clear, light air on sea, beautifully clear night, though dark.

"We stopped at 4 A. M., thus doing distance in three hours
and a half, picking up the first boat at 4.10 A. M.; boat in charge
of officer, and he reported that Titanic had foundered. At
8.30 A. M. last boat picked up. All survivors aboard and all
boats accounted for, viz., fifteen life-boats, one boat abandoned,
two Berthon boats alongside (saw one floating upwards
among wreckage), and according to second officer (senior officer
saved) one Berthon boat had not been launched, it having
got jammed, making sixteen life-boats and four Berthon boats
accounted for. By the time we had cleared first boat it was
breaking day, and I could see all within area of four miles.
We also saw that we were surrounded by icebergs, large and
small, huge field of drift ice with large and small bergs in it,
the ice field trending from N. W. round W. and S. to S. E., as
far as we could see either way.

"At 8 A. M. the Leyland S. S. California came up. I gave
him the principal news and asked him to search and I would
proceed to New York; at 8.50 proceeded full speed while
researching over vicinity of disaster, and while we were getting
people aboard I gave orders to get spare hands along and swing
in all our boats, disconnect the fall and hoist up as many
Titanic boats as possible in our davits; also get some on forecastle
heads by derricks. We got thirteen lifeboats, six on forward
deck and seven in davits. After getting all survivors aboard
and while searching I got a clergyman to offer a short prayer
of thankfulness for those saved, and also a short burial service
for their loss, in saloon.

"Before deciding definitely where to make for, I conferred
with Mr. Ismay, and as he told me to do what I thought
best, I informed him, I considered New York best. I knew
we should require clean blankets, provisions and clean linen,
even if we went to the Azores, as most of the passsengers{sic}
saved were women and children, and they hysterical, not
knowing what medical attention they might require. I
thought it best to go to New York. I also thought it would
be better for Mr. Ismay to go to New York or England as
soon as possible, and knowing I should be out of wireless
communication very soon if I proceeded to Azores, it left
Halifax, Boston and New York, so I chose the latter.

"Again, the passengers were all hysterical about ice, and I
pointed out to Mr. Ismay the possibilities of seeing ice if I
went to Halifax. Then I knew it would be best to keep in
touch with land stations as best I could. We have experienced
great difficulty in transmitting news, also names of survivors.
Our wireless is very poor, and again we have had so
many interruptions from other ships and also messages from
shore (principally press, which we ignored). I gave instructions
to send first all official messages, then names of passengers, then
survivors' private messages. We had haze early Tuesday
morning for several hours; again more or less all Wednesday
from 5.30 A. M. to 5 P. M.; strong south-southwesterly
winds and clear weather Thursday, with moderate rough sea.

"I am pleased to say that all survivors have been very
plucky. The majority of women, first, second and third
class, lost their husbands, and, considering all, have been
wonderfully well. Tuesday our doctor reported all survivors
physically well. Our first class passengers have behaved
splendidly, given up their cabins voluntarily and supplied
the ladies with clothes, etc. We all turned out of our cabins
and gave them to survivors--saloon, smoking room, library,
etc., also being used for sleeping accommodation. Our crew,
also turned out to let the crew of the Titanic take their
quarters. I am pleased to state that owing to preparations made
for the comfort of survivors, none were the worse for exposure,
etc. I beg to specially mention how willing and cheerful the
whole of the ship's company behaved, receiving the highest
praise from everybody. And I can assure you I am very
proud to have such a company under my command.
"A. H. ROSTRON."

The following list of the survivors and dead contains the latest revisions and
corrections of the White Star Line officials, and was furnished by them exclusively
for this book.

LIST OF SURVIVORS
FIRST CABIN

ANDERSON, HARRY.
ANTOINETTE, MISS.
APPIERANELT, MISS.
APPLETON. MRS. E. D.
ABBOTT, MRS. ROSE.
ALLISON, MASTER, and nurse.
ANDREWS, MISS CORNELIA I.
ALLEN, MISS. E. W.
ASTOR, MRS. JOHN JACOB, and maid.
AUBEART, MME. N., and maid.

BARRATT, KARL B.
BESETTE, MISS.
BARKWORTH, A. H.
BUCKNELL, MRS. W.
BOWERMAN, MISS E.
BROWN, MRS. J. J.
BURNS, MISS C. M.
BISHOP, MR. AND MRS. D. H.
BLANK, H.
BESSINA, MISS A.
BAXTER, MRS. JAMES.
BRAYTON, GEORGE.
BONNELL, MISS LILY.
BROWN, MRS. J. M.
BOWEN, MISS G. C.
BECKWITH, MR. AND MRS. R. L.
BISLEY, MR. AND MRS.
BONNELL, MISS C.

CASSEBEER, MRS. H. A.
CARDEZA, MRS. J. W.
CANDELL, MRS. CHURCHILL.
CASE, HOWARD B.
CAMARION, KENARD.
CASSEBORO, MISS D. D.
CLARK, MRS. W. M.

CHIBINACE, MRS. B. C.
CHARLTON, W. M.
CROSBY, MRS E. G.
CARTER, MISS LUCILLE.
CALDERHEAD, E. P.
CHANDANSON, MISS VICTOTRINE.
CAVENDISH, MRS. TURRELL, and maid.
CHAFEE, MRS. H. I.
CARDEZA, MR. THOMAS.
CUMMINGS, MRS. J.
CHEVRE, PAUL.
CHERRY, MISS GLADYS.
CHAMBERS, MR. AND MRS. N. C.
CARTER, MR. AND MRS. W. E.
CARTER, MASTER WILLIAM.
COMPTON, MRS. A. T.
COMPTON, MISS S. R.
CROSBY, MRS. E. G.
CROSBY, MISS HARRIET.
CORNELL, MRS. R. C.
CHIBNALL, MRS. E.

DOUGLAS, MRS. FRED.
DE VILLIERS, MME.
DANIEL, MISS SARAH.
DANIEL, ROBERT W.
DAVIDSON, MR. AND MRS. THORNTON,
and family.
DOUGLAS, MRS. WALTER, and maid.
DODGE, MISS SARAH.
DODGE, MRS. WASHINGTON, and son.
DICK, MR. AND MRS. A. A.
DANIELL, H. HAREN.
DRACHENSTED, A.
DALY, PETER D.

ENDRES, MISS CAROLINE.
ELLIS, MISS

LIST OF SURVIVORS--FIRST CABIN (CONTINUED)

EARNSHAW, MRS. BOULTON.
EUSTIS, MISS E.
EMMOCK, PHILIP E.

FLAGENHEIM, MRS. ANTOINETTE.
FRANICATELLI, MISY.
FYNN, J. I.
FORTUNE, MISS ALICE
FORTUNE, MISS ETHEL.
FORTUNE, MRS. MARK.
FORTUNE, MISS MABEL.
FRAUENTHAL, DR. AND MRS. H. W.
FRAUENTHAL, MR. AND MRS. T. G
FROLICHER, MISS MABGARET.
FROLICHER, MAY AND MRS.
FROLICHER, MISS N.
FUTRELLE, MRS. JACQUES.

GRACIE, COLONEL ARCHIBALD.
GRAHAM, MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM.
GRAHAM, MISS M.
GORDON, SIR COSMO DUFF.
GORDON, LADY.
GIBSON, MISS DOROTHY.
GOLDENBERG, MR. AND MRS. SAMUEL.
GOLDENBERG, MISS ELLA.
GREENFIELD, MRS. L. P.
GREENFIELD, G. B.
GREENFIELD, WILLIAM.
GIBSON, MRS. LEONARD.
GOOGHT, JAMES.

HAVEN, MR. HENRY B.
HARRIS, MRS. H. B.
HOLVERSON, MRS. ALEX.
HOGEBOOM, MRS. J. C.
HAWKSFORD, W. J.
HARPER, HENRY, and man servant.
HARPER, MRS. H. S.
HOLD, MISS J. A.
HOPE, NINA.
HOYT, MR. AND Mrs. FRED.
HORNER, HENRY R.
HARDER, MR. AND MRS. GEORGE.
HAYS, MRS. CHARLES M., and daughter.
HIPPACH, MISS JEAN.
HIPPACH, MRS. IDA S.

ISMAY, J. BRUCE.

JENASCO, MRS. J.

KIMBALL, MR. AND MRS. ED. N.
KENNYMAN, F. A.
KENCHEN, MISS EMILE.

LONGLEY, MISS G. F.
LEADER, MRS. A. F.
LEAHY, MISS NORA.
LAVORY, MISS BERTHA.
LINES, MRS. ERNEST.
LINES, MISS MARY.
LINDSTROM, MRS. SINGIRD.
LESNEUR, GUSTAVE, JR.

MADILL, MISS GEORGETTE A.
MAHAN, MRS.
MELICARD, MME.
MENDERSON, MISS LETTA.
MAIAIMY, MISS ROBERTA.
MARVIN, MRS. D. W.
MARECHELL, PIERRE.
MARONEY, MRS. R.
MEYER, MRS. E. I.
MOCK, MR. P. E.
MIDDLE, MME. M. OIJVE.
MINAHAN, MISS DAISY.
MINAHAN, MRS. W. E.
MCGOUGH, JAMES.

NEWELL, MISS ALICE.
NEWELL, MISS MADELINE.
NEWELL, WASHINGTON.
NEWSON, MISS HELEN.

O'CONNELL, MISS R.
OSTBY, E. C.

LIST OF SURVIVORS--FIRST CABIN (CONTINUED)

OSTBY, MISS HELEN.
OMUND, FIEUNAM.

PANHART, MISS NINETTE.
PEARS, MRS. E.
POMROY, MISS ELLEN.
POTTER, MRS. THOMAS, JR.
PEUCHEN, MAJOR ARTHUR.
PEERCAULT, MISS A.

RYERSON, JOHN.
RENAGO, MRS. MAMAM.
RANELT, MISS APPIE.
ROTHSCHILD, MRS. LORD MARTIN.
ROSENBAHM, MISS EDITH.
RHEIMS, MR. AND MRS GEORGE.
ROSIBLE, MISS H.
ROTHES, COUNTESS.
ROBERT, MRS. EDNA.
ROLMANE, C.
RYERSON, AIISS SUSAN P.
RYERSON, MISS EMILY.
RYERSON, MRS. ARTHUR, and maid.

STONE, MRS. GEORGE M.
SKELLER, MRS. WILLIAM.
SEGESSER, MISS EMMA.
SEWARD, FRED. K.
SHUTTER, MISS.
SLOPER, WILLIAM T.
SWIFT, MRS. F. JOEL.
SCHABERT, MRS. PAUL.
SHEDDEL, ROBERT DOUGLASS.
SNYDER, MR. AND MRS. JOHN.
SEREPECA, AIISS AUGHSTA.
SILVERTIIORN, R. SPENCER.
SAALFELD, ADOLF.
STAHELIN, MAX.
SIMOINUS, ALFONSIU8.
SMITH, MRS. LUCIEN P.
STEPHENSON, MRS. WALTER.
SOLOMON, ABRAHAM.
SILVEY, MRS. WILLIAM B
STENMEL, MR. AND MRS. HELEERY
SPENCER, MBS. W. A., and maid.
SLAYTER, MISS HILDA.
SPEDDEN, MR. AND MRS. F. O., and child.
STEFFANSON, H. B.
STRAUS, MRS., maid of.
SCHABERT, MRS. EMMA.
SLINTER, MRS. E.
SIMMONS, A.

TAYLOR, MISS.
TUCKER, MRS., and maid.
THAYER, MBS. J. B.
THAYER, J. B., JR.
TAUSSIG, MISS RHTH.
TAUSSIG. MRS. E.
THOR, MISS ELLA.
THORNE, MRS. G.
TAYLOR, MR. AND MRS. E. Z
TROUT, MISS JESSIE.
TUCKER, GILBERT.

WOOLNER, HUGH.
WARD, MISS ANNA.
WILLIAMS, RICHARD M., JB.
WARREN, MRS. P.
WILSON, MISS HELEN A.
WILLIARD, MISS C.
WICK, MISS MARY.
WICK, GEO.
WIDENER, valet of.
WIDENER, MRS. GEORGE D., and maid.
WHITE, MRS. J. STUART.

YOUNG, MISS MARIE.

LIST OF SURVIVORS--SECOND CABIN

ABESSON, MRS. MANNA.
ABBOTT, MRS. R.
ARGENIA, MRS., and two children.
ANGEL, F.
ANGLE, WILLIAM.

BAUMTHORPE, MRS. L.
BALLS, MRS. ADA E.
BUSS, MISS KATE.
BECKER, MRS. A. O., and three children
BEANE, EDWARD.
BEANE, MRS. ETHEL,
BRYHI, MISS D.
BEESLEY, MR. L.
BROWN, MR. T. W. S.
BROWN, MISS E.
BROWN, MRS.
BENTHAN, LILLIAN W.
BYSTRON, KAROLINA
BRIGHT, DAGMAR.
BRIGHT, DAISY.

CLARKE, MRS. ADA.
CAMERON, MISS. C.
CALDWELL, ALBERT F.
CALDWELL, MRS. SYLVAN
CALDWELL, ALDEN, infant.
CRISTY, MR. AND MRS.
COLLYER, MRS. CHARLOTTE.
COLLYER, MISS MARJORIE
CHRISTY, MRS. ALICE.
COLLET, STITART.
CHRISTA, MISS DIJCIA.
CHARLES, WILLIAM.
CROFT, MILLIE MALL.

DOLING, MRS. ELSIE.
DREW, MRS. LULU.
DAVIS, MRS. AGNES.
DAVIS, MISS MARY.
DAVIS, JOHN M.
DUVAN, FLORENTINE.
DUVAN, MIBS A.
DAVIDSON, MISS MARY.
DOLING, MISS ADA.
DRISCOLL, MRS. B.
DEYSTROM, CAROLINE.

EMCARMACION, MRS. RINALDO.

FAUNTHORPE, MRS. LIZZIE
FORMERY, MISS ELLEN.

GARSIDE, ETHEL.
GERRECAI, MRS. MARCY.
GENOVESE, ANGERE.

HART, MRS. ESTHER.
HART, EVA.
HARRIS, GEORGE.
HEWLETT, MRS. MARY.
HEBBER, MISS S.
HOFFMAN, LOLA.
HOFFMAN, LOUIS.
HARPER, NINA.
HOLD, STEPHEN.
HOLD, MRS. ANNA.
HOSONO, MASABTJMI.
HOCKING, MR. AND MRS. GEORGE.
HOCKING, MISS NELLIE.
HERMAN, MRS. JANE, 2 daughters
HEALY, NORA.
HANSON, JENNIE.
HAMATAINEN, W.
HAMATAINEN, ANNA.
HARNLIN, ANNA, and Chjld

ILETT, BERTHA.

JACKSON, MRS. AMY.
JULIET, LlnVCHE.
JERWAN, MARY.
JUHON, PODRO.
JACOBSON, MRS.

KEANE, MISS NORA H.
KELLY, MRS. F.
KANTAR, MRS. S.

LEITCH, JESSIE.
LAROCHE, MRS. AND MISS SIMMONE.

LIST OF SURVIVORS--SECOND CABIN (CONTINITED)

LAROCHE, MISS LOUISE.
LEHMAN, BERTHA.
LAUCH, MRS. ALEX.
LANIORE, AMELIA.
LYSTROM, MRS. C.

MELLINGER, ELIZABETH.
MELLINGER, child.
MARSHALL, MRS. KATE.
MALLETT, A.
MALLETT, MRS. and child.
MANGE, PAULA.
MARE, MRS. FLORENCE.
MELLOR, W. J.
McDEARMONT, MISS LELA.
McGOWAN, ANNA.

NYE, ELTZABETB.
NASSER, MRS. DELIA.
NUSSA, MRS. A.

OXENHAM, PEBCY J.

PHILLIPS, ALICE.
PALLAS, EMILIO.
PADRO, JITLIAN.
PRINSKY, ROSA.
PORTALTTPPI, EMILIO.
PARSH, MRS. L.
PLETT, B.

QUICK, MRS. JANE.
QUICK, MRS. VERA W.
QUICK, MISS PHYLLIS.

REINARDO, MISS E.
RIDSDALE, LUCY.
RENOUF, MRS. LILY.
RUGG, MISS EMILY.
RICHARDS, M.
ROGERS, MISS SELINA.
RICHARDS, MRS. EMILIA, two boys, and
MR. RICHARDS, JR.

SIMPSON, MISS.
SINCOCK, MISS MAUDE.
SINKKONNEN, ANNA.
SMITH, MISS MARION.
SILVEN, LYLLE.

TRANT, MRS J.
TOOMEY, MISS. E.
TROUTT, MISS E.
TROUTT, MISS CECELIA.

WARE, MISS H.
WATTER, MISS N.
WILHELM, CB AS.
WAT, MRS. A., and two children.
WILLIAMS, RICBARD M., JR.
WEISZ, MATBILDE.
WEBBER, MISS SIJSDD.
WRIGHT, MISS MARION.
WATT, MISS BESSIE.
WATT, MISS BEKTHA.
WEST, MRS. E. A.
WEST, MISS CONSTANCE.
WEST, MISS BARBARA.
WELLS, ADDIE.
WELLS, MASTER.

A list of surviving third cabin passengers and crew is omitted owing to the impossibility
of obtaining the correct names of many.

ROLL OF THE DEAD
FIRST CABIN

ALLISON, H. J.
ALLISON, MRS., and maid.
ALLISON, MISS.
ANDREWS, THOMAS.
ARTAGAVEYTIA, MR. RAMON.
ASTOR, COL. J. J., and servant.
ANDERSON, WALKER.

ROLL OF THE DEAD--FIRST CABIN (CONTINUED)

BEATTIE, T.
BRANDEIS, E.
BVCKNELL, MRS. WlLLIAM, maid of.
BAHMANN, J.
BAXTER, MR. AND MRS. QUIGG.
BJORNSTROM, H.
BIRNBAHM, JACOB.
BLACKWELL, S. W.
BOREBANK, J. J.
BOWEN, MISS.
BRADY, JOHN B.
BREWE, ARLBLIR J.
BUTT, MAJOR A.

CLARK, WALTER M.
CLLFFORD, GEORGE Q.
COLLEY, E. P.
CARDEZA, T. D. M., servant of.
CARDEZA, MRS. J. W., maid of.
CARLSON, FRANK.
CORRAN, F. M.
CORRAN, J. P.
CHAFEE, MR. H. I.
CHISHOLM, ROBERT.
COMPTON, A. T.
CRAFTON, JOHN B.
CROSBY, EDWARD G.
CUMMINGS, JOBN BRADLEY.

DULLES, WILLIAM C.
DOUGLAS, W. D.
DOUGLAS, MASTER R., nurse of.

EVANS, MISS E.

FORTUNE, MARK.
FOREMAN, B. L.
FORTUNE, CHARLES.
FRANKLIN, T. P.
FUTRELLE, J.

GEE, ARTHUR.
GOLDENBERG, E. L.
GOLDSCHMIDT, G. B.
GIGLIO, VICTOR.
GUGGENHEIM, BENJAMIN,

HAYS, CHARLES M.
HAYS, MRS. CHARLES, maid of.
HEAD, CHRISTOPITER.
HILLIARD, H. H.
HIPKINS, W. E.
HOGENHEIM, MRS. A.
HARRI3, HENRY B.
HARP, MR. AND MRS. CHARLES M.
HARP, MISS MARGARET, and maid.
HOLVERSON, A. M.

ISLAM, MISS A. E.
ISMAY, J. BRUCE, servant of.

JULIAN, H. F.
JONES, C. C.

KENT, EDWARD A.
KENYON, MR. AND MRS. F. R.
KLABER, HERMAN.

LAMBERTH, WILLIAM, F. F.
LAWRENCE, ARTHUR.
LONG, MILTON.
LEWY, E. G.
LOPING, J. H.
LINGREY, EDWARD.

MAGUIRE, J. E.
McCAFFRY, T.
McCAFFRY, T., JR.
McCARTHY, T.
MIDDLETON, J. C.
MILLET, FRANK D.
MINAHAN, DR.
MEYER, EDGAR J.
MOLSON, H. M.
MOORE, C., servant.

NATSCH, CHARLES.
NEWALL, MISS T.
NICHOLSON, A. S.

OVIES, S.
OBNOUT, ALFRED T.

ROLL OF THE DEAD--FIRST CABIN (CONTINUED)

PARR, M. H. W.
PEARS, MR. AND MRS. THOMAS.
PENASCO, MR. AND MRS. VICTOR.
PARTNER, M. A.
PAYNE, Y.
POND, FLORENCE, and maid.
PORTER, WALTER.
PUFFER, C. C.

REUCHLIN, J.
ROBERT, MRS. E., maid of.
ROEBLING, WASHINGTON A., 2d.
ROOD, HUGH R.
ROES, J. HUGO.
ROTHES, COUNTESS, maid of.
ROTHSCHILD, M.
ROWE, ARTHUR.
RYERSON, A.

SILVEY, WILLIAM B.
SPEDDEN, MRS. F. O., maid of
SPENCER, W. A.
STEAD, W. T.
STEHLI, MR. AND MRS. MAX FBOLICHER.
STONE, MRS. GEORGE, maid of.
STRAUS, MR. AND MRS. ISIDOR.
SUTTON, FREDERICK.
SMART, JOHN M.
SMITH, CLINCH.
SMITET, R. W.
SMITH, L. P.

TAUSSIC,, EMIL.
THAYER, MRS., maid of.
THAYER, JOHN B.

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