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Science in the Kitchen. by Mrs. E. E. Kellogg

Part 11 out of 17

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pleasant, and for those of moderate means or those unaccustomed to
dinner-giving are by far the most suitable.

The arrangement and adornment of the table afford an opportunity for the
display of much artistic taste and skill. An expensive outlay is by no
means necessary, as highly pleasing effects may be produced by the
addition of a few choice, well-arranged flowers or blossoming plants to
a table already well laid with spotless linen, bright silver, and clean
glass and china ware. A profusion of ornament should be avoided, large
pieces of plate, and high, elaborate designs of flowers or fruit should
not be used, as they obstruct the intercourse of the guests.

A center piece of flowers, with a small bouquet tied with ribbon for
each guest, is quite sufficient. Low dishes filled with violets or
pansies; a basket filled with oranges, mingled with orange leaves and
blossoms; bowls of ferns and roses; a block of ice wreathed in ferns,
with an outer circle of water lilies; dishes of vari-colored grapes
resting amid the bright leaves of the foliage plant, are some of many
pleasing designs which may be employed for the adornment of the dinner
table. The amount of space occupied with decorations must depend upon
the style of service employed. If no calculation need be made for
placing the different dishes composing the dinner, a strip of colored
plush or satin bordered with ivy, smilax, or some trailing vine, is
quite frequently used for the decoration of a long table.

A very pleasing custom consists in selecting some especial color for the
decorations with which the table napery, dishes, and even the food to be
served shall accord; as, for example, a "pink" dinner, with roses as the
chief flower, strawberries, pink lemonade, and other pink attractions;
or a "yellow" luncheon, served on napery etched with yellow, with vases
of goldenrod for center pieces, and dainty bouquets of the same tied
with yellow ribbon at each plate, while yellow tapers in golden
candlesticks cast a mellow light over all, during the serving of a bill
of fare which might include peaches and cream, oranges, pumpkin pie, and
other yellow comestibles.

The menu cards afford much opportunity for adding attractiveness to a
company dinner. If one possesses artistic skill, a floral decoration or
a tiny sketch, with an appropriate quotation, the guest's name, and date
of the dinner, make of the cards very pleasing souvenirs. A proper
quotation put after each dish is much in vogue as a means of promoting
conversation. The quotations are best selected from one author.

There are no absolute rules for the service of company dinners, much
depending upon social conditions and established customs. Two modes are
in general use,--placing the dishes upon the table to be dished by the
host and hostess, and placing all food upon the side table to be dished
and served by a waiter. When the latter method is used, it is quite
customary to place the plates of soup upon the table before dinner is
announced. As many knives, forks, and spoons as will be needed for the
courses may be placed beside each plate, or they may be brought in with
the course, as preferred. Clean plates are necessary for every course.
The manner of serving is essentially like that already described.

Care should be taken to have the dining room at an agreeable
temperature, neither too warm nor too cold.

At large dinner parties, each gentleman, as he enters, receives a card
upon which is written the name of the lady he is to take in to dinner,
to whom the hostess at once presents him. When dinner is announced, the
host leads the way with the oldest or most distinguished lady or the one
to whom the dinner is given, while the hostess follows last, with the
most honored gentleman. The host places the lady whom he escorts on his
right. If the number is small, the host indicates the places the guests
should occupy as they enter the room; if the party is large, the menu
card at each plate bears the name of the guest for whom it is designed.
The lady escorted by the host should be the first one served.

Soup is always taken and tasted, whether liked or not; after the first
course, it is proper to accept or refuse a dish, as preferred.

No well-bred hostess ever apologizes for the food upon her table or
urges anything upon her guests when once declined. No orders should be
given to servants during the meal; everything that will contribute to
the proper serving of the dinner should be arranged beforehand, and all
necessary instructions given.

At the close of the dinner, the hostess gives the sign for retiring.

TABLE TOPICS.

A meal--what is it? Just enough of food
To renovate and well refresh the frame,
So that with spirits lightened, and with strength renewed,
We turn with willingness to work again.

--_Sel._

Do not bring disagreeable things to the table in your conversation
any more than you would in your dishes.--_Sel._

Courtesy in the mistress of the house consists in feeding
conversation; never in usurping it.--_Mme. Swetchine_

Good humor and good health follow a good meal; and by a good meal we
mean anything, however simple, well dressed in its way.--_Smiles._

Unquiet meals make ill digestion.--_Shakespeare._

Eat slowly and do not season your food with care.--_Sel._

To rise from the table _able_ to eat a little more is a proverbially
good rule for every one. There is nothing more idiotic than forcing
down a few mouthfuls, because they happen to remain on one's plate
after hunger is satisfied, and because they may be "wasted" if left.
It is the most serious waste to overtax the stomach with even half
an ounce more than it can take care of.--_Sel._

I pray you, O excellent wife! cumber not yourself and me to get a
curiously rich dinner for this man and woman who have just alighted
at our gate.... These things, if they are desirous of them, they can
get for a few shillings at any village inn; but rather let that
stranger see, if he will, in your looks, accents, and behavior, your
heart and earnestness, your thought and will, that which he cannot
buy at any price in any city, and which he may travel miles and dine
sparely and sleep hardly to behold.--_Emerson._

AFTER MEAL TIME

To no other department of domestic work perhaps is so little thought
given or so little science applied as to the routine work of clearing
the table and washing the dishes after mealtime. Any way to accomplish
the object, seems to be the motto in very many households. But even for
these prosaic tasks there is a best way, which, if employed, may make of
an otherwise irksome service a really pleasurable one.

CLEARING THE TABLE.--First of all, put back the chairs, and brush
up the crumbs from the floor, then collect all untouched foods and store
them away in clean dishes; next gather the silver, place it handles
upward in pitchers or other deep dishes, and pour hot water over it. For
gathering the silver a compartment tray in which knives, forks, and
spoons may be placed separately is important. Many of the scratches and
marks on their silver ware, which housekeepers deplore, come from the
careless handling together of forks, knives, and spoons. Now in a deep
basin upon a tray, collect all the refuse and partly eaten foods,
carefully emptying cups, glasses, finger bowls, etc., and scraping all
dishes which contained food as clean as possible; for no crumbs or
particles of food should be introduced into the dishwater. Pile the
dishes as fast as cleaned upon a second tray in readiness for washing.
It saves much liability of breakage in transferring from the dining room
to the kitchen, if each kind of soiled dishes is packed by itself.

Wipe carefully, if not needing to be washed, and replenish all salts,
granola cups, and sugar bowls before putting away. Gather the soiled
napkins for the laundry, and put those clean enough to be used again in
their proper places. Especial care must be taken, however, so to
designate those reserved for future use that each shall receive the same
again, as nothing is more disgusting to a sensitive person than to be
tendered a napkin which has been used by some one else. Some form of
napkin holder should be considered an essential part of the table
furnishing. If rings cannot be afforded, ordinary clothes pins, gilded
and decorated with a bit of ribbon, make very pretty substitutes.

Brush the tablecloth, fold in its creases, also the sub-cover of canton
flannel, and lay both away until again needed.

_Washing the Dishes._--Plenty of hot water and clean towels are the
essential requisites for expeditious and thorough dish-washing. A few
drops of crude ammonia added to the water will soften it and add to the
luster of the silver and china. Soap may be used or not according to
circumstances; all greasy dishes require a good strong suds. There
should also be provided two dish drainers or trays, unless there is a
stationary sink with tray on which to drain the dishes. For washing
glassware and fine china, _papier-mache_ tubs are preferable to anything
else, as they are less liable to occasion breakage of the ware. If many
dishes are to be washed, frequent changes of water will be necessary as
the first becomes either cold or dirty. Perfectly sweet, clean dishes
are not evolved from dirty dishwater. The usual order given for the
washing of dishes is, glasses, silver, fine china, cups, saucers,
pitchers, plates and other dishes. This is, however, based upon the
supposition that cups and saucers are used for beverages, and plates are
soiled by the use of various greasy foods; but in families where tea
and coffee and animal foods are dispensed with, and saucers are used for
grains with cream dressing, the plates are often cleaner than the
saucers and should be washed first.

The general rule to be followed is always to wash the dishes least
soiled first, and all of one kind together. The latter item is specially
important, since much of the nicking of dishes and breaking of handles
from cups, covers, and pitchers is the result of piling dishes
promiscuously together while washing.

It is quite as easy to finish washing one kind before beginning on
another as to do it in any less safe and systematic way, and if wiped in
the same order, it does away with the need of sorting when putting the
dishes away.

If for any reason the dishes must wait for a time before being washed,
the best plan is to pack them carefully into large pans, cover with warm
water, and let them soak. When ready to wash them, prepare hot suds and
clear water for rinsing in additional pans. Do not use too hot water, as
a high temperature will break glass and "check" the enamel of ordinary
ware. The law of expansion holds good with both china and glassware, and
all glass and glazed wares should be dipped into hot water in such a
manner that all its surfaces may receive the heat and expand together.

All dishes used for milk should be first thoroughly rinsed in cold water
before being washed in hot water or suds.

Be sure that the inside of all cups and pitchers is thoroughly clean. It
is a good plan to have a mop made by fastening finger-lengths of coarse
cotton twin to a suitable handle, for washing the inside of pitchers.

In cleaning forks, spoons, or cups, which have been employed in beating
or eating eggs, rinse them in cold water before putting them into hot
suds, as hot water cooks the egg and causes it to adhere. Common table
salt is said to be excellent for removing the egg tarnish from silver.
Clean Dover egg beaters by beating a dish of cold water, or by holding
under a stream of cold water from the faucet, then carefully rinse and
wipe perfectly dry. Do not put the upper part of the beater into hot
water, as it will remove the oil from the wheels so that they will not
work easily.

Grain-boilers and mush-kettles should be allowed to cool, then filled
with cold water and allowed to soak during the meal hour, when they can
be easily cleaned.

Tin dishes should be washed with hot suds as soon as possible after
using.

[Illustration: Wire Dishcloth]

For cleaning; iron pots, use soft water and soap or washing-soda with a
wire dishcloth or kettle scraper. If the food adheres to the sides, fill
with cold water and soak. Kettles and all dishes placed over a fire
should be cleaned on the outside as well as the inside. To remove the
soot, rub first with pieces of dry paper and afterward with damp paper;
then wash with hot suds and a cloth. Kettles and saucepans burned on the
inside may he cleaned by putting a little cold water and ashes in them
and allowing them to soak on the range until the water is warm.
Porcelain-lined and granite-ware utensils stained from food burning on,
may be cleaned after soaking for a time in a solution of sal-soda, which
may be prepared by pouring boiling water over the soda in the proportion
of two pints of water to one pound of sal-soda, and stirring until
dissolved. It may be prepared in quantity and stored in a stone jar
until needed.

Wash wooden ware and bread boards with cold water and sand soap. In
scraping dough from the bread board, always scrape with the grain of the
wood and be careful not to roughen the surface.

Steel knives and forks with ivory or wooden handles should not be put
into dishwater. Hot water will expand the steel and cause the handles to
crack. Wash them thoroughly with the dishcloth, scour with bath brick,
and wipe dry.

All tin and iron dishes should be thoroughly dried before putting away,
to prevent rusting.

If draining is considered preferable to wiping dishes, a good plan, if
one has not a patent dish drainer, is to fold an old tablecloth in
several thicknesses and spread upon the table. Wash the dishes carefully
and rinse in hot water. Place a cup or bowl bottom upward, lay a plate
on each side, then one between and above them, with two more on the
outside, and so on, not permitting them to touch more than necessary.

DISHCLOTHS AND TOWELS.--No dishes or utensils can be well cared for
without good, clean dishcloths and towels, and plenty of them. An
excellent dishcloth may be either knit or crocheted in some solid stitch
of coarse cotton yarn. Ten or twelve inches square is a good size.
Several thicknesses of cheese-cloth basted together make good
dishcloths, as do also pieces of old knitted garments and Turkish
toweling. If a dish mop is preferred, it may be made as follows: Cut a
groove an inch from the end of a stick about a foot in length and of
suitable shape for a handle; cut a ball of coarse twine, into nine-inch
lengths, and lay around the stick with the middle of the strands against
the groove; wind a fine wire or cord around the twine to fasten it in
the groove; then shake down the twine, so it will lie all one way like a
mop, and fasten it to the handle by tying a second cord around it on the
outside.

Towels for drying dishes should be of three different grades,--fine ones
without lint for glass, silver, and fine china; coarser ones for the
ordinary table ware, and still another quality for pans, kettles, and
other kitchen ware. The right size is a yard in length and half as wide,
with the ends hemmed. As to material, fine checked linen is usually
employed for glass and silver towels, and crash for ordinary dishes, for
iron and tinware towels which have become somewhat worn, or a coarse bag
opened and hemmed, may be used. Old, half-worn tablecloths may be cut
into excellent dish towels.

It is of the greatest importance that all dishcloths, mops, and towels
be kept perfectly sweet and clean. Greasy dishcloths and sour towels are
neither neat nor wholesome and are a most fertile source of germs, often
breeding disease and death. After each dish washing, the dishcloth,
towels, and mops should be thoroughly washed in hot water with plenty of
soap, well rinsed and hung up to dry either upon a line out of doors or
a rack made for the purpose near the kitchen range. If care is always
taken to clean the dishes as much as possible before washing and to
change the suds as often as they become dirty, the towels will not be
hard to keep clean and sweet-smelling. Those used during the week should
go into the wash as regularly as other household articles. Dish towels
are also much better for being ironed. It gives them a "surface" which
facilitates the drying operation.

THE CARE OF SILVER, GLASS, ETC.--If silver is well washed in hot
water containing a few drops of ammonia, and carefully dried with a
fine, soft towel, it will keep bright for a long time without other
cleaning. If special cleaning is necessary, try the following: Place the
silver in a pan of hot water, then with a soft cloth, soaped and
sprinkled with powdered borax, scour the silver well; afterward rinse in
clear cold water, and dry with a clean cloth. If a more thorough
cleaning is needed, apply moistened Spanish whiting with a silver brush
and soft flannel, afterward polishing with dry whiting and chamois skin.
Frequent scouring should be avoided by careful washing, as too much
rubbing wears out plated ware and dulls the best of silver. Silver ware
and plate which is not in ordinary use can be kept from tarnishing by
varnishing with collodion, a solution of gun-cotton in ether. The
articles should be carefully brushed in this colorless varnish with an
elastic brush, taking care that the entire surface is covered. The film
of collodion will protect the underlying metal from the action of the
sulphurous vapors to which is due the blackening of silver.

Tinware which has become blackened may be made to look bright and
shining again by rubbing with a damp cloth dipped in sal-soda. Afterward
wipe dry. Sand soap or sapolio may be used for the same purpose.

Cut-glass ware which has become in any way blurred or tarnished can be
restored by polishing it with a soft piece of newspaper. First rub well
with a piece slightly moistened and afterward repeat the process with
dry paper. Rubbing with a soft brush dipped in fine, soft whiting is
another method often employed for the same purpose. Cut-glass
water-bottles dim or stained on the inside are best cleaned by rinsing
with dilute muriatic acid, then carefully rinsing several times in clear
cold water to remove all trace of the acid, which is a poison.

All fine china should be handled carefully in washing and drying. There
will be less danger of breakage if the china is gradually heated by
allowing it to stand in a pan of warm water before being put into hot
water. The same is true of all table ware, and is of especial importance
in cold weather.

Brass faucets and other brass or copper articles may be cleaned by
rubbing with whiting wet with aqua ammonia.

Yellowed ivory handles may be restored to their original whiteness by
rubbing with sandpaper and emery; mineral soap or pumice stone may be
used for the same purpose. Nice table cutlery packed away for a season
may be kept from rusting by covering the metal portion with a thin
coating of paraffine. Rust may be removed from steel by scouring with
emery and oil; but if there is much corrosion, some weak muriatic acid
will be needed. This, however, will take some of the metal with the
rust, and must be washed off quickly.

Trays and japanned goods should never have boiling water poured over
them, as it will make the varnish crack and peel. If a tray is badly
soiled, wet with a sponge moistened in warm water and soap, and rub with
a dry cloth; if it looks smeary, dust on a little flour and rub again.
Marks and scratches may sometimes be removed by rubbing with a flannel
cloth dipped in sweet oil.

CARE OF THE TABLE LINEN.--Much of the attractiveness of the table
depends upon the linen used; if this is not well cared for, the finest
table ware cannot make up for the defect.

Stains upon table linen made by acids and vinegar may be removed by
simply washing in clear water; berry stains are easily taken out by
pouring boiling water over them; peach stains are best removed by
soaking for some time in cold water and then washing with soap before
allowing warm water to touch them. Chlorine water or a solution of
chloride of lime will remove fruit stains, and vegetable colors. Coffee
stains rubbed with a mixture of warm water and the yolk of egg, are said
to disappear when the mixture is washed off with clean warm water. Sour
buttermilk well rubbed into the material, dried in, and afterward washed
out in several waters, is said to be effectual in removing tea stains.
All stains should be removed as soon as possible after being made, and
always before putting the linen into the wash.

In washing table linen, housekeepers should remember that hard rubbing
is the worst wear which it can receive. If soaked over night, a gentle
squeezing will usually be quite sufficient to remove all soil, or if a
little borax (a handful to ten gallons of water) or household ammonia in
the proportion of two tablespoonfuls to a pail of water be added, two or
three hours' soaking will suffice. Care should also be taken in hanging
and fastening properly upon the line. Fold the cloth over the line six
or eight inches at least, and in such a manner as to keep the thread
straight, and fasten with three or more clothes pins. Table linen is
often sadly frayed at the corners by being pinned so that all strain
comes upon the corners, and if left to whip in the wind, is soon ruined.
Napkins in summer are much nicer if dried upon the grass. Only the
merest trifle of starch, if any, should be used for table linen.

Table linen should be taken from the line while still damp, folded
evenly lengthwise with the selvage together, then folded lengthwise
again, rolled tight, and wrapped in damp towels so that the outside will
not become dry, and ironed the same day. The irons should be heavy and
as hot as possible without danger of scorching, and the board should be
well padded with several thicknesses of flannel. Iron the linen in
single folds, keeping a damp cloth over portions which will not be
immediately reached. When the entire surface has been ironed, fold
evenly lengthwise and with the selvage edges toward the ironer, again go
over the entire upper side; then fold with the just completed portion
inside, iron again, and so continue until the whole is ironed and
folded. Both napkins and tablecloths are ironed in this way. They
should be thoroughly dried with the iron and well aired before being
laid away, in order to bring out the patterns well and to give them the
desirable glossy finish.

Colored table linen should be washed in tepid water containing a little
powdered borax, which serves to set the color. Very little, if any, soap
should be used. Rinse in tepid water containing a small quantity of
boiled starch; dry in the shade, and iron while yet damp.

Table linen should be carefully darned at once when it begins to wear
and become thin, and may thus be preserved for a long time. When new, it
should be washed before being made up, and the threads raveled or drawn,
so as to make the ends exactly straight. Napkins should be washed before
being cut apart. When not required for regular use, the linen should be
folded loosely, and laid away without ironing in some place where it
will not be subjected to pressure. When needed, it can be quickly
dampened and ironed.

THE GARBAGE.--What to do with the waste accumulating from
preparation of foods is a question of no small importance. The too
frequent disposition of such material is to dump it into a waste-barrel
or garbage box near the back door, to await the rounds of the scavenger.
Unless more than ordinary precautions in regard to cleanliness are
observed, such a proceeding is fraught with great danger. The bits of
moist food, scraps of meat, vegetables, and other refuse, very quickly
set up a fermentative process, which, under the sun's rays, soon breeds
miasm and germs; especially is this true if the receptacle into which
the garbage is thrown is not carefully cleaned after each emptying.

A foul-smelling waste-barrel ought never to be permitted under any
circumstances. The best plan is to burn all leavings and table refuse as
fast as made, which may be done without smell or smoke by opening all
the back drafts of the kitchen range, and placing them on the hot coals
to dry and burn. Some housekeepers keep in one end of the sink a wire
dish drainer into which all fruit and vegetable parings are put. If
wet, the water quickly drains from them, and they are ready to be put
into the stove, where a very little fire soon reduces them to ashes. All
waste products which cannot well be burned, may be buried at a distance
from the house, but not too much in one spot, and the earth should be
carefully covered over afterward. Under no circumstances should it be
scattered about on the surface of the ground near the back door, as
heedless people are apt to do.

If the table refuse must be saved and fed to animals, it should be
carefully sorted, kept free from all dishwater, sour milk, etc., and
used as promptly as possible. It is a good plan to have two tightly
covered waste pails of heavy tin to be used on alternate days. When one
is emptied, it may be thoroughly cleansed and left to purify in the air
and sunshine while the other is in use. Any receptacle for waste should
be entirely emptied and thoroughly disinfected each day with boiling
suds and an old broom. This is especially imperative if the refuse is to
be used as food for cows, since the quality of the milk is more or less
affected by that of the food.

TABLE TOPICS.

A woman cannot work at dressmaking, tailoring, or any other
sedentary employment, ten hours a day, year in and out, without
enfeebling her constitution, impairing her eyesight, and bringing on
a complication of complaints; but she can sweep, cook, wash, and do
the duties of a well-ordered house, with modern arrangements, and
grow healthier every year. The times in New England when all women
did housework a part of every day, were the times when all women
were healthy.--_Harriet Beecher Stowe._

The best ways are commonly the easiest ways and those that give most
comfort to the household. _Know how_ is a great labor-saving
invention, on which there is no patent.--_Sel._

Who sweeps a room as for God's law
Makes that and th' action fine.

--_George Herbert._

A YEAR'S BREAKFASTS & DINNERS

What to get for the family meals is frequently a most perplexing
problem, especially when one remembers the many important points that
should enter into the arrangement of the daily bill of fare. A
well-arranged menu should be composed of articles which supply the
requisite amount of food elements for proper nutrition, palatably
prepared. These should be adapted to the season and also to the family
purse. There should be an agreeable and pleasing change from day to day,
with never too great variety at one meal, and no incongruous association
of foods that do not harmonize, upon the same bill of fare. The amount
of time and strength available for the preparation of the meal must also
receive consideration. The problem would be easier of solution could one
select her menu wholly from fresh material each time; but in most
households the odds and ends and "left-over" foods must be utilized, and
if possible compounded into dishes that will not have the savor of
yesterday's breakfast or dinner.

The making of a bill of fare offers opportunity for thought and study
under all circumstances; but it is often particularly difficult for the
housewife long accustomed to the use of foods of a different character,
to make up a menu of hygienic dishes properly adapted to all
requirements. For such of our readers as need aid in this direction, we
give in this chapter bills of fare for fifty-two weeks' breakfasts and
dinners. Not that we presume to have arranged a model dietary which
every one can adopt,--individual preferences, resources, and various
other conditions would preclude that,--but we have endeavored to prepare
a list of menus suitable for use should circumstances admit, and which
we trust may be found helpfully suggestive of good, hygienic living.

We have given meats no place upon these bills of fare, as we wished
particularly to illustrate how good, substantial menus of appetizing
variety can be provided without their use; but such of our readers as
desire this class of foods will have no difficulty in supplementing the
bills we have arranged by adding such meats as accord with their tastes
and purses, while our chapter on Meats will give them all needed
information as to their preparation.

In arranging the bills of fare it has been presupposed that the
housewife has provided herself with at least a moderate allowance of
canned or dried vegetables and fruits during their season, for use
throughout the year. Effort has also been made to suggest an ample
variety of seasonable and wholesome articles and to make provision for
any probable left-over foods; and to illustrate how by planning and
thinking beforehand the same material may be used to form the base of
two different dishes for successive days, enough of which for both may
often be cooked at the same time, thus economizing in time and fuel.

No particular year has been taken, as we desired the menus to be adapted
to all years, and as no dates could be given, we have taken even weeks,
ending each with a Sabbath menu, beginning with the first month of the
year.

A third meal, if desired, whether it be luncheon or supper, should, for
health's sake, be so simple in character that we have not deemed it
necessary to give bills of fare. Breads, fruits, and grains, with milk,
cream, and some simple relish, tastefully served, offer ample provision
for a healthful and nourishing repast.

No mention has been made of beverages upon the bills of fare. If any are
used, hot milk or caramel coffee are to be preferred. Cooked fruit,
either fresh, dried, or canned, is desirable for every meal, but the
kind--as also of the fresh fruit upon the breakfast bill--may be
arranged according to individual preferences and resources. The use of
cream, sugar, and other accessories should be suited to circumstances.

It is intended that croutons be served with the soups, and in arranging
the variety of breads, an effort has been made to provide one of harder
texture for use with grains and other soft foods. The wafers mentioned
are the whole-wheat and gluten wafers manufactured by the Sanitarium
Food Co., which by many families are considered more convenient for
general use as a hard bread than the crisps, sticks, etc., which upon
some of the menus are designed for the same purpose.

Less variety may be used, and changes made to suit the taste and
circumstances of those providing and partaking of the meals; but
whatever is subtracted should still leave upon the bill of fare the more
nutritious articles, like grains, whole-wheat bread, and other foods
rich in nerve and muscle forming elements.

Whether the housewife follows the bills of fare given with such
modifications as are best suited to the needs of her household, or
provides some of her own choosing, she will find it a great saving of
vexation and trouble to make them out for several days or a week ahead,
at one time, rather than from day to day or from meal to meal. She can
then plan her work and her resources so as the more nearly to make "both
ends meet," and can provide a more varied fare, while if changes are
needed, they can be easily made by substituting one article for another,
as circumstances demand.

In the arrangement of her menus she will find it well to select first
the grain and breads to be used, since being among the most nutritious
of all foods, they may well form the chief and staple food, around
which all other articles upon the bill of fare are grouped. If the grain
chosen be rice, farina, or one largely composed of starch, the remainder
of the menu should include some foods rich in nitrogenous elements, such
as macaroni, whole-wheat or Graham breads, the legumes, eggs, etc. If
the choice of grain be one containing a high percentage of nitrogenous
material, less of this element will be required in the accompanying
foods. As an aid in determining the nutritive value of any given food
substance, the following table, presenting the results of the chemical
analysis of the more common articles used as food, which we have
compiled from the most recent scientific authorities, will be found
helpful:--

TABLE SHOWING THE NUTRITIVE VALUES OF COMMON FOOD SUBSTANCES.

(1)Water.
(2)Albuminous elements.
(3)Starch.
(4)Grape Sugar.
(5)Cane Sugar.
(6)Free Fat.
(7)Free Acid.

GRAINS.
FOOD SUBSTANCES (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
Wheat, Poland 13.2 21.5 61.9 X 1.5 X
Mich. White 12.8 11.6 71. X 1.3 X
" Diehle 12.2 13.8 72.2 X X X
Japanese 12.4 16.5 65.1 X 1.6 X
Rye, Winter 8.7 11. 74.6 X 1.9 X
German 8. 14. 78. X X X
Barley 24. 10.5 66.7 X 2. X
So. Russian 4. 12.7 70.9 X X X
Oats 12. 10.7 58.3 X 7.8 X
Corn, Flint 13.1 10.2 68.5 X 4.8 X
Dent 13.4 9.4 68.5 X 5. X
Sweet 13.4 11.4 62.7 X 7.8 X
Rice 12.6 6.7 78.5 X .9 X
Millet 11.8 10.5 68.2 X 4.2 X
Buckwheat 12.7 10. 71.8 X 1.4 X
Iceland Moss 16. 22. 36.3 X 1.4 X

FLOUR.
FOOD SUBSTANCES (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
Graham 13. 11.7 69.9 X 1.7 X
Wheat 11.6 11.1 75.4 X 1.1 X
Rye 13.7 11.6 69.7 X 2. X
Barley 14.8 11.4 71.2 X 1.5 X
Oat 7.7 15.1 67.2 X 7.1 X
Corn 14.2 9.7 69.5 X 3.8 X
Buckwheat 13.5 8.9 74.3 X 1.6 X
Bean 10.3 23.2 59.4 X 2.1 X
Pea 11.4 25.2 57.2 X 2. X
Banana 14.9 2.9 77.9 X .5 X
Arrowroot 18. X 82. X X X

BREADS.
FOOD SUBSTANCES (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
Barley 12.4 9.4 64.4 4.7 1. X
Whole Wheat 13. 8.7 60. 4. 6. X
White 45.1 5.3 46. 2.3 .8 X
Rye 42.3 6.1 46.9 2.3 .4 X
Swedish Speise 12. 10. 72.3 3.1 1.6 X
Brod
Zwieback, White 13.3 8.5 73.3 1.8 1. X
Rye 11.6 9.3 67.2 3.6 1. X
Macaroni 13.1 9. 76.8 X .3 X
Manna 15.3 1.9 18.1 49.[2] X X

FRESH FRUITS.
FOOD SUBSTANCES (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
Apple 84.8 .4 X 7.2 X .8
Apricot 81.2 .5 X 4.6 X 1.2
Blackberry 86.4 .5 X 4.1 X .2
Banana 73. 1.9 X X .6 X
Cherry 79.8 .7 X 10.2 X .9
Cranberry 89.6 .1 X 1.5 X 3.3
Currant 84.7 .5 X 6.4 X 2.3
Grape 78.2 .6 X 14.3 X .8
Gooseberry 85.7 .5 X 7.1 X 1.4
Pear 83.2 .4 X 8.2 X .2
Prune 81.2 .8 X 6.2 X .8
Plum 84.9 .4 X 3.6 X 2.5
Peach 80. .7 X 4.5 X .9
Raspberry 85.7 .4 X 3.9 X 1.4
Strawberry 87.6 1.1 X 6.3 .5 .9
Whortleberry 78.4 .8 X 5. X 1.6

DRIED FRUITS.
FOOD SUBSTANCES (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
Prune 29.3 2.3 .2 44.5 .5 X 2.7
Pear 29.4 2. 10.8 29.1 .4 X .8
Apple 27.9 1.3 5.6 42.8 .8 X 3.6
Cherry 49.8 2. X 31.2 X .3 X
Raisin 32. 3.4 X 54.6 X .6 X
Fig 31.2 4. X 49.8 X X X
Date 33. 9. X X 58. X X

NUTS.
FOOD SUBSTANCES (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
Chestnut 7.3 14.6 69. X X 2.4 X
Walnut 7.2 15.8 13. X X 57.4 X
Hazelnut 7.1 17.4 7.2 X X 62.6 X
Sweet Almond 6.2 23.5 7.8 X X 53. X
Peanut 6.5 26.3 1.8 X X 46.2 X
Cocoanut 46.5 5.6 8. X X 35.9 X

Syrup 24.6 X X 26.2 44.9 X X
Honey 20.6 .8 X 72.8 1.8 X X

VEGETABLES.
FOOD SUBSTANCES (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
Carrot 85.8 1.2 X X .3 X
Winter Cabbage 80. 4. X 1.2 .9 X
Red Cabbage 90. 1.8 X 1.7 .2 X
White Cabbage 90. 1.9 X 2.3 .2 X
Spinach 38.5 3.5 X .1 .6 X
Celery 84.1 1.5 X .8 .4 X
Head Lettuce 94.3 1.4 X X .3 X
Potato 75. 2.2 X X .2 X
White Turnip 92.5 1.5 X X .2 X
Beet 87.5 1.3 X X .1 X
Sugar Beet 71.6 2. X 12.6 .5 X
Parsnip 82. 1.2 X X .6 X
Sweet Potato 71.8 1. X X .2 X
Cucumber 95.2 1.2 X 1. X X
Asparagas 93.7 1.8 X .4 .3 X
Cauliflower 90.9 2.3 X 1.2 .3 X
Melon 90.4 1. X 2.2 .3 X
Squash 90.3 1.1 X 1.4 .1 X
Onion 86. 1.7 X 2.8 .1 X
Pumpkin 90.3 1.1 5.1 1.5 .1 X
Tomato 92.4 1.6 X 2.5 .3 1.8
Peas,
green, garden 78.4 6.4 12. X X .5 X
small 10.3 24.6 52.6 X 3.5 X
African 6.5 23.4 57.8 X 6. X
green shelled 12.7 21.7 57.7 X 1.9 X
Beans, field 13.5 25. 48.3 X 1.7 X
French or
Kidney 11. 23.7 55.6 X 2.2 X
white 15. 26.9 48.8 X 3. X
Lima 9. 21.9 60.6 X 1.6 X
String beans 88.7 2.7 5.5 1.2 .1 X
Lentils 12.3 25.9 53. X 1.9 X
German 11.7 33. 30.3 X 8.7 X

MILK AND BUTTER. Milk
FOOD SUBSTANCES (1) (2) (3) (4) Sug. (6) (7)
Mother's milk 89.2 .9 X X 5.4 3.2 X
Cows' " 86. 4.1 X X 5.2 3.9 X
Cream 66. 2.7 X X 2.8 26.7 X
Swedish Butter 13.8 .6 X X .6 84.4 X
French " 12.6 X X X .2 86.4 X
Cheese, Stilton 32. 26.2 X X 34.5 3.3 X
Skimmed milk 88. .4 X X 3.8 1.8 X
Buttermilk 88. 4.1 X X 3.6 .7 X
Milk of Cow 58. 1.7 X 2.8 X 35.2 X
Tree

MEATS.
FOOD SUBSTANCES (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
Lean Beef 72. 19.3 X X X 3.6 X
Lean Mutton 72. 18.3 X X X 4.9 X
Veal 63. 16.3 X X X 15.8 X
Pork 39. 9.8 X X X 49.9 X
Poultry 74. 21. X X X 3.8 X
White Fish 78. 18.1 X X X 2.9 X
Salmon 77. 16.1 X X X 5.5 X
Entire Egg 74. 14. X X X 10.5 X
White of Egg 78. 20.4 X X X X X
Yolk of Egg 52. 16. X X X 30.7 X

(8)Pectose.
(9)Non-Nitrog. Substances.
(10)Salts.
(11)Cellulose.
(12)Propor. Carbon to Nitrogenous.
(13)Total Nutritive Value.

GRAINS.
FOOD SUBSTANCES (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13)
Wheat, Poland X X 1.9 X 2.9 86.8
Mich. White X X 1.6 1.7 6.2 85.5
" Diehle X X 1.8 X 5.2 87.8
Japanese X X 1.5 2.9 4. 84.7
Rye, Winter X X 2.3 1.5 6.9 89.8
German X X X X 5.5 92.
Barley X X 2.6 3.8 6.5 82.2
So. Russian X X 2.4 X 5.5 86.
Oats X X 3.3 17.9 5.2 86.7
Corn, Flint X X 1.4 1.7 7.1 84.9
Dent X X 1.5 2.2 7.8 84.4
Sweet X X 1.8 2.9 6.1 83.7
Rice X X .8 .5 11.8 86.9
Millet X X 2.8 2.5 6.9 85.7
Buckwheat X X 1.9 1.7 7.3 85.6
Iceland Moss X X 1.4 2.9 2.6 81.1

FLOUR.
FOOD SUBSTANCES (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13)
Graham X X 1.8 1.9 6.1 85.1
Wheat X X .6 .2 6.8 88.2
Rye X X 1.4 1.6 6.1 84.7
Barley X X .6 .5 6.3 84.7
Oat X X 2. .9 4.9 91.4
Corn X X 1.3 1.5 7.5 84.3
Buckwheat X X 1. .7 8.5 83.8
Bean X X 3.3 1.7 2.6 88.
Pea X X 2.9 1.3 2.3 87.3
Banana X X 2.2 1.6 27. 83.5
Arrowroot X X X X 82. 82.

BREADS.
FOOD SUBSTANCES (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13)
Barley X X 3.8 4.3 7.4 83.3
Whole Wheat X X 3. 5.3 8. 81.7
White X X .5 X 9.2 54.9
Rye X X 1.5 .5 8.1 57.2
Swedish Speise X X X 1. 7. 87.
Brod
Zwieback, White X X .6 1.5 9. 83.2
Rye X X 2.1 4.7 7.7 83.7
Macaroni X X .8 X 8.5 86.9
Manna X 5.6 X 10.1 67. 72.7

FRESH FRUITS.
FOOD SUBSTANCES (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13)
Apple 4.8 X .5 1.5 18. 13.7
Apricot 5.4 X .8 5.3 9.2 13.5
Blackberry 1.4 X .4 7. 6.2 8.1
Banana X 23.9 1. .3 .3 26.7
Cherry 1.8 X .7 5.9 14.5 14.8
Cranberry X X .2 6.3 15. 4.1
Currant .9 X .7 4.6 12.8 10.7
Grape 2. X .5 3.6 13.8 18.2
Gooseberry 1.4 X .4 3.5 14.2 10.8
Pear 3.3 X .3 4.4 20.5 12.4
Prune 4.9 X .7 5.5 7.7 13.4
Plum 4.6 X .7 4.3 9. 10.8
Peach 7.1 X .7 6.1 6.4 13.9
Raspberry .7 X .5 7.4 9.7 6.9
Strawberry .5 X .8 2.3 6.1 10.1
Whortleberry .9 X 1. 12.3 6.2 9.3

DRIED FRUITS.
FOOD SUBSTANCES (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13)
Prune 4.3 13.4 1.4 1.5 19.6 69.2
Pear 4.5 14.9 1.7 6.9 19.9 63.7
Apple 4.8 6.5 1.6 5.1 37.8 67.
Cherry X 14.3 1.6 2.4 15.7 47.8
Raisin X 7.5 1.2 1.7 23. 66.3
Fig X X 2.9 12.1 12.4 36.7
Date X X X X 6.4 67.

NUTS.
FOOD SUBSTANCES (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13)
Chestnut X X 3.3 3.4 4.8 89.3
Walnut X X 2. 4.6 4.4 88.2
Hazelnut X X 2.5 3.2 4. 89.7
Sweet Almond X X 3. 6.5 2.6 87.3
Peanut X X 3.3 13.9 1.7 79.6
Cocoanut X X 1. 2.9 7.8 50.5

Syrup X 2. 2.3 X 71. 75.4
Honey X 3.8 .2 X 91. 78.1

VEGETABLES.
FOOD SUBSTANCES (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13)
Carrot X 9.2 1. 1.5 .2 11.7
Winter Cabbage X 10.4 1.6 1.9 .5 18.1
Red Cabbage X 4.2 .8 1.3 1. 8.7
White Cabbage X 2.6 1.2 1.8 1.3 8.2
Spinach X 4.3 2. 1. .2 10.5
Celery X 11. .8 1.4 .8 14.5
Head Lettuce X 2.2 1. .8 1.8 4.9
Potato X 21. 1. .6 .1 24.4
White Turnip X 3. .7 2.1 .1 5.4
Beet X 9. 1.1 1. .1 11.5
Sugar Beet X .7 1. 11.6 21.5 23.3
Parsnip X 7.2 1. 8. .5 10.
Sweet Potato X 25.3 .7 1. .2 27.2
Cucumber X 1.4 .4 .8 .8 4.
Asparagas X 2.3 .5 1. .4 5.3
Cauliflower X 3.4 .8 .9 .6 8.2
Melon X 4. .7 1.4 2.1 3.8
Squash X 5.2 .7 1.2 1.3 8.5
Onion X 8. .7 .7 1.7 13.3
Pumpkin X X .7 1.2 6. 8.5
Tomato X X .6 .8 1.8 6.8
Peas,
green, garden X X .8 1.9 2. 19.7
small X X 2.6 6.4 2.2 83.3
African X X 3. 3.3 2.7 90.2
green shelled X X 2.8 3.2 2.7 84.1
Beans, field X X 3.5 8. 2. 78.5
French or
Kidney X X 3.7 3.8 2.4 85.2
white X X 3.5 2.8 1.9 82.2
Lima X X 2.9 4. 3.1 93.
String beans X X .6 1.2 2.5 10.1
Lentils X X 3. 3.9 2.1 83.8
German X X 2.7 13.6 1.2 74.7

MILK AND BUTTER.
FOOD SUBSTANCES (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13)
Mother's milk X X .4 X X X
Cows' " X X .8 X 2.2 14.
Cream X X 1.8 X 11. 34.
Swedish Butter X X .6 X 141. 86.2
French " X X .8 X 86.6 87.4
Cheese, Stilton X X 4. X 1.4 68.
Skimmed milk X X .8 X 1.4 10.4
Buttermilk X X .8 X 1. 9.2
Milk of Cow X X .5 X 2.2 40.2
Tree

MEATS.
FOOD SUBSTANCES (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13)
Lean Beef X X 5.1 X .18 28.
Lean Mutton X X 4.8 X .26 28.
Veal X X 4.7 X .93 37.
Pork X X 2.3 X .49 61.
Poultry X X 1.2 X .18 26.
White Fish X X 1. X .16 22.
Salmon X X 1.4 X .34 23.
Entire Egg X X 1.5 X .75 26.
White of Egg X X 1.6 X X 22.
Yolk of Egg X X 1.3 X 1.9 48.

[Footnote 1: Chiefly sugar and starch.]

[Footnote 2: Mannite]

BILLS OF FARE FOR EVERY DAY IN THE YEAR.

In the following pages will be found a breakfast and dinner bill of fare
for every day in the year, beginning with January 1. We would
particularly recommend a trial of their use by the young and
inexperienced matron just entering upon housekeeping, whose desire
should be to begin right--provide simple and healthful as well as
palatable food for her family. To many such we trust that our "year's
breakfasts and dinners" may come like the grateful suggestions of a
helpful friend. An explanation of the bills of fare has been given in
the preceding pages, and need not be repeated here.

FIRST WEEK

FIRST DAY

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Rolled Oats
Gravy Toast
Corn Puffs
Breakfast Rolls
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Vegetable Oyster Soup
Baked Potato with Tomato Cream Sauce
Mashed Peas
Baked Squash
Rolled Rye
Whole-Wheat Bread
Cream Crisps
Stewed Fruit
Pop Corn Pudding

SECOND DAY

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Cerealine
Snowflake Toast
Whole-Wheat Puffs
Toasted Wafers
Baked Sweet Apples
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Swiss Potato Soup
Baked Potato and Pease Gravy
Macaroni with Kornlet
Stewed Lima Beans
Pearl Barley
Corn Cake
Cream Crisps
Stewed Fruit
Cracked Wheat Pudding

THIRD DAY

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Rice with Fig Sauce
Cream Toast
Breakfast Rolls
Whole-Wheat Bread
Baked Sweet Apples
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Lima Bean Soup
Mashed Potato
Scalloped Vegetable Oysters
Hominy
Graham Puffs
Oatmeal Bread
Toasted Wafers
Stewed Fruit
Simple Custard Pie

FOURTH DAY

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Rolled Wheat
Dry Toast with Hot Cream
Hominy Gems
Toasted Wafers
Baked Sweet Potatoes with Tomato Gravy
Celery
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Tomato Cream Soup
Boiled Potatoes with Cream Sauce
Mashed Peas
Baked Chestnuts
Whole-Wheat Puffs
Graham Bread
Rice
Stewed Fruit
Stewed Fruit Pudding

FIFTH DAY

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Mixed Mush
Browned Sweet Potato
Macaroni with Cream Sauce
Baked Sweet Apples
Graham Bread
Corn Puffs
Toasted Wafers
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Cream Pea Soup
Mashed Potatoes
Baked Cabbage
Stewed Corn
Pearl Wheat
Zwieback
Current Puffs
Graham Bread
Stewed Fruit
Apple Tart

SIXTH DAY

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Graham Grits
Toasted Wafers
Celery Toast
Raised Biscuit
Whole-Wheat Puffs
Baked Sweet Apples
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Corn Soup
Baked Squash
Mashed Beans
Rolled Rye
Beaten Biscuit
Graham Bread
Stewed Fruit
Apple Meringue Desert

SABBATH

BREAKFAST

Oranges
Oatmeal
Prune Toast
Baked Sour Apples
Breakfast Rolls
Fruit Bread
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Tomato and Macaroni Soup
Canned Green Peas
Scalloped Potato
Steamed Rice
Whole-Wheat Bread
Plain Buns
Zwieback
Stewed Fruit
Fresh Fruit and Nuts

SECOND WEEK.

FIRST DAY

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Graham Mush with Dates
Cream Toast
Toasted Rolls
Fruit Bread
Whole-Wheat Puffs
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Combination Soup
Boiled Potato with Cream Sauce
Pease Cakes
Stewed Celery
Cracked Wheat
Whole-Wheat Bread
Sally Lunn Gems
Zwieback
Stewed Fruit
Apple Tapioca

SECOND DAY

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Plum Porridge
Strawberry Toast
Whole-Wheat Bread
Graham Crisps
Pop Overs
Baked Apples
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Celery Soup No. 2.
Mashed Squash
Mashed Potato
Chopped Turnip
Rolled Wheat
Graham Crisps
Rye Gems
Stewed Fruit
Cream Rice Pudding

THIRD DAY

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Granola Fruit Mush
Corn Cake
Toasted Wafers
Graham Puffs
Boiled Macaroni
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Swiss Potato Soup
Baked Sweet Potato
Boiled Beets, Sliced
Succotash
Graham Grits
Graham Bread
Toasted Rolls
Stewed Fruit
Cornstarch Meringue

FOURTH DAY

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Oatmeal
Snowflake Toast
Toasted Wafers
Currant Puffs
Graham Bread
Baked Apples
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Oatmeal Soup
Mashed Sweet Potato
Scalloped Tomatoes
Farina
Graham Fruit Bread
Crusts
Zwieback
Stewed Fruit
Apple Pie

FIFTH DAY

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Graham Apple Mush
Gravy Toast
Breakfast Rolls
Graham Fruit Bread
Macaroni with Kornlet
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Vegetable Soup
Mashed Potato
Cabbage Salad
Mashed Peas with Tomato Sauce
Pearl Barley
Toasted Wafers
Vienna Bread
Whole-Wheat Puffs
Stewed Fruit
Rice Mold with Fruit Sauce

SIXTH DAY

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Orange Rice
Blackberry Toast
Currant Puffs
Graham Crisps
Baked Apples
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Cream Barley Soup
Potato Puffs
Baked Beets
Stewed Corn and Tomatoes
Pearl Wheat
Parker House Rolls
Zwieback
Corn Puffs
Stewed Fruit
Prune Pudding

SABBATH

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Rolled Oats
Grape Toast
Toasted Wafers
Fruit Bread
Whole-Wheat Puffs
Cup Custard
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Cream Pea Soup
Stewed Potato
Canned Okra and Tomato
Browned Rice
Beaten Biscuits
Graham Crackers
Fruit Bread
Stewed Fruit
Prune Pie with Granola Crust

THIRD WEEK.

FIRST DAY

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Graham Mush with Raisins
Gravy Toast
Toasted Beaten Biscuit
Whole-Wheat Puffs
Baked Potato with Celery Sauce
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Baked Bean Soup
Steamed Potatoes with Pease Gravy
Scalloped Vegetable Oysters
Mashed Parsnip
Graham Grits
Whole-Wheat Bread
Rye Gems
Toasted Wafers
Stewed Fruit
Bread Custard Pudding

SECOND DAY

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Rolled Oats
Peach Toast
Cottage Cheese
Hoe Cake
Graham Wafers
Graham Puffs
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Lentil and Parsnip Soup
Mashed Potato
Celery
Hulled Corn
Scalloped Tomato
Macaroni with Raisins
Raised Corn Bread
Cream Crisps
Stewed Fruit
Farina Blancmange

THIRD DAY

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Oatmeal Porridge
Celery Toast
Potato Cakes
Cream Rolls
Whole-Wheat Bread
Zwieback
Baked Sweet Apples
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Cream Rice Soup
Boiled Potato with Brown Sauce
Stewed Cabbage
Mashed Split Peas
Boiled Wheat
Whole-Wheat Bread
Toasted Rolls
Currant Puffs
Stewed Fruit
Corn Meal Pudding

FOURTH DAY

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Rolled Rye
Apricot Toast
Crusts
Toasted Wafers
Corn Puffs
Granola
Baked Apples
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Cream Pea Soup
Mashed Potato
Cabbage Hash
Stewed Vegetable Oysters
Graham Mush
Graham Puffs
Buns
Toasted Wafers
Stewed Fruit
Cornstarch with Raisins

FIFTH DAY

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Rice with Fig Sauce
Graham Gruel
Lentil Toast
Beaten Biscuits
Graham Gems
Zwieback
Baked Potato with Cream Gravy
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Mixed Potato Soup
Macaroni with Kornlet
Baked Beans
Graham Grits
Toasted Beaten Biscuit
Whole-Wheat Bread
Sally Lunn Gems
Stewed Fruit
Fig Pudding with Orange Sauce

SIXTH DAY

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Brewis
Blackberry Toast
Toasted Wafers
Whole-Wheat Puffs
Graham Bread
Macaroni with Tomato Sauce
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Canned Green Pea Soup
Boiled Potato
Corn and Tomato
Mashed Lentils and Beans
Farina
Graham Crusts
Zwieback
Cream Crisps
Stewed Fruit
Rice and Tapioca Pudding

SABBATH

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Granola Fruit Mush
Grape Toast
Graham Fruit Bread
Beaten Biscuit
Baked Sour Apples
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Canned Corn Soup
Creamed Potatoes
Mashed Peas
Cold Boiled Beets, sliced
Steamed Rice
Graham Bread
Beaten Biscuit
Toasted Wafers
Stewed Fruit
Raised Jelly Cake
Fresh Fruit

FOURTH WEEK

FIRST DAY

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Cerealine Flakes
Snowflake Toast
Toasted Beaten Biscuit
Whole-Wheat Bread
Corn Puffs
Steamed Figs
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Pea and Tomato Soup
Baked Potatoes with Brown Sauce
Cabbage Salad
Parsnips with Egg Sauce
Cracked Wheat
Whole-Wheat Bread
Rye Gems
Sticks
Stewed Fruit
Rice and Stewed Apple Dessert

SECOND DAY

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Oatmeal
Prune Toast
Pop Overs
Whole-Wheat Bread
Cream Rolls
Baked Apples
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Vegetable Oyster Soup
Boiled Potato with Lentil Gravy
Turnips in Juice
Celery with Tomato
Cracked Wheat
Toasted Rolls
Raised Biscuit
Oatmeal Gems
Stewed Fruit
Tapioca and Fig Pudding

THIRD DAY

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Graham Mush with Dates
Gravy Toast
Hoe Cake
Graham Sticks
Whole-Wheat Bread
Boiled Macaroni
Baked Chestnuts
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Celery Soup No. 2
Mashed Sweet Potato
Chopped Beets
Succotash
Graham Grits
Toasted Wafers
Graham Bread
Currant Puffs
Stewed Fruit
Banana Dessert

FOURTH DAY

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Rolled Wheat
Apple Toast
Graham Puffs
Zwieback
Graham Bread
Baked Bananas
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Parsnip Soup No. 2
Scalloped Potatoes
Stewed Lima Beans
Macaroni with Egg Sauce
Farina
Graham Crisps
Crescents
Whole-Wheat Puffs
Stewed Fruit
Prune Dessert

FIFTH DAY

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Cerealine Cakes
Gravy Toast
Bean Gems
Graham Crisps
Fruit Bread
Baked Apples
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Vegetable Soup
Baked Potato with Tomato Cream Sauce
Stewed Parsnip with Celery
Mashed Peas
Pearl Wheat
Toasted Wafers
Fruit Bread
Graham Gems
Stewed Fruit
Lemon Pie

SIXTH DAY

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Oatmeal Porridge
Cream Toast
Breakfast Rolls
Whole-Wheat Bread
Corn Puffs
Macaroni with Raisins
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Cream Pea Soup
Stewed Potato
Hulled Corn
Chopped Turnip
Rolls
Toasted Wafers
Graham Gems
Stewed Fruit
Molded Cracked Wheat with Fruit Sauce

SABBATH

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Rolled Rye
Prune Toast
Pulled Bread
Fruit Rolls
Toasted Wafers
Citron Apples
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Lentil Soup
Macaroni with Tomato Sauce
Stewed Corn
Steamed Rice
Cream Crisps
Whole-Wheat Bread
Stewed Fruit
Caramel Custards
Fruit and Nuts

FIFTH WEEK

FIRST DAY

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Plum Porridge
Tomato Toast
Whole-Wheat Puffs
Whole-Wheat Bread
Toasted Rolls
Baked Apples
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Canned Okra and Tomato Soup
Baked Sweet Potatoes
Mashed Cabbage
Pease Cakes
Boiled Wheat
Oatmeal Crisps
Graham Gems
Whole-Wheat Bread
Stewed Fruit
Carrot Pudding

SECOND DAY

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Oatmeal Porridge
Banana Toast
Whole-Wheat Puffs
Zwieback
Rye Bread
Browned Sweet Potato
Baked Sour Apples
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Bean and Potato Soup
Potatoes Stewed with Celery
Egg Macaroni
Stewed Carrots
Hominy
Rye Bread
Sticks
Currant Buns
Stewed Fruit
Prune Whip

THIRD DAY

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Corn Meal Mush
Snowflake Toast
Hominy Gems
Sticks
Whole-Wheat Bread
Baked Sweet Apples
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Brown Soup
Baked Potato with Cream Sauce
Scalloped Turnip
Mashed Chestnuts
Lentil Puree with Lemon
Graham Grits
Graham Bread
Beaten Biscuit
Rye Gems
Stewed Fruit
Cream Rice Pudding

FOURTH DAY

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Graham Apple Mush
Blackberry Toast
Toasted Wafers
Graham Bread
Whole-Wheat Puffs
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Black Bean Soup
Mashed Potato
Scalloped Tomatoes
Stewed Vegetable Oysters
Pearl Wheat
Sally Lemon Gems
Graham Bread
Zwieback
Stewed Fruit
Apple Tart

FIFTH DAY

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Oatmeal
Vegetable Oyster Toast
Graham Bread
Toasted Wafers
Corn Cake
Baked Sweet Potato
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Vegetable Soup
Baked Potato
Stewed Beans
Kornlet
Chopped Beets
Browned Rice
Rye Gems
Toasted Wafers
Whole-Wheat Bread
Stewed Fruit
Orange Pudding

SIXTH DAY

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Boiled Oats
Strawberry Toast
Graham Gems
Hoe Cakes
Toasted Wafers
Macaroni with Kornlet
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Tomato and Vermicelli Soup
Browned Potato
Cabbage Salad
Baked Squash
Mashed Peas
Rice
Whole-Wheat Puffs
Toasted Wafers
Graham Bread
Stewed Fruit
Baked Corn Meal Pudding

SABBATH

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Lemon Rice
Dry Toast with Hot Cream
Fruit Bread
Beaten Biscuit
Graham Crackers
Baked Sour Apples
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Canned Pea Soup
Chopped Sweet Potatoes
Stewed Lima Beans
Celery
Boiled Wheat
Beaten Biscuit
Whole-Wheat Bread
Toasted Wafers
Stewed Fruit
Squash Pie

SIXTH WEEK

FIRST DAY

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Graham Mush with Dates
Poached Eggs on Toast
Corn Cakes
Toasted Beaten Biscuit
Whole-Wheat Bread
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Bean and Hominy Soup
Potato Rice
Turnips with Cream Sauce
Mashed Parsnips
Baked Barley
Whole-Wheat Bread
Cream Graham Rolls
Stewed Fruit
Plain Fruit Pudding

SECOND DAY

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Rice with Fig Sauce
Gravy Toast
Toasted Rolls
Whole-Wheat Puffs
Crescents
Baked Sweet Apples
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Swiss Lentil Soup
Baked Potato
Boiled Beets
Stewed Cabbage
Mashed Squash
Cracked Wheat
Graham Raised Biscuit
Cream Crisps
Stewed Fruit
Farina Blancmange with Mock Cream

THIRD DAY

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Oatmeal
Dry Toast with Hot Cream
Whole-Wheat Bread
Cream Crisps
Graham Puffs
Lemon Apples
Macaroni with Cream Sauce
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Velvet Soup
Mashed Potato
Mashed Peas
Vegetable Hash
Graham Grits
Graham Bread Sticks
Toasted Wafers
Stewed Fruit
Cracked Wheat Pudding

FOURTH DAY

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Corn Meal Mush
Gravy Toast
Toasted Wafers
Currant Puffs
Baked Sour Apples
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Pea and Tomato Soup
Boiled Potato with Cream Sauce
Browned Parsnips
Baked Turnip
Pearl Wheat
Whole-Wheat Puffs
Graham Bread
Toasted Wafers
Stewed Fruit
Almond Cornstarch Pudding

FIFTH DAY

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit
Corn Meal Porridge
Cream Toast
Zwieback
Whole-Wheat Puffs
Toasted Wafers
Macaroni with Egg Sauce
Stewed Fruit

DINNER

Plain Rice Soup
Potato Snowballs
Carrots with Egg Sauce
Mashed Beans
Rolled Wheat
Fruit Loaf
Crusts
Toasted Wafers
Stewed Fruit
Apple Tart

SIXTH DAY

BREAKFAST

Fresh Fruit

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