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New York at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis 1904 by DeLancey M. Ellis

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Limestone
Mount Eve Granite Co., Mount Eve
Granite
Mutual Gas Co., Andover
Crude oil
National Salt Co., Ithaca and Warsaw. Silver medal
Salt
National Wall Plaster Co., Fayetteville
Crude gypsum
Plaster of paris
Land plaster
James Nevins & Son, Walton
Bluestone
New York State School of Clay Working and Ceramics, Alfred
Silver medal
Clay products
New York Hydraulic Pressed Brick Co., Canandaigua
Brick
New York State Museum, Department of Paleontology. Grand
prize
General Exhibit in Paleontology, including publications, slab
of Potsdam sandstone, restorations of fossils
New York State Museum. Bronze medal
Plaster Model of Tilly Foster Iron Mine
New York State Museum. Gold medal
Publications on Geology, Mineralogy, Topography, Quarrying,
Mining, Metallurgy, Development of Water Resources, etc.
New York State Museum. Gold medal
Collection of Minerals and Building Stones
New York State Museum. Silver medal
Ten Geologic maps of the State of New York and special
parts thereof
Relief Map of New York
Hypsometric Map of New York
Road Map of New York
Sixty-four photographic enlargements illustrating New York
State mineral resources and other geological features; size,
11 by 14 inches
New York State Museum. Silver medal
Collective Exhibit
Northern New York Marble Co., Gouverneur
Marble
North River Garnet Co., Ticonderoga
Garnet
Oakfield Plaster Manufacturing Co., Oakfield
Gypsum
Onondaga Coarse Salt Association, Syracuse. Silver medal
Solar salt
Ontario Talc Co., Gouverneur
Talc
D. Parmatir, Potsdam
Sandstone
Pass & Seymour, Syracuse
Insulators
Peter Pitkin's Sons, Portageville
Bluestone
Potsdam Sandstone Co., Potsdam
Sandstone
A. L. Pritchard, Pleasantville
Marble
Queen City Brick Co., Buffalo
Brick
Quick & Co., Alma
Crude oil
Remington Salt Co., Syracuse
Salt
Retsof Mining Co., Retsof and Livonia
Rock salt
W. Rielly, Cobleskill
Limestone
E. P. Roberts, Cortland
Granite
Robins Conveying Belt Co., New York city
Belts and conveyor on separator
Rochester Brick & Tile Co., Rochester
Brick
Rossie Metallic Paint Co., Rossie
Mineral paint
Rudolph & Dotterwich, Allegany
Crude oil
D. G. Scholten, Gouverneur. Bronze medal
Marble
Scio Oil & Gas Co., Scio
Oil sand and crude oil
C. R. Scott, Alma
Crude oil
Scott, Fuller & Fay, South Bolivar
Crude oil
George W. Searles, White Lead Lake, Herkimer county
Infusorial earth
J. Shanahan, Tribes Hill
Limestone
J. Shear & Co., Schenectady
Sandstone
Solvay Process Co., Syracuse. Grand prize
Salt products
Solvay Process Co., Syracuse
Limestone (Onondaga)
South Dover Marble Co., South Dover
Marble
St. Lawrence Marble Co., Gouverneur
Marble
A. D. Symonds, Elmira
Bluestone
The Tanite Co., Cortland
Emery
Evan T. Thomas, Prospect
Limestone
F. Thomas, Troy
Mineral paint
Loren Thomas, Waterloo
Marble
James Thornton Estate, Alma
Crude oil
Ticonderoga Graphite Co., Ticonderoga
Graphite
Tonawanda Brick Co., Tonawanda
Brick
W. B. Underhill Brick Co., Croton Landing
Sand
Union Salt Co., Watkins
Salt
Union Talc Co., Gouverneur
Talc
United States Gypsum Co., Oakfield. Grand prize
Gypsum
Statuary of plaster of paris
United States Talc Co., Gouverneur
Talc
James Van Etten, Granite
Millstones
Vosburg Oil Co., Bolivar
Oil sand and crude oil
Vossler Bros & Quick, Alma
Crude oil
Warsaw Bluestone Co., Rock Glen
Bluestone
Watertown Marble Co., Watertown
Marble
Watkins Salt Co., Watkins
Salt
Wells & Hall, Ogdensburg
Mineral paint
Wetherill Separating Co., New York city. Gold medal
Wetherill magnetic separator, Type E, No. 3, working on
New York magnetic iron ores
L. H. White, Saratoga Springs
Granite
White Crystal Marble Co., Gouverneur
Marble Ashler
Williamson & Co., Northport
Sand
Witherbee, Sherman & Co., Mineville. Silver medal
Iron ore
Worcester Salt Co., Silver Springs. Silver medal
Salt

[Illustration: VARIED INDUSTRIES BUILDING AND PLAZA ST. LOUIS]

CHAPTER XV

Social Economy Exhibit and Schedule of Awards

SOCIAL ECONOMY EXHIBIT By DELANCEY M. ELLIS Director of Education and
Social Economy

The Department of Social Economy being closely allied with the
Department of Education, and its exhibit being installed in the Palace
of Education, it was placed under the general charge of the Director of
Education, whose title was changed to the Director of Education and
Social Economy.

APPROPRIATIONS

The following appropriations were made for exhibits in this department:

State Commission in Lunacy, ------------ $1,800
State Board Of Charities, -------------- 1,200
State Department Of Prisons, ----------- 2,000
State Department Of Labor, ------------- 1,000
Craig Colony for Epileptics, Sonyea, --- 500
General expenses, ---------------------- 1,000
-------
Total, --------------------------------- $7,500
-------

From the last named appropriation was paid the expenses for the exhibits
of the State Department of Health and the State Department of Excise,
and such other institutions or associations as were properly included in
this class.

PREPARATION OF EXHIBITS

All of the exhibits of State Departments were prepared by the
departments contributing them, and in the case of the State Commission
in Lunacy and the State Board of Charities the exhibits were installed
by a special representative. This also is true of the exhibit of the
State Department of Prisons, which required the constant attendance of
an expert to demonstrate its workings.

During the latter part of the Exposition period William T. Arms, an
attache of the State building, was detailed to the Department of Social
Economy, and dividing his time among the several State exhibits, added
materially to the pleasure and knowledge of visitors concerning New
York's institutions.

PLAN OF ARRANGEMENT

The Exposition authorities determined that the exhibits in the
Department of Social Economy should be collective; that is, that all the
work in the Department of Charities and Corrections from whatever source
should be installed together; the same to be true of general betterment
movements, hygiene, municipal improvement, etc. This plan precluded the
installation of the State's exhibit in this department in one place with
a dignified installation, as in the other exhibit departments, and made
necessary the placing of the exhibit in several different parts of the
building according to the subdivision of the classification under which
it fell. Perhaps from the standard of general utility the arrangement
was all that could be desired, but from the standpoint of the State it
is of doubtful value, as such a disposition of the State's exhibit made
no single part of it of any considerable size, nor as impressive as had
the State's work in this department been shown together.

No State in the Union approaches the Empire State in its progressive
policy in the care of the insane, the destitute and delinquents, in the
solving of labor and excise problems, and had the exhibit in this
department been installed together, a most effective and striking lesson
would have been taught.

STATE COMMISSION IN LUNACY

The exhibit of the New York State Commission in Lunacy was the most
suggestive and comprehensive of any shown in the Department for the
Insane, and was designed primarily to show the difference between the
ancient and modern methods of treating these unfortunates. Two rooms
were shown, the first of which represented the primitive methods adopted
for treating insanity. The room was barren, dark and not over clean. At
the front was shown one of the old peep-doors taken from the Utica
Asylum. It was of massive construction and contained a small aperture
covered by a heavy wooden blind, through which the attendant could
observe the doings of the patient, or, more properly speaking, the
prisoner. Within stood one of the so-called Utica cribs built of heavy
wood, over which was a cover of wooden bars. In this crib the patient
was obliged to remain in a recumbent position, the cover closed and
locked. Near by stood a restraining chair, a whirling chair, a straight
jacket and shackles, all representing ancient methods of "quieting" the
victims of the dread disease.

Adjoining was an airy room, clean and inviting, made cheerful by growing
plants and attractive furniture, with every modern appliance for the
care of an invalid, resembling closely a room of the better class in a
general hospital. There was an entire absence of any kind of restraint.
A neat iron bedstead, rocking chairs, invalid table, wash stand, book
case with books, and in fact every comfort and convenience was at hand.
In this room were also shown the uniforms worn by the nurses and
attendants in the State hospitals for the insane, and a series of
reference books upon the subject of insanity, The exhibit was
supplemented by a series of handsome photographs completely illustrating
the various State hospitals for the insane, the daily life of the
inmates and the expert attention which they receive.

Glass cases contained a large amount of industrial work done by the
inmates. This chiefly consisted of sewing and embroidery. A feature of
the exhibit was an oak cabinet containing a series of specimens showing
cross sections of the brain prepared at the Pathological Institute in
New York city. It was of decided scientific value and interest. Near by
was a miniature tent hospital, a complete model of the hospital for the
care of insane patients afflicted with tuberculosis which is now in
operation at the Manhattan State Hospital, Ward's Island, N. Y.

A striking feature was a copy of the famous oil painting, "Dr. Pinel
Freeing the Insane at La Salpetriere after the close of the French
Revolution." It most graphically told the story of the complete
revolution in treating this dread disease.

STATE BOARD OF CHARITIES

The exhibit of the State Board of Charities was installed under four
different subdivisions of Group 139 (Charities and Corrections) of the
official classification.

1. Class 784. Destitute, neglected and delinquent children
2. Class 785. Institutional care of destitute adults
3. Class 787. Hospitals, dispensaries and nursing
4. Class 789. Treatment of criminals

The exhibit of the Board in the department for the care of juvenile
delinquents was comprehensive in its make up. Photographs of the various
State institutions devoted to this purpose were shown, clearly
demonstrating the superiority of these institutions as to buildings,
equipment and maintenance. These photographs were supplemented by an
exhibit of industrial work of the inmates.

The State Industrial School at Rochester and the House of Refuge for
Juvenile Delinquents at Randall's Island both contributed some
exceptional work in wood carving and wrought iron.

In addition to this were shown the uniforms worn in the different
institutions and also specimens of the scholastic work which the
children are doing.

The State Board of Charities also assumed the responsibility for, and
partially prepared, the exhibit of various charity organization
societies within the State, by far the most elaborate of which was the
exhibit of the Charity Organization Society of New York city. By means
of photographs, administrative blanks and reports the great work which
this organization is doing was clearly revealed.

The work of the Board in the care of destitute adults was demonstrated
by means of a complete set of photographs of the county alms houses of
the State of New York. From two to four pictures of each institution
were shown, giving a very clear idea of their scope and equipment. These
photographs were supplemented by a statistical blank containing valuable
data as to the value of the plant, number of employees, of inmates, and
such other information as would be useful to the public.

The exhibit of the work of the Board as related to general hospitals of
the State consisted largely of a series of photographs, supplemented by
valuable statistical matter.

The Board also prepared an exhibit from the various State prisons, the
industrial work of which is under the jurisdiction of the State Prison
Commission. This exhibit contained photographs of the members of the
State Prison Commission, photographs showing the interiors of the
different prisons, reports, etc., and revealed the fact that the Empire
State is in the front rank in inaugurating reform movements looking
toward the health, safety and moral uplift of the inmates.

STATE DEPARTMENT OF PRISONS

The exhibit of the State Department of Prisons probably received as much
attention from the public as any single State exhibit prepared. It
consisted of a demonstration of the workings of the Bertillon and finger
print systems for the identification of criminals. An ornate
installation of solid oak, handsomely carved, was built by the inmates
of the State Prison at Ossining, and was carried to St. Louis and
erected upon the space assigned to this department.

Throughout the season Captain J.H. Parke, an expert on the finger print
system, and E.E. Davis, Jr., an expert on the Bertillon system, were
present to demonstrate the workings of these systems to Exposition
visitors. But few are familiar with the operations of the Bertillon
system, and the finger print system is as yet practically unknown.

New York State is the pioneer State of the Union in putting into
practical operation the finger print system for the identification of
criminals, and it is the only State in which it is at present in use.
Although there is a National Bureau of Identification at Washington, D.
C., which is conducted through the co-operation of the chiefs of police
of many of the large cities throughout the country, it cannot be said to
be a department of the United States government, and its system is far
from as perfect as that of the Empire State.

STATE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

Probably in no State of the Union does there exist a labor department
organized upon such extensive lines as is that of the State of New York.
Recently three bureaus were merged forming the State Department of
Labor. These were the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Board of Mediation
and Arbitration and the office of the Factory Inspector. The exhibit
consisted of a complete set of reports of these various bureaus, and of
the department erected therefrom, supplemented with a series of graphic
charts bearing upon every phase of the labor question, and comparing the
economic condition of the Empire State with that of other States of the
Union and various foreign countries. The exhibit was a valuable
sociological contribution. An especially strong feature was four
monographs, entitled "Typical Employers' Welfare Institutions in New
York," "Labor Legislation in New York," "The Work of the State
Department of Labor," and "The Growth of Industry in New York." These
were printed in such quantities as to permit of their distribution among
visitors to the Exposition. The graphic charts were reproduced in
half-tones and inserted in the monographs.

The exhibit was carefully studied by students of sociology generally as
it is recognized that the State of New York speaks with a voice of
authority upon questions of this nature.

STATE DEPARTMENT OF EXCISE

The question of controlling the liquor traffic is one of lively interest
throughout the civilized world. The exhibit of the State Department of
Excise was so prepared as to clearly demonstrate the superiority of the
system of State control in licensing this traffic as administered under
the New York State Liquor Tax Law. The exhibit consisted of a series of
graphic charts showing this statute's moral benefit to the people of the
State by reducing the number of drinking places more than twenty per
cent and increasing the amount collected from liquor licenses from about
three million to about eighteen million dollars annually. By means of a
key, which accompanied the charts, the visitor was enabled easily to
trace the development of the law since its first enactment and to see
the efficiency with which it is enforced.

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

The exhibit of the State Department of Health was made up of a complete
set of reports of the department, supplemented by administrative blanks
used in the enforcement of the Health Law, and photographs showing the
offices of the department, the anti-toxin laboratory and other features
of the department's work. A full set of blanks used in the collection of
vital statistics and sample specimens of anti-toxin and anti-tetanus,
which are distributed without charge by the department, completed the
exhibit.

CRAIG COLONY

The exhibit of Craig Colony consisted of a model designed to show the
ideal institution for the care, education and treatment of epileptics,
towards which Craig Colony in its development is working. The model was
skillfully constructed and cost considerably more than the appropriation
made by the Commission, the balance being paid from private sources.

MISCELLANEOUS EXHIBITS

The New York State exhibit in the Department of Social Economy also
contained an exhibit of the Woman's Institute at Yonkers, a
philanthropic organization providing for the care of needy families in
their homes and promoting several general betterment movements. The
exhibit consisted of photographs, blanks and statistics bearing upon the
work of the organization.

Close by was an exhibit of the George Junior Republic at Freeville, a
unique institution for the care of juvenile delinquents and carried on
along the lines of a civic organization. The exhibit consisted of
interesting photographs showing the buildings and the plant, also
specimens of blanks and samples of the money in use in the institution,
and a general account of the work since its inception.

One of the most interesting exhibits was that of the Bank of New York,
New York city, which is one of the oldest banks in the United States,
having been organized in 1784 and having since enjoyed a most prosperous
career. In addition to photographs, original by-laws and figures
concerning the present condition of the bank, was exhibited the first
ledger of the institution, which contained the accounts of Aaron Burr,
Robert R. Livingston and other noted contemporaries. In addition were
shown requisitions of Alexander Hamilton, then Secretary of the
Treasury, for loans to the government, and other interesting historical
documents.

The State Library prepared and exhibited an interesting compilation of
sociological legislation and literature which was designed to show the
advanced work done by the library in that direction.

Exhibits were also in place from the Church Association for the
Advancement of the Interests of Labor; the Eastman Kodak Company, of
Rochester, N. Y.; the Blacksmith and Wheelwright; the Sugar Trade
Review, and a volume published by the Mercantile Publishing Company
containing a directory of manufacturers and valuable trade statistics.

_Catalogue of Exhibitors in the Department of Social Economy, Arranged
by Groups, with the Awards, if Any, Received by Each_

GROUP ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-NINE

_Study and Investigation of Social and Economic Conditions_

Blacksmith and Wheelwright, New York city. Silver medal
Publication
Church Association for the Advancement of the Interests of Labor,
New York city. Silver medal
Photographs
Statistics
Division of Sociology, New York State Library, Albany. Silver medal
A comparative index of sociological legislation and literature
Manufacturers' Publishing Company, New York city. Silver medal
Directory of Manufacturers
Willett & Gray, New York city. Silver medal
Sugar Review

The following awards were made to exhibits not a part of the collective
State Exhibit:

American Book Company, New York city. Grand prize
Text books on economics
R. G. Dunn & Company, Commercial Agency New York city. Silver medal
Statistics
Photographs
Richmond C. Hill, secretary Board of Trade, Buffalo. Silver medal

GROUP ONE HUNDRED THIRTY

_Economic Resources and Organization_

Charles Hemstreet, New York city. Silver medal

GROUP ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-ONE

_State Regulation of Industry and Labor_

State Department of Labor, Albany. Grand prize
Graphic charts
Reports
Monographs

The following award was made to an exhibit not a part of the collective
State Exhibit:

American Institute of Social Service, New York city. Gold medal
Charts
Photographs
Statistics

GROUP ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-TWO

_Organization of Industrial Workers_

State Department of Labor, Albany. Grand prize
Graphic charts
Reports
Monographs

GROUP ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-FIVE

_Provident Institutions and Banks_

National Consumers' League, New York city. Grand prize
Charts
Printed matter
Garments.
Bank of New York, New York city. Grand prize
Historical ledger and documents
Statistics
By-laws
Pictures

GROUP ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-SIX

_Housing of the Working Classes_

The following awards were made to exhibits not a part of the collective
State Exhibit:

J. B. & J. M. Cornell Company. Gold medal
Model Household Nursery. Gold medal
New York city, tenement house department, Lawrence Veiller,
collaborator. Grand prize
Niagara Development Company, New York city. Silver medal

GROUP ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-SEVEN

_The Liquor Question_

State Department of Excise, Albany. Grand prize
Graphic charts
Statistics

GROUP ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-EIGHT

_General Betterment Movements_

National Consumers' League, New York city. Gold medal
Charts
Printed matter
Garments
New York Training School for Deaconesses. Bronze medal
Photographs
Prospectus
People's Institute, New York city. Silver medal
Photographs
Prospectus
Reports
Woman's Institute, Yonkers. Silver medal
Photographs
Charts
Statistics
Administrative blanks
Reports
Young Women's Christian Association, New York city. Silver
medal
Reports
Statistics
Administrative blanks
Art work

The following awards were made to exhibits not a part of the collective
State Exhibit:

American Institute of Social Service, New York city. Grand prize
General Electric Company, Schenectady. Gold medal
Institutional charities, collective exhibit. Gold medal
Prepared and installed by American Institute of Social Service
St. Bartholomew's Church, New York city
St. George's Church, New York city
Washington Square M. E. Church, New York city
Church of the Ascension, New York city
Marcy Avenue Church, Brooklyn
Westminster Presbyterian Church, Buffalo
Mohawk and Hudson River Humane Society, Albany. Gold medal
Siegel-Cooper Company, New York city. Gold medal
J. H. Williams Company, Brooklyn. Silver medal

The following awards were made to collaborators:

Dr. William H. Tolman, New York city. Gold medal
Dr. William W. Stillman, Albany. Gold medal
Mrs. Florence Kelly, New York city. Gold medal

GROUP ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-NINE

_Charities and Corrections_

Brooklyn Bureau of Charities. Gold medal
Photographs
Statistics
Buffalo Charity Organization Society. Gold medal
Photographs
Statistics
Charity Organization Society, New York city. Grand prize
Reports
Charts
Statistics
Photographs
Maps
Administrative blanks
Cornell University, Department of Philanthropy and Finance, Ithaca.
Gold medal
Graphic charts
Craig Colony for Epileptics, Sonyea. Gold medal
Model of institution
George Junior Republic, Freeville. Gold medal
Photographs
Charts
Statistics
Reports
Manhattan State Hospital East, Ward's Island, New York city.
Gold medal
Photographs
Statistics
Newburg Associated Charities. Silver medal
Photographs
Statistics
New York City United Hebrew Charities. Gold medal
Photographs
Statistics
State Board of Charities, Albany. Grand prize
Reports
Statistics
Photographs
Industrial work
Administrative blanks
State Commission in Lunacy, Albany. Grand prize
Rooms showing ancient and modern treatment of insane
patients
Reports
Industrial work
Model tuberculosis hospital
Pathological specimens
State Commission of Prisons, Albany. Gold medal
Photographs
Reports
Statistics
State Prison Department, Albany. Grand prize
Working exhibit of Bertillon and Finger Print systems for
identification of criminals
Woman's Institute, Yonkers. Silver medal
Photographs
Charts
Statistics
Administrative blanks
Reports

The following awards were made to collaborators:

Robert W. Hebbard, Secretary State Board of Charities. Gold
medal
T. E. McGarr, Secretary State Commission in Lunacy. Gold medal
Edward T. Devine, New York city. Gold medal

The following awards were made to exhibits not a part of the collective
State Exhibit:

Association for Improving the Condition of the Poor, Brooklyn.
Silver medal
Asylum of the Sisters of St. Dominie, New York city. Silver medal
Brooklyn Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Brooklyn.
Silver medal
Catholic Home Bureau, New York city. Gold medal
Children's Aid Society, New York city. Gold medal
Committee on the Prevention of Tuberculosis, New York city. Grand prize
Department of Finance, New York city. Grand prize
Department of Public Charities, New York city. Gold medal
Hebrew Sheltering Guardian Society, New York city. Gold medal
Rev. Thomas L. Kinkead, Peekskill. Gold medal
Lincoln Hospital and Home, New York city. Silver medal
Long Island College Hospital, New York city. Silver medal
Missionary Sisters Third Order of St. Frances, New York city. Gold medal
Mission of the Immaculate Virgin for the Protection of Homeless and
Destitute Children, New York city. Silver medal
Mount Sinai Hospital for Children, New York city. Silver medal
New York Catholic Protectory, New York city. Gold medal
New York Charity Organization Society, New York city. Grand prize
New York Foundling Hospital, New York city. Silver medal
New York Juvenile Asylum, New York city. Gold medal
New York Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, New York
city. Gold medal
Orphans' Home, Brooklyn. Silver medal
St. Vincent's Hospital, New York city. Silver medal
Seton Hospital, New York city. Silver medal
Sisters of Mercy, Gabriels. Gold medal

The following awards were made to collaborators:

Miss Lillian Brandt, New York city. Gold medal
Homer Folks, New York city. Gold medal
Dr. D. C. Potter, New York city. Gold medal

GROUP ONE HUNDRED FORTY

_Public Health._

Rochester, City Department of Health. Gold medal
Charts
Statistics
Photographs
State Department of Health, Albany. Grand prize
Reports
Administrative blanks
Photographs
Statistics

The following award was made to a collaborator:

Dr. George Goler, Health Officer, Rochester. Gold medal

The following awards were made to exhibits not a part of the collective
State Exhibit:

Adirondack Cottage Sanitorium, Saranac Lake. Grand prize
Dr. Simon Baruch, New York city. Silver medal
Department of Health of the City of New York. Grand prize
Allen Hazen, New York city. Gold medal
Dr. S. Adolphus Knopf, New York city. Gold medal
Kny-Scheerer Company, New York city. Grand prize
Kny-Scheerer Company, Department of Natural Science, New York city. Gold
medal
Sanitorium Gabriel, Saranac Lake. Gold medal

The following awards were made to collaborators:

Dr. E. L. Trudeau, Saranac Lake. Grand prize
Herman Biggs, M. D., New York city. Gold medal

GROUP ONE HUNDRED FORTY-ONE

_Municipal Improvement_

The following awards were made to exhibits not a part of the collective
State Exhibit:

American Institute of Social Service. Silver medal
Photographs illustrating municipal conditions
City of New York, Art Commission. Gold medal
City of New York, Aqueduct Commission and Department of Water
Supply. Gold medal
City of New York, Children's School Farm. Silver medal
City of New York, Department of Street Cleaning. Grand prize

The following awards were made to collaborators:

Mrs. Ruth Ashley Hirschfield. Gold medal
Model playground and nursery
George W. Waring in recognition of services in the establishment
of the system used in the Department of Street Cleaning, New
York city. Gold medal

THE FOLLOWING IS A RECAPITULATION OF THE AWARDS MADE TO THE STATE OF
NEW YORK IN THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL ECONOMY.

_Grand Prize._

Group 129.................. 1
Group 131.................. 1
Group 132.................. 1
Group 135.................. 2
Group 136.................. 1
Group 137.................. 1
Group 138.................. 1
Group 139.................. 7
Group 139, Collaborators... 1
Group 140.................. 4
Group 140, Collaborators... 1
Group 141.................. 1
---
Total..................... 22
===
_Gold Medal._

Group 131.................. 1
Group 136.................. 2
Group 138................. 10
Group 138, Collaborators... 3
Group 139................. 18
Group 139, Collaborators... 5
Group 140.................. 5
Group 140, Collaborators... 2
Group 141.................. 4
---
Total..................... 50
===

_Silver Medal._

Group 129 7
Group 130 1
Group 136 1
Group 138 5
Group 139 13
Group 140 1
Group 141 2
----
Total. 30
====
_Bronze Medal._

Group 138 1
===

Grand prizes. 22
Gold medals. 50
Silver medals. 30
Bronze medal. 1
-----
Grand total. 103
=====

[Illustration: PALACE OF EDUCATION AND SOCIAL ECONOMY FROM FESTIVAL
HALL]

CHAPTER XVI

Financial Statement

EXPENDITURES

GENERAL ADMINISTRATION

Secretary and Chief Executive Officer--
salary (33 months) ---------------------------- $10,449 17
Secretary and Chief Executive Officer--
traveling expenses and maintenance at
St. Louis ------------------------------------- 6,528 08
Clerk hire, assistants, stenographers, etc.------ 7,143 00
Rent of New York office ------------------------- 450 00
Maintenance of Albany office after close of
Exposition ------------------------------------ 550 80
Office fixtures, desks, tables, chairs, etc. 571 19
General traveling expenses of employees
and other officials and expense of
maintenance at St. Louis ---------------------- 3,367 38
Printing and engraving, stationery and
office supplies, including all engraving
for functions given by Commission ------------- 4,461 98
Express, freight, cartage, telephone (local
and long distance) and telegraph -------------- 1,481 65
Petty cash, including postage, car fares,
messenger service, sundry supplies, etc . ----- 3,615 07
Railroad and hotel expenses of individual
members of Commission for attendance
at meetings in New York and St. Louis:
Edward H. Harriman --------------- $321 00
William Berri -------------------- 552 45
Edward Lyman Bill ---------------- 828 10
Louis Stern ---------------------- $97 80
James H. Callanan ---------------- 1,591 38
Frederick R. Green --------------- 768 55
Frank S. McGraw ------------------ 880 92
Mrs. Norman E. Mack -------------- 1,592 45
John K. Stewart ------------------ 1,013 39
John C. Woodbury ----------------- 1,087 40
John Young ----------------------- 1,928 75
Cyrus E. Jones ------------------- 35 50
--------- $10,697 69
Railroad, hotel and other expenses of the
Commission attending the dedication ceremonies
at St. Louis, April 30, 1903 ------------------ 1,722 80
Railroad, hotel and other expenses of the
Commission for meeting held at St. Louis
in December, 1903 ----------------------------- 1,260 50
Miscellaneous expenditures not included in
above ----------------------------------------- 1,565 33
-----------
Total expenditures ------------------------------ $53,864 64
===========
Receipts:
Rebate from Planters' Hotel ----------------- $60 00
Rebate on insurance ------------------------- 369 81
Interest on deposits of funds
in treasurer's hands ---------------------- 403 66
-----------
Total receipts ---------------------------------- $833 47
===========

NEW YORK STATE BUILDING, CONSTRUCTION

Caldwell & Drake, contract for construction
of building and extras ------------------------ $61,634 85
Embellishment of building, models for
Quadrigae, statuary, coat of arms, etc.,
and mural decorations ------------------------- 11,133 64
Enlarging and placing sculpture ----------------- 5,000 00
Organ case -------------------------------------- $3,500 00
Furniture, carpets, shades, screens, etc. ------- 19,750 55
Electroliers, electric fixtures, etc. ----------- 5,077 73
Appointments, watchman's time clock, fire
protection, refrigerators, gas logs, electric
heaters, etc. --------------------------------- 1,189 90
Landscape gardening ----------------------------- 3,694 30
Architects' fees -------------------------------- 5,128 70
Architects' expenses ---------------------------- 1,783 90
Insurance on building --------------------------- 2,444 20
------------
Total expenditures ------------------------------ $120,337 77
============
Receipts:
Sale of building and furniture ---------------- $7,025 00
============

NEW YORK STATE BUILDING, MAINTENANCE

Superintendent--salary -------------------------- $1,225 00
Hostesses and matrons--salaries ----------------- 3,232 50
Attendants, postmaster, watchman, porters
--salaries ------------------------------------ 20,696 59
Janitor service --------------------------------- 2,682 50
Allowance for maintenance of superintendent,
hostesses, matrons, etc., at St. Louis ------- 1,902 10
Equipment, including table and bed linen,
dishes, light renewals, canopies, electric
fans, etc. ------------------------------------ 4,486 91
General supplies, renewals, livery, cartage,
baggage transfer and laundry ------------------ 7,721 29
Light and water --------------------------------- 4,974 90
Caterers' bills, floral decorations, music,
illuminations and other incidentals for all
functions given by the Commission, including
New York Week, Dedication Day and
other occasions elsewhere enumerated,
also for restaurant charges of all members
of the Commission while at the Exposition ----- $17,444 79
Expenses of the Governor, his staff and
legislative party, including transportation
and hotel bills in connection with New
York Week observance -------------------------- 3,982 62
Special illumination of building in honor of
visit of President Roosevelt ------------------ 250 00
Total expenditures ------------------------------ $68,599 20
-----------
Receipts
Rebate on gas, livery and safe ---------------- $70 00
===========

EDUCATION

Director of Education and Social Economy
--salary (20 1/2 months.) --------------------- $3,422 20
Traveling expenses of Director, Advisory
Committee and employees ----------------------- 1,815 93
Clerks, stenographer, attendants, draughtsman
and other employees--salaries ----------------- 4,403 98
Allowance for maintenance of Director and
attendants at St. Louis ----------------------- 2,719 74
Printing and stationery and binding of
exhibit work ---------------------------------- 807 01
Supplies--material for preparation of
exhibit --------------------------------------- 1,690 00
Installation-booth, facades, cabinets,
counters, cases and appointments -------------- 7,096 52
Express, freight, cartage, postage, telephone
and telegraph --------------------------------- 793 73
-----------
Total expenditures------------------------------- $22,749 11
===========
Receipts:
Amounts received from cities, etc., on
account of binding exhibit material,
sale of installation and appointments $666 50
==========

FINE ARTS

Employees--salaries ----------------------------- $280 00
Storage of art works, packing, handling,
repairing, etc. ------------------------------- 3,129 09
Express, cartage, etc., to and from St. Louis 3,139 04
Insurance on art works -------------------------- 2,423 00
Printing and supplies --------------------------- 173 26
Postage, telephone and telegraph and
miscellaneous expenditures -------------------- 155 56
-----------
Total expenditures ------------------------------ $9,299 95
===========
Receipts:
Rebate on insurance --------------------------- $42 13
===========

AGRICULTURE AND LIVE STOCK

Superintendent--salary (19 months) --------- $3,166 55
Superintendent--traveling expenses -------------- 1,115 87
Allowance for maintenance of Superintendent
and assistants at St. Louis ------------------- 1,380 00
Assistants, attendants, laborers, etc.--
salaries -------------------------------------- 5,579 54
Miscellaneous traveling expenses for
collecting exhibit material ------------------- 1,120 93
Cost of grain, vegetables and dairy products
for exhibit ----------------------------------- 2,425 92
Installation--booth, counters, cabinets,
show cases, etc. ------------------------------ 4,110 44
Refrigerator show cases for butter and
cheese ---------------------------------------- 1,500 00
Printing and stationery ------------------------- 42 45
Express, freight, cartage, including on live
stock for exhibit, cold storage, telephone,
telegraph and postage ------------------------- $2,230 62
Miscellaneous supplies -------------------------- 612 13
Total expenditures ------------------------------ $23,285 45
Receipts:
Sale of exhibit material ---------------------- $592 10

HORTICULTURE

Superintendent--salary (18 1/2 months) ---------- $3,111 06
Superintendent--traveling expenses -------------- 1,021 81
Assistants, attendants, stenographer, labor,
etc. ------------------------------------------ 4,631 31
Allowance for maintenance of Superintendent
and assistants at St. Louis ------------------- 1,840 00
Miscellaneous traveling expenses, collecting
fruit ----------------------------------------- 858 90
Cost of fruit for exhibit, cold storage, etc. 2,579 81
Installation--booth, facade, tables, cases,
etc. ------------------------------------------ 3,711 26
Office rent, supplies, etc. --------------------- 736 72
Printing and stationery ------------------------- 181 19
Freight, cartage, express, telephone,
telegraph and postage ------------------------- 1,580 62
Total expenditures ------------------------------ $20,252 68
Receipts:
Rent of plates and sale of installation ------- $253 50

FOREST, FISH AND GAME

General traveling expenses, collecting
exhibit material ------------------------------ $1,890 22
Cost of exhibit material ------------------------ 5,782 49
Allowance for maintenance of special agent
and assistants at St. Louis during
Exposition period, and for packing and
returning exhibit ----------------------------- $3,183 73
Installation--flooring, cabinets, show cases,
frames, etc. ---------------------------------- 3,283 42
Printing and stationery ------------------------- 262 81
Freight, cartage, express and storage ----------- 361 07
Miscellaneous supplies -------------------------- 97 40
Total expenditures -------------------------- $14,861 14
Receipts:
Sale of floors ------------------------------ $15 00

MINES AND METALLURGY

Clerk hire and labor ---------------------------- $901 08
Traveling expenses, collecting exhibit and
maintenance of attendants and assistants
at St. Louis ---------------------------------- 2,631 59
Excavating fossil trails ------------------------ 180 91
Installation--flooring, cases, cabinets,
counters, etc. -------------------------------- 2,155 22
Freight, cartage, express, etc. ----------------- 1,187 94
Postage, telephone and telegraph ---------------- 91 22
Printing and stationery ------------------------- 122 78
Supplies ---------------------------------------- 207 44
Other miscellaneous expenditures ---------------- 254 18
Total expenditures -------------------------- $7,732 36

SOCIAL ECONOMY

Charities:
Services of assistants preparing
statistics, etc. ---------------------------- $148 25
Supplies, photographs, etc.-------------------- 549 56
Freight, express and cartage ------------------ $52 25
Printing and stationery ----------------------- 16 58
Total --------------------------------------- $766 64
Model of Craig Colony --------------------------- $500 08
Excise:
Preparation and installation of charts -------- $276 32
Labor:
Preparation of graphic charts ----------------- $505 15
Printing, engraving, binding, etc. ------------ 201 45
Traveling expenses ---------------------------- 44 50
Total --------------------------------------- $751 10

Lunacy:
Services of assistants ------------------------ $86 00
Photographs, supplies, etc. ------------------- 1,291 58
Traveling expenses ---------------------------- 23 71
Freight and cartage --------------------------- 40 28
Total --------------------------------------- $1441 57

Prisons:
Traveling expenses and maintenance of
attendants at St. Louis ------------------- $2,000 00

SUMMARY

Receipts:
Appropriation, chapter 421, Laws of
1902 ---------------------------------------- $100,000 00
Appropriation, chapter 546, Laws of
1903 ---------------------------------------- 200,000 00
Appropriation, chapter 640, Laws of
1904 ---------------------------------------- 40,000 00
From General Administration, as per
above schedule ------------------------------ 833 47
From State Building, construction ------------- 7,025 00
From State Building, maintenance -------------- $70 00
From Education -------------------------------- 666 50
From Fine Arts -------------------------------- 42 13
From Agriculture and Live Stock --------------- 592 10
From Horticulture ----------------------------- 253 50
From Forest, Fish and Game -------------------- 15 00

Total --------------------------------------- $349,497 70

Expenditures:
General Administration ------------------------ $53,864 64
State Building, construction ------------------ 120,337 77
State Building, maintenance ------------------- 68,599 20
Education ------------------------------------- 22,749 11
Fine Arts ------------------------------------- 9,299 95
Agriculture and Live Stock -------------------- 23,285 45
Horticulture ---------------------------------- 20,252 68
Forest, Fish and Game ------------------------- 14,861 14
Mines and Metallurgy -------------------------- 7,732 36
Social economy
Charities -------------------------- $766 64
Craig Colony ----------------------- 500 08
Excise ----------------------------- 276 32
Labor ------------------------------ 751 10
Lunacy ----------------------------- 1,441 57
Prisons ---------------------------- 2,000 00
5,735 71
Balance returned to State treasury -------- 2,779 69
Total ------------------------------------- $349,497 70

Book of the day: