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New York at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis 1904 by DeLancey M. Ellis

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truth the place where the home life of Greater New York is developed,
where it may be seen in its simple beauty adorned with its rugged
virtue. I have not boasted of her rich men, but of her intellectual
gifts; not of her social leaders, but of her clear-minded men and women;
not of her wealth, but of her mental attainments. It is from such a
community that we come to-day to write upon your visitors' book the name
of Brooklyn. In our way we are as proud of our homes as was the old
Roman matron of her two sons, although we may be as poorly decked with
tawdry jewels as she was. We are as proud of our independence in
politics as Philadelphia should be ashamed of her regularity. Boston is
credited with being the Athens of America. Brooklyn deserves the title,
but would leave to Boston her pedantic ways. We are sincere in our
speech and simple in our faith, and when we say we rejoice in St. Louis'
success, are glad to be here and are honored in having a day set aside
for us, we but echo the sentiments that our hearts suggest."

At the conclusion of the oration the Chairman introduced Henry Sanger
Snow, LL.D., who read the following original poem:

POEM OF DR. SNOW

I

Hail! city of the West, from ocean's strand
Afar we bring thee greeting. At thy gate,
Wide-thrown in welcome, gathered nations stand
And praise the deed ye grandly celebrate!
The imperial star that rose from eastern seas,
Marking the new-born nation in the West,
Rides in _thy_ zenith now--by slow degrees
The march of Empire takes its westward quest--
And over scene more fair, sure star could never rest!

II

Worthy thy festival of that high deed--
Louisiana's treaty--greatest act
Of all that came from our great Jefferson:
Nor king nor statesman sealed a nobler pact!
And worthy the _deed_ of this fair festival,
When the young land whose life had scarce begun,
With lofty courage doubt could ne'er appall,
In the one act a finer victory won
Than war in all her scarlet glory e'er hath done!

III

An hundred years have passed--what wonders wrought
Along the Mississippi's mighty stream!
The changes time's transforming wand hath brought
Seem but the unreal visions of a dream!
Where stretched in vast expanse to western sea
The pathless forest and the trackless plain,
Great States and teeming millions soon should be,
And orchards fair and fields of waving grain
And every art of peace through that broad land should reign.

IV

Hail to the Statesman whose far-seeing eyes
Saw in the germ the nation that should be,
Saw how a mighty empire should arise
And span the continent from sea to sea,
And building for the future, led the way
With prescience and high courage, daring fate,
An emperor's domain in a single day
Bought for a purse of gold! a vast estate,
From Europe's despot gained--to Freedom consecrate!

V

Conquest of Peace! on thy triumphal day
No mourning captives, chained to victor's car,
Nor spoil of war, nor bloodshed marked thy way,
Nor hate, nor wrong did thy escutcheon mar!
No throng of armed hosts thy mountains crossed.
Thy forests echoed to no battle cry,
No glory gained with nation's honor lost,
Nor victor's plaudit, echoed with a sigh.
Louisiana won--nor any doomed to die!

VI

Conquest of Peace! No Alsace here doth kneel,
And Lorraine, scarred with unforgotten scar;
No riven Poland, 'neath the warrior's heel,
Spoil of the victor from the field of war.
The sun that shines thy boundless plains along
Lights not the smallest hamlet but is free;
The winds that sweep thy mountains bear no song
Save that the patriot sings--where Liberty
And Peace and Law now are, and evermore shall be!

VII

So be it ever, through the coming age
Our nation's destiny shall be fulfilled,
Not by the tears that greed or passion wage,
Not by the blood of foes or brethren spilled!
But in the wiser and the nobler way
The patriot Statesman taught us, when of yore
His victory of Peace in one brief day
Won glory greater than a year of war!
So may it be, dear land, with thee for evermore!

At the conclusion of the exercises the benediction was pronounced by the
Reverend Doctor Wintner, of Brooklyn, New York, in the following words:

"May the Lord our God, Creator of the universe and Father of mankind,
bless all those in our home city afar off, and also those near here, and
may He look down upon you in His kindness and grace, and grant you peace
forevermore. Amen."

THE LUNCHEON

Immediately after the formal exercises, the delegation were guests of
the State Commission at luncheon, at which Commissioner William Berri
presided. Covers were laid for about 200. At the conclusion of the
luncheon toasts were responded to by several. The program of remarks
follows:

"A Welcome to the Fair,"
Honorable David R. Francis, President of the Louisiana
Purchase Exposition

"The Old Brooklynites,"
Ex-Senator Stephen M. Griswold
"'Tis the sunset of life gives us mystical lore."

"Brooklyn of the Future"
Dr. Henry Sanger Snow
"There is a fascination in recollections of the past and
hopes for the future."

"Brooklyn Women"
Judge Hiram R. Steele
"Woman! Blest partner of our joys and woes."

THE COMMITTEES

The local Brooklyn committee was as follows: President, Martin W.
Littleton; Secretary, John B. Creighton.

Executive Committee: Herbert F. Gunnison, Robert W. Haff, Timothy L.
Woodruff, Julian D. Fairchild, J. Edward Swanstrom, S.F. Rothschild,
James J. McCabe, Frank E. O'Reilly, John N. Harman and Thomas P. Peters.

Entertainment Committee: Thomas P. Peters, James J. McCabe, James
McLeer, Robert W. Haff and Timothy L. Woodruff.

Program Committee: J. Edward Swanstrom, Julian D. Fairchild and S.F.
Rothschild.

Transportation Committee: Herbert F. Gunnison, Frank E. O'Reilly and
William Berri.

THE EVENING RECEPTION

The New York City building on the Model street, in which the evening
reception was held, was elaborately decorated with colored lights, the
word "Brooklyn" appearing in fairy lamps over the main doorway. Within a
wealth of palms and smilax was used.

The reception took place between eight and ten and was attended by the
Brooklyn delegation, Exposition officials, State and national
representatives and many invited guests. An orchestra furnished music
and throughout the evening a buffet luncheon was served. The receiving
line consisted of Thomas W. Hynes, Commissioner for New York city, and
Mrs. Hynes; Vice-President Berri, of the State Commission, and Mrs.
Berri; Colonel William Hester; Mr. and Mrs. J. Edward Swanstrom; Mr. and
Mrs. R.W. Haff; Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P. Peters; Mr. John B. Creighton;
Mr. and Mrs. Clarence W. Seamans; Dr. and Mrs. Henry Sanger Snow; Mr.
and Mrs. Hiram R. Steele; Mr. and Mrs. Stephen M. Griswold; Mr. and Mrs.
J. Adolph Mollenhauer; Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Raymond; Mr. Herbert F.
Gunnison.

The exercises of the day were marked by an enthusiasm which invariably
characterizes the undertakings of Brooklynites, and the large delegation
which had journeyed all the way from home to spend four short days at
the Fair felt more than repaid for the journey.

[Illustration: CYNGALESE STICK DANCERS]

CHAPTER VIII

Thanksgiving Day

[Illustration]

The fact that the Exposition did not close until December first
compelled all employees to remain in St. Louis Thanksgiving Day; that
day which, of all others, generally marks a family gathering. The
Commission thoughtfully extended an invitation to all of its employees
and their families in St. Louis to be their guests at Thanksgiving
dinner in the State building. The number included about sixty-five
people, every attache who was in town accepting the invitation.

The official colony of the Empire State at the great Exposition
assembled at the State building at one o'clock. All were cordially
greeted by Vice-President Berri, Mrs. Berri and Mrs. Norman E. Mack.
Before sitting down to dinner a group picture was taken on the front
steps of the building, a copy of which was subsequently presented by the
Commission to each employee.

The table was set in the grand hall and was heavily laden with products
of the State of New York. Owing to the approaching close of the
Exposition, the agricultural and horticultural exhibits were heavily
drawn upon. Great heaps of New York's superlative fruit and prize
vegetables were used in decorating the table. Messrs. Bayno & Pindat
served a tempting menu, features of which were those dishes always
associated with Thanksgiving Day--roast turkey and pumpkin pie. A spirit
of hearty good fellowship pervaded the entire occasion, and each one
vied with his neighbor in adding to the total of the entertainment.

Remarks were made between the courses, and early in the event
Vice-President Berri, who presided, arose and, after complimenting every
one present on behalf of the Commission for the part they had taken in
contributing to New York's success at the Fair, proceeded in a most
happy vein and said in part, as follows:

REMARKS BY MR. BERRI

"We should be thankful way down deep in our hearts that we are citizens
of such a great country--the United States of America. When you think of
its wonderful struggle for years and know that to-day it is at the
forefront of progress among the nations of the earth should we not be
thankful that we are a part of it? We should be thankful that we have
such a great President--a man respected by all nations. Republicans
should be thankful that they won such a great victory at the polls, and
Democrats should be thankful that the Republicans give them such good
government.

"The married men here should be thankful that they have such good wives,
and the wives that they have such good husbands; the unmarried men that
they have in the future such a vista of happiness that is to come to
them, and the young ladies should be thankful that there are so many
young men around. There is no way to view this occasion but with a
thanksgiving spirit, and nothing pleases me more than to be with you
to-day. There has been no feature of our Fair at any time, in all of its
various functions we have had, that gives me such great pleasure as to
preside at this gathering. It is the first time we have been all brought
together, and, while the hours of the Fair are numbered, I am sure that
every one will go home never forgetting the pleasant days they have had
at the great Exposition at St. Louis in the year nineteen hundred and
four."

He then called upon Mrs. Norman E. Mack, the only other member of the
Commission present. Mrs. Mack was warmly applauded and said:

RESPONSE BY MRS. MACK

"It gives me great pleasure to be able to take my Thanksgiving dinner
to-day with so many who have done so much for the glory of New York at
this Exposition. I particularly wish to compliment those of our own
building who have always been so courteous and nice to me, and by so
doing have aided the New York Commission in making the New York State
building the social center of the Exposition."

OTHER SPEAKERS

Brief remarks were also made by Mr. J. H. Durkee, Superintendent of
Agriculture; Mr. DeLancey M. Ellis, Director of Education and Social
Economy; Mr. James T. Patterson, Assistant Superintendent of
Horticulture; Mr. A. B. Strough, in charge of the Forestry, Fish and
Game exhibit; Dr. H. H. Hinshaw, in charge of the Scientific exhibit,
and the following officials of the State building: Hon. Frank J.
LeFevre, Superintendent; Mrs. Dore Lyon, Hostess; Mrs. F. P. Applebee,
Assistant Hostess; Miss Laura C. MacMartin, Matron, and Mr. George B.
Cowper, Assistant Superintendent. Others present were called upon and
made appropriate remarks, and the Pikers' Club, an organization composed
of attaches of the building, furnished the musical part of the
entertainment.

PRESENTATION TO SECRETARY BALL

Vice-President Berri then presented Mr. Charles A. Ball, Secretary and
Chief Executive Officer of the Commission, with a complete fishing
outfit in behalf of all of the employees of the New York State
Commission. Mr. Ball enjoys a wide reputation as an expert with the rod.
In his remarks Mr. Berri said that it had never been demonstrated that
the Secretary had ever returned with any fish, and expressed the hope
that with such a perfect equipment some tangible results might be shown.
He also humorously referred to the fact that in the fire which a short
time before had threatened the destruction of the State building, Mr.
Ball's first thought had been for the safety of his fishing reels. The
presentation was a complete surprise to the Secretary, who feelingly
expressed his deep appreciation of the thoughtfulness of his staff in
making him a present which he should treasure as long as he lived. He
also expressed his gratitude to all of the employees of the Commission
for their loyal support, which had meant so much in the successful
participation of New York at the greatest Fair the world ever knew. He
closed with laudatory remarks concerning the Commission, and the wisdom
and thoroughness which had characterized its work.

In the course of her remarks Mrs. Lyon read the following original poem:

POEM BY MRS. LYON

Like ships upon the changing sea of life,
Unknowing and unknown until we met,
We've sailed awhile together, and no strife
Has marred our joy, nor brought a faint regret.

O'er this composite family of ours,
Begotten from each corner of our State,
Has breathed a peaceful spirit, and the hours
Have sped on wings from early dawn till late.

'Tis something to have met each other here,
And found in each some trait to be admired,
And felt the world replete with joy and cheer,
And friendship still the thing to be desired.

The tiny corners that we once possessed
By gentle contact have been rubbed away,
And words that might have hurt have been suppressed,
And peacefully we hail this Festive Day.

The time when we must part comes on apace,
And soon we'll wend along our various ways,
Then mem'ry's realm will crowded be for space
To welcome friends of Exposition days.

To name each one and strive to pay the debt
We owe, of deepest gratitude and praise
In words, would take me many hours yet,
And possibly run over into days.

And--after all, when all is said and done,
It only means we've met--to live--to part.
Then here's my wish--That we have just begun
A friendship which may blossom in each heart.

LANTERN SLIDES

At the conclusion of the remarks a series of lantern slides illustrating
some of the most attractive natural features of the Empire State were
shown, the slides being a part of the exhibit in education. The
entertainment concluded with informal dancing, music for the same being
furnished by an orchestra which was in attendance. The assemblage
dispersed with three rousing cheers for the Empire State and for the
Louisiana Purchase Exposition Commission of the State of New York.

[Illustration: SIOUX CHIEF "BLUE HORSE" AND ARMY OFFICERS]

CHAPTER IX

Educational Exhibit and Schedule of Awards

THE EDUCATIONAL EXHIBIT

BY DELANCEY M. ELLIS

Director of Education and Social Economy

[Illustration]

The movement for an educational exhibit of the State of New York at St.
Louis was inaugurated at a meeting of the State Teachers' Association,
held at Saratoga in July, 1902, at which a resolution was offered
inviting the various educational associations of the State to co-operate
with the above association in promoting an exhibit commensurate with the
State's educational importance. An immediate response was forthcoming.

THE CONFERENCE COMMITTEE

Ten powerful educational associations and the two State administrative
departments (since merged into the Department of Education) each sent a
delegate to a central committee, which took the name of "Conference
Committee," and consisted of Chairman, Myron T. Scudder, principal State
Normal School, New Paltz, representing the Normal Principals' Council;
Secretary, Henry L. Taylor, representing the University of the State of
New York; A. M. Wright, Second Deputy Superintendent of Public
Instruction, representing the Department of Public Instruction; F. D.
Boynton, superintendent of schools, Ithaca, representing the State
Teachers' Association; Andrew W. Edson, associate superintendent of
schools, city of New York, representing the Council of School
Superintendents; Calvin W. Edwards, president Board of Education,
Albany, representing the Association of School Boards; F. S. Fosdick,
principal Masten Park High School, Buffalo, representing the Associated
Academic Principals; George H. Walden, principal Grammar School No. 10,
Rochester, representing the Council of Grammar School Principals; H. J.
Schmitz, acting principal State Normal School, Geneseo, representing the
Science Teachers' Association; A. C. Hill, Department of Public
Instruction, representing the Training Teachers' Conference; Erwin B.
Whitney, school commissioner, first district, Broome county,
representing the School Commissioners and Superintendents' Association.

This Committee organized as above in October, 1902, and appointed a
subcommittee to appear before the Louisiana Purchase Exposition
Commission and request an adequate appropriation and the appointment of
a director to carry on the work.

APPOINTMENT OF DIRECTOR

At the Meeting of the Commission held June 10, 1903, DeLancey M. Ellis,
of Rochester, was appointed director, and the sum of $20,000 was set
aside for the preparation of the educational exhibit. Offices were
immediately opened at 46 Elwood building, Rochester, N. Y., and the work
of collecting and preparing the exhibit material was begun. As the
schools were just about to close for the summer holidays but little
could be accomplished, and none of the work of the school year 1902-1903
could be procured. It is to be regretted that time was not allowed to
procure an exhibit of work covering an entire school year. That which
covers a shorter period is of necessity fragmentary and hardly conveys
clearly an idea of the quality or scope of the work being done in a
given institution.

ADVISORY COMMITTEE

The Conference Committee was invited to retain its organization and to
take the name of "Advisory Committee," to co-operate with and assist the
director, the members of the committee to serve without compensation,
but necessary expenses while in discharge of their duties to be paid
from the appropriation for the exhibit.

It would be hard to overestimate the services performed by this
committee. Each member took a hearty interest in the work in hand and
freely gave of his time and advice in carrying the work forward to a
successful conclusion. Any lack of interest or enthusiasm on the part of
the members of a given association was quickly dispelled by a personal
appeal to its members from its representative upon the committee. In
this way the interest was most genuine and general throughout the State,
and in no way could the sentiment of educational interests be more
clearly crystallized than in a meeting of this committee, and to them is
due the thanks of the Commission, as well as the thanks of the
educational forces of the State of New York for their unselfish efforts
and wise counsel, which in so large a way was responsible for the
success of the educational exhibit.

PLANS PRESENTED BEFORE EDUCATIONAL ASSOCIATIONS

The director was invited to present the plans for the exhibit at the
following educational meetings during the year 1903: University
Convocation, at Albany, in June; State Teachers' Association, at Cliff
Haven, in July; School Commissioners and Superintendents, at Watkins, in
September; Association of Superintendents, which met in conjunction with
the Massachusetts Association of Superintendents, at Boston, in October,
and Associated Academic Principals, at Syracuse in December. The subject
was cordially received, and a general effort was made throughout the
field of education in the Empire State to prepare an exhibit which would
surpass any that had ever been gathered before. By means of circulars,
several of which were sent broadcast throughout the State, full
instructions were given to local authorities as to the preparation of
the work, amount of material desired and the proposed plan of
arrangement. Throughout the fall and winter the director visited many
cities of the State, consulted with exhibitors as to the most attractive
way of preparing material, and held himself in readiness to assist all
who experienced any difficulty in the preparation of their exhibits. The
exhibit material was collected, systematically arranged and mounted at
the offices in Rochester, the entire expense of its preparation and
transportation being borne by the State, with the exception of the
binding of written work and small incidental expenses, which were borne
by the local school authorities.

LOCATION OF THE EXHIBIT

The space assigned to the State of New York contained approximately
2,300 square feet and was most advantageously located. It was directly
within and facing the main north entrance of the Palace of Education,
and at the intersection of the main north and south aisle and transverse
aisle "B." For its neighbors were the city of St. Louis and the State of
Missouri, both of which prepared most meritorious exhibits; and the
State of Massachusetts, which is always looked upon as standing in the
front rank in educational progress.

The Exposition authorities announced that no unit smaller than the State
in public school exhibits would be recognized, except in the case of
four or five cities which had powerful, strongly centralized school
systems, making them worthy of independent space and proper subjects for
individual study.

EXHIBIT OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK

The city of New York was numbered among these exceptions, and
approximately 1,500 square feet of space was assigned it adjoining the
space assigned to the State of New York. The city government
appropriated $10,000 for its exhibit and bore the entire expense of the
same. Associate Superintendent Andrew W. Edson was named as committee in
charge of the exhibit by Superintendent William H. Maxwell. The city
authorities early expressed a willingness and desire to co-operate with
the State authorities in the preparation of an exhibit and agreed to
follow the same general style of installation and arrangement. Due
acknowledgment is hereby made to Superintendent Maxwell, Associate
Superintendent Edson and to committees in charge of minor details for
the adoption of plans already inaugurated in the preparation of the
State exhibit, and to C. B. J. Snyder, superintendent of school
buildings in the city of New York, who prepared the plans for the booth
for both the State and city exhibits at no expense to the State.

THE INSTALLATION

The booth was so planned that from the outside it was apparently a
single inclosure, the State and city exhibits being separated on the
interior by an appropriate screen nine feet high, through which an
entranceway was cut. Mr. Snyder's plans provided for a scheme of
installation which, while inexpensive, was both artistic and dignified
and admirably adapted for the display of the material to be exhibited.
In fact it was generally conceded that much more effective results had
been obtained than by surrounding states which had expended considerably
more money. The inclosure was massive, the woodwork being an effective
imitation of Flemish oak, and the hanging surface a burlap of a neutral
green tint; the facade, sixteen feet in height, being broken every few
feet at fixed intervals by fluted pilasters with ornamental caps. On the
outside a wainscoting extended three feet from the floor, above which
were panels for hanging exhibit material, the whole being capped by an
attractive dentulated cornice. The entranceway, which was thrown across
the corner at the intersection of the aisles, was a massive arch,
surmounted by the coat of arms of the State, tinted in old ivory,
underneath which in gold letters was, "State of New York." The interior
was cut by transverse walls, nine feet high and extending seven feet
from the main wall, thus forming a series of alcoves convenient for
study on the part of visitors and leaving in the center an open space
for the display of models, apparatus and cabinet material. Directly
facing the entranceway were general and private offices. Completely
surrounding the interior of the booth, on the eye line, were 100 wall
cabinets which have come to be so generally used for the display of
exhibit material. The wall space above the cabinets was used for the
display of especially meritorious and attractive material, while below
was a countershelf upon which, here and there, rested a showcase for the
display of sewing, clay modeling, botanical specimens, etc. Underneath
the counters were shelves for bound books and cupboards for the storage
of printed matter and supplies. All work was mounted uniformly upon a
Scotch gray cardboard and neatly lettered in white ink.

SCOPE OF THE EXHIBIT

Instead of confining the exhibit to the work of the public schools, as
was quite generally done by other States exhibiting, it was decided to
show, so far as possible, work now being done in all forms and phases of
education in the Empire State. Space was freely given to private
institutions to demonstrate the place which they are filling in the
educational work of the State. Every subdivision of the official
classification found an exemplification within the New York State
exhibit. The participation of twenty-four cities and numerous
incorporated villages, both in elementary and high school work, made the
exhibits of those departments thoroughly representative of the work of
the State as a whole. It is unfair to pick the work of a few progressive
school systems, and endeavor to make it stand for the work of the State
at large.

PLAN OF ARRANGEMENT

The plan of arrangement was arrived at only after the most careful
thought and discussion, the desire being to so arrange the material as
to be most serviceable to the educator and to those seeking suggestions
and helpful ideas. In arranging an educational exhibit, emphasis must be
placed either upon political divisions, subjects or grades. It was early
determined that no separate space should be assigned to any single
locality, but that all of the work of the State in the grades should be
exhibited grade by grade and that of the high schools by subjects, and
arranged under various departments, such as science, classics,
mathematics, etc., thus making it possible for a grade teacher to
readily compare her work with that of New York's, and to profit by the
comparison, no matter in whose favor it might be, and a high school
instructor in charge of a department to readily find the work of that
department. This method rendered it unnecessary to look over the
exhibits from several cities to find the particular work desired.
Moreover, a further subdivision was made, in that the work was arranged
according to the population of the contributing cities and villages.
That is, the work from the city of the largest population contributing
was installed first, and so on in order. While it was not the purpose to
invite comparison of work between rival cities of the State, but rather
to present a united front to the world at large, still if it was the
desire of some to make such comparison, the above indicated arrangement
was the most equitable, as all cities of approximately the same
resources and theoretically working under like conditions were placed
side by side, and the work of the small village was not placed in
juxtaposition with that of the large, strongly centralized city system
with many times its resources. A complete catalogue of the exhibit was
freely distributed, and cross-references made to work of the various
localities, so there was no difficulty for those interested in a single
place to locate the work it contributed.

It was generally conceded that, while the above arrangement made no
concession to local pride, it was by all odds the wisest arrangement to
follow in an exposition of international scope. The compliments which
were bestowed upon the arrangement of the exhibit, and the readiness
with which all visitors found the work in which they were particularly
interested, demonstrated beyond a doubt the wisdom of the committee in
pursuing the course above outlined. The entire exhibit was also
carefully classified in harmony with the official classification of the
Exposition under the several groups and subdivisions thereof, thereby
rendering additional aid in promptly locating exhibits in any particular
department.

EXHIBIT DIVISIONS

Entering the booth one found to the left of the entrance the exhibit of
the former State Department of Public Instruction. (It should be stated
here that the exhibits of the University of the State of New York and of
the State Department of Public Instruction were prepared before
unification was an accomplished fact. The two exhibits can be said to
have formed the exhibit of the new Department of Education.)

Next was the exhibit of the kindergartens, filling three units. (The
term "unit" is used to designate one of the wall cabinets containing
thirty-three cards 22 x 28 inches.)

Adjoining the kindergarten section was the exhibit of the elementary
grades, filling twenty-five units. All the subjects of the curriculum
were shown, the work in the wall cabinets being "types" or "samples" of
work, the great bulk of which was shown in bound volumes.
Cross-reference was made on the margin of each card to the volume
containing similar work, thus facilitating the search of the visitor for
a number of class exercises of work of the same general nature, and
relieving the visitor interested in a general way of looking over a vast
repetition of material. Separating the elementary grades from the high
schools was the exhibit of the rural schools of the State, those schools
under the jurisdiction of the several school commissioners. It was most
complete and interesting, and afforded a clear picture of the work done
in the ungraded country schools. The exhibit of the high schools,
filling fourteen units, was next in order, and, as stated above, was
subdivided into subjects. Twenty-four cities of the State, to say
nothing of the incorporated villages, private institutions, etc.,
contributed material in one or more of the foregoing departments.

Next was installed the exhibit covering the professional training of
teachers, equally divided between the State Normal School system and the
work of the training schools and classes in cities and villages, each
occupying five units. Every Normal School of the State was represented,
each making a special exhibit in the particular subject or subjects
assigned it by a committee of Normal School principals, to whom was
delegated the duty of preparing an exhibit. All of the city training
schools in the State, save four, were represented, as well as the great
majority of training classes, the whole exhibit having been arranged by
the State Supervisor of Training Schools and Classes.

In the next section was installed the exhibit in higher education,
exhibits being in place from Colgate University, Hobart College,
Manhattan College, the College of Pharmacy--allied with Columbia
University--and Syracuse University, the latter institution making an
exhibit both in applied sciences and in fine arts. Next were installed
the exhibits of technical and trade schools, which contained interesting
displays from the leading institutions in the State engaged in this line
of work. Just beyond was the exhibit of the industrial schools, and then
the display of special work in education which is being done by
institutions not wholly educational in character. A unique unit was that
devoted to the work of the Indian schools of the State, each of the
several reservations being represented, and the whole exhibit being
arranged by the State Inspector of Indian Schools.

The next alcove was devoted to the education of defectives. It contained
concise exhibits from the institutions of the State devoted to the
instruction of the deaf, dumb and blind, and was carefully studied by
those engaged in this work.

The exhibit of summer schools and extension courses adjoined this and
was designed to show the work which is best exemplified by the
Chautauqua institution. In a manner allied with this work is that of the
Education Department in visual instruction, which is carried on by
lantern slides to aid in the teaching of geography, history and kindred
subjects. It was, therefore, installed under this head. The exhibit
received hearty commendation from educators generally, but particularly
from foreign visitors. The scheme is thoroughly practicable, and nowhere
else is it carried on with the same careful attention to detail, nor is
the same perfection of slide making reached as in the State of New York.

The last exhibit before leaving the booth was that of the University of
the State of New York.

SPECIAL FEATURES

There were many features of special interest. A series of thirty-two
charts were prepared as the special exhibit of the New York State
Teachers' Association, and will be reproduced in the forthcoming report
of that body. To one interested in following the tremendous progress
made in every branch of educational activity within our State during the
past decade, these charts are invaluable. The two charts here reproduced
and which formed a part of the exhibit of the Department of Public
Instruction were the subject of much comment.

The model of the new State Normal and Training School at Fredonia, which
was prepared by the manual training and art classes of the institution,
came in for its share of attention. It was an accurate model of one of
the State's finest educational structures.

The State Normal School at New Paltz sent a doll house made by the
seventh grade boys for the first grade children in the practice
department, the entire structure being completely furnished and
appointed by the children.

A special feature was the exhibit of clay modeling from the State School
of Clay Working and Ceramics at Alfred, the only school of its kind in
the United States receiving State aid. Near by stood a cabinet full of
home-made apparatus sent from various institutions, but a large part of
which came from the physical laboratories of Pratt Institute, Brooklyn.
The exhibit contained much of interest to a science teacher.

On the exterior of the facade was a huge educational map of the State,
upon which was shown the location, grade, construction and normal
capacity of every institution of learning within its borders. The
superiority of New York's schoolhouses was shown by the large number
constructed of brick and stone. The year 1904 marked the passing of the
log schoolhouse, only four of which were shown upon the map as against
approximately fifty ten years ago. The facade also contained an
admirable exhibit of art work prepared by the students of the New York
School of Applied Design for Women.

SIGNIFICANCE OF SOME CITY EXHIBITS

Various methods of instruction peculiar to certain cities or localities
were fully set forth. Albany exhibited the work of one of the most
complete systems of free kindergartens in the country, as well as the
correlation of subjects in the elementary grades; also manual training
and art courses in the high school. Batavia demonstrated the system of
individual instruction as carried on in its schools, which involves the
employment of two teachers in each classroom. Syracuse exemplified its
courses in art, manual training and physical training in the elementary
grades. Jamestown clearly set forth its course in manual training
throughout the entire school course, while Ithaca, in addition to a
well-rounded exhibit, by means of photographs, brought out the subject
of high school athletics. The exhibit from Yonkers, which was general in
character, portrayed the efficiency and superiority of the school
equipment in that city.

EDITORIAL COMMENT

The exhibit from first to last demonstrated beyond peradventure the
beneficial results accruing from a strongly centralized, and, at the
same time, most liberal administration of educational interests.

A prominent morning daily paper, commenting editorially upon the
exhibit, says: "It is worth your attention; it means more to every
citizen of the Empire State than any other exhibit shown. The chief
product of the Empire State is men; neither fields of grain or
manufactures, invention or art are as important a product as men. In New
York State are produced some of the greatest men of the country. A large
part of the raw material comes into New York harbor past 'Liberty
Enlightening the World,' and is gradually converted into citizenship.
... Some of the raw material imported is next to worthless; some of the
domestic stuff is equally unpromising, but in the great bulk, year in
and year out, there is the making of fine men. ... New York State men
are scattered throughout the country. They found the cities of the west;
they run the railroads; they manipulate the finances; they capitalize
the new enterprises; they invest in the futures; they get into the
public offices; they plan the political campaigns; they produce the new
ideas; they center current history. Men are made in New York State in
the schools. ... The better the schools the finer the quality of the men
produced. Therefore, the school exhibit of New York State should
interest every citizen, as the schools have been bettering year by year
and the product increasing in value. ... The Commission in charge of
this exhibit has spared no expense to make this educational showing a
storehouse of novel ideas and suggestions dealing with the advance in
pedagogy, and of the State's resources in the teaching of the young
idea."

DISPOSITION OF MATERIAL

Many requests were received from the representatives of foreign
governments, agents of pedagogical museums and individuals for portions
of the exhibit, but the determination of the Lewis and Clark Exposition
Commission of the State of New York to send the entire exhibit to the
Exposition at Portland, Oregon, precluded the possibility of acceding to
these requests and insures the holding intact of the entire exhibit
throughout the Portland Exposition period, at the conclusion of which it
is to be hoped that provision will be made for the establishment of a
Pedagogical Museum at the Capitol in Albany, of which this exhibit may
be made the nucleus.

ITEMS OF EXPENDITURE

The appropriation of $20,000 was expended approximately, as follows

Installation: Booth, wall cabinets, furniture, etc. $6,000
Salary of Director and assistants and maintenance
at St. Louis ----------------------------------- 8,500
Freight, express, cartage, telegrams, etc. ------- 1,000
Material used in preparation and general supplies 2,700
Traveling expenses ------------------------------- 1,250
Printing and stationery -------------------------- 350
Expenses of Advisory Committee ------------------- 200
-------
Total -------------------------------------------- $20,000
=======

THE STAFF

The Director acknowledges the loyalty and efficiency of those associated
with him in the work of the department. To them belongs a large share of
any credit which may be forthcoming for the value of the exhibit.

In an educational exhibit, probably more than any other, the necessity
of a personal explanation to supplement the work exhibited is necessary.
Miss Olive C. Kellogg, of New York city, and Miss Clara M. Paquet, of
Cohoes, expert attendants, were always ready to explain the work
exhibited, and to give full information concerning the distinctive
features of the various city systems and institutions. They spoke the
principal foreign languages, thus aiding visitors from abroad in more
easily grasping the ideas set forth and the methods exemplified.

Miss Mary MacArthur, of Rochester, N.Y., served throughout the period of
preparation and through the Exposition period as general assistant and
stenographer; Hugh J. Kelly, of Albany, N.Y., as assistant and clerk,
and E.J. Haddleton and H.B. Skinner, of Albany, as expert letterers and
draftsmen.

_Catalogue of Exhibitors in the Department of Education, Arranged by
Groups, with the Awards, if Any, Received by Each_

GROUP ONE

_Kindergartens, Elementary Education, and Training of Teachers for
Same_

Albany, Board of Education, public schools. Gold medal
Administrative blanks
Forty-one volumes class exercises
Photographs
Course of study in drawing and drawings
Ballston, Board of Education, training class. Collective award,
gold medal
Students' written work
Batavia, Board of Education, public schools. Gold medal
Eight volumes pupils' work
Photographs
Charts
Pamphlets
Cambridge, Board of Education, training class
Photographs
Canajoharie, Board of Education, public schools
Pupils' selected work
Canajoharie, Board of Education, training class
Students' written work
Canton, Board of Education
Administrative blanks
Photographs
Cape Vincent, Board of Education, public school
Three volumes pupils' written work
Cato, Board of Education, public school
One volume pupils' written work
Cattaraugus, Board of Education, training class. Collective award,
gold medal
Students' written work
Clayton, Board of Education, training class. Collective award,
gold medal
Students' written work
Two volumes drawings
Clyde, Board of Education, training class. Collective award, gold
medal
Students' selected work
Cohoes, Board of Education, public schools
Pupils' drawings
Colton, Board of Education, training class. Collective award, gold
medal
Students' selected work
Corinth, Board of Education, public schools
Six volumes of pupils' written work
Photographs
Corinth, Board of Education, training class. Collective award, gold
medal
Students' written work
Cortland, Board of Education, public schools
Photographs
Administrative blanks
Pupils' selected work
Annual report
Depew, Board of Education, public schools
Six industrial charts
DeRuyter, Board of Education, teachers' training class. Collective
award, gold medal
Students' written work
East Aurora, Board of Education, public schools
Six volumes pupils' written work.
Catalogues
Education, State Department of. Grand prize
Charts
Statistics
Administrative blanks
Reports
Maps
Lantern slides
Publications illustrating visual instruction system
Fairport, Board of Education, training class. Collective award, gold
medal
Students' written work
Freeport, Board of Education, public schools
Three volumes pupils' written work
Froebel Normal Institute, New York city. Silver medal
One volume catalogues
Photographs
Students' written work
Administrative blanks
Kindergarten songs
Glens Falls, Board of Education, training class. Collective award,
gold medal
Students' written work
Gouverneur, Board of Education, training class. Collective award,
gold medal
Students' written work
Griffith Institute, Springville, Board of Education, training class.
Collective award, gold medal
Students' written work
Hamilton, Board of Education, training class. Collective award,
gold medal
Students' written work
Herkimer, Board of Education, public schools
Pupils' selected work
Hornellsville, Board of Education, training class. Collective award,
gold medal
Students' work
Hudson, Board of Education, public schools
One volume pupils' work in penmanship
Ithaca, Board of Education, public schools. Gold medal
Sixteen volumes pupils' written work
Sloyd work
Administrative blanks
Photographs
Jamestown, Board of Education, public schools. Silver medal
Nineteen volumes pupils' written work
Statistical charts
Cabinet of manual training work
Administrative blanks
Photographs
Johnstown, Board of Education, public schools. Collective award,
gold medal
Six volumes pupils' written work
Industrial charts
Annual report
Johnstown, Board of Education, training class
Students' written work
Kingston, Board of Education, public schools. Collective award,
gold medal
Seven volumes pupils' written work
Drawings
Photographs
Little Falls, Board of Education, public schools
Pupils' selected work
Malone, Board of Education, training class. Collective award, gold
medal
Students' written work
Map, Educational map of New York State
(See award to Louisiana Purchase Exposition Commission)
Mechanicville, Board of Education, public schools
Six volumes pupils' written work
Medina, Board of Education, public schools
Six volumes pupils' written work
Map drawing and relief maps
Mexico, Board of Education, training class
Students' written work
Mohawk, Board of Education, public school
Four volumes pupils' written work
Newark, Board of Education, public schools
One volume pupils' written work
Catalogues and administrative blanks
New Rochelle, Board of Education, public schools. Collective
award, gold medal
Eighteen volumes pupils' written work
Drawings
Photographs
North Collins, Board of Education, training class. Collective award,
gold medal
Students' written work
Norwich, Board of Education, training class. Collective award,
gold medal
Students' written work
Nunda, Board of Education, training class. Collective award, gold
medal
Students' written work
Ogdensburg, Board of Education, public schools
Four volumes pupils' written work
Drawings
Administrative blanks
Ogdensburg, Board of Education, training class. Collective award,
gold medal
Students' written work
Oneida, Board of Education, public schools
Seven volumes pupils' written work
One volume annual reports
Administrative blanks
Oneida, Board of Education, training class. Collective award, gold
medal
Students' written work
Onondaga, Board of Education, academy
Pupils' nature study work
Phelps, Board of Education, public schools
Five volumes pupils' written work
Phoenix, Board of Education, training class. Collective award, gold
medal
Students' written work
Port Byron, Board of Education, public school
One volume pupils' written work
Port Henry, Board of Education, public schools
One volume pupils' written work
Port Henry, Board of Education, training class. Collective award,
gold medal
Students' written work
Port Jervis, Board of Education, union school
Drawings
Administrative blanks
Port Leyden, Board of Education, union school
Two volumes pupils' written work
Photographs
Public Instruction, State Department of
(See award to Louisiana Purchase Exposition Commission)
Administrative blanks
Pamphlets
Charts
Statistics
Publications
Fifty-six volumes, report of superintendent
Pulaski, Board of Education, training class. Collective award, gold
medal
Students' work
Richfield Springs, Board of Education, training class. Collective
award, gold medal
Students' written work
Rochester, plan of Clifford street embellishment
Rural schools: Collective exhibit from following counties
Broome county. Collective award, gold medal
Pupils' written work
Photographs
Cattaraugus county. Collective award, gold medal
Pupils' written work
Photographs
Chautauqua county. Collective award, gold medal
Pupils' written work
Photographs
Chenango county. Collective award, gold medal
Pupils' written work
Photographs
Columbia county
Pupils' industrial work
Cortland county. Collective award, gold medal
Pupils' written work
Dutchess county. Collective award, gold medal
Photographs
Genesee county
Photograph
Herkimer county. Collective award, gold medal
Pupils' written work
Lewis county. Collective award, gold medal
Pupils' written work
Madison county. Collective award, gold medal
Photographs
Monroe county. Collective award, gold medal
Pupils' written work
Nassau county. Collective award, gold medal
Pupils' written work
Photographs
Niagara county. Collective award, gold medal
Pupils' written work
Photographs
Oneida county. Collective award, gold medal
Pupils' written work
Onondaga county. Collective award, gold medal
Pupils' written work
Photographs
Ontario county. Collective award, gold medal
Pupils' written work
Oswego county. Collective award, gold medal
Pupils' written work
Rensselaer county. Collective award, gold medal
Pupils' written work and industrial work
Schuyler county. Collective award, gold medal
Pupils' written work
Photographs
Ulster county. Collective award, gold medal
Photographs.
Washington county. Collective award, gold medal
Pupils' written work
Rushford, Board of Education, training class. Collective award,
gold medal
Students' work
Sag Harbor, Board of Education, public schools
Seven volumes pupils' written work
St. Patrick's Academy, Catskill
Two volumes pupils' written work
Photographs
Drawings
Salamanca, Board of Education, union school
Eight volumes pupils' written work
Photographs
Salamanca, Board of Education, training class. Collective award,
gold medal
Students' written work
Sandy Hill, Board of Education, public school
Photograph
Sandy Hill, Board of Education, training class
Photograph
Schenectady, Board of Education, public schools. Collective award,
gold medal
Eight volumes pupils' written work
Administrative blanks
Photographs
South Byron, union school
Pupils' selected work
Photograph
Syracuse, Board of Education, public schools. Gold medal
Pupils' selected work in drawing
Photographs illustrating physical training course
Manual training work
Unadilla, Board of Education, training class
Photographs
Union, Board of Education, training class. Collective award, gold
medal
Photographs
Utica, Board of Education, public schools. Collective award, gold
medal
Nine volumes pupils' written work
Manual training and construction work
Graphic charts
Photographs
Warrensburg, Board of Education, public schools
Nine volumes pupils' written work
Waterloo, Board of Education, public schools
Pupils' selected work
Catalogues
Administrative blanks
Photographs
Home-made apparatus
Watertown, Board of Education, public schools. Collective award,
gold medal
Thirteen volumes pupils' written work
Drawings
Annual reports
Watkins, Board of Education, public schools. Collective award,
gold medal
Six volumes pupils' written work
Photographs
Administrative blanks
Watkins, Board of Education, training class
Students' written work
Wellsville, Board of Education, public schools. Collective award,
gold medal
Seven volumes pupils' written work
White Plains, Board of Education, public schools
Nine volumes pupils' written work
Course of study in drawing and manual training
Drawings, manual training, and Venetian iron work
Photographs
Administrative blanks
Statistics
Whitney Point, Board of Education, training class. Collective
award, gold medal
Students' written work
Yonkers, Board of Education, public schools. Gold medal
Nineteen volumes pupils' written work
Drawings
Photographs of buildings
Photographs illustrating physical training and school plans

The following awards were made in this group to exhibits not a part of
the collective State exhibit:

New York city, Department of Education, collective exhibit. Grand
prize
a. School system
b. Collective exhibit of elementary grades
c. Collective exhibit of vacation schools and evening schools
d. Collective exhibit of manual training, drawing, and
domestic science
e. Physical training and methods for atypical children
f. Kindergartens
g. Free lecture system
h. Training schools
i. Exhibit of school buildings
New York city, Department of Education, collective exhibit. Gold
medal
Manual training. Drawing. Domestic science
New York city, Department of Education, collective exhibit. Gold
medal.
Vacation schools. Evening schools
New York city, Department of Education, collective exhibit. Gold
medal
Physical training methods for atypical Children

The following awards were made to collaborators:

Andrew S. Draper, Albany. Grand prize
Education Department
Charles R. Skinner, Albany. Gold medal
Department of Public Instruction
DeLancey Al. Ellis, Rochester. Gold medal
State exhibit
William A. Wadsworth, Geneseo. Gold medal
Improvement of school grounds
Luther H. Gulick, New York city. Gold medal
Physical training
Theodore C. Hailes, Albany. Silver medal
Educational map
John Kennedy, Batavia. Silver medal
Individual instruction
James P. Haney, New York city. Silver medal
Manual training
Mrs. Anna L. Jessup, New York city. Silver medal
Sewing
Mrs. Mary E. Williams, New York city. Silver medal
Cooking
Evangeline E. Whitney, New York city. Silver medal
Vacation schools
Matthew J. Elgas, New York city. Silver medal
Evening schools
C. P. J. Snyder, New York city. Silver medal
Facade of exhibit

A grand prize was also awarded to the Louisiana Purchase Exposition
Commission of the State of New York for its collective exhibit in this
group, with special mention of the Department of Education,
administrative features; Department of Public Instruction,
administrative features, visual instruction system, and the educational
map.

GROUP TWO

_Secondary Education. Training of Teachers for Same_

Adelphi Academy and College, Brooklyn
Catalogues
Albany, Board of Education, high school. Gold medal
Fifteen volumes students' written work
Photographs illustrating manual training course
Drawings
Albany, Board of Education, training school
One volume students' written work
Photographs
Avon Club, Jamestown High School
Administrative blanks
Program of exercises
Batavia, Board of Education, high school. Gold medal
One volume students' written work
Photographs
Drawings
Beck Literary Society, Albany Academy. Bronze medal
Historical sketch
Administrative blanks
Programs
List of members
Brockport, State Normal School. Collective award, gold medal
Seventeen volumes students' work
Photographs
Buffalo, Masten Park High School. Collective award, gold medal
Administrative blanks
Two volumes students' written work
Four volumes student periodical and drawings
Buffalo, State Normal School. Collective award, gold medal
Two volumes science note books
Illustrated science work
Ten volumes publications
Photographs
Buffalo, Board of Education, Teachers' Training School. Collective
award, gold medal
Four volumes students' written work
Lesson outlines
Canajoharie, Board of Education, high school
One volume students' written work
Cape Vincent, Board of Education, high school
Students' selected work
Cattaraugus, Board of Education, high school
Photographs
Catalogues
Cohoes, Board of Education, high school
One volume students' written work and drawings
Cohoes, Board of Education, Teachers' Training School. Collective
award, gold medal
Students' written work
Corinth, Board of Education, high school
Three volumes students' written work
Photographs
Cortland, Board of Education, high school. Collective award, gold
medal
Administrative blanks
Students' selected work
Photographs
Cortland, State Normal School. Collective award, gold medal
Six volumes students' written work
Photographs
Administrative blanks
Catalogues
East Aurora, Board of Education, high school. Collective award,
gold medal
Two volumes students' written work
Photographs
Catalogues
Education, State Department of. Grand prize
Charts
Statistics
Reports
Bulletins
Administrative blanks
Elmira, Board of Education, training school. Collective award,
gold medal
Students' written work
Photographs
Fredonia, State Normal School. Gold medal
Model of building and floor plans
One volume lesson outlines
Freeport, Board of Education, high school
One volume students' written work
Genesee Wesleyan Seminary
Announcements
Photographs
Geneseo, State Normal School. Collective award, gold medal
Eleven volumes students' work
Photographs
Illustration of course in drawing
Goshen, Board of Education, high school
Weather maps
Hazen's School for Girls, Mrs., Pelham Manor
Science work
Herkimer, Board of Education, high school
One volume students' written work
Ithaca, Board of Education, high school. Gold medal
Four volumes students' written work
Administrative blanks
One volume catalogues
Drawings
Photographs
Jamaica, State Normal School. Collective award, gold medal
Four volumes lesson outlines and students' written work
Photographs
Jamestown, Board of Education, high school. Gold medal
Ten volumes students' written work
Administrative blanks
Photographs
Publications
Statistics
Jamestown, Board of Education, training school
Students' written work
Johnstown, Board of Education, high school
Two volumes students' written work
Annual report
Kingston, Board of Education, high school
Two volumes students' written work
Burnt leather work
Photographs
Kingston, Board of Education, training school. Collective award,
gold medal
Students' written work
Little Falls, Board of Education, high school
Students' selected work.
Map, educational map of New York State. Gold medal
(Award to go to Louisiana Purchase Exposition Commission)
Mechanicville, Board of Education, high school
Students' selected work
Moravia, Board of Education, high school
Drawings
New Paltz, State Normal School. Gold medal
Ten volumes students' work in art
Photographs
One volume publications
Rope work
Doll house
Administrative blanks
New Rochelle, Board of Education, high school
Five volumes students' written work
Photographs
Ogdensburg, Board of Education, high school
Two volumes students' written work
Olean, Board of Education, high school
Home-made apparatus
Oneida, Board of Education, high school
Three volumes students' written work
Administrative blanks
Oneonta, State Normal School. Collective award, gold medal
Eight volumes students' written work
Drawings
Science note books
Photographs
Oswego, State Normal School. Collective award, gold medal
Two volumes students' written work
Cabinet of manual training work
Relief maps
Photographs
Palmyra, Board of Education, high school
One volume students' work
Phelps, Board of Education, high school
Students' selected work
Plattsburg, State Normal School. Collective award, gold medal
Five volumes students' written work
Photographs
Port Byron, Board of Education, high school
One volume students' written work
Port Henry, Board of Education, high school
One volume students' written work
Photographs
Potsdam, State Normal School. Collective award, gold medal
Four volumes publications and lesson outlines
Photographs
Pratt Institute, physical laboratories, Brooklyn
Home-made apparatus
Photographs
Rochester, editors of "Clarion," East High School. Bronze medal
Three volumes students' publication "Clarion"
Sag Harbor, Board of Education, high school
One volume students' written work
St. Patrick's Academy, Catskill, academic department. Collective
award, gold medal
Students' selected work
Photographs
Salarranca, Board of Education, union school, high school
department. Collective award, gold medal
Two volumes students' written work
Photographs
Schenectady, Board of Education, high school
Eight volumes students' written work
Mechanical drawings
Administrative blanks
Photographs
Syracuse, Board of Education, High school. Collective award, gold
medal
Students' selected drawings
Floor plans
Photograph of building
Syracuse, Board of Education, training school. Collective award,
gold medal
Students' written work
Photographs
Tappan Zee High School, Piermont
Botany note book
Tarrytown, Washington Irving High School
Home-made apparatus
Utica, Board of Education, high school. Collective award, gold
medal
Drawings
Two volumes students' written work
Photographs
Utica, Board of Education, training school. Collective award, gold
medal
Students' written work
Warrensburg, Board of Education, high school
Administrative blanks
Two volumes students' written work
Watertown, Board of Education, high school
Six volumes students' written work
Drawings
Administrative blanks
Watertown, Board of Education, training school. Collective award,
gold medal
Students' written work
Watkins, Board of Education, high school
One volume students' written work
Photographs
One volume students' publication
Administrative blanks
White Plains, Board of Education, high school
One volume students' written work
Administrative blanks
Photographs
Yonkers, Board of Education, high school. Gold medal
Six volumes students' written work.
Photographs

The following awards were made in this group to exhibits not a part of
the Collective State Exhibit:

New York city, Department of Education. Grand prize
New York city, Department of Education, Commercial High School.
Gold medal
New York city, Department of Education, training school. Gold medal
New York city, Department of Education, manual training. Gold medal

The following awards were made to collaborators:
J. Russell Parsons, Jr., Albany. Gold medal
DeLancey M. Ellis, Rochester. Gold medal
Myron T. Scudder, New Paltz. Gold medal
A.T. Marble, New York city. Gold medal
Frank D. Boynton, Ithaca. Gold medal
F.B. Palmer, Fredonia. Gold medal.
James P. Haney, New York city. Silver medal

A grand prize was also awarded to the Louisiana Purchase Exposition
Commission of the State of New York for its collective exhibit in this
group.

GROUP THREE

_Higher Education. Colleges and Universities, Libraries, Museums,
Technical Schools_
Albany. State Normal College. Gold medal
Statistics
Publications
Clarkson Memorial School of Technology, Potsdam, N. Y. Bronze medal
Nine volumes theses
Three volumes students' written work
One volume catalogue and addresses
Photographs
Mechanical drawings
Colgate University, Hamilton. Silver medal
Thirty-seven publications
Map of grounds
Mechanical drawings
Statistics
College of Pharmacy, Columbia University, New York city
Drugs
Pharmaceutical preparations
Eight volumes text books
Education, State Department of. (See State Library.) Grand prize
Reports
Bulletins
Administrative blanks
Statistics
Hobart College, Geneva. Bronze medal
Map of campus
Eight volumes publications
Photographs. Charts
Hobart College. Gold medal
Astronomical department and discoveries
Manhattan College, department of civil engineering, New York city.
Silver medal
Theses
Mechanical drawing illustrating construction of dams and
embankments. Also bridge construction
Annual catalogues
Map, educational map of New York State. Silver medal
(Award to go to Louisiana Purchase Exposition Commission)
Post Graduate Medical School and Hospital, New York city
Photographs
Publications
Catalogues
Rochester Theological Seminary
Two volumes catalogues
State Library, Department of Education. Grand prize
Traveling libraries
Blanks
Statistics
Syracuse University, Syracuse. Gold medal
College of Fine Arts
Drawings, architectural and free hand
College of Applied Science
Metal work
Wood work
Model of steam engine
Home-made laboratory apparatus
University of the State of New York. Grand prize
Bulletins
Reports
Decimal classification
Traveling library for the blind
Photographs
Large pictures
Statistical charts
Specimens from Museum Department

The following awards were made in this group to exhibits not a part of
the collective State exhibit:

Columbia University, New York city. Grand prize
General exhibit
Columbia University, New York city. Gold medal
Special exhibit of Teachers' College
Columbia University, New York city. Gold medal
Special exhibit of Department of Botany
Columbia University, New York city. Gold medal
Special exhibit of Mines and Metallurgy
Columbia University, New York city. Bronze medal
Special exhibit of Department of Indo-Iranian Languages
Cornell University, Ithaca. Grand prize
General exhibit
Cornell University, Ithaca. Silver medal
Special exhibit of water color sketches
Cornell University, Ithaca. Silver medal
Special exhibit of Sibley College
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy. Grand prize
General exhibit
Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. Grand prize
General exhibit
Rev. D. Stuart Dodge, New York city. Gold medal
Relief map, Protestant College at Beirut, Syria
Pratt Institute, Brooklyn. Gold medal
Special exhibit of Polytechnic Department
New York University, New York city. Gold medal
Kny-Scheerer Company, New York. city. Gold medal
Operating tables
Hospital appliances

The following awards were made to collaborators:

Andrew S. Draper. Gold medal
Monograph
James Russell Parsons, Jr., Albany. Gold medal
Monograph
James McKeen Cattell, Columbia University, New York. Gold medal
Monograph
Edward Delevan Perry, Columbia University, New York. Gold medal
Monograph
Melvil Dewey, Albany. Gold medal
State librarian

GROUP FOUR

_Education in Fine Arts_

Clay Working and Ceramics, State School of. Silver medal
Specimens of pottery and modeling tools
New York School of Applied Design for Women. Gold medal
Framed designs and prospectus
Syracuse University, College of Fine Arts. Bronze medal
Architectural and free hand drawing

The following awards were made in this group to exhibits not a part of
the collective State exhibit:

Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, Art Department. Grand prize
Mademoiselle Veltin, New York city. Bronze medal
School of Fine Arts for Young Ladies

GROUP FIVE

_Education in Agriculture and Forestry_

Education, State Department of, State Museum Division. Grand prize
Publications
Statistics
Charts
Scientific discoveries

The following awards were made in this group to exhibits not a part of
the collective State exhibit

Cornell University, Ithaca. Gold medal
Exhibit of root crops
Cornell University, Department of Botany, Ithaca. Gold medal
Apparatus for photographing
Cornell University, Agricultural Experiment Station, Ithaca. Silver
medal
Poultry breeding
Cornell University, Ithaca. Bronze medal
Insects
New York Agricultural Experiment Station. Gold medal
Investigations on milk
New York Agricultural Experiment Station. Gold medal
Curing and paraffining cheese
New York Agricultural Experiment Station. Gold medal
Commercial feeding stuffs
New York Agricultural Experiment Station. Bronze medal
Investigations on rusty spot in cheese
New York Agricultural Experiment Station. Bronze medal
Wax model showing scale
Kny-Scheerer Company, New York city. Gold medal
Biological preparations
Biological and anatomical models

GROUP SIX

_Industrial and Trade Schools_

_Business Education. Education of the Indian_

Albany Business College, Albany. Gold medal
Pen drawings
Six volumes students' written work
Photographs
Binghamton School of Business, Binghamton
Photographs and prospectus
Clara de Hirsch Home for Working Girls, New York
Photographs
Industrial work
Education, State Department of
(See Indian Schools)
Henley Business School, Syracuse
Photographs
Administrative blanks
Students' written work
Indian schools. Silver medal
[Footnote: Award to go to Education Department, State of New York]
Collective exhibit, including material from the Allegany,
Cattaraugus, Tonawanda, Onondaga, Shinnecock and
Poospatuck Reservations
Pupils' written work
Photographs
Drawings
Industrial work
Industrial School, Rochester
Two volumes pupils' written work
Manual training and industrial work
Manhattan Trade School for Girls, New York city. Silver medal
Pupils' written work
Industrial work
Photographs
Statistics
New York Trade School, New York. Bronze medal
Photographs.
Courses of study

The following awards were made to collaborators:

S.E. Bartow, Albany Business College. Silver medal
Pen drawings

GROUP SEVEN

_Education for Defectives. The Blind, Deaf and Dumb, Feeble-Minded_

New York Institution for the Improved Instruction of Deaf-Mutes,
New York city.
Photographs
New York Institution for the Instruction of the Deaf and Dumb,
New York city. Gold medal
Photographs
Drawings
Pupils' written work
Pyrography
Publications
Eighteen volumes of reports
Text-books
Administrative blanks
Northern New York Institution for Deaf-Mutes, Malone
Pupils' selected work in drawing
New York Institution for the Blind, New York city. Bronze medal
Cord, rattan and raffia work
New York State School for the Blind, Batavia. Silver medal
Three volumes pupils' work
Basketry
Broom making
Mattress making
Piano action repairing
Sewing
Photographs
Administrative blanks
State Library, Home Education Division. Silver medal
Traveling library for the blind
Western New York Institution for Deaf-Mutes, Rochester. Bronze
medal
Four volumes pupils' written work
Five volumes reports and catalogues
Twenty volumes publications
Photographs,
Administrative blanks
Drawings
Charts

The following awards were made in this group to exhibits not a part of
the collective State exhibit:

American Association for Instructors of the Blind. Grand prize
New York State collaborators:
State School for the Blind, Batavia
New York School for the Blind, New York city
Association of Medical Officers of Institutions for Idiots and
Feeble-Minded Persons. Grand prize
New York State collaborators:
State Custodial Asylum for Unteachable Idiots, Rome
State Institution for Feeble-Minded Children, Syracuse
Convention of American Instructors of the Deaf. Grand prize
New York State collaborator:
Wright Oral School for the Deaf, New York city
New York city, Department of Education. Gold medal
For the establishment of a special school for the education
of atypical children
New York Institution for Feeble-Minded, Syracuse. Gold medal
Wright Oral School for the Deaf, New York city. Bronze medal

GROUP EIGHT

_Summer Schools, Extension Schools, Popular Lectures, Educational
Publications and Appliances_

Adirondack Summer School, Saranac Lake
Photographs and pamphlets
Chautauqua Institution, Chautauqua, N. Y. Grand prize
Photographs
Publications
Administrative blanks
Prospectus and syllibi
City History Club of New York. Bronze medal
Six volumes pupils' written work
Photographs
Charts
Statistics
People's Institute, New York city. Silver medal
One volume, "Working with the People"
Prospectus
Photographs
Teachers' Association, New York State. Gold medal
Statistical exhibit, 32 graphic charts
Training School for Deaconesses, New York city. Silver medal
Administrative blanks
Catalogues
Photographs
Young Women's Christian Association, New York city. Silver
medal
One volume of reports
Administrative blanks
Clay modeling
Pyrography
Artistic design and art furniture

The following awards were made in this group to exhibits not a part of
the collective State exhibit:

Funk & Wagnalls Company, New York city. Grand prize
Dodd, Mead & Company, New York city. Grand prize
Dr. Nicholas Murray Butler, New York city. Grand prize
American Book Company, school and college text-books. Grand
prize
Silver, Burdett & Company, New York city. Grand prize
Prang Educational Company, New York city. Grand prize
Charles Beseler Company, New York city, stereopticons and appliances.
Gold medal
Pitmanic Institute, Phonographic, New York city. Gold medal
C.W. Bardeen, Syracuse. Silver medal
S.S. Packard, New York city. Silver medal

The following awards were made to collaborators:

Henry L. Taylor, professional education in the United States. Gold
medal

A grand prize Was also awarded to the Louisiana Purchase Exposition
Commission of the State of New York for its collective exhibit in this
group

* * * * *

A special Commemorative Diploma was conferred by the Department jury
upon Andrew Sloan Draper, Commissioner of Education of the State of New
York, "in recognition of his distinguished service to Education."

* * * * *

RECAPITULATION OF THE AWARDS MADE TO THE STATE OF NEW YORK IN THE
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Grand Prize Gold Medal
Group I................ 5 Group I................ 63
Group 2................ 3 Group I, collab........ 2
Group 3................ 7 Group 2................ 36
Group 4................ I Group 2, collab........ 5
Group 5................ I Group 3................ 14
Group 6................ ..Group 4................ I
Group 7................ 3 Group 5................ 6
Group 8................ 8 Group 6................ I
Special................ I Group 7................ 3
Group 8................ 4
[**Total] 29 Special................ 4
[**Total] 139
_Silver Medal_ _Bronze Medal_
Group I................ 2 Group I.............. ..
Group 1, collab........ 8 Group 2................ 2
Group 2................ I Group 3................ 3
Group 3................ 5 Group 4................ 2
Group 4................ I Group 5................ 3
Group 5................ I Group 6................ I
Group 6................ 2 Group 7................ 3
Group 6, collab....... I Group 8................ I
Group 7................ 2
Group 8................ 5 [**Total] 15

[**Total] 28
Grand prizes................. 29
Gold medals.................. 139
Silver medals................. 28
Bronze medals................ 15
Grand total................ 211

[Illustration: PALACE OF EDUCATION FROM FESTIVAL HALL]

CHAPTER X

Fine Arts Exhibit and Schedule of Awards

THE FINE ARTS EXHIBIT

By CHARLES M. KURTZ

Acting Secretary of the Executive Committee on Art

[Illustration]

Up to the time of the organization of the Committee on Art for the State
of New York, appointed by the New York State Louisiana Purchase
Exposition Commission, very little had been accomplished in the
direction of securing a collection of representative works by the
artists of New York for exhibition at the World's Fair at St. Louis.
Professor Ives, Chief of the Department of Art of the Louisiana Purchase
Exposition, and Assistant Chief Kurtz had visited New York at frequent
intervals (the first time in January, 1902), had aroused considerable
interest in the Exposition among the artists, and had secured the
appointment of Advisory Committees of Painters, Sculptors, Architects,
Mural Painters, Miniature Painters, Engravers, Wood Engravers,
Illustrators and Workers in the Applied Arts to look after the
organization of exhibits in their respective fields of expression and
the interests of the Department of Art of the Louisiana Purchase
Exposition in connection therewith.

WAYS AND MEANS

It was impossible, however, for the work to be carried on in an adequate
and worthy manner without State co-operation and assistance, and a
committee of artists, representing the various Advisory Committees,
appeared before the Commission, asked that a committee of artists
representing the State of New York be appointed to co-operate with the
Advisory Committees in the organization of a creditable art exhibit, and
that a suitable sum of money be appropriated from the funds placed at
the disposal of the Commission to defray the cost of organizing the
exhibit, packing, transporting it to and from St. Louis, and insuring it
while in transit; the Exposition authorities having agreed to pay the
cost of unpacking in St. Louis, installation, insurance while in the Art
Palace, and repacking and forwarding at the close of the Exposition.

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE ON ART

After several meetings at the offices of the Commission in New York city
and a forceful presentation of the condition of affairs (and the urgent
necessity of action by the Commission) by Mr. Watrous, of the Artists'
Committee, the Commission formally resolved to appropriate the sum of
$10,000 for the purpose indicated, and appointed the following
"Executive Committee on Art for the State of New York" to assume general
direction of the work within the limits of the appropriation: Herbert
Adams (sculptor), Grosvenor Atterbury (architect), J. Carroll Beckwith
(painter), Francis C. Jones (painter), Louis Loeb (painter and
illustrator), Will H. Low (painter, illustrator and mural painter) and
Harry W. Watrous (painter). These men variously represented membership
in the National Academy of Design, the Society of American Artists, the
National Sculpture Society, the Society of Mural Painters, the American
Water Color Society, the Society of Illustrators, the New York Etching
Club, the American Fine Art Society, the American Institute of
Architects, the New York Architectural League, the Municipal Art Society
of New York and the Fine Arts Federation of New York. The Committee
formally organized by the election of Harry W. Watrous as Chairman.
Charles M. Kurtz, Assistant Chief of the Department of Art of the
Louisiana Purchase Exposition, was appointed Acting Secretary without
salary.

At a general meeting of the members of all the Advisory Committees in
New York city, called by Chairman Watrous at the National Academy of
Design, for each committee representing a group of the classification a
chairman and a secretary was elected and general plans were formulated
for the carrying on of the work.

Thereafter, frequent meetings were held by the various committees, at
nearly all of which the Chairman of the Executive Committee and the
Acting Secretary were present and participated in the work.

CAREFUL SELECTION OF MATERIAL

The Juries of Selection for the different groups of the classification
of the Department of Art, constituted from the membership of the
Advisory Committees representing various sections of the country, met
and acted during the last two weeks of March, 1904, in the city of New
York, passing upon upwards of 4,000 works submitted for exhibition. Of
this assemblage of works a comparatively small number represented
artists of high reputation, and a small proportion was found to be of
sufficient merit worthily to represent the artists of the State. The
number of exhibits secured thus being very small, and many of the more
prominent artists not having submitted works, the different group juries
held meetings, prepared lists of representative works calculated to
reflect credit upon the State, and specifically invited artists and
owners to lend the same for the Exposition. By this means the larger and
better portion of the exhibit was secured.

The State of New York, the Louisiana Purchase Exposition and the artists
in general in the State of New York are under great obligations to the
members of these juries who so freely, unselfishly and devotedly gave
their valuable time and effort to the organization of the art exhibit
which represented so comprehensively the best achievement of New York
artists.

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