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Manual of Gardening (Second Edition) by L. H. Bailey

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_Kale._--In very exposed or northern locations cover it lightly with
coarse litter.

_Onions._--For winter storage select only well-ripened, perfectly dry
bulbs. Store them in a dry, airy place, not in the cellar. They may be
spread out thinly on the floor, away from the walls, allowed to freeze
solid, and then covered several feet deep with hay or straw.

_Parsnips._--Take up some roots for winter use and store them in sand in
the cellar.

_Strawberry-beds_ should be given their winter covering of marsh hay,
etc., as soon as the ground is frozen solid.

SUGGESTIONS AND REMINDERS.--II. FOR THE SOUTH

JANUARY

_Annuals._--All kinds of hardy annuals and perennials, such as alyssum,
snapdragon, foxglove, hollyhock, phlox, poppy, pansy, lobelia,
candytuft, sweet pea, Chinese pink, sweet william, larkspur, foliage
cinerarias, centaurea, mignonette, and many others of the same class may
be sown. Most of them should be sown thinly and where they are intended
to flower, as they transplant poorly in this latitude.

_Cannas, caladiums, perennial phloxes, chrysanthemums, and verbenas_ may
be taken up, divided, and replanted.

_Roses_ may be planted in quantities. Let the ground intended for them
have a thorough dressing of manure. Occasionally a plant may be taken up
and divided. The hybrid varieties may now be layered. This is done as
follows: Select a shoot and bend it flat upon the ground; hold it in
both hands, having a distance of about 6 in. between them; keep the left
hand firm, and with the right give the shoot a sharp twist; now cover it
with 4 in. of earth and tie the free end to an upright stake.

_Asparagus beds_ should be liberally manured. New beds should now be
made. Set the plants 6 in. deep. Sow seed now.

_Beets and all hardy vegetables_ (carrots, parsnips, turnips, rutabagas,
kohlrabi, spinach, lettuce, herbs, etc.) may now be sown, planted, or
transplanted.

_Cabbage plants_ should be set out on heavily manured ground. Sow seed
of Early Summer for a later supply.

_Fruits._--If possible, all planting and transplanting of fruit-trees
and grape-vines should be finished this month. Pruning should be
completed as soon as possible, and preparation made to protect the
blossoms of tender fruits next month. Set out strawberry-plants, and
during dry weather run the cultivator through all old beds that are at
all weedy. It is a good plan, where practicable, to mulch the beds.
Here, pine-straw can be had plentifully for the purpose. Examine peach
trees for borers. Raspberries and blackberries should be pruned now if
the work is not already done. Cuttings of Le Conte pears, Marianna
plums, grape-vines, and pomegranates should be put in at once if they
have heretofore been forgotten. Root-grafting should be progressing
rapidly; this is the best time for this important work.

_Onion seeds._--Sow at once, and plant sets as soon as possible.

_Peas._--Sow early and late varieties. The late varieties succeed best
if sown at this season.

_Seasonable work._--This is a good month to obtain canes for staking
peas, tomatoes, and beans, hauling manure, making repairs, and examining
tools, etc. As the fall crop is harvested, the land should be prepared
for another crop. Tile-draining is now is order. Prepare frames to cover
with canvas for use next month.

_Sweet-potatoes._--A few may be bedded in a frame from which to obtain
"draws" for setting out about March 15.

_Tomatoes, egg-plants, and peppers._--Sow now on a slight hotbed. When
the plants come up, all the air possible should be given during the day.
They can be raised without heat, but at this season this plan would
better be attempted only by the skillful.

FEBRUARY

_Asters, cannas, dahlias, heliotropes, lobelias, petunias, pyrethrums,
ricinus, salvias, and verbenas_ are best sown in a coldframe, where they
can have some protection from heavy rain.

_Cannas_ should be transplanted now.

_Chrysanthemums_ must be planted in well-manured ground in a position
where water can be readily supplied to them.

_Dahlias_ may be taken up and divided as soon as they begin growth.

_Gladiolus and tuberose bulbs_ should be planted now. It is a good plan
to extend the planting through March and April.

_Pansies._--Plant them out in the beds where they are to flower.

_Routine work._--Sodding should now proceed rapidly. If sods cannot be
obtained, the ground may be planted with Bermuda grass. Plant small
pieces of the grass a foot apart and water them if the weather is dry,
and they will grow rapidly. Hedges should be cleared up and put in good
shape. All planting of trees and shrubs should be finished this month.
All pruning of trees must be done early in the month. Young roses cannot
be set too early in February. They thrive best when planted in fall.
Roll the drives and repair them when necessary. The lawn will now
require constant care, and the mower should be used before the grass
becomes 1-1/2 in. high.

_Bush-beans_ may be planted February 14. On alluvial land it is best to
plant them on slight rises as a protection against the rains which
sometimes occur toward the end of the month. If frost should threaten
just as the beans begin to peep out, cover them an inch deep with the
plow or hand cultivator. Sow Early Mohawk first, and at the end of the
month sow Early Valentine; a week later sow the wax varieties.

_Cabbage,_--Sow early varieties, such as Early Summer, Early Drumhead,
and Early Flat Dutch. Etampes, Extra Early Express, and Winnigstadt sown
for small heads in the order named have done very well in southern
Louisiana. The earlier sown plants should be transplanted as often as
convenient. Should worms cause trouble, dust the plants with a mixture
of one part of pyrethrum powder to six of fine dust.

_Carrots, celery, beets, endive, kohlrabi, onion sets, parsley,
parsnips, radishes and purple-top turnips_ must now be sown.

_Corn._--Plant Extra Early Adams, Yellow Canada, Stowell Evergreen, and
White Flint toward the middle of the month. Sow again a week later, and
again after another week. If the first two sowings fail, the last one
will give the early crop.

_Cucumbers._--Sow and protect with small boxes during cold days and
nights, or sow in pots or on sods. Protect the seedlings with sashes or
canvas, and plant them out late.

_Lettuce._--Sow seeds and transplant the plants on hand. This crop
requires a soil well supplied with plant-food.

_Melons._--Plant seeds in the same manner as advised for cucumbers.

_Okra._--Sow seeds on sods and set out the plants next month.

_Peas._--Sow seeds of a number of varieties.

_Peppers and egg-plants,_ if not sown last month, should be sown now.
Sow them under glazed sashes and keep close. When the plants appear,
give some air, and increase it according to the weather. If a large
number of plants is required, the sowing may be delayed until next
month. Should flea-beetles trouble you, use plenty of bordeaux on
egg-plants.

_Potatoes, Irish._--The main crop should be planted as early as
possible. Standard varieties are Early Rose, Peerless, and Burbank.

_Strawberries._--Run the cultivator through them at least once every
three weeks; if they are to be mulched, collect the necessary material.
Strawberries planted in February seldom yield much of a crop.

_Sweet-potatoes,_ can now be bedded and protected with canvas, or a row
or two of whole tubers may be planted for "draws" and vines.

_Tomatoes_ in frames should be given all the air and light possible and
plenty of room if protected with canvas, do not allow the plants
to crowd.

MARCH

_Beans._--Sow all varieties for a fall crop. As soon as the plants
appear, the cultivator must be run through the crop, and kept going as
often as necessary.

_Corn._--Continue to plant; and we recommend harrowing the patch as soon
as the young corn appears. It is generally planted in hills 3 or 4 ft.
apart, but better results will be obtained-by planting in drills and
leaving one stalk every 12 in.

_Cucumbers._--Sow in hills 4 ft. apart, using a liberal quantity of seed
to each hill. When the plants come up, thin them to about six in the
hill. When the plants begin to get rough leaves, pull out one or two
more from each hill. Striped cucumber-beetles are sometimes very
numerous, and in order to get a stand of plants it is necessary to go
through the patch early every morning and sprinkle all the hills with
air-slaked lime.

_Egg-plants._--Toward the end of the month the plants growing in frames
may be transplanted to their fruiting quarters. Seed may be sown outside
after March 15; sooner if a warm and sheltered spot is selected.

_Lettuce._--Sow in drills, and when the plants are large enough, thin to
a foot apart. If transplanted at this season, they often go to seed.

_Okra._--A sowing may be made now, but the main planting would best be
deferred until after March 15. Sow in drills 3 ft. apart and thin the
plants to 18 in. apart in the drills.

_Peas._--Early varieties may be sown; it is now too late to sow
tall-growing kinds.

_Peppers._--Treat as advised for egg-plants.

_Potatoes, Irish._--It is not too late to plant them, but the sooner
they are planted the better. The crop planted in February should be
harrowed as soon as the shoots begin to come up, and when the rows can
be fairly seen, the cultivator must be set to work to keep down weeds
and grass.

_Squashes._--Plant seed in hills 6 ft. apart. The directions for
planting melons may be followed. The same remarks apply to pumpkins and
other vegetables of this kind.

_Sweet-potatoes._--If slips or vines are at hand, they may be planted
late in the month for the earliest tubers. The whole potatoes may be
planted on a ridge to yield vines for later planting.

_Strawberries._--The mulching of beds or rows should be no longer
delayed, if clean and plentiful fruit is wanted.

_Tomatoes._--About March 15 the frame plants may go to their fruiting
quarters. It is necessary to use some judgment in this matter, as they
may be killed or injured by an April frost. Seed may be sown in the open
ground for plants for late fruiting. Set the plants 4 ft. apart
each way.

APRIL

_Alternantheras_ should go out now.

_Annuals_ of all kinds may still be sown where they are to flower, as
they transplant with difficulty at this season.

_Coleuses._--Plant out in the beds now. Cuttings root readily, simply
requiring to be stuck in.

_Beans_ of all kinds can be planted, limas especially.

_Beets._--Make another sowing.

_Cabbage plants_ obtained from spring sowings should be set out as soon
as fit. The ground requires to be very rich to carry this crop.

_Cucumbers._--These can be sown anywhere now.

_Corn._--Make a sowing to yield roasting ears to come in after that sown
last month.

_Okra._--Sow in drills 3 or 4 ft. apart.

_Peas._--Make a sowing of early varieties for the last time.

_Squash (bush) and pumpkin_ may now be planted.

_Tomatoes_ should be got out to their fruiting quarters as early in the
month as possible. Let them be set at least 4 ft. apart each way.

MAY

_Beans._--Plant a few more bush and pole beans.

_Celery_ may now be started. The bed or box needs plenty of water, and
should be shaded from sun.

_Lettuce_ requires careful handling to encourage it to germinate. It is
best sown in a box and kept shaded and moist.

_Melons, cucumbers, squashes, and pumpkins_ may be sown.

_Radishes._--Sow the yellow and white summer varieties.

_Remarks._--It is a constant struggle with weeds throughout this month,
and the cultivator and plow are ever going. As the land becomes vacant,
sow corn or plant sweet-potatoes--draws or vines. Sow some late Italian
cauliflower. Let the orchard have constant and thorough cultivation, and
remove all unnecessary growth from the trees as soon as they appear. Be
always on the lookout for borers. Keep the strawberries as free of grass
and coco, or knob-grass, as possible.

JUNE

_Beans._--All kinds may now be sown.

_Cauliflower._--Sow the Italian kinds.

_Corn._--Make a planting at the beginning of the month and again at the
end.

_Cucumbers._--Plant a few more hills. The plants at this season must be
given plenty of water.

_Endive._--Sow, and attend to the tying up of the plants that are of
sufficient size.

_Melons._--Sow for a succession a few more water and muskmelons.

_Okra_ may still be sown.

_Radishes._--Sow the summer varieties now.

_Squashes and pumpkins_ may yet be sown.

_Sweet-potato_ vines may now be set out in quantities.

_Tomatoes._--About the middle of the month sow for the fall crop.

JULY

_Beans._--Bush and pole beans may be planted towards the end of the
month.

_Cabbage and cauliflower_ may now be sown, but the main sowing should be
deferred until next month.

_Carrots._--A sowing should be made.

_Celery._--Sow and transplant what plants there may be on hand.

_Cucumbers._--These may be sown now for pickling.

_Endive._--Transplant and sow.

_Grapes_ should be kept well tied to trellis, and unnecessary growth
removed, so that the wood may have the chance of becoming thoroughly
ripened. If the cultivator and plow are not used judiciously, a second
growth will be started, which is not desirable.

_Lettuce._--The seed requires to be sprouted before being sown, and if
the sowing is done on a dry day the drills should be watered.

_Radishes._--Sow the summer kinds.

_Strawberries._--Keep the beds clean of weeds and grass.

_Tomatoes._--Make a sowing early in the month, or, what is much better,
take cuttings from plants still in bearing.

_Turnips._--Sow a few after a shower towards the end of the month.

_Remarks._--Much cannot be done this month, as the weather is hot and
dry, but the opportunity should not be lost for killing weeds and
preparing for the planting season, which is now rapidly drawing near.

AUGUST

_Artichokes._--Seed of the Green Globe may be sown now and large plants
obtained by spring. The seed-bed requires to be shaded.

_Bush beans, beets, pole beans, carrots, celery, endive, kohlrabi,
lettuce, mustard, Black Spanish and Rose China radishes, parsley,
turnips, rutabagas, and salad plants_ of all kinds may now be sown. The
seed should be sown on small ridges, adaptable to the kind of plants,
for level culture is not successful in the vegetable garden in
this section.

_Broccoli_ should be more grown, for it is hardier than the cauliflower.
Many cannot tell the difference between the two. Sow now.

_Cabbages_ must be sown by the middle of the month. Make the ground very
rich and shade the seed-bed, keeping it moist during the whole of
the time.

_Cauliflower_ should also be sown.

_Potatoes, Irish,_ should be planted by the middle of the month, if
possible. Plant only those that have sprouted, and instead of planting
on top of the ridge set in the furrow and cover 2 in. deep; as the
potatoes grow, work more soil down to them.

_Salsify._--Sow now or early next month.

_Shallots._--Plant them now.

_Squash._--Bush kinds may be planted now at any time.

_Sweet-potatoes._--Vines may still be set out, with prospects of
harvesting a fair crop.

_Tomatoes._--If short of plants, cut off good-sized limbs from bearing
plants and plant them deep. Keep them moist, and they will root in a few
days. Do this just before it rains.

SEPTEMBER

_Annuals_ of the hardy class may be sown this month: the following list
will assist in making a selection: Calliopsis, candytuft, calendulas,
canterbury bells, columbine, corn-flower, daisies, forget-me-nots,
gaillardia, godetia, larkspur, _Limnanthes Douglasii,_ mignonette,
pansies, _Phlox Drummondii,_ primroses, poppies of all kinds, _Saponaria
Calabrica, Silene pendula,_ sweet williams, and sweet peas.

_Bulbs._--Study the catalogues and make out your wants, for it is
nearing planting time.

_Lilies._--If success is required of the St. Joseph's or Virgin lily
(_L. candidum_), it must be planted right away.

_Perennials and biennials_ should be sown early this month. They have
two good growing months ahead of them yet to make considerable progress.
The seed-bed will require shade during the middle of the day until the
young plants come up; frequent weedings will be required, as coco has
not yet quit growing, and winter weeds are now putting in an appearance.

_Remarks._--All plants used for salad purposes may be sown this month.
The ground between the rows of growing crops should be kept in a fine,
friable condition. Vegetable seeds of all kinds should always be sown on
slight ridges on all but very sandy soils. If the seed is sown on a
level bed, as practiced at the North, the ground will become as hard as
a turnpike road should a heavy rain occur; and should this shower come
along before the plants are up, a crust a quarter of an inch deep will
be formed, and the plants will never see daylight. Sown on a ridge they
come all right, as the water gradually drains away, leaving the top of
the ridge loose and soft.

OCTOBER

_All spring flower seeds_ should be sown in boxes or trays in the
conservatory, and all spring bulbs should be planted. The hyacinth,
narcissus, tulip and anemone, ranunculus and various lily bulbs, will
bloom in good season planted at this time. The bedding plants should be
carefully watched, so that any attack of aphis may be treated
immediately. Sweet peas may be planted the first of this month, although
they are commonly sown in September. A rich spot should be selected for
them. This is the time to make the new lawn. The soil should be
thoroughly stirred and well pulverized, mixing in a good dressing of
commercial fertilizer, or, if one prefers it, a mixture which may be
made at home, consisting of cotton-seed meal, acid phosphate, and
sulfate of potash, at the rate of 1000 lb., 300 lb., and 100 lb.
respectively, per acre. A rich, well-rotted compost, as a top dressing,
would also be highly beneficial. Roses pruned late in September or early
this month will produce fine winter blooms.

_In the garden_ this is a busy month; some of the winter vegetables are
growing, and others should be sown. The bud artichokes should be
separated and set fully 3 ft. apart. Onions may still be sown in the
early part of the month, and shallots should be divided and set. Some
beans may be risked, and English peas sown for winter crop. A few
cauliflowers may be tried and cucumbers planted in pots for the hotbeds
next month. The following vegetables should be sown: Carrots, corn
salad, chervil, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, beets, endive, kohlrabi,
kale, lettuce, leeks, mustard, parsley, parsnip, radish, roquette,
spinach, Swiss chard, salsify. Some cabbage and a few cauliflowers
should be added to the list. Turnips should be sown for succession every
two weeks until April or May. The celery should be kept growing and
banking up commenced.

This is an excellent time to plant the new strawberry bed. Make the bed
rich with well-rotted manure and select good, healthy sets. The Michel's
Early and Cloud are probably the most popular varieties for general
planting, and should be set in alternating rows.

NOVEMBER

_Flower seeds and bulbs_ may be planted this month of the same varieties
as in October. Cuttings of all the herbaceous plants should be made and
potted, for use in the house and for the borders next season. The
coldframes should also be put in order. Some of the bulbs for winter
forcing should be selected and potted. One of the best Louisiana
gardeners recommends the following treatment: Select good, strong bulbs
and plant them in rich, light soil, in 5-in. pots, covering them about
half an inch. Water well and bury the pots 6 or 8 in. deep in the
ground, leaving them there about five weeks, when the bulbs will be
found to be well rooted. From this time gradually expose to the light,
and they will soon put forth blooms.

_The same vegetables_ may be sown as for October, and the late cabbage
seed planted. The Flat Dutch and Drumhead strains are prime favorites.
New sowings of peas, turnips, mustard, and radishes should be made, and
the hotbeds prepared and set out to cucumbers. Too much care cannot be
taken that the manure should be in the best condition possible, so that
a good supply of heat may be depended upon. The cucumbers planted last
month will be ready now for setting in the hotbeds, and a winter
crop forced.

_Orchard and vineyard planting._--This is the time to prepare land.
That on which a late crop of cowpeas has grown is well suited for the
purpose, and should be plowed deeply and well worked over. Towards the
last of the month it should be cultivated again, in order to be ready
for the trees next month.

DECEMBER

_Lawns and yards_ need watching this month, and attention should be paid
to the old leaves and fall rubbish, which makes the yard look untidy. A
good place for the leaves is the compost heap. Hedges should be put in
shape and the surface drains kept open. Shrubs and roses should be
pruned for an early supply of flowers. The Camellia Japonicas are now in
bloom, and care should be taken that the small branches are not torn
off, instead of being cut properly. Many of these most beautiful of
southern ornamental trees have been ruined by careless plucking
of flowers.

_Garden and orchard._--Many of the fall vegetables may be sown this
month and others sown for a succession. Peas, spinach, roquette,
radishes, lettuce, endive, and some Early York cabbage should also be
sown. In the old spent hotbeds, tomatoes, peppers, and egg-plants may be
started; there will not be enough heat to hurry them, and good, strong
stocky plants will be secured if care is taken. Irish potatoes may be
risked, should there be a favorable time for planting during the latter
part of the month. Usually they are planted in January. The chances are
about equal should they be planted late this month. Nuts of all kinds,
both for budding and otherwise, should be planted. Some of the best
Louisiana pecans are said to come true from seed, and may be sown where
they are intended to grow.

INDEX

The flowering annuals, being mostly in alphabetical list, are not
indexed here.

Abelia grandiflora,
abies species,
Abobra viridiflora,
abutilons,
acacia, rose,
acalypha,
acer, species,
Achillea Ptarmica,
achyranthes,
aconites,
actinidia,
adiantums,
adlumia,
Adonis vernalis,
aesculus species,
African lily,
agapanthus,
agave,
Agrostemma Coronaria,
Agrostis nebulosa,
ailanthus, shoots of,
Ajuga reptans,
akebia,
alder,
alliums,
almond,
alpine plants,
alternanthera,
Althaea frutex,
Althaea rosea,
Alyssum saxatile,
amarantus,
amaryllis,
Amelanchier Canadensis,
ammoniacal carbonate of copper,
ampelopsis species,
andromeda,
anemone,
anise,
anise-tree,
annuals for bedding,
annuals that bloom after frost,
annuals by color,
annuals, cultivation of,
annuals listed by height,
annuals for ribbon-beds,
annuals, distances apart,
Anthemis coronaria,
Anthemis Kelwayi,
Anthemis tinctoria,
Antigonon leptopus,
aphis,
Apios tuberosa,
apple, culture of,
apple-maggot,
apple-scab,
apricot, culture of,
aquarium,
aquatic plants,
aquilegias,
Arabis albida,
Arabis alpina,
Aralia Sieboldii,
araucaria,
arborvitae,
Arbutus Unedo,
architect's garden,
ardisia,
aristolochia,
Arnebia echioides,
arsenate of lead formula,
artemisias,
Artemisia Stelleriana,
artichoke,
Aruncus Sylvester,
Arundo Donax,
Asclepias tuberosa,
ashes,
ash, mountain,
ash trees,
asparagus,
asparagus beetle,
Asparagus medeoloides,
Asparagus plumosus and tenuissimus,
asparagus rust,
Asparagus Sprengeri,
aspen,
asperula,
aspidistra,
asters, native,
Astilbe Japonica,
Aubrietia deltoidea,
aucuba,
auricula,
azalea, culture of,
azalea species,

Baccharis halimifolia,
Bacterium tumefaciens,
balm,
bamboos,
Baptisia tinctoria,
basil,
baskets, hanging,
basswood,
bay-tree,
bean,
bedding,
beech,
beet,
begonias,
belladonna lily,
Bellis perennis,
Benzoin odoriferum,
Berberis Aquifolium,
Berberis Japonica,
Berberis Thunbergii,
Berberis vulgaris,
Bermuda buttercup,
Bermuda-grass,
betula species,
bignonia species,
billbergia,
biota,
birds,
bitternut,
bitter-sweet,
bitter-sweet, false,
blackberries, laying down,
blackberry, culture of,
blackberry, disease of,
blackberry insects,
black-rot,
bladder nut,
bleeding-heart,
blister-mite,
blood as fertilizer,
bloodroot,
blue beech,
blue-grass,
Bocconia cordata,
bog plants,
bolting trees,
boltonias,
boneblack,
bone, ground,
bordeaux mixture,
borders, making,
borers,
bougainvillea,
Boussingaultia baselloides,
bouvardia,
box,
box-elder,
boxthorn,
bridge-grafting,
Bridgeman, mentioned,
broccoli,
Bromus brizaeformis,
brooks, treatment of,
broom,
brussels sprouts,
buckthorn,
budding,
bud-moth,
buffalo berry,
Buist, mentioned,
bulbocodium,
bulbs, culture of,
bulbs in window-garden,
burdock, ornamental,
Burnette, F. H., quoted,
burning bush,
button-bush,
buttercups, tuberous,
butternut,
buttonwood,
Buxus sempervirens,

cabbage, culture,
cabbage, storing,
cabbage diseases,
cabbage insects,
cabbage maggots,
cactus,
caladium,
calceolaria,
calendars,
calla,
Calla palustris,
Callicarpa Americana,
callirrhoe,
Calycanthus floridus,
camassia,
camellias,
campanulas,
candytuft, perennial,
canker-worm,
cannas,
capsicum,
Capsicum frutescens,
caragana species,
caraway,
carbolic acid emulsion,
carbonate of copper,
cardinal flower,
cardiospermum,
carex for ground cover,
carnation rust,
carnations,
carpet-bedding, mentioned,
carpet-beds described,
Carpinus Americana,
carrot,
carya species,
Caryopteris Mastacanthus,
caryota,
case-bearers,
Cassia Marilandica,
castanea species,
catalpa species,
catnip,
cats,
cat-tail,
cauliflower,
cauliflower diseases,
cauliflower insects,
ceanothus,
cedar,
cedrus species,
Celastrus scandens,
celastrus species,
celeriac,
celery,
cellared stock,
cellars,
Celtis occidentalis,
Centrosema Virginiana,
century plants,
cephalanthus,
cephalotaxus,
Cercidiphyllum Japonicum,
Cercis Canadensis,
cereus,
chafer, rose,
chamaecyparis species,
chamaerops,
chamomile,
chard,
cherry, culture,
cherry diseases,
cherry, ornamental,
cherry trees, shapes of,
chervil,
chestnut, culture of,
chestnut disease,
chickens in gardens,
chickory,
Chilopsis linearis,
China-berry,
Chinese sacred lily,
chinquapin,
Chionanthus Virginica,
chionodoxa,
chrysanthemums,
chrysanthemums, hardy,
chrysanthemum disease,
Chrysanthemum frutescens,
chrysanthemum protection,
Chrysanthemum uliginosum,
cineraria,
Cineraria maritima,
cinnamon vine,
cinquefoil,
Citrus trifoliata,
cives,
Cladrastis tinctoria,
clary,
Claytonia Virginica,
clematis,
Clethra alnifolia,
Cleyera Japonica,
climbing plants,
clothes-post,
club-root,
Cobbett, mentioned,
cobnuts,
Coboea scandens,
Coccinea Indica,
Cocos Weddelliana,
Codiaeum,
Codlin-moth,
Coffee tree,
Coix Lachryma,
colchicum,
coldframes,
cold storage,
coleus,
collards,
colocasia,
coltsfoot for banks,
columbines,
Colutea arborescens,
comfrey,
compass plant,
conifers, discussion on,
conservation of moisture,
Convallaria majalis,
Convolvulus Japonicus and Sepium,
corchorus,
coreopsis species,
coriander,
corn, sweet,
corn salad,
Cornus Baileyi,
Cornus Mas,
cornus species,
corrosive sublimate for scab,
Corydalis lutea,
Corydalis nobilis,
corylus species,
costmary,
cotoneaster,
cottonwood,
cowpea,
coxcomb for bedding,
crab cactus,
crab trees,
cranberry,
crape myrtle,
crataegus species,
cress,
crocus,
crocus, fall blooming,
Crosby, quoted,
croton,
crown-galls,
crown imperial,
cryptomeria,
cucumber,
cucumber diseases,
cucumber insects,
Cucumis Anguria,
Cucumis foetidissima (perennius),
Cucumis species,
cucurbit insects,
cultivating,
cultivators,
Cuphea,
cupressus species,
curbing,
curculio,
currant,
currant, flowering,
currant, Indian,
currant diseases,
currant-worm,
cuttings,
cut-worms,
cycas,
cyclamen,
Cydonia Japonica,
Cydonia Maulei,
Cypress, bald,

daffodil,
dahlia,
Dahlia arborea or excelsa,
daisy,
dandelion,
daphnes,
day-lily,
delphiniums,
Desmodium Canadense,
desmodium species,
Deutzia gracilis,
deutzia species,
dewberry, culture of,
dewberry for banks,
dewberry insects,
dianthus,
dibbers,
Dicentra spectabilis,
Dictamnus Fraxinella,
diervillas,
dill,
dioscorea species,
Dirca palustris,
diseases of plants,
ditching,
dockmackie,
Dodecatheon Meadia,
dogs and gardens,
dog-tooth violet,
dogwoods,
Dolichos Japonicus,
dolichos, species,
Donnell, Webb, quoted,
doronicum,
doucin stocks,
Dracaena fragrans,
drainage of land,
drainage of walks,
drives and walks,
dry bouquets,
Duggar, on mushrooms,
dutchman's pipe,
dwarf fruit-trees,

Easter lily,
echeveria,
Echinocystis lobata,
egg-plant,
Egyptian lily,
elaeagnus species,
elecampane,
elm,
elm-leaf beetle,
emulsion, carbolic acid; kerosene,
endive,
enemies of plants,
enriching the land,
Epimedium rubrum,
epiphyllum,
Erianthus Ravennae,
Erigeron speciosus,
Eulalia,
Euonymus, climbing,
Euonymus species,
Euphorbia,
evergreens, discussion on,
everlastings,
exochorda,

fagus species,
Falconer, Wm., quoted,
Farfugium grande,
Fatsia Japonica and F. papyrifera,
fennel,
ferns,
fertilizing land,
Fessenden, mentioned,
Festuca glauca,
fetter bush,
Ficus elastica,
Ficus repens,
fig,
filberts,
fir,
flame flower,
Fletcher, S.W., quoted,
flower-garden in landscape,
foliage in landscapes,
forcing-hill,
forcing plants,
forget-me-nots,
formal gardens,
formalin for scab,
formal trees,
formulas for fungicides; insecticides,
Forsythia suspensa; viridissima,
frames,
fraxinus species,
freesia,
fringe tree,
fritillary,
fruit-buds,
fruits, culture of,
fuchsia,
fumigating,
fumitory,
fungi and insects,
fungicides,
funkia,

gaillardia, perennial,
gardenia,
Gardiner Hepburn, mentioned,
garlic,
gas plant,
gathering fruit,
Gelsemium sempervirens,
Genista tinctoria,
geranium,
gherkin,
ginkgo
girdled trees
gladiolus
Gleditschia tricanthos
gloxinia
Goff device
goldenglow
golden-rods
gooseberry
gooseberry disease
goumi
gourds, ornamental
grading
grafting
grafting-wax
grape, culture of
grape diseases
grapery
grapes for ornament
grasses, ornamental
grass for lawns
greenbrier
greens
Greiver, T. quoted
Grevillea robusta
ground-ivy
ground-nut
grub, white
guards for trees
gum tree
gunnera
gutters
Gymnocladus Canadensis
Gypsophila paniculata

Halesia tetraptera
Hamamelis Virginiana
handling the laud
handling the plants
hand-box
hand tools
hand-weeders
hanging baskets
harebells
harrows
hazels
Hedera Helix
hedges
heeling-in
Helenium autumnale
helianthus species
hellebore for insects
hemerocallis species
hemlock
Henderson, mentioned
hepaticas
herbaceous perennials
Heuchera sanguinea
Hibiscus Moscheutos
Hibiscus Rosa-Sinensis
Hibiscus Syriacus
hickories
Hicks, Edward, quoted
hicoria species
hippeastrum
hitching to trees
hoes
hollies
hollyhock
hollyhock rust
honey locust
honeysuckles
Hop
hop-tree
horehound
hornbeam
horseradish
hotbeds
house plants
howea
hoya
Humulus Lupulus
Hunn, C.E., quoted
hyacinth
hydrangea
hydrocyanic acid gas
hypericum species
hyssop

Iberis sempervirens
ilex species
Illicium anisatum
immediate effect
immortelles
inarching
Indian currant
insecticides
insects, remedies for
insects and fungi
Inula Helenium
Ipomoea pandurata
Ipomoea Quamoclit
iris
iron-wood
Isolepis gracilis
ivy, Boston, Japanese
ivy, parlor
ivy, true

jasmines
jasminum species
Jerusalem artichoke
jessamine
jonquil
Judas tree
juglans species
June-grass
juniper species

kainit
kale
Kalmia latifolia
katsura-tree
keeping fruit
Kenilworth ivy
kentia
kerosene emulsion
kerria
kitchen-garden
Kniphofia aloides
Koelreuteria paniculata
kudzu vine

labels
lady-birds
lagenaria
Lagerstroemia Indica
land, handling
larch
larix species
latania
Lathyrus latifolius
laurel, cherry
laurel, great
laurel, mountain
laurel, true
Laurus nobilis
lavender
lawn, making
lawns, treatment
leaf cuttings
leatherwood
leek
Leiophyllum buxifolium
lespedeza species
lettuce
lettuce disease
Liatris spicata
Libocedrus decurrens
ligustrum species
lilac species
liliums
lily-of-the-valley
lima beans
lime and sulfur wash
Linaria Cymbalaria
linden
Lindera Benzoin
Linum perenne
Liquidambar styraciflua
Liriodendron Tulipifera
live-oak
liver of sulfur
liver-leaf
lizard's tail
Lobelia cardinalis
lobster cactus
locust
locust, honey
Lombardy poplar
Long, E.A., quoted
Lonicera Halliana
lonicera species
loose-strife
lotus
lovage
luffa
Lychnis alpina
Lychnis Chalcedonica
Lychnis Coronaria
Lychnis Viscaria
Lycium Chinense
lycoris
Lysimachia clethroides
Lysimachia nummularia
Lythrum Salicaria

madeira vine
maggots of cabbage
magnolias
Mahernia odorata
mahonia
maidenhair tree
maize, striped
mallow, rose
M'Mahon, mentioned
manure for hotbeds
maples
marguerite carnations
marguerite chrysanthemum
marjoram
markers
marshplants
Mathews, Schuyler, picture by
matrimony vine
mats, making
matthiolas
Melia Azederach
melon
melon disease
melon insects
Menispermum Canadense
Mertensia Virginica
Mesembryanthemum
mice injury
mignonette
mignonette vine
mikania
miscanthus
miscible oils
mock orange
mock orange of South
moisture, saving
moles
Momordica
Monarda didyma
moneywort (see lysimachia)
Monterey cypress
monthly advice
moon-flower
moonseed
morning-glory, perennial
morus species
mounding-up trees
mountain ash
mountain laurel
moving large trees
muck
Mueune utilis
Muehlenbeckia
mulberry
mulberry, French
mulching plants
muriate of potash
Musa Ensete
mushrooms
muskmelon
muskmelon disease
mustard
myosotis
myriophyllum
myrtle, running
myrtle, true
Myrtus communis

narcissus
negundo
Nepeta Glechoma
Nephrolepis exaltata
Nettle tree
Nicotiana
night-blooming cereus
nine-bark
nitrate of soda
nitrogen
nozzles
nuts
Nyssa sylvatica

oaks
odd plants
oenothera Missouriensis
oil insecticides
okra
old-fashioned gardens
Olea fragrans
oleander
oleaster
onion
opuntia
orange, culture of
Orontium aquaticum
osage orange
osiers
Osmanthus fragrans
Ostrya Virginica
oxalis
oxalis for window-gardens
Oxalis tropaeoloides
Oxydendrum arboreum
oyster plant
oyster-shell scale

paeonia see: peony
palmettoes
palms.
palms for South.
pampas-grass.
pandanus.
Panicum virgatum.
pansy, culture of.
papavers.
paper-white narcissus.
papyrus.
Paradisea Liliastrum.
paradise stocks.
paris green formula.
parrot's feather.
parsley.
parsnip.
Passiflora incarnata.
passiflora species.
paulownia.
pavia.
pea.
peach, culture of.
peach diseases.
pear, culture of.
pear diseases.
pear insects.
pea-trees.
pecan.
pelargonium.
Pelargonium peltatum.
Peltandra undulata.
pennisetum.
pennyroyal.
pentstemon.
peony.
peppermint.
pepperidge.
pepper, red.
perennials, cultivation of.
Periploca Graeca.
periwinkle.
Phalaris arundinacea.
Phaseolus multiflorus.
phaseolus species.
Philadelphus coronarius and grandiflorus.
philadelphus species.
phillyreas.
phlox, culture of.
phlox, perennial.
Phlox subulata.
phoenix.
phosphoric acid.
photographing landscapes.
Phragmites communis.
physocarpus.
picea species.
picture in landscape.
pie plant.
Pieris floribunda (Andromeda).
Pilea arborea.
pine.
pinks.
pinus species.
Pittosporum.
plane-tree.
plan of grounds.
plant diseases.
plant-lice.
platanus species.
platycodon grandiflorum.
plows.
Plumbago Capensis.
plum, culture of.
plum, diseases.
plum, ornamental.
Poa compressa;
pratensis;
trivialis.
podocarpus.
poinsettia.
polemoniums.
Polianthes tuberosa.
polyanthus.
polygonums.
pomegranate.
poplar.
poppy, Iceland.
Populus Bolleana.
populus species.
Populus tremuloides.
potash salts.
potassium sulfide.
potato, culture.
potato diseases.
potato insects.
potato scab.
potato vine.
Potentilla fruticosa.
Potentilla hybrida.
pot-herbs.
prickly ash.
Primula Auricula.
Primula cortusoides
primulas
privets
propagating
protecting in winter
Pruning
pruning at transplanting
Prunus Caroliniana
Prunus Laurocerasius
prunus species
Pseudotsuga Douglasii
psylla
Ptelea trifoliata
pteris
Pueraria Thunbergiana
pumpkin
pumps
pyracantha
pyrethrum
pyrus, species

quereus species
quince, culture of

rabbit injury
radish
railroad-worm
rainfall, saving
raspberry, culture of
raspberry diseases
raspberry insects
ravenna grass
records of plantation
red-bud
red pepper
red spider
red-top
removing large trees
repairing trees
retinosporas
rhamnus species
rhododendron
rhododendron species
Rhodotypos kerrioides
rhubarb
rhubarb, forcing
rhubarb for ornament
Rhus Cotinus
rhus species
Rhynchospermum jasminoides
Ribes aureum
Ribes sanguineum
ribes species
richardia
ricinus
rill "improved"
Roberts, mentioned
robinia species
rockeries
rollers
root-crops
root cuttings
root-galls
Rosa rugosa
rosa species
Rosa Wichuraiana
rose acacia
rose, culture of
rose diseases
rose insects
rosemary
roses, climbing
roses in landscapes
rows, to make straight
Rubus crataegifolius
Rubus fruticosus
Rubus laciniatus
Rubus odoratus
Rubus phoenicolasius
Rudbeckia laciniata
Rudbeckia maxima
Ruscus aculeatus
Russelia juncea
rutabaga
rye-grass

sacaline
sage
salad plants
Salisburia adiantifolia
Salix laurifolia
salix species
salsify
salvia, perennial
Salvia pratensis
Sambucus species
Sanguinaria Canadensis
San Jose scale
Santolina Chamaecyparissus
sassafras
Saururus cernuus
saving of moisture
savory.
Saxifraga peltata.
Saxifraga sarmentosa.
Sayers, mentioned.
Scabiosa Caucasica.
scab on potatoes.
scale, San Jose.
scarifiers.
Schenley park.
Schizophragma hydrangeoides.
school-grounds.
scilla.
screens for wind.
screen to protect against insects.
screw pine.
scrubbing trees.
scuppernong.
sea-kale.
sedges for bogs.
sedum.
seed-beds.
seedlings, transplanting.
seed-sowing.
Selaginella denticulata.
sempervivum.
Senecio macroglossus and mikanioides.
senna, wild.
service-tree.
shearing.
shelter-belts.
she-oak.
shepherdia species.
shrubs, list of.
shrubs, pruning.
shrubs for the South.
Sicyos angulata.
silk vine.
Simonds, O.C., quoted.
Slingerland, quoted.
smilax (florists').
smilax species.
Smith, H.W., quoted.
Smith and Townsend, quoted.
smoke-tree.
snowball.
snow-berry.
snowdrop.
snowflake.
soap insecticides.
Socrates.
sod-cutter.
sodding.
soil, handling.
soil mulch.
Solanum Dulcamara.
Solanum jasminoides.
solidagos.
Sophora Japonica.
Sorbus species.
sorrel.
sorrel-tree.
sourwood.
South Carolina, rock.
sowing the seeds.
sparrows, poisoning.
Spartium junceum.
spearmint.
spider, red.
spinach.
Spiraea Aruncus.
spireas.
spraying.
spring beauty.
spruce.
spuds.
squash.
squash insects.
squill.
stake labels.
staphylea species.
Statice latifolia.
stem cuttings.
Sterculia platanifolia.
stevia.
Stewart, quoted.
stink-bug.
St. John's wort.
stocks.
storing of fruits and vegetables.
strawberry, culture of.
strawberry disease.
strawberry tree.
streams, treatment of.
street trees, repairing.
strychnine for sparrows.
Stuartia pentagyna.
styrax.
subsoiling.
subtropical gardening, mentioned
sulfate of potash
sulfide of potassium
sulfur as fungicide
sumac
sunflowers, wild
sunken fence
surgery
swainsona
sweet-flag
sweet gum
sweet-herbs
sweet pea, culture of
sweet potato
Swiss chard
symphoricarpos species
Symphoricarpus vulgaris
syringa
syringe

tacsonia
tallies
tamarack
tamarisk (tamarix)
tankage
tanks for aquatics
tansy
Tarryer, tools
Taxodium distichum
taxus species
Taylor, A.D., quoted
tecoma species
tennis-screen
tent-caterpillar
terracas
Thalictrum aquilegifolium
Thermopsis, mollis
thinning fruit
three guardsmen
Thuja occidentalis
thyme
Thymus argenteus
tilia species
tilling
tobacco insecticide
tomato
tomato disease
Townsend and Smith, quoted
Trachelospermum jasminoides
Tracy's garden plan
tradeseantia
transplanting young plants;
old plants
tree guards
Trees, lists and discussion
trees, moving large
tree surgery
trenching
trichosanthes
trilliums
trimming
Tritoma Usaria
Trollis Europieus
Tropaeolium peregrinum
trowels
trumpet creeper
tsuga species
tuberose
tubers, culture of
tub-plants, transplanting
tulips, culture of
tulip tree
turnip
Tussilago Farfara
typhas

Ulmaria Filipendula
ulmus species
umbrella plant
umbrella tree

varnish-tree
vegetables, culture of
vegetable oyster
viburnum species
vigna
vinca major
Vinca minor (see periwinkle, myrtle)
vines
violet, culture of
violet insect
violets, fumigating
virgilia
Virginia creeper
Vitex Agnus-Castus
vitis species

Walker, E., quoted
walks and drives
walnut
wandering jew.
washing trees.
water cress.
watering hotbeds.
watering house plants.
watering land.
water-lilies.
watermelon.
wax for grafting.
wax-plant.
wax-work.
weeders.
weed-spuds.
weeping trees.
weigela, kinds.
well about a tree.
wheel-hoes.
Whetzel, quoted.
white-fly.
white grub.
white hellebore.
wigandia.
willows.
willow, species of.
windbreaks.
wind-flower.
window-boxes.
window-gardens.
winter aconite.
winter protection.
wires, injury by.
wire-vine.
wistaria.
witch hazel.
witloof.
wood ashes.
woodbine.
woodruff.
wormwood.
wormwood, wild.

Xanthoceras.

Yams, ornamental.
yellows.
yew.
Yucca filamentosa.
Yuccas, shrubby.

zamia.
Zanthoxylum Americanum.
zebra grass.
Zizania aquatica.

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