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Life of Johnson, Volume 6 (of 6) by James Boswell

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parodies on Percy, ii. 136, n. 4, 212, n. 4;
Warton, iii. 158, n. 3;
party-opposition, averse to, ii. 348, n. 2;
passions, his, iv. 396, n. 3;
Passion-week, Johnson has an awe on him, ii-476;
dines out every day, iii. 300, n. 1;
dines with two Bishops, iv. 88;
paper on it in _The Rambler_, i. 214; iv. 88;
pastoral life, desires to study, iii. 455;
pathos, want of, iv. 45;
patience, iii. 26; v. 146-7;
payment for his writings: see JOHNSON, works;
peats, brings in a supply of, v. 303;
peculiarities
absence of mind, ii. 268, n. 2; iv. 71;
avoiding an alley, i. 485;
beating with his feet, v. 60, n. 3;
blowing out his breath, i. 485; iii. 153;
convulsive starts, i. 95;
mentioned by Pope, i. 143;
described, ib., i. 144, n. 1;
astonish Hogarth, i. 146;
alluded to by Churchill, i. 419, n. 1;
astonish a young girl, iv. 183, n. 2;
lose him an assistant-mastership, iv. 407, n. 4;
described by Boswell, v. 18;
by Reynolds, ib., n. 4;
entering a room, i. 484;
gesticulation, mimicked by Garrick, ii. 326;
half-whistling, iii. 357;
inarticulate sounds, i. 485; iii. 68;
march, iv. 71, 425;
pronunciation: see under JOHNSON, pronunciation;
puffing hard with passion, iii. 273;
riding, iv. 425;
rolling, iii. 294, 357; iv. 109; v. 40;
shaking his head and body, i. 485;
striding across a floor, i. 145;
talking to himself, i. 483; iv. 236, 399, n. 6; v. 306-7;
touching posts, i. 485, n. 1;
Boswell tells him of some of them, iv. 183, n. 2;
he reads Boswell's account, v. 307, n. 2;
Pembroke College: see under OXFORD, Pembroke College;
penance in Uttoxeter market, iv. 373;
penitents, a great lover of, iv. 406, n. 1;
pension: see PENSION;
personal appearance,
described by Boswell, iv. 425; v. 18;
by Miss Burney, i. 144, n. 1; ii. 141, n. 2; v. 23, n. 4;
by Mrs. Piozzi and Reynolds, i. 94, n. 4;
in _The Race_ ii. 31;
'A labouring working mind, an indolent reposing body,' iv. 444;
fingers and nails, iv. 190;
'ghastly smiles,' ii. 69, n. 1; v. 48, n. 1;
'majestic frame,' i. 472;
robust frame, i. 462;
youth, in his, i. 94;
philology, love of, iv. 34;
philosophy, study of, i. 302;
physicians, pleasure in the company of, iv. 293;
physick, knowledge of, i. 159; iii. 22;
'great dabbler in it,' iii. 152;
physics himself violently, iv. 135, n. 1; 229, n. 1;
writes a prescription, v. 74;
picture of himself in [Greek: Gnothi seauton] i. 298, n. 4;
piety, maintained the obligations of, v. 17;
plagiarism, i. 334;
players, prejudice against: see PLAYERS;
please, seeking to, iii. 54, n. 1;
poems of his youth, i. 50;
poetical mind, iii. 151; iv. 428; v. 17;
poetry, pleasure in writing, iv. 219; v. 418;
Politian, proposal to publish the poems of, i. 90;
politeness, his, acknowledged, i. 286; ii. 36; iii. 81, 331; iv. 126;
v. 23, 82, 98-9, 363;
thinks himself very polite, iii. 337; v. 363;
political economy, ignorance of, ii. 430, n. 1;
political principles, his, described by Dr. Maxwell, ii. 117-8;
politician, intention of becoming a, i. 489; 518-520;
'Pomposo,' i. 406;
poor, loved the, ii. 119, n. 4;
Pope's _Messiah_ turned into Latin, i. 61;
porter's knot, advised to buy a, i. 102, n. 2;
portraits, list of his, iv. 421, n. 2;
Burney, Miss, finds him examining one, ii. 141, n. 2;
Reynolds, portraits by,--one with Beauclerk's inscription, iv.
180, 444;
'blinking Sam,' iii. 273, n. 1;
Doughty's mezzotinto, ii. 286, n. 1;
one engraved for Boswell's _Life_, presented by Reynolds to
Boswell, i. 392; v. 385, n. 1;
one admired at Lichfield, ii. 141;
one at Streatham, iv. 158, n. 1;
other portraits, iv. 421, n. 2;
Reynolds, Miss, by, ii. 362, n. 1; iv. 229. n. 4;
post-chaise, delight in a: See POST-CHAISE;
praise and abuse, wishes he had kept a book of, v. 273;
praise, loved, but did not seek it, iv. 427; v. 17;
disliked extravagant praise, iii. 225; iv. 82;
prayers: See PRAYERS, and _Prayers and Meditations_;
prefaces, skill in, i. 139;
preference to himself, refused, iii. 54, n. 1;
Presbyterian service, would not attend a, iii. 336; v. 121, 384;
attends family prayer, v. 121;
pride, described by Reynolds, iii. 345, n. 1;
defensive, i. 265;
no meanness in it, iv. 429, n. 3;
princes, attacks, i. l49, n. 3;
principles and practice: See PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE;
prize-fighting, regrets extinction of, v. 229;
profession, regrets that he had not a, iii. 309, n. 1;
professor in the imaginary college, v. 109;
promptitude of mind: See JOHNSON, mind;
pronunciation--excellent, v. 85;
provincial accent, ii. 159, 464;
property, iv. 284, 402, n. 2;
public affairs, refuses to talk of, iv. 173;
public singer, on preparing himself for a, ii. 369;
public speaking, ii. 139;
punctuality, not used to, i. 211;
Punic war, would not hear of the, iii. 206, n. 1;
punish, quick to, ii. 363;
puns, despises, ii. 241; iv. 316;
puns himself, iii. 325; iv. 73, 81;
questioning, disliked, ii. 472, n. 1; iii. 57, 268; iv. 439
(See, however, iii. 24, n. 2);
quiet hours, seen in his, iii. 81, n. 1;
quoting his writings against him, iv. 274;
races with Baretti, ii. 386;
Ranelagh, feelings on entering, iii. 199;
rank, respect for: See Birth; rationality, obstinate, iv. 289;
read to, impatient to be, iv. 20;
reading,
amount of his, i. 70; ii. 36;
before college, i. 56, 445;
at college, i. 70; ii. 36;
read rapidly, i. 71; iv. 334, n. 3;
ravenously, iii. 284;
like a Turk, iv. 409;
did not read books through, i. 71; ii. 226;
reads more than he did, ii. 35, n. 3; iv. 218, n. 2;
slight books, v. 313;
when travelling, _Pomponius Mela de situ Orbis_, i. 465;
_Il Palmerino d'Inghilterra_, iii. 2;
_Euripides_, iv. 311;
Tully's _Epistles_, v. 428;
_Martial_, v. 429;
recitation, described by Boswell, ii. 212; iii. 29; v. 115;
Murphy, ii. 92, n. 4; v. 115, n. 5;
Mrs. Piozzi, ii. 212, n. 3; v. 115, n. 5;
Reynolds, v. 115; a great reciter, v. 43;
'recommending' the dead: See under DEAD;
reconciliation,
ready to seek a, ii. 100, n. 1; 109, 256; ib., n. 1; iii. 271;
rectory, offer of a, i. 320, 476; ii. 120;
refinement, high estimation of, iii. 54;
relations on the father's side, i. 35, n. 1; iv. 401;
religion, 'conversion,' his, iv. 272, n. 1;
early indifference to it, i. 67;
totally regardless of it, iv. 215;
early training, i. 38, 67;
'ignorant of it,' ii. 476;
a lax talker against it, i. 68;
predominant object of his thoughts, i. 69; ii. 124;
brought back by sickness, iv. 215;
'never denied Christ,' iv. 414, n. 2;
remorse, i. 164; 398, n. 5;
repetitions in his writings, i. 334, n. 2;
reproved by a lady, v. 39;
reputation, did not trouble himself to defend his, ii. 433;
residences: See Habitations;
resistance to bad government lawful, ii. 61, 170;
respect due to him, maintained the, iii. 310;
shows respect to a Doctor in Divinity, ii. l24;
'respectable Hottentot' not Johnson, i. 267, n. 2;
respected by others: by Boswell and Mrs. Thrale loved, ii. 427;
resolutions, 'fifty-five years spent in resolving,' i. 483;
rarely efficacious, ii. 113;
neglected, iv. 134; reveries, i. 144, n. 1, 145;
Reynolds's pictures, 'never looked at,' ii. 317, n. 2;
riding, v. 131, 285, 302: See JOHNSON, foxhunting;
ringleader of a riot, said to have been the, iv. 324;
rising late, i. 495, n. 3; ii. 17, 143, 410, 477; v. 210;
'roarings of the old lion,' ii. 284, n. 2;
roaring people down, iii. 150, 290;
roasts apples, iv. 218, n. 1;
robbed, never, ii. 119;
romances, love of, i. 49; iii. 2;
roughness: See JOHNSON, manners;
Round-Robin, receives the, iii. 83-5;
Royal Academy, Professor of the, ii. 67; iv. 423, n. 2;
rumour that he was dying, iii. 221;
rural beauties, little taste for, i. 461; v. 112;
sacrament, not received with tranquillity, ii. 115, n. 2;
instances of his receiving it at other times but Easter, ii. 43, n. 3;
iv. 270, 416;
same one day as another, not the, iii. 192;
sarcastic in the defence of good principles, ii. 13;
_Sassenach More_, ii. 267, n. 2;
satire, explosions of, iii. 80;
ignorant of the effect produced, iv. 168, n. 2;
Savage, effects of intimacy with, i. 161-4; v. 365;
saying, tendency to paltry, iv. 191;
sayings not accurately reported, ii. 333;
scenery, descriptions of moonlight sail, v. 333, n. 1;
of a ride in a storm, v. 346, n. 1;
schemes of a better life, i. 483; iv. 230;
scholar, preferred the society of intelligent men of the world to
that of a, iii. 21, n. 3;
'school,' his, described by Courtenay, i. 222;
by Reynolds, i. 245, n. 3; iii. 230;
distinguished for truthfulness, i. 7, n. 1; iii. 230;
Goldsmith, one of its brightest ornaments, i. 417;
taught men to think rightly, i. 245, n. 3;
schoolmaster, life as a, i. 97, n. 2, 98, n. 2, 488, n. 3;
Scotch, feelings towards the: See under SCOTLAND;
Scotland, tour in, ii. 266-8; v. 1-416;
_scottified_, v. 55;
screen, dines behind a, i. 163, n. 1;
scruple, troubled with Baxter's, ii. 477;
not weakly scrupulous, iv. 397:
See SCRUPLES;
seal, cut with his head, iv. 421, n. 2;
seasons, effect of: See WEATHER;
second sight: See under SCOTLAND, HIGHLANDS, second sight;
'seducing man, a very,' iv. 57, n. 3;
_Seraglio_, his, iii. 368;
an imaginary one, v. 216;
sermons composed by him, i. 241; iii. 19, n. 3, 181; iv. 381, n. 1;
v. 67;
severe things, how mainly extorted from him, iv. 341;
Shakespeare, read in his childhood, i. 70;
See under SHAKESPEARE;
shoes worn out, i. 76;
sight,
account of it by Boswell, iv. 425; v. 18;
by Miss Burney, iv. 160, n. 1, 304, n. 4;
actors' faces, could not see, ii. 92, n. 4;
acuteness shown in criticising dress, v. 428, n. 1;
in his French diary, ii. 401;
in observing scenes, i. 41; iii. 187; iv. 311; v. 141;
Baretti's trial, at, ii. 97, n. 1;
_Blinking Sam,_ iii. 273, n. 1;
difficulty in crossing the kennel when a child, i. 39;
eyes wild and piercing, i. 94, n. 4, 464, n. 1;
only one eye, i. 41;
restored to its use, i. 305;
inflamed, ii. 263-4;
short-sighted, called by Dr. Percy, iii. 273;
silence, fits of, ii. 213; iii. 307; v. 73;
silver buckles, iii. 325;
cup, i. 163, n. 2;
plate, ii. 5, n. i; iv. 92;
singularity, dislike of, ii. 74, n. 3; iv. 325;
sins, never balanced against virtues, iv. 398;
slavery, hatred of: See SLAVES;
sleep: See Nights;
smallpox, has the, v. 435;
Smith, Adam, compared with, iv. 24, n. 2;
_Sober,_ Mr., of _The Idler,_ iii. 398, n. 3;
social, truly, iv. 284;
society, mixing with polite, i. 80, 82, 496, n. 1; ii. 467;
iii. 272, n. 3 424; iv. 1, n. 1, 89, 108, n. 4, 109, 116-17, 147, 326,
357; v. 43, 98, 207, 358. 371, 374, 394, 455,457;
solitude, hatred of, i. 144, n. 2, 297, 339, n. 3, 515; iii; 405;
iv. 427;
suffers from it, iv. 163, n. 1:
See under JOHNSON, household;
'soothed,' ii. 113;
sophistry, love of, ii. 61; recourse to it, iv. iii;
sought after nobody, iii. 314;
Southwark election, ii. 287, n. 2;
speaking, impressive mode of, ii. 326;
spelling incorrect, i. 260, n. 2; iv. 36, n. 4; v. 124, n. 1;
spirit, lofty, iv. 374;
spirit, wishes for evidence for, ii. 150; iii. 298, n. 1; iv. 298:
See JOHNSON, super-natural;
splendour on, L600 a year, iv. 337;
spurs, loses his, iv. 407, n. 4; v. 163;
St. Clement Danes, his seat in, ii. 214;
St. James's Square, walks with Savage round, i. 163, n. 2, 164;
St. John's Gate, reverences, i. III;
St. Vitus's dance, v. 18;
stately shop, deals at a, iv. 319;
straggler, a, iii; 306;
Streatham, 'absorbed from his old friends,' i. 495, n. 2; ii. 427, n. 1;
iii. 225;
Miss Burney describes his life there, iv. 340, n. 3;
his 'home,' i. 493, n. 3; ii. 77, 141, n. 1; iii. 451; iv. 340;
his late hours there, ii. 407;
his farewell to it, iv. 158;
studied behaviour, disapproves of, i. 470;
study, advice about, i. 428; iv. 311;
style,
account of it, i. 217-25;
Addison's, compared with, i. 224, 225, n. 1;
affected by his _Dictionary,_ i. 221, n. 4;
'Brownism,' i. 221, 308;
caricatures of it, by Blair, iii. 172;
Colman, iv. 387, 388, n. 1;
_Lexiphanes,_ ii. 44;
Maclaurin, ii. 363;
in a magazine, v. 273;
man _Ode to Mrs. Thrale,_ iv. 387;
changes in it, iii. 172, n. 2;
criticises it himself, iii. 257, n. 3;
easier in his poems than his prose, v. 17;
female writing, ill-suited for, i. 223;
formed on Temple and Chambers, i. 218;
on writers of the seventeenth century, i. 219;
Gallicisms, dislikes, iii. 343, n. 3;
imitations of it, by Barbauld, Mrs., iii. 172;
Burney, Miss, iv. 389;
Burrowes, Rev. R., iv. 386;
Gibbon, iv. 389;
Knox, Rev. Dr., iv. 390;
Mackenzie, Henry, iv. 390, n. 1;
Nares, Rev. Mr., iv. 389;
newspapers, iv. 381, n. 1;
Robertson, iii. 173; iv. 388;
Young, Professor, iv. 392;
_Lives of the Poets,_ iii. 172, n. 2;
_Lobo's Abyssinia,_ translation of, i. 87;
Monboddo, criticised by, iii. 173;
parentheses, dislikes, iv. 190;
_Plan of the Dictionary,_ i. 184;
Rambler, i. 217; iii. 172, n. 2;
talk, like his, iv. 237, n. 1;
'the former, the latter,' dislikes, iv. 190;
Thrale, Mrs., described by, iii. 19, n. 2;
translates a saying into his own style, iv. 320;
Warburton attacks it, iv. 48;
subordination: see SUBORDINATION;
Sunday: see SUNDAY;
superiority over his fellows, i. 47;
supernatural agency, willingness to examine it, i. 406; v. 18;
superstition, prone to, iv. 426; v. 17:
see GHOSTS, and JOHNSON, spirit;
'surly virtue,' iii. 69;
swearing, profane, dislikes, ii. 338, n. 2; iii. 189;
falsely represented as swearing, ii. 338, n. 2;
'swore enough,' iv. 216;
uses a profane expression, v. 306;
swimming, i. 348; ii. 299; iii. 92, n. 1;
Latin verses on it, ib.;
talk--,
alike to all, talked, ii. 323;
best, rule to talk his, iv. 183, 185, n. 1;
books, did not talk from, v. 378;
calmly in private, iii. 331;
'his little fishes would talk like whales,' ii. 231;
loved to have his talk out, iii. 230;
not restrained by a stranger, ii. 438; iv. 284;
ostentatiously, talks, v. l24;
'talked their best,' his phrase, iii. 193, n. 3;
victory, talks for, ii. 238; iv. 111; v. 17, 324;
writing, like his, iv. 237, n. 1:
see JOHNSON, conversation;
talking to himself: see JOHNSON, peculiarities;
_tanti_ men, dislike of, iv. 112;
taste in theatrical merits, ii. 465;
tea,
Careless, Mrs., told him when he had enough, ii. 460, n. 1;
cups, a dozen, i. 313, n. 3;
fifteen, ii. 268, n. 2;
sixteen, v. 207, n. 1;
_claudile jam rivos pueri_, v. 279;
effects of it on him, i. 313;
misses drinking it once, v. 443;
'shameless tea-drinker,' i. 103, n. 3;
drank it at all hours, i. 313; v. 23;
takes it always with Miss Williams, i. 42l;
teachers, his, Dame Oliver, i. 43;
Tom Brown, ib.;
Hawkins, ib.;
Hunter, i. 44;
Wentworth, i. 49;
teaching men, pleasure in, ii. 101;
temper, easily offended, iii. 345; iv. 426; v. 17;
violent, iii. 81, 290, 300, 337, 384; iv. 65, n. 1;
'terrible severe humour,' iv. 159, n. 3;
violent passion, iv. 171;
on Rattakin, v. 145-7;
tenderness of heart, shown about Dr. Brocklesby's offer, iv. 338;
friendship with Hoole, iv. 360;
his friends' efforts for an increase in his pension, iv. 337;
pious books, iv. 88, n. 1;
on hearing Dr. Hodges's story, ii. 341, n. 3;
kissing Streatham church, iv. 159;
and the old willow-tree at Lichfield, iv. 372, n. 1;
in reciting Beattie's _Hermit_, iv. 186;
_Dies Irae_, iii. 358, n. 3;
Goldsmith's _Traveller_, v. 344;
lines on Levett, iv. 165, n. 4;
_Vanity of Human Wishes_, iv. 45, n. 3;
terror, an object of, i. 450, n. 1;
theatres, left off going to the, ii. 14;
thinking, excelled in the art of, iv. 428;
thought more than he read, ii. 36;
thoughts, loses command over his, ii. 190; 202, n. 2;
Thrales,
his 'coalition' with the, i. 493, n. 3;
his intimacy not without restraint, iii. 7;
gross supposition about it, iii. 7;
supposed wish to marry Mrs. Thrale, iv. 387, n. 1:
see THRALES, and under JOHNSON, Streatham;
toleration, views on, ii. 249-254;
Tory, a, 'not in the party sense,' ii. 117;
his Toryism abates, v. 386;
might have written a _Tory History of England_, iv. 39;
'tossed and gored,' ii. 66;
tossed Boswell, iii. 338;
town, the, his element, iv. 358: see. LONDON;
'tragedy-writer, a,' i. 102;
reason of his failure, i. 198, 199, n. 2;
translates for booksellers, i. 133;
travelling, love of, Appendix B., iii. 449-459;
'tremendous companion,' i. 496, n. 1;
'true-born Englishman,' i. 129; ii. 300; iv. 15, n. 3, 191;
v. 1, n. 1, 20;
truthfulness, exact precision in conversation, ii. 434; iii. 228;
Rousseau, compared with, ii. 434, n. 2;
truth held sacred by him, ii. 433, n. 2; iv. 305, n. 3;
all of his 'school' distinguished for it, i. 7, n. 1; iii. 230;
scrupulously inquisitive to discover it, ii. 247;
talked as if on oath, ii. 434, n. 2;
tutor to Mr. Whitby, i. 84, n. 2;
'_un politique aux choux et aux raves_,' iii. 324;
uncle, account of an, v. 316;
unobservant, iii. 423, n. 1;
unsocial shyness, free from, iv. 255;
_Ursa Major_, v. 384;
utterance, slow deliberate, ii. 326; iv. 429; v. 18;
verse-making, ii. 15;
made verses and forgot them, ib.;
youthful verses, i. 92;
Vesey's, Mr., surrounded by great people at, iii. 425;
Virgil,
quoted '_Optima quceque dies_,' ii. 129;
reads him, ii. 288; iv. 218;
_Vision of Theodore_,
thought by him the best thing he ever wrote, i. 192;
vocation to public life, iv. 359;
to active life, v. 63;
Wales, tour to: see WALES;
walk, his, in a court in the Temple, i. 463;
wants, fewness of his, ii. 474, n. 3;
warrants said to be issued against him, i. 141;
watch, dial-plate of his, ii. 57;
watched, his door, v. 248;
water, lectures on, v. 64;
water-fall, at Dr. Taylor's, iii. 190-1;
weather, influence of: see WEATHER;
Westminster Police Court, attendance at the, iii. 216;
whisky, tastes, v. 346;
'Why, no Sir!' iv. 316, n. 1;
wife,
affection for his, i. 96, 234-241; ii. 77;
disagreements, i. 239;
reported estrangement, i. 163, n. 2;
death, her, i. 234, 238, 277;
alluded to in his letter to Chesterfield, i. 262;
anniversary of the day, i. 236; iii. 98, n. 1; 317, n. 1;
funeral sermon, i. 241; iii. 181, n. 3;
grave and epitaph, i. 241; iv. 351, 369, n. 3, 394;
'resolves on Tetty's coffin,' i. 354, n. 2;
grief, his, i. 235-241;
almost broke his heart, iii. 305, 419;
'recommended,' i. 190, n. 2, 240, n. 5; ii. 476-7;
saucer, her, iii. 220, n. 1;
wishes for her in Paris, ii. 393;
at Brighton, ib., n. 8;
wig, his,
a bushy one, i. 113, n. 1;
Paris-made, ii. 403, n. 5; iii. 325;
fore-top burnt, ib., n. 3;
Wilkes, compared with, iii. 64, 78;
will, averse to execute his, iv. 402;
makes it, ib., n. 2;
wine, use of, i. 103, n. 3;
wisdom, his trade was, iii. 137, n. 1;
wit, extraordinary readiness, iii. 80;
Garrick's account of it, ii. 231;
woman, rescues an outcast, iv. 321;
talks with others of the class, i. 223, n. 2; iv. 396;
wonders, distrust of, iii. 229, n. 3;
words,
charged with using hard and big words, i. 184, 218, n. 2; iii. 190;
_sesquipedalia verba_, v. 399;
in the _Rambler_, i. 208, n. 3;
in _Lives of the Poets_, iv. 39;
needs words of larger meaning, i. 218; iii. 173;
'terms of philosophy familiarised,' i. 218;
words added to the language, i. 221; iv-39, n. 3; v. 130;
work, did his, in a workmanlike manner, iii. 62;
Works, those ascertained marked *, conjectured +, i. 112, n. 4;
Booksellers' edition, edited by Hawkins and Stockdale, i. 190, n. 4;
iii. 141 5 iv. 324;
right reserved by him to print an edition, i. 193; iv. 409;
catalogue of his Works, i. 16-24;
asked for by his friends, i. 112; iii. 321;
Historia Studiorum_, ib.;
one made by Boswell, iii. 322; iv. 383, n. 1;
projected works, ib.;
payments received,
_Translation of Lobo's Abyssinia_, five guineas, i. 87;
_London_, ten guineas, i. 124;
translation of part of _Sarpi's History_, L49, i. 135;
_Historical Account of Parliament_, part payment, two guineas for
a sheet of copy, i. 156;
_Life of Savage_, fifteen guineas, i. 165, n. 1;
_Dictionary_ L1575 (heavy out-payments to amanuenses), i. 183;
_Rambler_, two guineas a number, i. 208, n. 3;
_Vanity of Human Wishes_, fifteen guineas, i. 193, n. 1;
_Irene_, theatre receipts, L195, copyright, L100, i. 198, n. 2;
_Introduction to London Chronicle_, one guinea, i. 317;
_Idler_, first collected edition, L84 2s. 4d., i. 335, n. 1;
_Rasselas_, L100, + L25, i. 341;
_Lives of the Poets_, 200 guineas (? pounds) agreed on, iii. 111;
iv. 35;
L100 added, ib.;
L100 more for a new edition, ib., n. 3;
world, knowledge of the, iii. 20;
'a man of the world,' i. 427;
had been long 'running about it,' i. 215;
never complained of it, iv. 116, 171;
never sought it, iv. 172;
respected its judgment, i. 200, n. 2;
worshipped, iii. 331;
writings, criticised his own, iv. 5;
never wrote error, iv. 429; v. 17:
see JOHNSON, composition;
youth, pleasure in talking of the days of, iv. 375.
JOHNSON, Sarah (Johnson's mother),
account of her, i. 34, 35, n. 1, 38;
counted the days to the publication of the _Dictionary_, i. 288;
debt, in, i. 160;
death, i. 331, n. 4, 339, 512-5;
epitaph, iv. 393;
funeral expenses and _Rasselas_, i. 341;
_Harlcian Miscellany_, subscribes to the, i. 175, n. 1;
Johnson, teaches, i. 38;
encourages him in his lessons, i. 43, n. 4;
hears her call _Sam_, iv. 94;
letters to her, i. 5I2, 5I3, 514;
marriage, i. 95;
London, visits, i. 42, 110;
receipts for bills, i. 90, n. 3.
JOHNSON, Thomas (Johnson's cousin), iv. 402, n. 2, 440.
_Johnson in Birmingham_, i. 85, n. 3; 95, n. 3.
JOHNSON BUILDINGS, iii. 405, n. 6.
JOHNSON'S COURT,
Johnson removes to it, ii. 5;
Boswell and Beauclerk's veneration for it, ii. 229, 427;
'Johnson of that _Ilk_,' ib., n. 2; iii. 405, n. 6.
_Johnsoniana, or Bon-Mots of Dr. Johnson_, ii. 432; iii. 325.
_Johnsoniana_ (by Taylor), iv. 421, n. 2.
_Johnsonianissimus_, i. 7, n. 2.
_Johnsonised_, 'I have _Johnsonised_ the land,' i. 13.
_Johnston_, the Scotch form of Johnson, iii. 106, n. 1.
JOHNSTON, Arthur,
Johnson desires his portrait, iv. 265;
_Poemata_, i. 460; i 104; v. 95.
JOHNSTON, Sir James, iv. 281.
JOHNSTON, W., the bookseller, i. 341.
JOHNSTONE, Governor, i. 304, n. 1.
JOKES, a game of, ii. 231.
JONES, Miss (The _Chantress_), i. 322.
JONES, Phil., ii. 444.
JONES, Rev. River, i. 323, n. 4.
JONES, Sir William,
Garrick's funeral, iii. 371, n. 1;
'Harmonious Jones,' i. 223;
Johnson's admiration of Newton, anecdote of, ii. 125, n. 4;
Journey, commends, iii. 137;
use of _scrupulosity_; 'Jones teach me modesty and Greek,' iv. 433;
languages, knowledge of, v. 108, n. 9;
Literary Club, member of the, i. 479 ii. 240; v. 109, n. 5;
account of the black-balling, iii. 311, n. 2;
_Persian Grammar_, iv. 69, n. 2;
portrait, ii. 25, n. 2;
professor in the imaginary college, v. 108;
Shipley, Miss, marries, iv. 75, n. 3;
study of the law, iv. 309, n. 6;
Thurlow's character, iv. 349, n. 3;
mentioned, iii. 386.
JONSON, Ben,
_Alchemist_, iii. 35, n. 1;
_Fall of Mortimer_, iii. 78, n. 4;
at Hawthornden, v. 402, 414;
Kitely acted by Garrick, ii. 92, n. 3;
_Leges Convivales_, iv. 254, n. 4.
JOPP, Provost, ii. 291; v. 90.
JORDEN, Rev. William (Johnson's tutor), i. 59, 61, 79, 272.
JORTIN, Rev. Dr. John,
attacked by Hurd, iv. 47, n. 2;
Johnson desires information about him, iv. 161;
_Sermons_, iii. 248.
JOSEPH EMANUEL, King of Portugal, iv. 174, n. 5.
_Jour_, derivation of, ii. 156.
JOURNAL,
how it should be kept, ii. 217;
kept for a man's own use, iv. 177;
record to be made at once, i. 337; iii. 218; v. 393;
state of mind to be recorded, ii. 217; iii. 228; v. 272;
trifles not to be recorded, ii. 358;
Johnson advises Baretti to keep one, i. 365;
and Boswell, i. 433, 475; ii. 358;
mirror, like a, iii. 228;
regularity inconsistent with spirit, i. 155:
See JOHNSON, Journal, and BOSWELL, Journal.
_Journal des Savans_, ii. 39.
_Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides_. See under BOSWELL.
_Journey to London_. See _The Provoked Husband_.
_Journey into North Wales_, ii. 285; v. 427-460;
Mrs. Piozzi's account of its publication, v. 427, n. 1;
suppressions and corrections, ib.;
inscription on blank leaf, iv. 299, n. 3.
_Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland_,
first thought of in a valley, v. 141, n. 2;
composition of it, ii. 268-9, 271;
in the press, ii. 278-9, 281, 284, 287-8; v. 443;
published, ii. 290, 292;
sale, ii. 310; iii. 325;
second edition, ii. 291, n. 4; iii. 325, n. 5;
note added to it, v. 412, n. 2;
translation, ii. 310, n. 2;
errors, ii. 291, 301, 303; v. 412;
attacked by 'shallow North Britons,' ii. 305, 307;
in McNicol's _Remarks_, ii. 308;
supposed attack by Macpherson, ib., n. 1;
in Scotch newspapers, ii. 363;
misapprehended to rancour, v. 20;
Boswell projects a Supplement, ii. 300, n. 2;
Burke, Jones and Jackson commend it, iii. 137;
Burney's _Travels_ in Johnson's view as he wrote, iv. 186;
composed from very meagre materials, v. 405;
copy sent to the King, ii, 290;
to Warren Hastings, iv. 69;
to various other people, ii. 278, 285, 288, 290, 309, 310;
iii. 94, 102;
criticised by Dempster, ii. 303; iii. 301; v. 405, 407-9;
Dick, iii. 103;
Hailes, v. 405-7;
_Hermes_ Harris, ii. 265;
Knox, ii. 304;
Tytler, ii. 305;
Highlanders like it more than Lowlanders, ii. 308;
Iona, description of, iii. 173; v. 334;
Johnson anxious to know how it was received, ii. 290, 292, 294;
goes where nobody goes, v. 157, n. 3;
had much of it in his mind before starting, iii. 301.
letters to Mrs. Thrale, ii. 303, 305; v. 145, n. 2;
saw a different system of life, iv. 199; v. 112, 405;
shows gratitude and delicacy, ii. 303;
Macaulay, quoted by, iii. 449;
new, contains much that is, iii. 326;
Orme, described by, ii. 300; v. 408, n. 4;
route, choice of a, v. 120;
talked of in the Literary Club and London generally, ii. 318.
JOWETT, Rev. Professor Benjamin,
Master of Balliol College, ii. 338, n. 2.
JUBILEE. See SHAKESPEARE.
JUDGE, an eminent noble, iv. 178.
JUDGES,
afraid of the people, v. 57;
engaging in trade, ii. 343;
farming, ii. 344;
in private life, v. 396;
partial to the populace, ii. 353;
places held for life, ii. 353.
JUDGMENT,
compared with admiration, ii. 360;
source of erroneous judgments, ii. 131.
_Julia or the Italian Lover_, i. 262, n. 1.
_Julia Mandeville_, ii. 402, n. 1.
JULIEN, the Treasurer of the Clergy, ii. 391.
JULIEN, of the Gobelins, v. 107.
JULIUS CAESAR, iii. 171.
JUNIUS, Francis, i. 186.
_Junius_,
Burke, not, iii. 376;
Burke, Hamilton and Wilkes most suspected, ib., n. 4;
Samuel Dyer, iv. 11, n. 1;
concealment of the author, iii. 376;
duty of authors who are questioned about the authorship, iv. 305-6;
impudence, his, ii. 164;
Johnson attacks him, ii. 135;
Norton, Sir Fletcher, attacks, ii. 472, n. 2.
JURIES,
guards afraid of them, iii. 46;
judges of law, iii. 16, n. 1.
JUSTICE, a picture of, iv. 321.
JUSTICE HALL, ii. 98.
JUSTICES OF THE PEACE. See MAGISTRATES.
JUSTITIA HULK, iii. 268.
JUVENAL,
_Third Satire_, Johnson's imitation, i. 118 (see _London_);
Boileau's, ib.;
Oldham's, ib.;
_Tenth Satire_, Johnson's imitation, i. 192
(see _Vanity of Human Wishes_);
intention to translate other _Satires_, i. 193;
quotations,
_Sat_. i. 29, iv. 179, n. 4;
_Sat_. i. 79, v. 277, n. 4;
_Sat_. iii. 1, i. 325, n. 1;
_Sat_. iii. 2, ii. 133;
_Sat_. iii. 149, i. 77, n. 1;
_Sat_. iii. 164, i. 77, n. 3;
_Sat_. iii. 230 (_unius lacertae_), iii. 255;
_Sat_. viii. 73, iv. 114, n. 1;
_Sat_. x. 8, iv. 354, n. 2;
_Sat_. x. 180, ii. 227;
_Sat_. x. 217, iv. 357, n. 2;
_Sat_. x. 356, iv. 401, n. 1;
_Sat_. x. 365, iv. 180, n. 1;
_Sat_. xiv. 139, iii. 415, n. 3.

K.

KAMES, Lord (Henry Home),
coarse language in Court, ii. 200, n. 1;
_Elements of Criticism_, i. 393; ii. 89-90;
Eton boys, on, i. 224, n. 1;
_Hereditary Indefeasible Right_, v. 272;
Johnson, attacks, ii. 317, n. 1;
prejudiced against, i. 148;
'keep him,' ii. 53;
_Sketches of the History of Man_
Charles V celebrating his funeral obsequies, iii. 247;
Clarendon's account of Villiers's ghost, iii. 351;
interest of money, iii. 340;
Irish export duties, ii. 131, n. 1;
Lapouchin, Madame, iii. 340;
Paris Foundling Hospital, mortality in the, ii. 398, n. 5;
schools not needed for the poor, iii. 352, n. 1;
virtue natural to man, iii. 352;
Smollett's monument, v. 366;
'vicious Intromission,' ii. 198, 200;
mentioned, iii. 126.
KAUFFMANN, Angelica, iv. 277, n. 1.
KEARNEY, Michael, i. 489.
KEARSLEY, the bookseller,
letter from Johnson, i. 214;
publishes a _Life of Johnson_, iv. 421, n. 2.
KEDDLESTONE, iii. 160-2; v. 431-2.
KEEN, Sir Benjamin, v. 310, n. 3.
KEENE, ----, ii. 397.
KEITH, Admiral Lord, v. 427, n. 1.
KEITH, Mrs., v. 130.
KEITH, Robert, _Catalogue of the Scottish Bishops_, i. 309.
KEITH, ----, a collector of excise, v. 128-31.
KELLY, sixth Earl of, v. 387.
KELLY, Hugh,
account of him, iii. 113, n. 3;
displays his spurs, iv. 407, n. 4;
_False Delicacy_, ii. 48;
Johnson's _Prologue_, iii. 113, 118.
KEMBLE, John,
visits Johnson, iv. 242-4;
anecdote of Johnson and Garrick, i. 216, n. 3;
affected by Mrs. Siddons' acting, iv. 244, n. 1.
KEMPIS, Thomas a,
editions and translations, iii. 226; iv. 279;
Johnson quotes him, iii. 227, n. 1;
reads him in Low Dutch, iv. 21.
KEN, Bishop,
connected by marriage with Isaac Walton, ii. 364, n. 1;
a nonjuror, iv. 286, n. 3;
rule about sleep, iii. 169, n. 1.
KENNEDY, Rev. Dr., _Complete System of Astronomical Chronology_, i. 366.
KENNEDY, Dr., author of a foolish tragedy, iii. 238.
KENNEDY, House of, v. 374.
KENNICOTT, Dr. Benjamin,
_Collations_, ii. 128;
edition of the Hebrew Bible, v. 42;
meets Johnson, iv. 151, n. 2.
KENNICOTT, Mrs., iv. 151, n. 2, 285, 288, 298, n. 2, 305.
KENNINGTON COMMON, iii. 239, n. 2.
KENRICK, Dr. William,
account of him, i. 497;
_Epistle to James Boswell, Esq_., ii. 61;
Garrick libels, i. 498, n. 1;
Goldsmith, libels, i. 498, n. 1; ii. 209, n. 2;
Johnson, attacks, i. 497; ii. 61; v. 273;
made himself public, i. 498; iii. 256;
mentioned, ii. 44.
KENT, militia, i. 307, n. 4.
KEPLER, i. 85, n. 2.
KEPPEL, Admiral, iv. 12, n. 6.
KERR, James, v. 40.
KESWICK, iv. 437.
KETTLEWELL, John, iv. 286, n. 3.
KEYSLER, J. G., Travels, ii. 346.
KIDGELL, John, v. 270, n. 4.
KILLALOE, Bishop of. See DEAN BARNARD.
KILLINGLEY, M., iii. 208.
KILMARNOCK, Earl of, i. 180; v. 103, n, 1; 105.
KILMOREY, Lord, i. 83, n. 3; v. 433.
KIMCHI, Rabbi David, i. 33.
KINCARDINE, Alexander, Earl, and Veronica, Countess of,
v. 25, n. 2; 379, n. 3.
KINDNESS, duty of cultivating it, iii. 182.
KING, Captain, iv. 308, n. 3.
KING, Lord Chancellor, i. 359, n. 3.
KING, Henry, Bishop of Chichester, ii. 364, n. 1.
KING, Rev. Dr., a dissenter, iii. 288.
KING, Thomas, the Comedian, ii. 325, n. 1.
KING, William, Archbishop of Dublin,
_Essay on the Origin of Evil_, ii. 37, n. 1; iii. 13, n. 3, 402, n. 1;
troubles Swift, ii. 132, n. 2.
KING, Dr. William, Principal of St. Mary Hall, Oxford,
account of him, i. 279, n. 5;
his greatness, i. 282, n. 2;
English of Atterbury, Gower, and Johnson, ii. 95, n. 2;
Jacobite speech in 1754, i. 146, n. 1;
in 1759, i. 348;
Pretender in London, meets the, v. 196, n. 2;
describes his meanness, v. 200, n. 1;
Pulteney and Walpole, v. 339, n. 1.
_King, The, v. Topham_, iii. 16, n. 1.
KING'S EVIL,
Johnson touched for it, i. 42;
account of it, ib., n. 3.
'KING'S FRIENDS,' iv. 165, n. 3.
KING'S LIBRARY, i. 108.
KING'S PAINTER, iv. 368, n. 3.
KING'S Printing-house, ii. 323, n. 2.
KINGS,
conversing with them, ii. 40, n. 3;
flattered at church and on the stage, ii. 234;
flatter themselves, ib.;
great kings always social, i. 442;
ill-trained, i. 442, n. 1;
Johnson ridicules them, i. 333;
minister, should each be his own, ii. 117;
oppressive kings put to death, ii. 170;
praises exaggerated, ii. 38;
reverence for them depends on their right, iv. 165;
resistance to them sometimes lawful, i. 424;
servants of the people, i. 321, n. 1;
'the king can do no wrong,' i. 423;
want of inherent right, iv. 170.
KINGSNORTON, i. 35, n. 1.
KINNOUL, Lord, ii. 211, n. 4.
KINVER, v. 455.
KIPPIS, Dr. Andrew,
edits _Biographia Britannica_, iii. 174;
his 'biographical catechism,' iv. 376;
mentioned, iv. 282; v. 88, n. 2.
KNAPTON, Messieurs, the booksellers, i. 183, 290, n. 2.
KNELLER, Sir Godfrey,
as a Justice of the Peace, iii. 237;
his portraits, iv. 77, n. 1.
KNIGHT, Captain, i. 378, n. 1.
KNIGHT, Joseph, a negro,
account of him, iii. 214, n. 1;
Cullen's answer, iii. 127;
Maclaurin's plea, iii. 86, 88;
Johnson offers a subscription, ib.;
interested in him, iii. 95, 101, 129;
_argument_, iii. 200, 202-3;
decision, iii. 212, 216, 219.
KNIGHTON, i. 132, n. 1.
KNITTING, iii. 242.
KNIVES not provided in foreign inns, ii. 97, n. 1.
KNOLLES, Richard, _Turkish History_, i. 100.
KNOTTING, iii. 242; iv. 284.
KNOWLE, near Bristol, i. 353, n. 2.
KNOWLEDGE,
all kinds of value, ii. 357;
desirable per se, i. 417;
desire of it innate, i. 458;
diffusion of it not a disadvantage, iii. 37, 333;
question of superiority, ii. 220;
two kinds, ii. 365.
See EDUCATION and LEARNING.
KNOWLES, Mrs., the Quakeress,
courage and friendship, on, iii. 289;
death, on, iii. 294;
Johnson, meets, in 1776, iii. 78;
in 1778, iii. 284-300;
her account of the meeting, iii. 299, n. 2;
describes his mode of reading, iii. 284;
liberty to women, argues for, iii. 286;
proselyte to Quakerism, defends a, iii. 298;
sutile pictures, her, iii. 299, n. 2.
KNOX, John, the Reformer,
Cardinal Beaton's death, v. 63, n. 3;
his 'reformations,' v. 6l;
burial-place, ib., n. 4;
set on a mob, v. 62;
his posterity, v. 63.
KNOX, John, bookseller and author, ii. 304, 306.
KNOX, Rev. Dr. Vicesimus,
_Boswell's Life of Johnson_, praises, iv. 391, n. 1;
Johnson's biographers, attacks, iv. 330, n. 2;
imitates his style, i. 222, n. 1; iv. 390;
Oxford, attacks, iii. 13, n. 3; iv. 391, n. 1;
popularity as a writer, iv. 390, n. 2.
KRISTROM, Mr., ii. 156.

L.

_Labefactation_, ii. 367.
LABOUR, all men averse to it, ii. 98-99; iii. 20, n. 1.
LABRADOR, iv. 410, n. 6.
LA BRUYERE. See BRUYERE.
LACE, a suit of, ii. 352.
_Laceration_, ii. 106; iii. 419, n. 1.
_Lactantius_, iii. 133.
LADD, Sir John. See LADE.
LADE, Sir John,
account of him, iv. 412, n. 1;
Johnson's advice to him about marriage, ii. 109, n. 2;
lines on him, iv. 413.
LADIES OF QUALITY, iii. 353.
LADY AT BATH, an empty-headed, iii. 48.
LAFELDT, battle of, iii. 251.
LAMB, Charles,
account of Davies's recitation, i. 391, n. 2;
Methodists saying grace, v. 123, n. 1;
no one left to call him Charley, iii. 180, n. 3.
LANCASHIRE, militia, i. 307, n. 4.
LANCASTER, Boswell at the Assizes, iii. 261, n. 2.
LANCASTER, Dr., Provost of Queen's College, Oxford, i. 61, n. 1.
LANCASTER, House of, iii. 157.
LAND,
advantage produced by selling it all at once, ii. 429;
entails and natural right, ii. 416;
investments in it, iv. 164; v. 232;
part to be left in commerce, ii. 428.
LAND-TAX in Scotland, ii. 431.
LANDLORDS,
leases, not giving, v. 304;
rents, raising, ii. 102;
right to control tenants at elections, ii. 167, 340;
Scotch landlords, high situation of, i. 409;
tenants, their dependancy, ii. 102;
difficulty of getting, iv. 164;
to be treated liberally, i. 462;
under no obligation, ii. 102.
LANDOR, W. S., Johnson's geographical knowledge, i. 368, n. 1.
LANG, Dr., ii. 312, n. 3.
LANGBAINE, Gerard, iii. 30, n. 1.
LANGDON, Mr., iii. 207, n. 3.
LANGLEY, Rev. W., ii. 324, n. 1; iii. 138; v. 430.
LANGTON, Bennet,
account of him, i. 247;
_acceptum et expensum_, iv. 362;
Addison and Goldsmith, compares, ii. 256;
Addison's conversation, iii. 339;
Aristophanes, reads, iv. 177, n. 3, 362;
Barnes's Maccaronic verses, quotes, iii. 284;
Beauclerk, his early friend, i. 248:
makes him second guardian to his children, iii. 420;
leaves him a portrait of Garrick, iv. 96;
birth and matriculation at Oxford, i. 247, n. 1, 337;
Blue stocking assembly, at a, v. 32, n. 3;
Boswell, letter to, iii. 424;
Boswell's obligations to him, ii. 456, n. 3;
Burke and Johnson, comparing Homer and Virgil, iii. 193, n. 3;
v. 79, n. 2;
Burke's wit, i. 453, n. 2;
carpenter and a clergyman's wife, anecdote of a, ii. 456, n. 3;
children, his, too much about him, iii. 128;
mentioned, ii. 146; iii. 89, 93, 104, 130;
Clarendon's style, praises, iii. 257;
coach, on the top of a, i. 477;
collection of Johnson's sayings, iv. 1-34;
daughters to be taught Greek, iv. 20, n. 2;
dinners and suppers at his house, ii. 259; iii. 279, 280, 338;
economy, no turn to, iii. 363, n. 2;
expenditure and foibles criticised, iii. 48, n. 4, 93, 104, 128, 222,
300, 315, 317, 348, 362, 379; iv. 362;
_frisk_, joins in a, i. 250;
Greek, knowledge of, iv. 8, n. 3;
Clenardus's _Greek Grammar_, iv. 20;
recitation, ib., n. 2;
professor in the imaginary college, v. 108;
Hale, Sir Matthew, anecdote of, iv. 310;
_Idler_, anecdote of the, i. 33l;
introduces subjects on which people differ, iii. 186;
Johnson, afraid of, iv. 295;
at fairest advantage with him, i. 248, n. 3;
bequest to him, iv. 402, n. 2;
and Burke, an evening with, iv. 26;
conversation before dinner, repeats, iii. 279;
_confessor_, iv. 280-1;
death, unfinished letter on, iv. 418, n. 1;
deference to, iv. 8, n. 3;
devotion to, when ill, iv. 266, n. 3;
when dying, iv. 406-7, 414, n. 2, 439;
dress as a dramatic author, describes, i. 200;
estimate of Spence, v. 317, n. 1.
first acquaintance with him, i. 247; iv. 145;
friendship with him, iv. 132, 145, 352;
rupture in it, ii. 256, n. 2, 261, n. 2, 265, 282; v. 89;
reconciliation, ii. 292;
funeral, at, iv. 419;
gives him a copy of his letter to Chesterfield, i. 260;
imitates, iv. 1, n. 2;
Jacobitism, i. 430;
letters to him: see under JOHNSON, letters;
levee, attends, ii. 118;
loan to him, ii. 136, n. 2; iv. 402, n. 2;
repaid in an annuity to Barber, ib.;
_Ode on Inchkenneth_, alters, ii. 295, n. 2;
and Parr, an evening with, iv. 15;
_poemata_, edits, ii. 295, n. 2; iv. 384; v. 155, n. 2, 326, n. 2;
portrait, removes the inscription on, iv. 181;
praises his worth, iii. 161;
exclaims, '_Sit anima mea cum Langtono_,' iv. 280;
_Prologue_, criticises, iv. 25;
rebuked by, ii. 254;
urges him to keep accounts, iv. 177, n. 3;
visits him at Langton, i. 476, 477, n. 1;
at Rochester, iv. 8, n. 3, 22, 232-3;
at Warley Camp, iii. 360-2;
King, gives the sketch of _Irene_ to the, i. 108;
and the catalogue of Johnson's projected works, iv. 381, n. 1;
'Lanky,' ii. 258; v. 308;
laughed at, iii. 338, n. 3;
Lincoln, highly esteemed in, iii. 359;
literary character, his, i. 248, n. 3;
Literary Club, original member of the, i. 477;
marries Lady Rothes, ii. 77, n. 1;
militia, in the, iii. 123, 130, 360, 362, 368, 397;
appointed Major, iii. 365, n. 1;
_navigation_, his, ii. 136;
Nicolaida visits him, ii. 379;
orchard, has no, iv. 206;
Paoli visits him at Rochester, iv. 8, n. 3;
Paris, visits, i. 381;
pedigree, his, i. 248, n. 1;
personal appearance, i. 248, n. 3, 336;
Pitt's neglect of Boswell, blames, iii. 213, n. 1;
Pope reciting the last lines of the _Dunciad_, ii. 84, n. 2;
religious discourse, introduces, ii. 254; iv. 216; v. 89;
Richardson, introduced to, iv. 28;
Round-Robin, refuses to sign the, iii. 84, n. 2;
Royal Academy, professor of the, ii. 67, n. 1; iii. 464;
ruining himself without pleasure, iii. 317, 348;
_Rusticks_, writes, i. 358;
school on his estate, establishes a, ii. 188;
silent, too, iii. 260;
sluggish, iii. 348;
story, thought a story a, ii. 433;
table, his, iii. 128, 186;
talks from books, v. 378, n. 4;
_Traveller_, praises the, iii. 252;
Vesey's, Mr., an evening at, iii. 424; iv. i, n. 1;
will, makes his, ii. 261;
'worthy,' iii. 379, n. 4;
Young, account of, iv. 59;
mentioned, i. 336, 418, n. 1; ii. 34, n. 1, 63, 124, 141, n. 1, 186,
192, 232, 247, 279, 318, 338, 347, 350, 362, n. 2, 379; iii. 41, 119,
221, 250, 282, 326, 328, 354, 386, 417; iv. 71, 78, 197, 219, n. 3,
284, 317, 320, 344; v. 249, 295.
LANGTON, Cardinal Stephen, i. 248.
LANGTON, old Mr. (Bennet Langton's father),
canal, his, iii. 47;
exuberant talker, an, ii. 247;
freedom from affectation, iv. 27;
Johnson's Jacobitism, believes in, i. 430;
in his being a Papist, i. 476;
offers a living to, i. 320;
picture, would not sit for his, iv. 4;
stores of literature, his, iv. 27;
mentioned, i. 357; ii. 16.
LANGTON, Mrs. (Bennet Langton's mother), i. 325, 357, 476; ii. 146;
iv. 4, 268.
LANGTON, George (Bennet Langton's eldest son), i. 248, n. 1; ii. 282;
iv. 146.
LANGTON, Miss Jane (Bennet Langton's daughter),
Johnson's goddaughter, iii. 210, 11. 3; iv. 146, 268;
his letter to her, iv. 271.
LANGTON, Miss Mary (Bennet Langton's daughter), iv. 268.
LANGTON, Peregrine (Bennet Langton's uncle), ii. 17-19.
LANGTON, in Lincolnshire,
Johnson invited there, i. 288; ii. 142;
visits it, i. 476, 477, n. 1; ii. 17;
describes the house, v. 217.
LANGUAGES,
formed on manners, ii. 80;
origin, iv. 207;
pedigree of nations, ii. 28; v. 225;
scanty and inadequate, iv. 218;
speaking one imperfectly lets a man down, ii. 404;
writing verses in dead languages, ii. 371.
LANGUOR, following gaiety, iii. 199.
LANSDOWNE, Viscount (George Granville), _Drinking Song to Sleep_, i. 251.
LAPIDARY INSCRIPTIONS, ii. 407.
LAPLAND, i. 425; ii. 168, n, 1.
LAPLANDERS, v. 328.
LAPOUCHIN, Madame, iii. 340.
LASCARIS' _Grammar_, v. 459.
LAST, horror of the, i. 331, n. 7.
LATIN,
beauty of Latin verse, i. 460;
difficulty of mentioning in it modern names and titles, iv. 3, 10;
essential to a good education, i. 457;
few read it with pleasure, v. 80, n. 2;
modern Latin poetry, i. 90, n. 2;
pronunciation, ii. 404, n. 1.
See EPITAPHS.
_Latiner_, a, iv. 185, n. 1.
LA TROBE, Mr., iv. 410.
LAUD, Archbishop,
assists Lydiat, i. 194, n. 2;
_Diary_ quoted, ii. 214;
his Scotch Liturgy, ii. 163.
LAUDER, William,
account of his fraud about Milton, i. 228-231;
deceives Johnson, i. 229, 231, n. 2.
LAUDERDALE, Duke of, Burnet's dedication to him, v. 285.
LAUGHERS, time to be spent with them, iv. 183.
LAUGHTER,
a faculty which puzzles philosophers, ii. 378;
Chesterfield, Johnson, Pope and Swift on it, ib., n. 2;
laughing at a man to his face, iii. 338.
See JOHNSON, laugh.
LAUREL, the, i. 185.
LAUSANNE, iv. 167, n. 1.
LA VALLIERE, Mlle, de, v. 49, n. 3.
LAVATER'S _Essay on Physiognomy_, iv. 421, n. 2.
LAW, Archdeacon, iii. 416.
LAW, Edmund, Bishop of Carlisle,
Cambridge examinations, iii. 13, n. 3;
parentheses, loved, iii. 402, n. 1;
remarks on Pope's _Essay on Man_, ii. 37, n. 1; iii. 402, n. 1.
LAW, Robert, Fellow of Trinity College, Dublin, i. 489.
LAW, William,
Behmen, a follower of, ii. 122;
each man's knowledge of his own guilt, iv. 294;
Johnson's _Dictionary_, cited in, iv. 4, n. 3;
_Serious Call_,
praised by Johnson, i. 68; ii. 122; iv. 286, n. 3, 311;
by Gibbon, Wesley and Whitefield, i. 68, n. 2;
by Psalmanazar, iii. 445.
LAW,
Coke's definition of it, iii. 16, n. 1;
honesty compatible with the practice of it, ii. 47, 48, n. 1; v. 26, 72;
laws last longer than their causes, ii. 416;
manners, made and repealed by, ii. 419;
particular cases, not made for, iii. 25;
primary notion is restraint, ii. 416;
reports, English and Scotch, ii. 220;
writers on it need not have practised it, ii. 430.
LAW-LORD, a dull, iv. 178.
LAWRENCE, Chauncy, iv. 70.
LAWRENCE, Sir Soulden, ii. 296, n. 1.
LAWRENCE, Dr. Thomas,
account of him, ii. 296, n. 1;
President of the College of Physicians, ii. 297; iv. 70;
death, iv. 230, n. 2;
illness, iv. 143-4;
Johnson addresses to him an Ode, iv. 143, n. 2;
learnt physic from him, iii. 22;
long friendship with him, i. 82; iv. 143,144, n. 3
(for his letters to him, see JOHNSON, letters);
wife, death of his, iii. 418;
mentioned, i. 83, 326; iii. 93, 123, 436; iv. 355.
LAWRENCE, Miss, i. 82; iv. 143;
Johnson's letter to her, iv. 144, n. 3.
LAWYERS,
barristers have less law than of old, ii. 158;
'nobody reads now,' iv. 309;
chance of success, iii. 179;
Johnson's advice, iv. 309;
Sir W. Jones's, ib., n. 6;
Sir M. Hale's, iv. 310, n. 3;
bookish men, good company for, iii. 306;
Charles's, Prince, saying about them, ii. 214;
consultations on Sundays, ii. 376;
honesty: see under LAW;
knowledge of great lawyers varied, ii. 158;
multiplying words, iv. 74;
players, compared with, ii. 235;
plodding-blockheads, ii. 10;
soliciting employment, ii. 430;
work greatly mechanical, ii. 344.
LAXITY OF TALK. See JOHNSON, laxity.
LAY-PATRONS. See SCOTLAND, Church.
LAYER, Richard, i. 157.
LAZINESS, worse than the toothache, v. 231.
LEA, Rev. Samuel, i. 50.
LEANDRO ALBERTI, ii. 346; v. 310.
LEARNED GENTLEMAN, a, ii. 228.
LEARNING,
decay of it, i. 445; iv. 20; v. 80;
degrees of it, iv. 13;
difficulties, v. 316;
giving way to politics, i. 157, n. 2;
important in the common intercourse of life, i. 457;
'more generally diffused,' iv. 217;
trade, a, v. 59: see AUTHORS.
LEASOWES, v. 267, n. 1, 457.
LECKY, W.E.H., History of England, ii. 130, n. 3.
LE CLERK, i. 285.
LECTURES, teaching by, ii. 7; iv. 92.
LE DESPENCER, Lord, ii. 135, n. 2.
_Ledger, The_, iv. 22, n. 3.
LEE, Alderman, iii. 68, n. 3, 78, 79, n. 2.
LEE, Arthur, iii. 68, 76, 79, n. 2.
LEE, John (Jack Lee),
account of him, iii. 224, n. 1;
at the bar of the House of Commons, iii. 224;
on the duties of an advocate, ii. 48, n. 1.
LEECHMAN, Principal William,
account of him, v. 68, n. 4;
Johnson calls on him, v. 370;
writes on prayer, v. 68;
answered by Cumming, v. 101.
LEEDS, iii. 399, 400.
LEEDS, Duke of, verses on his marriage, iv. 14.
LEEDS, fifth Duke of,
member of the Literary Club, i. 479;
mentioned, ii. 34, n. 1.
LEEK, in Staffordshire, i. 37; iii. 136.
LE FLEMING, Bishop of Carlisle, i. 461, n. 4.
LE FLEMING, Sir Michael, i. 461, n. 4.
_Leeward_, i. 293.
LEEWARD ISLANDS, ii. 455.
LEGITIMATION, ii. 456.
LEGS, putting them out in company, iii. 54.
LEIBNITZ,
controversy with Clarke, v. 287;
on the derivation of languages, ii. 156;
mentioned, i. 137.
LEICESTER, iii. 4; iv. 402, n. 2.
LEICESTER, Robert Dudley, Earl of, v. 438.
LEICESTER, Mr. (Beauclerk's relation), iii. 420.
LEISURE,
for intellectual improvement, ii. 219;
sickness from it, a disease to be dreaded, iv. 352.
LELAND, Counsellor, iii. 318.
LELAND, John, _Itinerary_, v. 445.
LELAND, Dr. Thomas,
_History of Ireland_, ii. 255; iii. 112;
Hurd, attacked by, iv. 47, n. 2;
Johnson's letters to him, i. 489, 518; ii. 2, n. 1;
mentioned, iii. 310.
LEMAN, Sir William, i. 174, n. 2.
LEMAN, Lake, iv. 350, n. 1.
LENDING MONEY, influence gained by it, ii. 167.
LENNOX, Mrs.,
character by Mrs. Thrale, iv. 275, n. 2;
lived to a great age, ib., n. 3;
English version of Brumoy, publishes an, i. 345;
_Female Quixote_, i. 367;
Goldsmith advised to hiss her play, iv. 10;
Johnson cites her in his _Dictionary_, iv. 4, n. 3;
writes _Proposals_ for publishing her _Works_, ii. 289;
gives a supper in her honour, i. 255, n. 1;
_Shakespeare Illustrated_, i. 255;
superiority, her, iv. 275;
_Translation of Sully's Memoirs_, i. 309.
LEOD, v. 233.
LEONI, ----, the singer, iii. 21, n. 2.
_Leonidas_, v. 116.
LE ROY, Julien, ii. 390, 391.
LESLEY, John, _History of Scotland_, ii. 273.
LESLIE, Charles, the nonjuror, iv. 286, n. 3.
LESLIE, C. R., anecdote of the Countess of Corke, iv. 108, n. 4.
LESLIE, Professor, of Aberdeen, v. 92.
LESSEPS, M. de, v. 400, n. 4.
_Let ambition fire thy mind,_ iii. 197.
_Lethe_, i. 228.
_Letter to Lord Chesterfield_ published separately, i. 261, n. 1.
_Letter to John Dunning, Esq._, i. 297, n. 2.
LETTER-WRITING, iv. 102.
LETTERS,
none received in the grave, iv. 413;
studied endings, v. 238. See DATES.
_Letters from Italy_, iii. 55. See SHARP, Samuel.
_Letters of an English Traveller_, iv. 320, n. 4.
_Letters on the English Nation_, v. 113.
_Letter to Dr. Samuel Johnson occasioned by his late political
Publications_, ii. 316.
_Letters to Lord Mansfield_, ii. 229. See ANDREW STUART.
_Letters to the People of England_, iv. 113, n. 1.
_Lettre de cachet_, v. 206.
_Lettres Persanes_, iii. 291, n. 1.
LETTSOM, Dr., iii. 68.
LEVEE, Johnson's. See under JOHNSON.
LEVEES, Ministers', ii. 355.
LEVELLERS, i. 448.
LEVER, Sir Ashton, iv. 335.
LEVETT, John, of Lichfield, i. 81;
Johnson's letter to him, i. 160;
unseated as member for Lichfield, i. 161, n. 1.
LEVETT, Robert,
account of him, i. 243;
awkward and uncouth, iii. 22;
brothers, his, iv. 143;
brutality in manners, iii. 461;
complains of the kitchen, ii. 215, n. 4;
death, iv. 137, 142, 145;
Desmoulins, hates, iii. 368;
'_Doctor_ Levett,' ii. 214;
Johnson's birth-day dinners, present at, iii. 157, n. 3; iv. 135, n. 1;
companion, i. 232, n. 1; ii. 5, n. 1; iii. 220; iv. 145, 233,
249, n. 2;
introduced Langton to, i. 47; iv. 145;
letters to him: See under JOHNSON, letters;
lines on him, iv. 137, 165, 274, 303, n. 2;
questioned about, iii. 57;
his recommendation to, i. 417;
writings, makes out a list of, iii. 321;
Johnson's Court, garret in, ii. 5;
marriage, i. 370, 382;
mentioned, i. 81, n. 1, 435; iii. 26, 93, 363, 373; iv. 92.
LEWIS LE GROS, iii. 32, n. 5.
LEWIS XIV,
celebrated in many languages, i. 123;
charges accumulated on him, ii. 341, n. 4;
discontent and ingratitude, on, ii. 167, n. 3;
King of Siam sends him ambassadors, iii. 336;
La Valliere, Mlle. de, v. 49, n. 3;
manners, ii. 41;
torture used in his reign, i. 467, n. 1;
why endured by the French, ii. 170.
LEWIS XVI,
execution, ii. 396, n. 1;
Hume, when a child makes a set speech to, ii. 401, n. 4;
Johnson, seen by, ii. 385, 394-5;
Paoli, gives high office in Corsica to, ii. 71, n. 1;
torture used in his reign, i. 467, n. 1.
LEWIS XVIII, when a child makes a set speech to Hume, ii. 401, n. 4.
LEWIS, David,
verses to Pope, iv. 307;
_Miscellany_, ib., n. 3.
LEWIS, Dean, i. 370, n. 1, 382.
LEWIS, F., translates mottoes for the _Rambler_, i. 225.
LEWSON, Mrs., iii. 425.
LEXICOGRAPHER,
defined, i. 296;
Bolingbroke's anecdote of one, ib., n. 3;
referred to in the _Rambler_, i. 189, n. 1.
LEXIPHANES, ii. 44.
LEYDEN, iv. 241; v. 376.
LIBELS,
actions for them, iii. 64;
dead, on the, iii. 15;
England and America, in, i. 116, n. 1;
Fox's Libel Bill, iii. 16, n. 1;
juries, judges of the law, iii. 16, n. 1;
refuse to convict, i. 116, n. 1;
pulpit, from the, iii. 58;
severe law against libels, i. 124, n. 1.
LIBERTY,
all _boys_ love it, iii. 383;
clamours for it, i. 131, n. 1; iii. 201, n, 1;
conscience, of, ii. 249; iv. 216;
destroying a portion of it without necessity, iii. 224;
liberty and licentiousness, ii. 130;
luxury, effects of, ii. 170;
political and private, ii. 60, 170;
press, of the: See PRESS;
pulpit, of the, iii. 59;
_taedium vitae_, kept off by the notion of it, i. 394;
teaching, of, ii. 249; iv. 216;
thinking, preaching, and acting, of, ii. 252.
LIBERTY and Necessity. See FREE WILL.
LIBRARIES,
Johnson helps in forming the King's library, ii. 33, n. 4;
describes the Oxford libraries, ii. 35, 67, n. 2;
key of one always lost, v. 65;
_Stall Library_, iii. 91.
LICENSING ACT for plays, i. 141, n. 1.
LICHFIELD,
ale, ii. 461; iv. 97;
antiquities, iv. 369;
_Beaux Stratagem_, scene of the, ii. 461, n. 3;
Bishop's palace, ii. 467;
Boswell and Johnson visit it in 1776, ii. 461;
Boswell shown real 'civility,' iii. 77;
Boswell visits it in 1779, iii. 411-2;
boys dipped in the font, i. 91, n. 1;
Cathedral, i. 81, n. 2; ii. 466; v. 456;
Johnson in the porch, ii. 466, n. 3;
city of philosophers, ii. 464;
city and county in itself, i. 36, n. 4;
coach-journey from London, i. 340, n. 1;
postchaise, iii. 411;
Darwin's house, v. 428, n. 3;
drunk, all the _decent_ people got, v. 59;
English spoken there, purity of the, ii. 463-4;
_Evelina_ not heard of there, ii. 463, n. 4;
Friary, The, ii. 466; iii. 412;
George Inn, iii. 411;
Green's museum, ii. 465; iii. 412; v. 428;
Hospital, v. 445;
Hutton describes the town in 1741, i. 86, n. 2;
Jacobite fox-hunt, iii. 326, n. 1;
Johnson, Michael, a magistrate, i, 36; ii. 322, n. 1;
Johnson, his barber, ii. 52, n. 2;
beloved in his native city, ii. 469;
respect shown him by the corporation, iv. 372, n. 2;
defines it in his _Dictionary_, iv. 372;
hopes to set a good example, iv. 135;
house, i. 75; ii. 461; iv. 372, n. 2; 402, n. 2;
Latin verses to a stream, iii. 92, n, 1;
as Lord Lichfield, iii. 310;
loses three old friends, iv. 366;
monument in the Cathedral, iv. 423;
portrait admired there, ii. 141;
saucer in the Museum, iii. 220, n. 1;
theatre, tosses a man into the pit of the, ii. 299;
in love with an actress, ii. 464;
praises an actor, ii. 465;
attends it with Boswell, ii. 464-5, 471;
visits the town for the first time after living in London, i. 370;
last visit, iv. 372;
(for his other visits see iii. 450-3);
weary of it, ii. 52;
willow tree, iv. 372, n. 1;
lecture on experimental philosophy, v. 108;
manufactures, ii. 464;
oat ale and cakes, ii. 463;
people sober and genteel, ii. 463;
population in 1781, iii. 450;
Prerogative Court, i. 81, 101;
Sacheverell preaches there, i. 39, n. 1;
_Salve, magna parens_, iv. 372;
school, account of it in Johnson's time, i. 43-9;
compared with Stourbridge School, i. 50;
buildings dilapidated, i. 45, n. 4;
endowment, v. 445, n. 3;
famous scholars, i. 45;
service for a sick woman, v. 444;
Seward's, Miss, verses on it, iv. 331;
St. Mary's Church repaired, i. 67;
Johnson attends it in 1776, ii. 466;
St. Michael's Church, graves of Johnson's parents and brother, iv. 393;
Stowhill, ii. 470; iii. 412;
Swan Inn, v. 428;
Thrales, the, visit it in 1774 with Johnson, v. 428, 440, n. 2;
Three Crowns Inn, ii. 461; iii. 411;
_Warner's Tour_, iv. 373, n. 1.
LICHFIELD, fourth Earl of, iii. 309.
LICHFIELD, Leonard, an Oxford bookseller, i. 61, n. 3.
LIDDELL, Sir Henry, ii. 168, n. 1.
LIES,
'Consecrated lies,' i. 355;
disarm their own force, ii. 221;
Johnson's _Adventurer_ on lying, ii. 221, n. 2;
use of the word _lie_, iv. 49;
lying to the public, ii. 223;
servants 'not at home,' i. 436;
to the sick, iv. 306;
of vanity, iv. 167:
See FALSEHOOD and TRUTH.
LIFE,
changes in its form desirable at times, iii. 128;
changes in its modes, ii. 96: See under MANNERS;
choice, few have any, iii. 363;
just choice impossible, ii. 22, 114;
climate, not affected by, ii. 195;
composed of small incidents, i. 433, n. 4; ii. 359, n. 2;
domestick life little touched by public affairs, i. 381;
Dryden's lines, ii. 124; iv. 303;
every season has its proper duties, v. 63;
expecting more from it than life will afford, ii. 110;
happiest part lying awake in the morning, v. 352;
imbecility in its common occurrences, iii. 300;
method, to be thrown into a, iii. 94;
miseries, i. 299, n. 1, 331, n. 6;
'balance of misery,' iv. 300;
'nauseous draught,' iii. 386;
none would live it again, ii. 125, iv. 301-3;
pain better than death, iii. 296; iv. 374;
progress from want to want, iii. 53;
progression, must be in, iv. 396, n. 4;
state of weariness, ii. 382;
studied in a great city, iii. 253;
system of life not easily disturbed, ii. 102;
a well-ordered poem, iv. 154.
_Life of Alfred_, Johnson projects a, i. 177.
LILLIBURLERO, ii. 347.
LILLIPUT, Senate of, i. 115.
LILLY, William, iii. 172.
LINCOLN,
a City and County, i. 36, n. 4;
visited by Boswell, iii. 359.
LINCOLN'S INN, Society of, iv. 290, n. 4.
LINCOLNSHIRE,
militia, i. 36, n. 4; iii. 361;
orchards very rare, iv. 206;
reeds, v. 263;
mentioned, v. 286.
_Line_, the civil, iii. 196.
LINEN, v. 216.
_Linguae Latinae Liber Dictionarius_, i. 294, n. 6.
LINLEY, Miss, ii. 369, n. 2.
LINLITHGOW, Earl of, v. 103, n. 1.
LINTOT, Bernard, the bookseller,
quarrels with Pope, i. 435, n. 4;
mentioned, ii, 133, n. 1; iv. 80, n. 1.
LINTOT the younger,
Johnson said to have written for him, i. 103;
his warehouse, i. 435.
LIQUORS, scale of, iii. 381; iv. 79.
LISBON,
earthquake, i. 309, n. 3;
parliamentary vote of L100,000 for relief, i. 353, n. 2;
packet boat to England, iv. 104, n. 3;
persecution of Malagrida, iv. 174, n. 5;
postage to London, iii. 22;
mentioned, ii. 211, n. 4.
_Literary Anecdotes_, Nichols's, iv. 369, n. 1.
LITERARY CLUB. See CLUBS.
LITERARY FAME, ii. 69, n. 3, 233, 353.
LITERARY friend, a pompous, iv. 236.
LITERARY IMPOSTORS. See IMPOSTORS.
LITERARY JOURNALS, ii. 39.
_Literary Magazine or Universal Review_, i. 307, 320, 328, 505.
LITERARY man, life of a, iv. 98.
LITERARY PROPERTY. See COPYRIGHT.
LITERARY REPUTATION, ii. 233.
LITERARY REVIEWS. See Critical and Monthly.
LITERATURE,
amazing how little there is, iii. 303, n. 4;
dignity, its, iii. 310;
England, neglected in, ii. 447, n. 5;
before France in it, iii. 254;
general courtesy of literature, iv. 246;
generally diffused, iv. 217, n. 4;
how far injured by abundance of books, iii. 332;
respect paid to it, iv. 116;
wearers of swords and powdered wigs ashamed to be illiterate, iii. 254.
LITTLE THINGS,
contentment with them, iii. 241;
danger of it, iii. 242.
LITTLETON, Adam, i. 294, n. 6.
LIVELINESS, study of, ii. 463.
LIVERPOOL, iii. 416.
LIVERPOOL, first Earl of. See JENKINSON, Charles.
LIVERPOOL, third Earl of, iii. 146, n. 1.
LIVES OF THE POETS,
account of its publication
advertised, iii. 108;
_Advertisement_, iv. 35, n. 1;
Johnson's engagement with the booksellers, iii. 109;
design greatly enlarged, iv. 35;
payment agreed on, iii. 111;
extraordinarily moderate, ib., n. 1;
L100 added, iv. 35;
payment for a separate edition, ib., n. 3;
progress of their composition, iii. 313, 317, n. 1;
first four volumes published, iii. 370, 380, n. 3;
Johnson's indolence in finishing the last six, iii. 418, 435;
iv. 34, 58, n. 3;
published, iv. 34;
printed separately, iv. 35, n. 3, 63;
additions, ib., n. 1.
reprinting, iv. 153;
new edition, iv. 157;
attacks expected, iii. 375;
attacked, iv. 63-5;
booksellers, impudence of the, iv. 35, n. 3;
Boswell has the proof sheets, iii. 371;
and most of the manuscript, iv. 36, 71, 72;
his observations on some of the _Lives_, iv. 38-63;
commended generally, iv. 146;
contemporaries, difficulty in writing the _Lives_ of, iii. 155, n. 3;
copies presented to Mrs. Boswell, iii. 372;
to the King, ib., n. 3;
to Wilkes, iv. 107;
to Langton, iv. 132;
to Bewley, iv. 134;
to Rev. Mr. Wilson, iv. 162;
to Cruikshank, iv. 240;
to Miss Langton, iv. 267;
to Johnson's physicians, iv. 399, n. 5;
Dilly's account of the undertaking, iii. 110;
Johnson's anger at an indecent poem being inserted, iv. 36, n. 4;
collects materials, iii. 427;
not the _editor_ of this Collection of Poets, iii. 117, n. 8, 137,
370; iv. 35, n. 3;
inattention to minute accuracy, iii. 359, n. 2;
letters to Nichols the printer, iv. 36, n. 4;
portraits in different editions, iv. 421, n. 2;
recommends the insertion of four poets, iii. 370; iv. 35, n. 3;
trusted much to his memory, iv. 36, n. 3;
Nichols, printed by, iv. 36, 63, n. 1, 321;
piety, written so as to promote, iv. 34;
Rochester's _Poems_ castrated by Steevens, iii. 191;
rough copy sent to the press, iv. 36;
Savage, many of the anecdotes from, i. 164;
titles suggested, iv. 36, n. 4;
words, learned, iv. 39.
_Lives of the Poets_ (Bell's edition), ii. 453, n. 2; iii. 110.
_Lives of the Poets_, by Theophilus Cibber, i. 187; iii. 29-30.
LIVINGS, inequality of, ii. 172.
LIVY, i. 506; ii. 342.
LLANDAFF, Bishopric of, iv. 118, n. 2.
LLOYD, A., _Account of Mona_, v. 450.
LLOYD (Llwyd), Humphry, v. 438.
LLOYD, Mrs., Savage's god-mother, i. 172.
LLOYD, Olivia, i. 92.
LLOYD, Robert, the poet,
account of him, i. 395, n. 2;
_Connoisseur_, i. 420, n. 3; ii. 334, n. 3;
_Odes to Obscurity_, ii. 334.
LLOYD, Mr. and Mrs. Sampson,
Boswell and Johnson dine with them, ii. 456, 457;
_Barclay's Apology_, ii. 458;
observance of days, ii. 458.
LLOYD, William, Bishop of St. Asaph,
his learning in ready cash, ii. 256, n. 3;
his palace, v. 437.
LLOYD, ----, of Maesmynnan, v. 445.
LLOYD, ----, schoolmaster of Beaumaris, v. 447.
LOAN, government, raised at eight per cent, in 1779, iii. 408; n. 4.
_Lobo's Abyssinia_,
Johnson translates it, i. 78, n. 2, 86-9, 340, n. 3;
sees a copy in his old age, iii. 7.
_Loca Solennia_, Boswell writes to Johnson from, ii. 3, n. 1.
LOCAL,
attachment, ii. 103;
consequence, ii. 133;
histories, iv. 218, n. 1;
sanctity, ii. 276.
LOCHBUY, Laird of,
Johnson visits him, v. 341-3;
his dungeon, v. 343.
LOCHBUY, Lady, v. 341-3.
LOCHIEL, Chief of, v. 297, n. 1.
LOCKE, John,
anecdote of him and Dr. Clarke, i. 3, n. 2;
_Common-Place Book_, i. 204;
exportation of coin, on the, iv. 105;
last words to Collins, iii. 363, n. 3;
Latin Verses, v. 93-5;
style, iii. 257, n. 3;
_Treatise on Education_, cold bathing for children, i. 91, n. 1;
the proper age for travelling, iii. 458;
whipping an infant, ii. 184;
Watts, Dr., answered by, ii. 408, n. 3.
LOCKE, William, of Norbury Park, iv. 43.
LOCKHART, Sir George, v. 227, n. 4.
LOCKHART, J. G.,
_Captain Carleton's Memoirs_, on the authorship of, iv. 334, n. 4;
Johnson on the Royal Marriage Bill, ii. 152, n. 2;
Scott and the _Vanity of Human Wishes_, i. 193, n. 3.
LOCKMAN, J., i. 115, n. 1;
'_l'illustre Lockman_,' iv. 6.
LODGING-HOUSE LANDLORDS, i. 422.
LOFFT, Capel,
account of him, iv. 278;
his _Reports_ quoted, iii. 87, n. 3.
LOMBE, John, iii. 164.

LONDON

I.

LONDON,
advantages of it, ii. 120;
Black Wednesday, v. 196, n. 3;
bones gathered for various uses, iv. 204;
Boswell's love for London: See BOSWELL, London;
buildings, new, iv. 209;
rents not fallen in consequence, iii. 56, 226;
Burke, described by, iii. 178, n. 1;
burrow, near one's, i. 82, n. 3; iii. 379;
censure escaped in it, See below, freedom from censure;
centre of learning, ii. 75;
circulating libraries, i. 102, n. 2; ii. 36. n. 2;
City, aldermen, political divisions among the, iii. 460;
Camden, Lord, honours shown to, ii. 353, n. 2;
Common-Council, inflammable, ii. 164;
petitions for mercy to Dodd, iii. 120, n. 3, 143;
subscribes to Carte's _History_, i. 42, n. 3;
contest with House of Commons, ii. 300, n. 5; iii. 459-60; iv. 139;
division in the popular party, iii. 460; iv. 175, n. 1;
King, presents a remonstrance to the (1770), iii. 460;
an Address (1770), iii. 201, n. 3;
an Address (1781), iv. 139, n. 4;
'leans towards him' (1784), iv. 266;
'in unison with the Court' (1791), iv. 329, n. 3;
Lord Mayors not elected by seniority, iii. 356, 459-60;
ministers for seven years not asked to the Lord Mayor's feast, iii. 460;
Wilkes, the Chamberlain, iv. 101, n. 2;
City-poet, iii. 75;
City, women of the, iii. 353;
Culloden, news of, v. 196, n. 3;
dangers from robbers in 1743, i. 163, n. 2;
Johnson attacked, ii. 299;
'dangers of the night,' i. 119, n. 1;
dear to men of letters, ii. 133;
deaths, from hunger, iii: 401;
from all causes, iv. 209;
eating houses unsociable, i. 400;
economy, a place for, iii. 378;
freedom from censure, ii. 356; iii. 378;
Gibbon loves its dust, iii. 178, n. 1;
and the liberty that it gives, iii. 379, n. 2;
gin-shops, iii. 292, n. 1;
glasshouses, i. 164, n. 1;
Gordon riots, iii. 427-31;
greatest series of shops in the world, ii. 218;
hackney-coaches, number of, iv. 330;
happiness to be had out of it, iii. 363;
heaven upon earth, iii. 176, 378;
hospitality, ii. 222;
hospitals, iii. 53, n. 5;
increase, complaints of its, iii. 226;
influence extended everywhere, ii. 124;
intellectual pleasure, affords, iii. 5, 378; iv. 164; v. 14;
Irish chairmen, ii. 101;
Johnson loves it, i. 320; ii. 75, 120; iii. 5; iv. 358;
returns to it to die, iv. 374-5;
life on L30 a year, i. 105;
_London_, described in Johnson's, i. 118;
London-bred men strong, ii. 101; iv. 210;
magnitude and variety, i. 421; ii. 75, 473; iii. 21; iv. 201;
Minorca, compared with life in, iii. 246;
mobs and illuminations, iii. 383: see below, riots;
mortality of children, iv. 209;
parish, a London, ii. 128;
pavement, the new, v. 84, n. 3;
Pekin, compared with, v. 305;
population not increased, iv. 209;
preferable to all other places, iii. 363, 378;
press-gangs not suffered to enter the city in Sawbridge's Mayoralty,
iii. 460;
Recorder's report to the King of sentences of death, iii. 121, n. 1;
relations in London, ii. 177;
Reynolds's love of it, iii. 178, n. 1;
riots in 1768. ii. 60, n. 2; iii. 46, n. 5;
shoe-blacks, ii. 326; iii. 262;
shopkeeper compared with a savage, v. 81, 83;
slaughter-houses, v. 247;
society, compared with Paris, iii. 253;
strikes, iii. 46, n. 5;
theatre, proposal for a third, iv. 113;
tires of it, no man, iii. 178;
Boswell will tire of it, iii. 353;
too large, ii. 356;
Trained Bands, iv. 319;
universality, ii. 133;
wall, taking the, i. 110; v. 230;
wits, ii. 466;
wheat, price of, in 1778, iii. 226, n. 2.

II. Localities.

LONDON,
Aldersgate Street, Milton's School, ii. 407, n. 5;
Anchor Brewhouse, i. 491, n. 1;
Argyll Street, Johnson's room in Mrs. Thrale's house, iii. 405, n. 6;
iv. 157, 164;
Bank of England, Jack Wilkes defends it against the rioters, iii. 430;
Barking Creek, iii. 268, n. 4;
Barnard's Inn, No. 6, Oliver Edward's chambers, iii. 303;
Batson's coffee-house, frequented by physicians, iii. 355, n. 2;
Baxter's (afterwards Thomas's), Dover Street, Literary Club met there,
i. 479, n. 2; v. 109, n. 5;
Bedford Coffee-house, Garrick attacks Dodsley's _Cleone_, i. 325, n. 3;
Bedford Street, 'old' Mr. Sheridan's house, i. 485, n. 1;
Billingsgate, Johnson, Beauclerk and Langton row to it, i. 251;
Johnson and Boswell take oars for Greenwich, i. 458;
Johnson lands there, iv. 233, n. 2;
Black Boy, Strand, Johnson dates a letter from it, iii. 405, n. 6;
Blackfriars, Boswell and Johnson cross in a boat to it, ii. 432;
Blackfriars bridge, Johnson's letter about the design for it, i. 351;
Blenheim Tavern, Bond Street, meeting place of the Eumelian Club,
iv. 394, n. 4;
Boar's Head, Eastcheap, a Shakesperian Club, v. 247;
Bolt Court,
Boswell takes his last leave of Johnson at the entry, iv. 338;
Johnson's last house, ii. 427; iii. 405, n. 6;
garden, ii. 427, n. 1;
burnt down, ib.;
described in Pennant's _London_, iii. 275;
Oxford post-coach takes up Boswell and Johnson there, iv. 283;
Bond Street, i. 174, n. 2; iv. 387, n. 1;
Bow Church, confirmation of Bishop Hampden's election, iv. 323, n. 3;
Bow Street, Johnson resides there, iii. 405, n. 6;
Sir John Fielding's office, i. 423;
Bridewell Churchyard, Levett buried there, iv. 137;
British Coffee House,
Boswell and Johnson dine there, ii. 195;
club, account of a, iv. 179, n. 1;
Guthrie and Captain Cheap, i. 117, n. 2;
Buckingham House, ii. 33, n. 3;
Butcher Row,
account of it, i. 400, n. 2;
Boswell and Johnson dine there, i. 400;
meet Edwards there, iii. 302;
Button's Coffee-house,
Addison frequented it, iv. 91, n. 1;
Dryden _said_ to have had his winter and summer chairs there,
iii. 71, n. 5;
Carlisle House, iv. 92, n. 5;
Castle Street, Cavendish Square,
Johnson lodged there, i. 111, 135, n. 1; iii. 405, n. 6;
visited the Miss Cotterells, i. 244;
Catherine Street, Strand,
Johnson describes a tavern, v. 230;
lodged near it, i. 103; iii. 405, n. 6;
Charing Cross, full tide of human existence, ii. 337; iii. 450;
Charing Cross to Whitechapel, the greatest series of shops in the
world, ii. 218;
Clerkenwell, an alehouse where Johnson met Mr. Browne, i. 113, n. 1;
Clerkenwell Bridewell, broken open in the Gordon Riots, iii. 429;
described in _Humphry Clinker_, ii. 123, n. 2;
Clifford's Inn, Lysons lived there, iv. 402, n. 2;
Clifton's eatinghouse, i. 400;
Clubs: See under CLUBS;
Coachmaker's Hall, Boswell attends a religious Robinhood Society,
iv. 93, 95;
Compters, The, iii. 432;
Conduit Street, Boswell lodges there, ii. 166;
Cornhill, iv. 233, n. 2;
Covent Garden,
election mob, iv. 279, n. 2;
Hummums, iii. 349, n. 1;
Johnson helps the fruiterers, i. 250;
Piazzas infested by robbers, i. 163, n. 2;
Covent Garden Theatre,
_Douglas_, v. 362, n. 1;
Johnson at an oratorio, ii. 324, n. 3;
his prologue to Kelly's comedy, iii. 114;
Maddocks the straw-man, iii. 231;
_She Stoops to Conquer_ in rehearsal, ii. 208;
_Sir Thomas Overbury_, iii. 115, n. 2;
time of sickness, ii. 410, n. 2;
Crown and Anchor Tavern, Strand,
Boswell's supper party, ii. 63, 186; iii. 41;
Boswell and Johnson dine there, ii. 192;
Cuper's Gardens, v. 295;
Curzon Street, Lord Marchmont's house, iii. 392;
Doctors' Commons, i. 462, n. 1;
Dover Street, Literary Club met at Baxter's and Le Telier's, i. 479;
Downing Street,
Boswell's lodgings, i. 422;
Lord North's residence, ii. 331;
Drury Lane Theatre,
Abington's, Mrs., benefit, ii. 324;
_Beggar's Opera_ refused, iii. 321, n. 3;
Boswell lows like a cow, v. 396;
_Comus_ acted, i. 227;
Davies's benefit, iii. 249;
_Earl of Essex_, iv. 312, n. 5;
Fleetwood's management, i. 111, n. 2;
Garrick, opened by, i. 181;
Goldsmith and Lord Shelburne there, iv. 175, n. 1;
_Irene_ performed, i. 153, 196-8, 200-1;
Johnson in the Green Room, i. 201; iv. 7;
management by Booth, Wilks, and Cibber, v. 244, n. 2;
Duke Street, St. James's, No. 10, Mrs. Bellamy's lodgings, iv.
244, n. 2;
Durham Yard,
Johnson mentions it in dating a letter, iii. 405, n. 6;
the site of the Adelphi, ii. 325, n. 3;
East-India House, John Hoole one of the clerks, ii. 289, n. 2;
Essex Head, Essex Street, iv. 253: See under CLUBS;
Exeter-Change, iv. 116, n. 2;
Exeter Street,
Johnson's first lodgings, i. 103; iii. 405, n. 6;
said to have written there some of the _Debates_, i. 504-5;
Falcon Court, Fleet Street, Boswell and Johnson step aside into it,
iv. 72;
Farrar's-Buildings, Boswell lodges there, i. 437;
Fetter Lane,
Johnson lodges there, iii. 405, n. 6;
has sudden relief by a good night's rest, iii. 99, n. 4;
Levett woos his future wife in a coal shed, i. 370, n. 3;
Fleet-ditch, Johnson's voice seems to resound to it, ii. 262;
Fleet Prison,
broken open in the Gordon Riots, iii. 429;
Endymion Porter's pun on it, v. 137, n. 4;
Lloyd a prisoner, i. 395, n. 2;
Oldys a prisoner, i. 175, n. 2;
Savage lodges in its liberties, i. 125, n. 4, 416, n. 1;
Fleet Street,
animated appearance, ii. 337;
compared with Tempe and Mull, iii. 302;
Boswell meets Johnson 'moving along,' iv. 71;
dangers, its, i. 163, n. 2;
Goldsmith lodges in a court opening out of it, i. 350, n. 3;
Greenwich Park not equal to it, i. 461;
Johnson's favourite street, ii. 427; iii. 450;
Johnson helps a gentlewoman in liquor across it, ii. 434;
Kearsley the bookseller, i. 214, n. 1;
Langton lodges there during Johnson's illness, iv. 266, n. 3;
Lintott's shop at the Cross Keys, iv. 80, n. 1;
Macaulay describes its 'river fog and coal smoke,' iv. 350, n. 1;
the Museum, iv. 319;
Fox Court, Brook Street, Holborn, Savage's birthplace, i. 170, n. 5;
Gerrard Street, Boswell's lodgings, iii. 51, n. 3;
Goodman's Fields, Garrick's first appearance, i. 168, n. 3;
Gough Square,
Johnson lives there from 1749-1759 (writes the _Dictionary, Rambler,
Rasselas_, and part of the _Idler_), i. 188, 350, n. 3; iii. 405, n. 6;
described by Carlyle, i. 188, n. 1;
by Dr. Burney, i. 328;
Gray's Inn,
Johnson lodges there, i. 350, n. 3; iii. 405, n. 6;
Osborne's bookshop, i. 161;
Great Russell Street, Beauclerk's library, iv. 105, n. 2;
Gresham College, iii. 13;
Grosvenor Square, Mr. Thrale's house,
Johnson's room in it, iii. 324, n. 4, 405, n. 6; iv. 72;
Mr. Thrale dies there, iv. 84;
Grub Street,
defined, i. 296;
saluted, ib., n. 2;
Johnson had never been there, ib.;
history of it, i. 307, n. 2;
'Let us go and eat a beefsteak in Grub Street,' iv. 187;
Guildhall,
Beckford's monument, iii. 201;
its Giants, v. 103, n. 1;
Wilkes on his way to it, iv. 101, n. 2;
Haberdashers' Company, i. 132, n. 1;
Half-Moon Street, Boswell's lodgings, ii. 46, n. 2, 59;
Harley Street,
Johnson dines at Allan Ramsay's house, No. 67, iii. 391, n. 2;
Haymarket Theatre,
Foote and George III, iv. 13, n. 3;
Foote's patent, iii. 97, n. 2;
Gordon Riots, open at the, iii. 429, n. 3;
_Spectator_, mentioned in the, iii. 449;
Hedge Lane, Johnson visits a man in distress, iii. 324;
Henrietta Street, i. 485, n. 1;
Holborn,
Boswell starts from it in the Newcastle Fly, ii. 377, n. 1;
Johnson twice resides there, iii. 405, n. 6;
writes there his _Hermit of Teneriffe_, i. 192, n. 1;
Tyburn procession along it, iv. 189, n. 1;
Hummums, iii. 349;
Hyde Park,
Boswell takes an airing in Paoli's coach, ii. 71, n. 2;
troops reviewed there at Dodd's execution, iii. 120, n. 3;
Hyde Park Corner, iii. 450;
Inner Temple: See below under TEMPLE;
Ironmonger Row, Old Street, Psalmanazar lived there, iii. 443, 444;
Islington,
Johnson goes there for change of air, iv. 271, 415;
mentioned, iii. 273, 450;
Ivy Lane: See under CLUBS, Ivy Lane Club;
Johnson Buildings, iii. 405, n. 6;
Johnson's Court,
Johnson removes to it, ii. 5;
Boswell and Beauclerk's veneration for it, ii. 229, 427;
'Johnson of that _Ilk_,' ib., n. 2; iii. 405, n. 6;
Kennington Common, iii. 239, n. 2;
Kensington,
Elphinston's academy, ii. 171, n. 2;
Boswell and Johnson dine there, ii. 226;
Kensington Palace,
Dr. Clarke and Walpole sit up there one night, iii. 248, n. 2;
King's Bench Prison,
broken open in the Gordon Riots, iii. 429;
Lydiat imprisoned, i. 194, n. 2;
Smart dies in it, i. 306, n. 1;
Wilkes imprisoned, iii. 46, n. 5;
King's Bench Walk,
Johnson hears Misella's story, i. 223, n. 2;
'Persuasion tips his tongue,' &c., ii. 339, n. 1;
King's Head: See CLUBS, Ivy Lane;
Knightsbridge, v. 286;
Lambeth-marsh, Johnson said to have lain concealed there, i. 141;
Lambeth Palace, _public_ dinners, iv. 367, n. 3;
Leicester-fields, Reynolds lived there, ii. 384, n. 3;
Le Telier's Tavern: See above under DOVER STREET;
Lincoln's Inn, Warburton appointed preacher, ii. 37, n. 1;
Little Britain,
Benjamin Franklin lodged next door to Wilcox's shop, i. 102, n. 1;
mentioned by Swift, i. 129, n. 3;
London Bridge, Old,
account of it, iv. 257, n. 1;
booksellers on it, iv. 257;
_shooting_ it, i. 458, n. 2;
Lower Grosvenor Street, iv. 110;
Ludgate prison, Dr. Hodges dies in it, ii. 341, n. 3;
Magdalen House, iii. 139, n. 4;
Mansion-House, Boswell dines there, ii. 378, n. 1;
Marshalsea,
broken open at the Gordon Riots, iii. 429;
described by Wesley, i. 303, n. 1;
Marylebone-Gardens, Johnson said to have begun a riot there, iv. 324;
Mile-End Green, iii. 450;
Mitre Tavern,
Johnson's resort, i. 399;
Boswell and Johnson's first evening there, i. 401;
Johnson, Boswell, and Goldsmith, i. 417;
Boswell's supper, i. 423;
Boswell and Johnson alone on a rainy night, i. 426;
supper on Boswell's return from abroad, ii. 8;

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