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Ice Creams, Water Ices, Frozen Puddings Together with by Mrs. S. T. Rorer

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1 quart can or 12 fresh tomatoes
1 slice of onion
1 blade of mace
1 saltspoonful of celery seed
1 pint of water
1 teaspoonful of salt
1 teaspoonful of paprika
1 tablespoonful of gelatin
Juice of one lemon
A dash of cayenne

Add all the ingredients to the tomatoes, stir over the fire until the
mixture reaches the boiling point, boil five minutes, and strain through a
fine sieve. When this is cold, freeze according to the rule for sherbets,
turning slowly all the time.

Serve in punch glasses at dinner as an accompaniment to roasted beef, or
venison, or saddle of mutton.

If fresh tomatoes are used, simply cut them into halves and cook them
without peeling.

This will fill nine or ten punch glasses.

FROZEN FRUITS

Frozen fruits are mixed and frozen the same as water ices, that is, they
are only stirred occasionally while freezing, but the fruit must be mashed
or it will form little balls of ice through a partly frozen mixture. The
only difference between a water ice and a frozen fruit is that the mixture
is not strained, and more fruit and less water is used. If canned fruits
are used, and these recipes followed, cut down the sugar. Cream may be used
in place of water with sub-acid fruits.

FROZEN APRICOTS

1 quart of apricots
2 tablespoonfuls of gelatin
1 cupful of sugar
1 pint of cream

Drain the apricots from the can, mash them through a colander, add the
sugar and stir until the sugar is dissolved. Cover the gelatin with a half
cupful of cold water and soak for a half hour. Stand it over hot water,
stir until dissolved, add it to the apricot mixture, and freeze. When
frozen, remove the dasher and stir in the cream whipped to a stiff froth.
Repack and stand aside two hours to ripen.

This will serve ten persons.

FROZEN BANANAS

12 large ripe bananas
1 pound of sugar
1/2 pint of water
1 pint of cream
Juice of two lemons

Peel the bananas and mash them through a colander. Add the sugar to the
water, and boil five minutes; when cold, add the lemon juice and the
bananas. Put the mixture into a freezing can, stir slowly until frozen.
Remove the dasher and stir in carefully the cream whipped to a stiff froth.

This will serve ten or twelve persons.

FROZEN CHOCOLATE

1 quart of milk
3 ounces of chocolate
2/3 cupful of sugar
1 pint of water
1/2 pint of cream, whipped
1 teaspoonful of vanilla

Grate the chocolate and put it in a double boiler with the water and sugar;
let the water in the surrounding boiler boil fifteen minutes, beat well,
and add the milk. Stir until thoroughly mixed, and the milk is very hot.
Take from the fire, add the vanilla, and when the mixture is cold, freeze,
turning slowly all the while. Serve in chocolate cups with the whipped
cream on top.

This will fill nine chocolate cups.

FROZEN PINEAPPLE

2 large pineapples
1 quart of water
1 pound of sugar
Juice of one lemon

Peel the pineapples and grate them. Add the sugar to the water, stir until
the sugar is dissolved, boil five minutes and cool; add the pineapple and
lemon juice, and freeze, turning the freezer slowly.

This will serve eight or ten persons.

FROZEN COFFEE

1 quart of cold water
1/2 pound of sugar
6 heaping tablespoonfuls of finely ground coffee
1/2 pint of cream

Put the coffee and the water in a double boiler over the fire, and let the
water in the surrounding boiler boil for at least twenty minutes after it
begins to boil. Strain through two thicknesses of cheese cloth, add the
sugar, stir until the sugar is dissolved, and stand aside until very cold.
Add the cream and the unbeaten white of one egg. Freeze, turning the
freezer slowly. This should be the consistency of a soft mush and very
light.

Serve in coffee cups, either plain or with whipped cream on top.

This will serve six persons,

FROZEN PEACHES, No. 1

2 pounds of very ripe peaches
6 peach kernels
1 pint of water
1/2 pound of sugar
Juice of one lemon

Crack the kernels, chop them fine, add them to the sugar, add the water,
and boil five minutes; strain and stand aside to cool. Pare the peaches,
press them through a colander, add them to the cold syrup, turn into the
freezer, and stir slowly until the mixture is frozen. If the peaches are
colorless, add a few drops of cochineal before freezing.

This will serve eight persons.

FROZEN PEACHES, No. 2

1 quart of peach pulp
1 pint of cream
3/4 pound of sugar
Juice of one lemon

Add the lemon juice to the peach pulp, add the sugar, and stand aside,
stirring every now and then until the sugar is dissolved. Freeze the
mixture, stirring slowly; when frozen, remove the dasher, and fold in the
cream whipped to a stiff froth.

This is one of the nicest ices for afternoon or evening collations.

This will serve eight persons; in stem glasses, ten persons.

FROZEN RASPBERRIES

1 quart of raspberries
3/4 pound of sugar
1 pint of water
Juice of one lemon

Add the sugar and the lemon juice to the berries, mash them with a potato
masher. Let them stand one hour, add the water, and freeze.

This will serve eight persons.

FROZEN WATERMELON

Scrape the centre from a very ripe watermelon, chop quickly and press
through a colander. To each pint of this juice, add a half cupful of sugar
and four tablespoonfuls of sherry. Freeze until it is like wet snow. Serve
in glasses. One pint will fill three stem glasses.

FROZEN STRAWBERRIES

1 quart of very ripe strawberries
1 pound of sugar
1 pint of water
Juice of one lemon

Add the sugar and lemon juice to the berries, let them stand one hour. Mash
the berries through a colander, add the water, and freeze, turning the
dasher constantly but very slowly.

This will serve eight persons.

FRAPPE

A frappe is nothing more nor less than a water ice partly frozen. For
instance, Cafe Frappe is a partly frozen coffee. The mixture looks like
wet snow. A Champagne Frappe is champagne packed in salt and ice and the
bottles agitated until the champagne is partly frozen.

PARFAIT

A parfait is a dessert made from frozen whipped cream, sweetened and
flavored. An old fashioned parfait was not frozen in an ice cream freezer;
the mixture was packed at once into a mold, the mold packed in salt and ice
to freeze for two or three hours. To be perfect, the mixture must be frozen
on the outside to the depth of one and a half to two inches, with a soft
centre. The quick parfait given under frozen desserts is now in general
use.

MOUSSE

A mousse is a parfait frozen to the centre. These mixtures are not smooth
like ice cream, but are frozen in crystals and to be exactly correct,
should look like moss when cut.

BURNT ALMOND MOUSSE

1/4 pound of Jordan almonds
2 ounces of almond paste
2/3 cupful of powdered sugar
1 pint of thick cream
1 teaspoonful of almond extract

Whip the cream to a very stiff froth. Blanch, toast and grind the almonds,
putting them through an ordinary meat grinder; rub them with the almond
paste, adding the extract and about two tablespoonfuls of water or sherry.
Sprinkle the sugar over the whipped cream, and then fold in the nut
mixture. Pack at once into a mold, put on the lid, fasten the seam with a
strip of muslin dipped in paraffin or melted suet, and pack in coarse salt
and ice to freeze for two or three hours.

Serve plain or dusted with chopped almonds.

This will serve six persons.

COFFEE MOUSSE

1 pint of cream
1/2 cupful of powdered sugar
2 tablespoonfuls of coffee extract

Whip the cream to a stiff froth, sprinkle over the sugar, add the coffee
extract, and, when well mixed, pack and freeze.

This will serve six persons.

EGYPTIAN MOUSSE

1/2 cupful of rice
1 tablespoonful of gelatin
2/3 cupful of sugar
1/4 pound of dates
1/2 pint of milk
1 pint of cream
1 teaspoonful of vanilla

Wash the rice, throw it into boiling water, boil rapidly twenty minutes;
drain, add the milk, and cook in a double boiler fifteen minutes. Add the
sugar, the gelatin that has been moistened in cold water, and the dates
chopped. Take from the fire, add the vanilla, and when the mixture is cold,
fold in carefully the whipped cream. Freeze as directed in a mold, and
serve with cold quince jelly sauce.

This will serve ten persons.

DUCHESS MOUSSE

4 eggs
1/2 cupful of sugar
1 pint of cream
1 teaspoonful of vanilla
5 drops of cochineal

Beat the yolks of the eggs and the sugar until very, very light; fold
in the whites of the eggs and the flavoring. Stand the bowl in a pan of
boiling water and beat continuously until the ingredients are hot; take
from the fire and beat constantly for ten minutes. When this is cool, fold
in the cream whipped to a stiff froth, pack and freeze.

Serve with quince jelly sauce poured over the mousse.

This will serve eight persons.

PISTACHIO MOUSSE

4 ounces of pistachio nuts
1 tablespoonful of gelatin
1 pint of water
1 pint of cream
1/2 pound of sugar
1 teaspoonful of almond extract
3 drops of green coloring

Blanch the pistachio nuts and put them through a meat grinder. Boil
the sugar and water for five minutes; when cool, add the coloring, the
pistachio nuts, and the gelatin moistened in a little cold water. When this
is cold, fold in the cream beaten to a stiff froth, and freeze in a mold as
directed.

If this is not too well mixed the cream will separate, which makes the
handsomer dessert. When the mousse is turned from the mold it will then
have a solid white base with a rather green, beautiful transparent mixture
at the top.

This will serve ten persons.

RICE MOUSSE WITH A COMPOTE OF MANDARINS

1/2 cupful of rice
1 tablespoonful of gelatin
2/3 cupful of sugar
1 pint of milk
1 pint of cream
1/4 pound of candied cherries
1 teaspoonful of vanilla

Wash and boil the rice in water for twenty minutes, drain, put it in a
double boiler with the milk and sugar; stir until the sugar is dissolved,
cover the kettle and cook slowly for twenty minutes. Press through a sieve,
add the vanilla, and the gelatin covered with cold water. When this is
cold, fold in the cream whipped to a stiff froth; pack and freeze.

I usually freeze this in the ordinary ice cream can; simply remove the
dasher, put in the mixture and pack it to freeze for two or three hours.

While this is ripening, separate the mandarins into carpels. Boil together
for five minutes one pound of sugar, a half pint of water and the juice of
one lemon; take from the fire, add at once the carpels, stir lightly until
they are thoroughly covered with the syrup and stand aside until _very
cold_.

At serving time, wipe the outside of the freezing can with a warm towel,
turn the mousse into the centre of a round dish, heap the carpels around
the base and over the top in the form of a pyramid, pour over the syrup,
and send at once to the table.

This will serve twelve persons.

SAUCES FOR ICE CREAMS

HOT CHOCOLATE SAUCE

1/2 cupful of cream or condensed milk
2 ounces of chocolate
1 cupful of sugar
1 teaspoonful of vanilla

Put all the ingredients into a saucepan and stir over the fire until they
reach boiling point, boil until the mixture slightly hardens when dropped
into cold water. Add the vanilla, turn at once into the sauceboat and send
to the table. This must be sufficiently thin to dip nicely over the ice
cream.

MAPLE SAUCE

1 cupful of sugar
1 teaspoonful of lemon juice
1 cupful of water
1 teaspoonful of maple flavoring

Put half the sugar in an iron saucepan and stand it over the fire until it
melts and browns, add hastily the water, the remaining sugar and the lemon
juice, and boil for about two minutes; take from the fire and add the
flavoring. This may be served plain, or with chopped fruit or nuts added.

CLARET SAUCE

Boil one cupful of sugar and a half cupful of water with a saltspoonful of
cream of tartar for five minutes. Take from the fire and add one cupful of
claret, and stand aside until icy cold.

NUT SAUCE

1 cupful of sugar
1/2 cupful of chopped nuts
1 cupful of water
1 teaspoonful of caramel
2 teaspoonfuls of sherry

Boil the sugar and water with a saltspoonful of cream of tartar or a
teaspoonful of lemon juice for five minutes, take from the fire and add all
the other ingredients, and stand aside to cool.

MONTROSE SAUCE

1/2 tablespoonful of granulated gelatin
1/4 cupful of sugar
1/2 cupful of milk
1 pint of cream
2 tablespoonfuls of brandy
1 teaspoonful of vanilla
Yolks of 3 eggs

Cover the gelatin with milk, let it soak a half hour, and put it, with the
milk, in a double boiler over the fire. Beat the yolks of the eggs and the
sugar together, add them to the hot milk, stir about one minute until the
mixture begins to thicken, take from the fire, and, when cold, add the
vanilla and the brandy, and, if you like it, four tablespoonfuls of sherry.
Stand this aside until very, very cold.

ORANGE SAUCE

1/2 pint of orange juice
1/2 pint of water
1/2 cupful of sugar
1 tablespoonful of arrowroot
Whites of three eggs

Add the sugar to the water, and, when boiling hot, add the arrowroot
moistened. Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth, add gradually the
hot mixture, beating all the while. Add the orange juice, beat again. Turn
it into a sauceboat and stand aside until very cold.

WALNUT SAUCE

Melt maple sugar with a little water, and add to each cupful of syrup a
half cupful of chopped black walnuts. Maple syrup may also be used by
adding half the quantity of boiling water and the nuts.

REFRESHMENTS FOR AFFAIRS

In arranging this matter, I have made an earnest effort to be of service
to the housewife without or with one maid, as well as to those who are
fortunate enough to have trained help.

It is, perhaps, unnecessary to say that elaborate refreshments are entirely
out of place at small afternoon or evening cards. An ice, with a wafer,
or cake and coffee, served on card tables, are sufficient. A salad, with
bread and butter sandwiches and coffee, or a salad sandwich with coffee,
make a nice combination. Hot dishes, even light entrees, seem to call
for a dessert, or another course and coffee. For wedding and other large
receptions serve a greater variety of dishes--jellied meats, boned chicken,
salads, sandwiches, ices, cakes and coffee. In winter creamed dishes may be
served in paper cases on the same plate with salads and other cold dishes.
Serve coffee in small cups after refreshments.

Many so called elaborate dishes are quite easily made, and entrees are
frequently quite as good when rewarmed.

Chicken croquettes may be made and fried early in the day, ready to rewarm
on brown paper in a baking pan in a hot oven ten minutes before serving
time. Sandwiches will keep perfectly well for several hours if wrapped in
a damp towel and closed in a tin bread box. Salad sandwiches are better,
however, if made as near serving time as possible.

If a large reception is to be given, even with good help, prepare as many
dishes as possible the day before, to avoid confusion on the fixed day.

Refreshments for small affairs need not necessarily cost much time or
money. A half cupful of chopped left-over steak, a couple of chops or a bit
of chicken or a box of sardines, make a good foundation for molds of tomato
jelly. Served with bread and butter sandwiches and coffee they are quite
sufficient for afternoon or evening cards.

Many of the ices in this book are new and attractive. The new sorbets are
liked by those who are always striving for a change. Many are old and
reliable.

At large affairs, serve from the dining table.

At card parties, large and small, serve on the card tables, using a small
tea cloth on each table.

At afternoon teas, serve from the tea table in the drawing room.

At lawn parties, serve from a large table on the lawn. Small tables may be
placed here and there for the convenience of guests.

Every day afternoon tea may be served, in the summer on the porch, in the
winter, in the living room or library.

If two dishes only are served, be sure that they harmonize with each other
and with the manner of service.

Suitable and hygienic combinations are always to be considered, but the
aesthetic side seems to me of equal importance.

COFFEE FOR LARGE HOME AFFAIRS

Allow eleven ounces of finely ground coffee to each gallon of water. This
will serve twenty five persons with one coffee cup each, and forty persons
with after-dinner cups. The better way to make a large quantity of coffee
without an urn is to purchase a new wash boiler. Wash it and put in the
required quantity of water (cold). Weigh the coffee and divide it into half
pound lots. Put each lot in a small cheese cloth bag; tie the top of the
bag, allowing room for the coffee to swell. Put the bags in the water an
hour before serving time, bring slowly to a boil, and then boil rapidly for
five minutes. Remove the bags at once, pressing them well. Keep the coffee
very hot until it is all served.

Coffee is not spoiled by being kept at boiling point for some time, if the
grounds are removed.

SOUPS

BOUILLON

2 pounds of chopped lean beef
2 quarts of cold water
1 small onion
12 cloves
2 tablespoonfuls of sugar
2 teaspoonfuls of salt
12 whole peppercorns
A dash of cayenne
Juice of half a lemon

Put the sugar in the soup kettle, add the onion, sliced, and shake until
the onion is thoroughly browned and the sugar almost burned; add the meat,
shake it for a moment, and add the water. Cover, bring to boiling point,
and put over a slow fire to simmer for two hours. Add all the seasonings
and simmer one hour longer. Strain through a colander, pressing the
meat. Beat the whites of two eggs slightly, then whisk them into the
warm bouillon, and add the juice of the lemon. Bring to boiling point,
boil rapidly five minutes, let it stand a moment, and strain through two
thicknesses of cheese cloth. This should stand until it is perfectly cold,
so that every particle of fat may be removed from the surface. Reheat to
serve.

This will serve ten persons, using ordinary bouillon cups.

CLAM BOUILLON

50 large clams
2 quarts of water
12 whole peppercorns
1/2 teaspoonful of celery seed

Wash and scrub the clams thoroughly. Put them, a few at a time, in the soup
kettle, the bottom of which has been covered with a pint of boiling water.
Boil rapidly, take the clams out with a skimmer, and put in another lot,
and so continue until all the clams have been cooked. Remove them from the
shells, saving all the liquor. Chop and return them, with the liquor and
remaining water, to the soup kettle. Simmer gently a half hour, then add
the peppercorns, crushed, and the celery seed. Cover the kettle, take it
from the fire and allow it to stand until perfectly cold. Strain through
two thicknesses of cheese cloth. Reheat to serve.

This will serve fifteen persons.

BELLEVUE BOUILLON

1 quart of plain or chicken bouillon
1 quart of clam bouillon
1/2 pint of cream
Paprika

This is one of the most elegant of all bouillons. Heat the bouillons
separately, mix them at the last minute, pour at once into heated cups, put
a tablespoonful of whipped cream on the top of each cup, garnish with a
dusting of paprika, and send to the table.

This will serve ten persons; in a pinch, twelve.

CHICKEN BOUILLON

1 four pound fowl
3 quarts of water
1 onion
2 tablespoonfuls of sugar
1 teaspoonful of salt
1 bay leaf
1 saltspoonful of celery seed, or one half cupful of chopped celery
1 saltspoonful of black pepper

Draw the chicken and cut it up as for a fricassee. Scald and skin the feet,
and crack them thoroughly with your cleaver knife. Put the sugar in a soup
kettle, add the onion, sliced, shake over a quick fire until brown, add the
chicken and the water, bring to boiling point, and skim. Simmer gently for
two hours. Add all the seasonings, simmer one hour longer, and strain. Add
the juice of half a lemon and the whites of two eggs, slightly beaten. Boil
rapidly five minutes, and strain through two thicknesses of cheese cloth.
Reheat to serve. This may be used in place of beef bouillon, with the clam
broth, for Bellevue bouillon.

This will serve twelve persons.

OYSTER BOUILLON

50 fat oysters
2 quarts of water
12 whole peppercorns
12 whole allspice
1-1/2 teaspoonfuls of salt

Drain and wash the oysters. Throw them at once in a hot kettle, shake until
the gills have curled, cover the kettle, and simmer gently for fifteen
minutes. Drain again, this time saving the liquor. Return it to the kettle
with the peppercorns and allspice, crushed, and water. Chop the oysters
with a silver knife, put them back in the kettle, simmer gently a half
hour, and add the salt. Strain through two thicknesses of cheese cloth,
reheat and serve with whipped cream on top of each cup.

This serves fifteen persons.

TOMATO PUREE a la RORER

1 quart can of tomatoes
1/2 pint of cream
1 quart of chicken bouillon
2 tablespoonfuls of butter
2 tablespoonfuls of arrowroot
1 bay leaf
1 blade of mace
1 onion
1 teaspoonful of salt
1 teaspoonful of paprika

Add the onion, paprika, mace and bay leaf to the tomatoes, boil rapidly
five minutes. Moisten the arrowroot with three or four tablespoonfuls of
cold water, add it to the hot tomato, boil ten minutes, and press through
a sieve. Add the chicken bouillon, boil ten minutes, add the butter, and,
when the butter is thoroughly dissolved, turn at once into cups. Put a
tablespoonful of whipped cream on top of each, and serve.

This will serve ten persons.

GLAZE

Glaze is absolutely necessary for fine cooking, either for the browning of
sweetbreads, birds or chickens.

Cover a half box of gelatin with a half cupful of cold water to soak for an
hour. Put one quart of good bouillon, chicken or beef, over the fire, and
boil it rapidly until reduced to a pint; add the gelatin. As soon as the
gelatin is dissolved, strain the mixture. Put four tablespoonfuls of sugar
into an iron saucepan, stir until it is browned, then add to it slowly the
hot glaze, stir until it is thoroughly melted, turn it into a china or
granite receptacle, and stand away to cool. Keep this in the refrigerator,
and use it according to directions.

SWEETBREADS

SWEETBREADS a la CREME, No. 1

2 pairs of calves' sweetbreads
1 can of mushrooms
1 pint of milk
4 level tablespoonfuls of butter
4 level tablespoonfuls of flour
1 level teaspoonful of salt
1 saltspoonful of white pepper

Wash the sweetbreads and trim them. Throw them in a saucepan of boiling
water and simmer gently for one hour; drain and throw them in cold water.
The water in which they were boiled may be used for stock. When they are
thoroughly cold, remove the membrane, and pick them into small pieces.
Rub the butter and flour together in a saucepan, add the milk, stir until
boiling, add the mushrooms, chopped fine, the sweetbreads, salt and pepper.
Stir until it again reaches the boiling point, cover and stand over hot
water for twenty minutes. Serve in ramekin dishes, pate shells or paper
cases. This will fill twelve cases, or fourteen pate shells.

SWEETBREADS a la CREME, No. 2

1 pound of fresh mushrooms
2 pairs of calves' sweetbreads
1/2 pint of milk
4 level tablespoonfuls of butter
4 level tablespoonfuls of flour
1 teaspoonful of salt
1 saltspoonful of white pepper

Wash and stem the mushrooms; do not peel them. With a silver knife cut them
into slices. Put half the butter in a saucepan, add the mushrooms and half
the milk, and the salt and pepper. Cover the saucepan, and stew slowly a
half hour. Rub the remaining butter and flour together; drain the liquor
from the mushrooms, add it, with the rest of the milk, to the butter and
flour. Stir until boiling, add the mushrooms and sweetbreads that have been
boiled and picked apart. Cover the saucepan, stand it over hot water, or
use a double boiler, pushing the boiler to the back of the stove for twenty
to thirty minutes. The saucepan must be kept closely covered, or the aroma
of the mushrooms will be lost.

This will fill sixteen cases, or fourteen pate shells, or alone it will
serve twelve persons.

SWEETBREADS a la BORDELAISE

1 pair of calves' sweetbreads
1/2 pint of stock
1 onion
1 bay leaf
1/2 teaspoonful of salt
1 can of mushrooms
1 teaspoonful of browning or kitchen bouquet
1 saltspoonful of white pepper
2 level tablespoonfuls of butter
2 level tablespoonfuls of flour

Wash the sweetbreads, put them in a saucepan, add the bay leaf, onion and
one pint of cold water; bring to boiling point, and simmer gently one hour.
Save the water in which they were boiled. Throw the sweetbreads into cold
water, remove the membrane and pick them apart. Put the butter and flour in
a saucepan; when thoroughly mixed, add a half pint of stock in which the
sweetbreads were boiled, stir until boiling, add the mushrooms, drained,
and the seasoning. Bring to boiling point, and push to the back of the fire
for ten minutes. Skim off any butter that comes to the surface, add the
sweetbreads, cook gently ten minutes longer, and serve in either pate
cases, ramekin dishes, or paper cases.

This will serve eight persons.

BAKED SWEETBREADS

2 pairs of calves' sweetbreads
1 can of French peas
3 tablespoonfuls of butter
2 tablespoonfuls of glaze
1 teaspoonful of salt
1 saltspoonful of pepper

Wash the sweetbreads and soak them in cold water; cut them apart and trim
them neatly. Sprinkle the bottom of a baking pan with a chopped onion, put
the sweetbreads on top, dust them lightly with salt and pepper, baste them
with one tablespoonful of the butter, melted, and run them in a quick oven
to bake for twenty minutes. Then brush them thoroughly with glaze and bake
them ten minutes longer. Drain, wash and heat the peas, add the remaining
butter and season them with salt and pepper. Put the peas in the bottom
of the serving dish, dish the sweetbreads in them and send at once to
the table. These may also be served in individual dishes, cutting the
sweetbreads in small pieces, so they may be eaten with a fork.

They will serve from four to six people. The throat sweetbread may be cut
into halves, but as a rule one sweetbread is served to each person.

LAMBS' SWEETBREADS IN PAPER CASES

8 lambs' sweetbreads
1/2 box of gelatin
1 pint of beef stock or chicken bouillon
1 can of peas
1 head of celery
2 level tablespoonfuls of butter
2 level tablespoonfuls of flour
1/2 pint of milk
1 lemon
Hearts of lettuce
Yolks of two eggs
Salt and pepper

Wash the sweetbreads, put them in a saucepan, cover with boiling water,
add two tablespoonfuls of vinegar and a sliced onion. Cook gently for
three-quarters of an hour. Drain, put them in a baking pan, brush them with
butter, add a few tablespoonfuls of glaze or stock, put over three or four
slices of bacon, and cook in the oven a half hour, basting three or four
times. Rub the butter and flour together, add the milk, stir until boiling,
add two tablespoonfuls of the soaked gelatin, a half teaspoonful of salt
and a little white pepper. Take from the fire and add hastily the beaten
yolks of the eggs. Cover the bottom of a cold baking pan with muffin rings,
put one sweetbread into each muffin ring. When the sauce is a little cool,
cover the sweetbreads thoroughly, filling the rings quite full. Stand these
away over night in a cold place.

Dissolve the remaining gelatin in the hot bouillon, season, add the lemon
juice, and stand it aside over night. At serving time, remove the contents
from the rings and place them in paper cases of the same size. Turn the
clear aspic out on to a towel and cut it into pretty shapes. Decorate the
top of the cases with this aspic, placing a sprig of green in the centre.
Drain and press the cold peas through a sieve, and season them with salt
and pepper; put this pulp in a pastry bag with a star tube, and decorate
the top of each mold. Serve at once with mayonnaise passed in a boat.

Another way is to fill the bottom of the paper cases with finely chopped
celery, mixed with mayonnaise, and put the sweetbreads on top, omitting
the peas. If made well, these are exceedingly handsome. One "ring" will be
served to each person.

SWEETBREADS a la NEWBURG

2 pairs of calves' sweetbreads
1 can of mushrooms
4 hard boiled yolks of eggs
1/2 pint of milk
2 level tablespoonfuls of butter
1 tablespoonful of flour
1/2 teaspoonful of salt
1 saltspoonful of white pepper
1/2 saltspoonful of grated nutmeg
A dash of cayenne

Cook the sweetbreads as directed in first recipe; when cold, pick them
apart, rejecting the membrane. Rub the butter and flour together, add the
milk, stir until boiling, and add this slowly to the mashed yolks of the
eggs. Work and stir until you have a perfectly smooth paste. Press it
through a fine sieve, add the salt, pepper, mushrooms and sweetbreads.
Stand over hot water for twenty minutes, until thoroughly hot. Add, if you
use it, four tablespoonfuls of sherry, and serve.

This will serve ten persons.

SHELL-FISH DISHES

DEVILED CRABS

12 crabs, or one pint of crab flake
4 hard boiled eggs
2 level tablespoonfuls of butter
2 tablespoonfuls of soft bread crumbs
1 tablespoonful of flour
1 teaspoonful of salt
1 saltspoonful of grated nutmeg
1 teaspoonful of onion juice
1/2 pint of milk
A dash of cayenne

Chop the whites of the hard boiled eggs very, very fine. Put the yolks
through a sieve. Rub the butter and flour together, and add the milk; stir
until boiling, take from the fire, and add the bread crumbs and the eggs.
Add all the seasoning to the crab flake, mix the two together, and fill at
once into the shells. The shells must be quite full, so that there will be
no danger of the fat being held in the shell. Dip the shells in egg, then
cover them thickly with bread crumbs. It is well to egg and bread crumb the
upper side again; in fact both dippings may be on the upper sides, leaving
the shells red underneath. Put these in a frying basket and fry for a
minute in hot, deep fat. Serve one to each person.

This quantity should fill eight shells.

CRAB BACKS a la CARACAS

1 dozen crabs, or six backs and a pint of crab flake
1 teaspoonful of salt
1 teaspoonful of onion juice
A dash of cayenne

Add the seasoning to the crab flakes, and mix without breaking the flakes.
Fill the mixture into the backs, put a teaspoonful of butter on the top
of each, sprinkle lightly with crumbs, and bake in a quick oven twenty
minutes,

CRAB MEAT a la DEWEY

1 pint of crab flake
2 tablespoonfuls of butter
2 tablespoonfuls of flour
1 teaspoonful of salt
1 red and one green pepper
1/2 pint of chicken stock, or milk
2 tablespoonfuls of sherry
Yolks of two eggs

Drop the peppers into hot fat just a moment and rub off the skin, remove
the seeds and chop the flesh fine. Put this, with the butter, in a
saucepan, and shake over the fire until the peppers are soft. Add the
flour, mix, and add the stock or milk; stir until boiling, add the salt and
pepper and the crab flakes. Do not stir, but heat slowly over hot water.
When hot, add the yolks of the eggs, beaten with two tablespoonfuls of
cream. Heat again, just a moment, being careful not to curdle the eggs, and
serve on toast.

This dish is very nice when made in a chafing dish, and will serve six
people.

LOBSTER CUTLETS

1 pint of lobster meat
2 level tablespoonfuls of butter
4 level tablespoonfuls of flour
1/2 pint of milk
1 teaspoonful of salt
1 teaspoonful of onion juice
1 saltspoonful of white pepper
1/2 saltspoonful of grated nutmeg
Yolk of one egg
A dash of cayenne

Chop the boiled lobster rather fine with a silver knife, and add to it all
the seasoning. Rub the butter and flour together in a saucepan, add the
milk, stir until you have a smooth, thick paste, add the yolk of the egg,
cook a moment longer, add the lobster, and turn out to cool. When cold,
form into cutlet shaped croquettes, dip in egg, roll in bread crumbs,
and fry in deep hot fat. Put a small claw in the end of each cutlet to
represent the bone. Serve with these either cream sauce or sauce tartar.

This quantity should make eight cutlets.

LOBSTER NEWBURG

Make this precisely the same as crabs Newburg, using one pint of boiled
lobster meat. Cut the lobster in cubes of about one inch. Purchase one
large or two small lobsters.

OYSTER CROQUETTES

50 fat oysters
4 level tablespoonfuls of flour
2 level tablespoonfuls of butter
1 tablespoonful of chopped parsley
1 teaspoonful of salt
1 teaspoonful of onion juice
1/2 saltspoonful of nutmeg
1 saltspoonful of white pepper
Yolks of two eggs

Drain and wash the oysters, throw them into a hot kettle, shake until the
gills curl and the liquid boils. Boil five minutes and drain, saving the
liquor. There should be a half cupful of liquor. Chop the oysters and add
them to the liquor. Rub the butter and flour together, add the oysters and
liquor, stir until the mixture reaches boiling point, and push to the back
of the stove where it will cook for ten minutes. Add all the seasoning and
the yolks of the eggs, cook just a minute, and turn out to cool. This must
stand either over night, or must be placed directly on the ice for at least
four hours. When cold, form into small cylinder shaped croquettes, dip in
egg and bread crumbs, and fry in deep hot fat.

This quantity will make one dozen good sized cylinders.

POULTRY AND GAME DISHES

CHICKEN CROQUETTES

1 four pound chicken
1/2 pint of milk
2 level tablespoonfuls of butter
4 level tablespoonfuls of flour
2 teaspoonfuls of salt
2 teaspoonfuls of onion juice
2 tablespoonfuls of chopped parsley
1 saltspoonful of grated nutmeg
1 saltspoonful of white pepper
A dash of cayenne

Draw, truss the chicken, put it into boiling water, boil it rapidly for
ten minutes, and let it simmer until tender. When cold, remove the meat,
rejecting the bones and skin. Chop the meat with a chopping knife; do not
put it through the meat grinder. When fine, add all the seasoning and mix
thoroughly. Put the milk in a saucepan over the fire, and add the butter
and flour, rubbed together. Stir and cook until you have a smooth paste,
add the chicken, mix thoroughly, and turn out to cool. When cold, form into
croquettes, dip in an egg, beaten with a tablespoonful of water, roll in
dry bread crumbs, and fry in deep hot fat. Serve plain, or with French
peas.

This will make thirteen large croquettes.

One pair of thoroughly cooked sweetbreads may be chopped with the chicken,
or you may add a pair of parboiled calf's brains; this increases quantity,
and makes the croquettes more creamy.

This should make sixteen large cylinders or pyramids, serving sixteen
persons.

The meat from the chicken after it is chopped should measure one quart.
Any other meat may be substituted for chicken, but could not be used, of
course, for an elegant affair.

CHICKEN a la CREME

The white meat of one cooked chicken
1 pair of calves' sweetbreads
1 can of mushrooms
4 level tablespoonfuls of butter
4 level tablespoonfuls of flour
1 pint of milk
1 teaspoonful of salt
1 saltspoonful of white pepper
10 drops of onion juice
Yolks of two eggs

Cut the chicken into cubes of a half inch. Boil the sweetbreads and pick
them apart, rejecting the membrane. Drain and wash the mushrooms, cut them
into halves and mix them with the sweetbread and chicken. Rub the butter
and flour together, and add the milk; when boiling, add salt, pepper, onion
juice and meat. Stand this over hot water in a covered saucepan for twenty
minutes, add the yolks of the eggs, slightly beaten, and bring just to
boiling point.

Served in ramekins or paper cases this is sufficient for fifteen persons.
Served as a supper or luncheon dish alone, twelve persons.

CHICKEN a la KING

The white meat of one chicken
1/2 can of mushrooms
1 green pepper
1/3 pint of milk
1/2 teaspoonful of salt
2 level tablespoonfuls of butter
2 level tablespoonfuls of flour
1 saltspoonful of white pepper
2 tablespoonfuls of sherry

Drop the pepper into hot fat for a moment to remove the skin, then chop it
very fine. Put the butter in a saucepan or chafing dish, add the pepper,
stir until the pepper is soft, add the flour, mix and add the milk, stir
until boiling, and add the salt. Cut the meat into pieces an inch square,
add them to the hot sauce, add the mushrooms, sliced, and, when hot, add
the wine and serve.

This will serve four or five persons.

BOUDINS a la REINE

1 pint of chopped cooked chicken
1/2 can of mushrooms
1 can of peas
2 eggs
1/2 cupful of bread crumbs
1/2 cupful of chicken stock
1 teaspoonful of salt
1 saltspoonful of pepper

Brush ordinary timbale cups lightly with butter, put a mushroom in the
centre of the bottom, and around the edge a ring of peas. Put the stock and
bread over the fire, and, when boiling, add the chicken and seasonings,
stir until it reaches the boiling point, take from the fire, and add the
eggs, well beaten. Put this carefully in the cups, cover the top with oiled
paper, stand the cups in a shallow pan partly filled with hot water, and
cook in the oven about twenty minutes, until the contents are "set" in the
centre. Heat the remaining quantity of peas, and season them with salt and
pepper. Turn the boudins on a platter, surround them with the hot peas, and
send them at once to the table.

This will serve eight persons.

These may also be served with plain sauce, or with Sauce Bechamel.

SAUCE BECHAMEL

2 level tablespoonfuls of butter
2 level tablespoonfuls of flour
1/2 cupful of chicken stock
1/2 cupful of milk
1/2 teaspoonful of salt
1 saltspoonful of pepper
Yolk of one egg

Rub the butter and flour together, add the liquids, stir until boiling,
add the salt and pepper, stir, add the yolk of an egg, well beaten, pass
through a fine sieve, and use at once.

CHICKEN TIMBALE

The white meat of one chicken
1/2 pint of soft white bread crumbs
1/2 cupful of milk
1 teaspoonful of salt
1 saltspoonful of white pepper
The whites of five eggs

Put the raw meat of the chicken twice through the meat chopper, then put
it in a mortar and pound it to a paste, or work it in a bowl with a wooden
spoon. Boil the bread and milk, stirring constantly; when this is cold, add
the salt, pepper and four tablespoonfuls of cream; work it gradually into
the chicken meat. This must be a perfectly smooth paste. Add the unbeaten
whites of two eggs; when they are thoroughly incorporated, fold in the well
beaten whites of the three eggs. Put at once into an oiled Charlotte mold
or into small timbale molds.

The molds may be garnished with mushrooms, or chopped truffles, or peas.
Stand them in a pan of hot water, cover with oiled paper and cook in the
oven, small molds twenty-five minutes, a large mold thirty-five. Serve hot,
with cream mushroom sauce.

This quantity in small molds should serve twelve people; in a large mold,
ten.

CREAM MUSHROOM SAUCE

1 can of mushrooms
2 level tablespoonfuls of butter
1/2 pint of milk
2 level tablespoonfuls of flour
1/2 teaspoonful of salt
1 saltspoonful of pepper

Rub the butter and flour together, and add the milk, stir until boiling,
add the seasoning, and the mushrooms, cut into halves. When hot it is ready
to use.

COLD DISHES

POULET EN BELLEVUE

1/2 box of gelatin
1 pint of chicken stock
1 bay leaf
1 onion
The white meat of two chickens
Salt and pepper

Remove the white meat carefully from two boiled chickens; split the breasts
into halves, long ways. Cover the gelatin with a half cupful of cold water
to soak for a half hour. Add the seasonings to the stock or bouillon, bring
to a boil, add the gelatin, and if not clear, clarify with the white of an
egg. Add the juice of a lemon and strain. Take small oblong china or tin
molds, garnish the bottoms with fancy bits of good red pepper and chopped
truffles, baste over a little of the hot aspic, and let them stand until
very cold. Cool the remaining aspic, but do not allow it to become solid.
Put on top of each mold a half breast of chicken, dust with salt and
pepper, pour over the cold aspic and stand them aside over night. At
serving time dip the molds quickly into hot water, turn out the cutlets,
dish them on luncheon plates, and garnish with hearts of lettuce. Pass
mayonnaise dressing.

This will make eight molds and serve eight persons. Use the dark meat for
fricassee or stew of chicken.

TOMATOES a l'ALGERIENNE

The white meat of one chicken
24 perfect tomatoes
1/4 box of gelatin
1/2 pint of chicken stock
1/2 pint of cream
1 teaspoonful of anchovy paste
3 heads of fine lettuce
1/2 pint of mayonnaise

Peel the tomatoes, cut off the stem end and scoop out the hard portion and
the seeds; put the tomatoes on the ice. Put the meat of the chicken through
the meat grinder, season it with the anchovy paste, if you have it, and
salt and pepper. Soak the gelatin in a half cupful of cold water, add the
chicken stock, bring to a boil, add a half teaspoonful of salt, a dash of
pepper, and the juice of half a lemon. Mix a part of this with the chicken.
Whip the cream, stir it into the chicken mixture, and fill it into the
tomatoes, making them smooth on top. When the tomatoes are very cold and
the aspic is cool, but not thick, baste just a little over the top, dust
thickly with chopped parsley and finely chopped almonds, and stand them in
a cold place for several hours. Arrange each tomato in a little nest of
lettuce leaves, and pass with them mayonnaise dressing. If these are made
well, they are the most sightly of the small cold dishes, and cost almost
nothing.

This, of course, will be served to twenty-four persons.

Tongue, sardines, lobster, crab meat or cold left-over meat may be
substituted for chicken.

GALANTINE OF CHICKEN

2 chickens
1/2 pound of boiled ham
1/4 pound of larding pork
1 can of mushrooms
2 teaspoonfuls of salt
1 egg
1 pound of lean veal
2 truffles
Salt and pepper

Singe the chickens, and remove the head and feet; place the chicken on the
table with the breast down. Take a small, sharp-pointed sabatier knife and
cut the skin from neck to rump right down the back bone. Carefully and
slowly run the knife between the bones and the flesh, keeping it always
close to the bone. Take out first the wings, then loosen the carcass, and
then take out the legs. Unjoint and separate each bone, and take it out as
you come to it. Do not take the small bones from the wings; they may be
cut off. When you have removed all the flesh from the bones, keeping it
perfectly whole, and without breaking the skin, wipe the skin and put it on
the table; draw the legs and the wings inside. Take all the raw meat from
the other chicken, rejecting the skin and bones, but you do not have to
bone this one carefully. Put it in the meat grinder, with half the ham, all
the veal and half the bacon. When chopped, season it with two teaspoonfuls
of salt, and two saltspoonfuls of white pepper; add the egg and mix
thoroughly. Put a thin layer of this into the boned chicken, put in here
and there long pieces of the remaining ham and bacon, a layer of mushrooms,
blocks of truffles, then another layer of the forcemeat, and so continue
until you have used all the ingredients. Pull up the skin and sew it down
the back, making a perfect roll. Tie the neck and rump. Roll this in cheese
cloth, fasten it securely, and sew the cheese cloth so that the roll will
be perfect when done.

Put all the bones in the soup kettle, add a sliced onion, a bay leaf,
and sufficient cold water to come just to the top of the bones. Bring to
boiling point, and put in the "galantine," as the chicken roll is called.
Cover the kettle, and boil continuously for four hours. When done, slightly
cool, remove the cloth, and stand it away until perfectly cold. Strain the
water, which should measure two quarts; add to it a box of gelatin that has
been soaked in a cupful of water for an hour. Bring this to boiling point,
season it with salt and pepper, add the juice of a lemon and the whites
of two eggs, slightly beaten. Boil five minutes, and strain through two
thicknesses of cheese cloth. Select a long round pudding mold, or a regular
boned chicken mold, something like a large melon mold; baste the mold
inside with this liquid jelly, decorate it in patterns or unconventional
designs, using green and red pepper, the hard boiled white of egg and peas.
Allow the remaining jelly to cool, but not stiffen. After you finish the
decorations, baste them carefully with, cold gelatin and stand the mold on
ice. Then put in a little more cold jelly, until you have a good base upon
which to rest the "galantine." Put it in, breast side down, and pour over
the remaining gelatin. Stand in a cold place for twenty-four hours. When
ready to serve, wipe the mold with a warm cloth, and turn the "galantine"
on to a long platter. Garnish the platter with hearts of lettuce. To serve,
cut the "galantine" in the thinnest possible slices, and serve it with a
salad, either celery, or mixed vegetables, or plain lettuce; or it may be
served with a sauce tartar or plain mayonnaise dressing. This is one of the
most elegant of cold dishes, and will serve twenty-five persons.

CHICKEN MOUSSE

1 pint of cooked chopped chicken
1/2 pint of milk
2 level tablespoonfuls of butter
1 teaspoonful of salt
1 level tablespoonful of flour
1 tablespoonful of granulated gelatin
1 saltspoonful of white pepper
1/2 pint of cream

Rub the butter and the flour together over the fire, add the milk, stir
until boiling, and add the gelatin that has been soaked in a couple of
tablespoonfuls of cold water for fifteen minutes. Add the salt, pepper and
chicken, mix thoroughly and stand it aside to cool. Beat the cream to a
stiff froth. Make a half cupful of mayonnaise from the yolk of one egg
and eight tablespoonfuls of olive oil; stir the cream gradually into the
mayonnaise and then add it carefully to the cold chicken mixture. Turn it
into an ordinary melon pudding mold, cover closely and stand it in a bucket
of cracked ice and salt. It is wise to bind the cover seam to keep out the
salt water. When slightly frozen, which will take about two hours, remove
the lid, turn out the mousse, cover the top with first a ring of hard
boiled whites, chopped fine, then a ring of finely chopped parsley, inside
this a ring of the yolks of the eggs pressed through a sieve, and right in
the centre a sprig of curly parsley. Send at once to the table. Lobster,
crab flakes and cold roasted game may be used according to this recipe.

This will serve eight persons at a reception. At a luncheon only six
persons.

PATE-DE-FOIE-GRAS IN ASPIC

1 box of granulated gelatin
1 teaspoonful of beef extract
1 small onion
1 bay leaf
1 blade of mace
1 truffle
1 carrot
1 green pepper
1 red pepper
1 lemon
1 tureen of foie-gras

Cover the gelatin with a half cupful of cold water to soak for a half hour.
Put all the vegetables and seasoning in one quart of cold water, bring to
boiling point, simmer gently twenty minutes, add the beef extract, one
teaspoonful of salt and a saltspoonful of black pepper. Add the gelatin,
stir until the gelatin is dissolved, and strain. Add the juice of the lemon
and the whites of two eggs, slightly beaten. Bring to boiling point, boil
rapidly for five minutes, and strain through two thicknesses of cheese
cloth. Cut the peppers into fancy shapes. Chop the truffle fine. Select a
dozen dariole molds, moisten them in cold water, baste them with the aspic,
and, when cold, garnish the bottoms handsomely with a pepper and truffle.
Put in another layer of aspic, which must be cold, but not thick; on top
of this place a slice of pate-de-foie-gras, cover them carefully with the
aspic, filling the mold to the top. Stand these away over night. Serve
on crisp lettuce leaves, and pass with them a mayonnaise. These are the
handsomest of all the cold aspic dishes.

A single large mold may be used for ball suppers or large receptions. To
serve, cut it into slices, and pass mayonnaise of celery.

This will serve twelve persons.

BONED TURKEY

Turkey is boned precisely the same as you bone a "galantine" of chicken.
Use for the stuffing:

2 chickens
1 pound of sausage meat
1 pound of veal
3 truffles
1 can of mushrooms
1 pound of ham

Take six hours to cook the turkey. When cold put it in a boned turkey mold
that has been garnished, and fill with aspic.

Cut in very thin slices to serve thirty persons.

BONED QUAIL

Purchase twenty-four quails. Split them down the back and remove the bones,
keeping your knife close to the bone. Do not break the skin nor tear the
flesh. Spread them out, skin side down, on a board and stuff them with the
seasoned sausage meat. Put them into shape, sew them down the back, cover
the breast of each with a slice of bacon, put them in a baking pan, add a
half pint of hot stock, and bake in a quick oven forty minutes, dusting
with pepper and basting frequently. When cold, remove the string from the
back.

For a dozen quails use:

1 box of gelatin
1 quart of milk
1 tablespoonful of grated onion
2 truffles
4 level tablespoonfuls of butter
4 level tablespoonfuls of flour
2 teaspoonfuls of salt
1 saltspoonful of white pepper

Soak the gelatin in the milk a half hour. Rub the butter and flour
together, then add the milk and gelatin, stir until boiling, and add all
the seasoning and strain. Stand aside until cool, but not thick. Place the
birds on a tin sheet or a large platter, and baste them with this cold
white sauce. As soon as the first basting has hardened, baste them again.
This time decorate the breasts with the truffles cut into fancy shapes.
To serve, arrange them around a large mound of mayonnaise of celery. Use
either a meat platter, or two round chop dishes. Have the breasts of the
birds down, and the back slightly pressed into the salad. In between each
bird put a pretty bunch of curly parsley, and garnish the top of the mound
with Spanish peppers cut into strips. Serve one to each person.

SALADS

Salads play a most important part in all conventional suppers. Chicken,
lobster, crab, duck, tongue, and lamb salad take the place of other meats,
although for a large supper there is no objection to serving a meat salad
following a hot course. If one can make a good mayonnaise dressing, salads
are the easiest of all refreshments, and are most acceptable to the guests.

MAYONNAISE

Put the yolks of three eggs in a clean cold dish, beat slightly and add
slowly, almost drop by drop, a half pint or more of salad oil. After adding
the first half pint, add a half teaspoonful of vinegar now and then to
prevent breaking. You may add a quart of oil, if you like; you may serve it
plain, or stir in at the last moment stiffly whipped cream. One quart of
mayonnaise will hold one quart of whipped cream. For light colored salads,
as sweetbread and Waldorf, it is well to use the whipped cream slightly
colored with a drop of vegetable green.

SAUCE TARTAR

Add to a half pint of mayonnaise dressing a tablespoonful of chopped
gherkin, the same of chopped parsley, four chopped olives and a
tablespoonful of capers.

SAUCE SUEDOISE

1/2 pint of mayonnaise
1/2 pint of cream
2 tablespoonfuls of finely grated horseradish

Whip the cream and drain it, then stir it carefully into the mayonnaise,
and at last add the horseradish. This sauce is appropriate to serve with
boned partridges or quail, and is also nice to serve with mixed cold meats.

FRENCH DRESSING

Put eight tablespoonfuls of oil in a bowl, add a half teaspoonful of salt,
and a piece of ice the size of an egg. Work the ice with the oil until the
salt is thoroughly dissolved, then add a tablespoonful of tarragon vinegar
and a drop of Tabasco sauce. Remove the ice, beat rapidly until you have
a creamy dressing, and use at once. French dressing should be used over
cucumber or tomato molds, and is nice with fish or chicken mousse and East
Indian Salad.

CUCUMBER MOLDS

2 good sized cucumbers
1/2 box of gelatin
1 pint of chicken stock
1 teaspoonful of salt
1 tablespoonful of onion juice
1 saltspoonful of pepper
The juice of one lemon

Peel and grate the cucumbers. Add the gelatin to the stock, soak for twenty
minutes, bring to a boil and add the seasoning; then stir in the drained
cucumber. Turn into small round timbale cups and stand aside to harden.
Serve with any cold fish dish, as cold boiled slice of halibut, or fish in
aspic. These are nice for Sunday night supper with broiled sardines.

TOMATO MOLDS

1 can of tomatoes
1 box of gelatin
1 onion
1 saltspoonful of celery seed
1 bay leaf
1 blade of mace
2 tablespoonfuls of tarragon vinegar
1 teaspoonful of paprika
2 teaspoonfuls of salt

Cover the gelatin with a cupful of cold water to soak for fifteen minutes.
Add all the seasoning to the tomatoes, bring to boiling point, add the
gelatin, and strain. Turn into twelve small tomato molds and stand aside to
harden. Serve with mayonnaise dressing as an accompaniment to boned chicken
or turkey, or chicken pate, or alone, with mayonnaise, as a complete salad.
Chopped celery, a little cold cooked meat or nuts may be added, when the
molds are to be served as a salad. With this addition, one half the recipe
will serve twelve persons.

CRABS RAVIGOT

Purchase as many crab shells as you have people to serve. To each six allow
a pint of crab flakes. If you buy the crabs fresh, twelve crabs will serve
six people. Squeeze over the flakes the juice of one lemon, add a half
teaspoonful of salt and a dash of Tabasco. Fill the meat loosely into the
shells, place each shell on a pretty paper doily on a plate, and spread
over a thick layer of mayonnaise dressing, with which you have mixed a
tablespoonful of chopped parsley, a tablespoonful of tarragon leaves, a
tablespoonful of chopped onion or shallot, and a tablespoonful of green
chives.

CHICKEN SALAD

Cut cold boiled chicken into dice, add an equal quantity of tender celery,
season with salt, pepper and lemon juice, mix with mayonnaise dressing, and
serve on lettuce leaves.

A four pound chicken, and six heads of tender celery, three heads of
lettuce, a half pint of whipped cream, and one pint of mayonnaise, will
serve fifteen persons.

LOBSTER SALAD

Cut cold boiled lobster into cubes of an inch, mix with mayonnaise dressing
and serve on lettuce leaves.

One three-pound lobster will serve six persons.

CRAB SALAD

Season crab flakes with salt, pepper and lemon juice, mix them with
mayonnaise dressing, and serve on lettuce leaves, garnished with cress.

One pint of flakes will serve six persons.

TONGUE SALAD

Cut fresh-cooked beef's tongue or calf's tongue into dice. Have ready
peeled perfectly round smooth tomatoes, take out the core and scoop out
the seeds. Fill each tomato with the cubes of tongue, sprinkle over a
teaspoonful of lemon juice and a little salt and pepper. Stand these on
nests of lettuce leaves, put on top of each a large tablespoonful of
mayonnaise. Dust thickly with paprika and serve one to each person.

LAMB SALAD

Cut cold boiled lamb into dice, mix with it half the quantity of freshly
cooked green peas or canned peas. Add a half can of mushrooms, chopped
fine, salt, pepper and lemon juice. Mix with mayonnaise dressing and serve
on lettuce leaves, garnished with large sprigs of mint. Cap the top of the
dish with a good sized sprig of fresh mint, and sprinkle capers all over
the salad.

A nice plain lamb salad is made by mixing left-over cold lamb with
mayonnaise; serve on lettuce leaves and garnish with chopped mint.

A quart will serve ten persons.

TOMATOES EN SURPRISE

This is one of the nicest of the salads for a simple card party. It takes
the place of both vegetables and meat, and with brown bread and nut
sandwiches as an accompaniment, is very attractive. Peel the tomatoes, cut
off the stem end and scoop out the core and seeds. Fill the tomatoes with
either crab flakes, chopped lobster, canned salmon, or sardines. Squeeze
over a little lemon juice, and dust with salt and pepper. Turn them
upside down on a nest of lettuce leaves, and cover the tomato with creamy
mayonnaise.

SWEETBREAD SALAD

2 pairs of sweetbreads
4 ounces of almonds
4 ounces of pecan meats
2 ounces of shelled Brazilian nuts
2 Spanish peppers
1/2 can of mushrooms
2 heads of celery
2 heads of lettuce
1 pint of mayonnaise
1 pint of cream
1 can of French peas

This is the most elaborate of all salads, is palatable and comparatively
wholesome. Put the sweetbreads into boiling water, add a tablespoonful of
vinegar, and simmer gently for one hour. When cold, remove the membrane and
pick the sweetbreads apart. Put them in a bowl, cover them with an onion,
sliced, and squeeze over the juice of a lemon; cover the bowl and stand it
aside over night. Blanch and chop the almonds, and chop the pecans. Remove
the onion from the sweetbreads, mix in the nuts, add the white portions of
the celery, cut the size of the sweetbreads. Add the mushrooms, sliced, two
teaspoonfuls of salt, a saltspoonful of white pepper and a saltspoonful
of paprika. Add the cream, whipped, to the mayonnaise, and mix a portion
of it with the sweetbreads and celery. Have a round shallow salad bowl
lined with the lettuce leaves, turn in the centre the sweetbread salad and
cover it over with the remaining quantity of mayonnaise. Put the peas in
a ring around the base of the salad, and cap the top with the yolk of a
hard-boiled egg. Cut the white of the egg into eighths and press them
upside down around the yolk, forming a sort of a daisy. Cut the Spanish
peppers into rings and arrange them just above the peas. Put here and there
around the base, above the peas, ripe or green olives, and send to the
table.

This will serve at supper or luncheon ten persons.

ROAST BEEF SALAD

For impromptu evening affairs any cold left-over meat may be utilized in
a salad. Beef, mutton and tongue are usually served with French dressing,
seasoned with tomato catsup. Cut the meat into dice, season with salt and
pepper, dish them on lettuce, or they may be mixed in the winter with
chopped celery or chopped crisp cabbage, and basted with French dressing,
seasoned with two or three tablespoonfuls of tomato catsup for beef, mint
sauce, or a drop of Tabasco Sauce for mutton, a little Worcestershire Sauce
for tongue.

A quart will serve ten persons.

EAST INDIAN SALAD

This is purely a vegetable salad; it is exceedingly nice for a simple
evening affair. Shave sufficient cabbage to make a pint, soak it in cold
water for one hour, changing the water once or twice. Cover a half box of
gelatin with a half cupful of cold water to soak for a half hour. Put a
half can of tomatoes in a saucepan, add one onion, chopped, a teaspoonful
of salt, a saltspoonful of pepper and the juice of a lemon, or two
tablespoonfuls of vinegar. Bring to boiling point, and add the gelatin.
Cover the bottom of a large melon mold with finely chopped celery or cooked
carrots, put on top of this a few drops of onion juice, then a thin layer
of cabbage, a dusting of salt and pepper, then a goodly quantity of India
relish; cover this over with chopped nuts, pecans, hickory or peanuts, then
another layer of celery, and so continue until the mold is full, seasoning
the layers with salt and pepper. Have the last layer chopped celery. Strain
over this the tomato aspic, which should be cold, but not thick, and stand
aside for four or five hours. Serve plain, or garnished with lettuce leaves
or cress.

This will serve twelve persons.

POTATO SALAD

Fancy potato salad may be served for an evening affair with an
accompaniment of cold tongue, or it may be garnished with hard-boiled
eggs and form the entire course. Serve with it brown bread and butter and
coffee.

4 potatoes
8 tablespoonfuls of olive oil
2 tablespoonfuls of cream
2 tablespoonfuls of tarragon vinegar
1 level teaspoonful of salt
1 saltspoonful of pepper

Wash the potatoes and boil them with skins on. The moment they are done,
drain the water, dry and peel. Put the oil, salt, pepper and vinegar in
a bowl, beat rapidly until thoroughly mixed, and then add one good sized
onion, sliced very thin, or use two tablespoonfuls of grated onion. Put in
the hot potatoes, sliced, toss them a moment, and if you have it, sprinkle
over two tablespoonfuls of vinegar from pickled walnuts, or a tablespoonful
of mushroom catsup. Stand aside to cool. When ready to serve, turn on to a
cold platter, garnish with chopped parsley, and, if you have them, chopped
pickled beets.

This is sufficient for six persons.

FRENCH POTATO SALAD

Moisten a teaspoonful of cornstarch in four tablespoonfuls of milk, add
two tablespoonfuls of cream and stir over hot water until thick; then add
gradually six tablespoonfuls of olive oil, a teaspoonful of French made
mustard, a level teaspoonful of salt and a saltspoonful of pepper. Boil
four potatoes, cut them into blocks, and, when nearly cold, mix them with
this dressing, and stand aside until very cold. Serve with a garnish of
chopped celery or lettuce leaves.

This will serve six persons.

MACEDOINE SALAD

A mixture of vegetables, peas, beans, carrots, turnips, can be purchased,
canned, at any grocery store. Drain, wash them in cold water, dish them
on a bed of shaved cabbage or lettuce leaves, and cover them with French
dressing. All these vegetables may be cooked at home and used cold. String
beans garnished with carrots make an excellent salad.

BANANA SALAD

For this use the red bananas. Roll them out of the skin rather than strip
the skin from them, and cut them into slices a half inch thick. Cover the
bottom of your salad bowl with crisp lettuce leaves, then put over the
bananas, allowing one banana to each two persons. Squeeze over the juice of
a lemon, and, when ready to serve, baste with French dressing.

APPLE AND NUT SALAD

4 tart apples
1 cupful of pecan meats
24 blanched almonds
2 sweet Spanish peppers
The rule for French dressing

Peel the apples, cut them into dice, squeeze over the juice of one or two
lemons, and stand them aside until wanted. The lemon juice will prevent
discoloration. Chop the nuts. At serving time line the salad bowl with
a layer of chopped celery or cabbage or lettuce leaves, then a layer of
apples, nuts, celery, apples and nuts. Baste with the French dressing, and,
if you have them, garnish with the sweet peppers cut into strips, and use
at once.

This, using a pint of chopped cabbage or celery, will serve six persons.

CANTALOUPE SALAD

This is the newest and most sightly of salads. Arrange crisp lettuce or
Romaine leaves on individual plates. Cut a cold ripe cantaloupe into
halves, take out the seeds, and with a large vegetable scoop or teaspoon
scoop out balls or egg-shaped pieces. Heap a half dozen of these on the
lettuce leaves, and, at serving time, baste them well with French dressing,
and serve. Watermelon may be substituted for cantaloupe.

SANDWICHES

Sandwiches may be made from thin white bread, or whole wheat bread, or
Boston brown bread, or nut bread. A nut loaf is easily made at short
notice, and needs only butter to make an excellent sandwich. An endless
variety of sandwiches may be made from materials always at hand.

For CHEESE SANDWICHES: Grind or mash common American cheese, add a
palatable seasoning of tomato catsup, Worcestershire sauce, and a little
melted butter. A teaspoonful of these will be sufficient for a quarter of
a pound of cheese. Put this between thin slices of unbuttered bread. If
a large quantity of sandwiches is to be made, beat the butter to a cream
before using it.

MEATS: All sorts of meats, just a little left over, may be chopped,
seasoned and utilized for sandwiches. If the meat is slightly moistened
with a little olive oil, cream or melted butter, and the sandwiches are
wrapped in a damp cloth, as soon as made, and closed in a tin bread box,
they will keep nicely for several hours.

On a warm day put a few moist lettuce leaves on top of the sandwiches,
under the cloth, and put the box in a cold place.

CANNED SALMON, SARDINES, or BOILED SALT COD, pounded and nicely seasoned
with oil and lemon juice, or mayonnaise, make nice sandwiches to serve with
molded tomato jelly, and coffee, for a "winter evening." They are quite
enough with coffee alone in an emergency.

NUT SANDWICHES are made by putting chopped nuts or nut butter between thin
slices of buttered bread, or crackers.

SWEET SANDWICHES are made by putting a mixture of chopped fruits between
thin slices of buttered bread. The fruits best suited for sandwiches are
dates, raisins, candied ginger and cherries, and washed figs. These may be
used separately or blended, using less ginger than other fruits. A nice
filling may be made from a half pound of dates, an ounce of ginger, and ten
cents' worth of roasted peanuts, or a quarter of a pound of pecans. Put
these through a meat chopper, add the juice of an orange, and pack the
mixture in jelly tumblers. Keep in a cold place. This will keep a month in
winter, and equally long in a refrigerator in summer.

Sweet sandwiches are usually cut into "fingers," or into rounds with an
ordinary biscuit cutter.

HONOLULU SANDWICHES are made by rubbing one roll of Neufchatel cheese with
a half cupful of grated apple, two sweet Spanish peppers, and twenty-four
blanched and chopped almonds. Add salt and a drop of Tabasco sauce. Spread
between thin slices of unbuttered bread.

JELLY OR CANNED FRUIT SANDWICHES are made by spreading jelly or mashed
fruit, drained, on a very thin slice of buttered bread. Trim off the crusts
and roll quickly. Tie with baby ribbon, or press it firmly together. These
are usually served with chocolate or tea.

CHICKEN SALAD OR CELERY MAYONNAISE SANDWICHES are usually served with
coffee, and can be made quickly by mixing any left-over chicken, or tender
white celery, with mayonnaise, and putting the mixture between thin slices
of buttered bread. A lettuce leaf on the bread first holds the salad
nicely. One may use two lettuce leaves if necessary.

NUT BREAD

2 cupfuls of flour
1/2 cupful of chopped nuts
2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder
1 cupful of milk
1 egg
2 tablespoonfuls of sugar
1/2 teaspoonful of salt

Sift the salt, baking powder and flour together, add and mix in the nuts
and sugar. Beat the egg, add the milk, and stir these in the flour. Mix
well, and turn it in a greased bread pan. Cover, and allow it to stand
fifteen minutes. Bake in a moderately quick oven a half hour. Pecans,
hickory nuts, peanuts, or English walnuts may be used.

Use the next day after it is baked. Cut thin, butter lightly, and press two
slices together. Serve whole, or cut into halves. Do not remove the crusts.

SUGGESTIONS FOR CHURCH SUPPERS

NUT MEAT ROLL

1 pound of chopped beef
1 quart of roasted peanuts in shells
1 teaspoonful of salt
1 saltspoonful of pepper
3 shredded wheat biscuits
2 eggs
1 tablespoonful onion juice
1 tablespoonful of parsley

Shell and chop the peanuts, mix them with the meat, and add the shredded
wheat rubbed fine; salt, pepper, parsley, chopped, and onion juice. Mix
well. Beat the egg slightly, add three tablespoonfuls of water, and mix
this into the meat. Form in a roll about eight inches long, roll in oiled
paper, place it in a baking pan, add a half cupful of water to the pan and
bake in a moderate oven three-quarters of an hour. Remove the paper and
stand aside to cool. Serve in thin slices with either tomato or potato
salad.

This will serve eight persons at a cost of about four cents each.

JELLIED VEAL

3 knuckles of veal
4 onions
1 carrot
3 teaspoonfuls of salt
8 tablespoonfuls of vinegar
6 gherkins
1 teaspoonful of black pepper

Wash the knuckles, remove the meat and cut it in pieces. Put the bones in a
kettle, the meat on top, and pour over six quarts of cold water. Bring to a
boil, skim, and simmer gently two hours. Add the onion sliced, the carrot
chopped, salt and pepper, and simmer one hour longer. Drain in a colander.
Dip long molds, or ordinary bread pans, in cold water, cover the bottom
with slices of hard boiled eggs, put the meat in bits on top of this,
seasoning it with a little salt. Slice the gherkins and put them in layers
between the meat. Strain the liquid, add the vinegar, and pour it over the
meat. There should be just enough to cover it nicely. If there is more
than this, boil it down before adding vinegar. Stand aside over night.
When cold, dip the mold a second in boiling water, and turn the jelly in a
platter. Serve cut in slices, with either a nice cold slaw, or cabbage and
celery salad. Jellied beef is made the same, substituting a leg or shin of
beef.

This will cost about seventy five cents, and will make twenty-five to
thirty slices.

BAGGED VEAL

2 pounds of lean ham
4 pounds of veal cutlet
3 shredded wheat biscuits
2 eggs
2 onions
1 teaspoonful of powdered sage
1/2 teaspoonful of allspice
1 teaspoonful of salt
1/2 teaspoonful of black pepper

Put the meat, raw, through a meat chopper, add the biscuits crumbed, the
onions grated, and all the seasonings. Work it well with the hands, and mix
in the eggs, slightly beaten. Pack the mixture in clean salt bags or bags
about that size, plunge them in a kettle of boiling water, boil rapidly ten
minutes, and simmer three hours. When cool, turn the bags wrong side out
off the meat. Serve sliced like summer sausage.

This will cost one and a half dollars, and will serve twenty five persons.

A SPANISH STEW FOR ONE HUNDRED PERSONS

25 pounds of round of beef
6 sweet peppers, or
1 can of Spanish pimentos
12 sweet turnips
1/2 bottle of Worcestershire sauce
1 cupful of flour
1 pound of suet
10 large onions
3 gallon cans of peas
12 carrots
1 jar of beef extract
4 tablespoonfuls of salt
4 tablespoonfuls of cornstarch
1/4 pound of butter

Put the suet into a large kettle or in two smaller ones; try it out and
remove the crackling. Add to the hot fat the onions and peppers chopped
fine. Shake until they are well cooked and slightly browned. Add the
meat cut into cubes of one inch, cover the kettles and cook a half hour,
stirring now and then. Dissolve the beef extract in three gallons of hot
water, pour it over the meat, and simmer for two hours. Add the carrots
and turnips cut into dice, and more water if necessary, and cook one hour
longer. Add the flour and cornstarch moistened in cold water, and all the
seasonings. Stir and boil ten minutes, add the peas, drained, and serve.
This is nice garnished with small hot milk biscuits. Taste before serving
it, to see if you have added sufficient salt.

VEAL ROLL

4 pounds of lean veal
3 shredded wheat biscuits
1 teaspoonful of salt
1/2 teaspoonful of sage
1/2 pound of lean ham
2 eggs
1 tablespoonful of parsley
1 saltspoonful of pepper

Put the veal and ham through a meat chopper, add all the seasonings, and
the biscuits rubbed fine. Mix thoroughly, add the egg slightly beaten, mix
again, and form into a roll three inches in diameter. Roll in oiled paper,
place in a baking pan, cover the bottom of the pan with hot water, add a
slice of onion, and, if you have it, a little chopped celery tops. Bake
slowly one and a half hours, basting over the paper every fifteen minutes.
When done, remove the paper, and put in a cold place. Serve in thin slices
with tomato jelly salad.

This will cost about one dollar and will serve eighteen persons.

MAN-OF-WAR SALAD

For twenty-five persons, chop sufficient hard white cabbage to make two
quarts. Cover it with cold water, let it soak for an hour, and then wash
it through several cold waters, and dry it in a towel. Cover three boxes
of gelatin with a pint of cold water to soak a half hour. Open three cans
of tomatoes, put them in a saucepan with four chopped onions, a cupful of
chopped celery tops, if you have them, bring to a boil, add the juice of
a lemon, a level tablespoonful of salt, ten drops of Tabasco sauce, the
juice of a lemon, or two tablespoonfuls of vinegar, and the gelatin. Stir
a moment, and press through a sieve. Dip bread pans or melon molds in cold
water, put in a layer of cabbage, then a very thin layer of Indian relish,
then cabbage, and so continue until the molds are filled. Pour over the
tomato jelly, cold, and stand aside over night. Serve in slices with cooked
or French dressing.

COOKED DRESSING

Put a pint of milk over the fire in a double boiler, add three level
tablespoonfuls of cornstarch moistened in a little cold milk. Cook until
thick and smooth. Take from the fire, add the beaten yolks of four eggs,
and work in slowly two tablespoonfuls of butter. Add a teaspoonful of salt
and a saltspoonful of pepper. When cool add the juice of a lemon or four
tablespoonfuls of vinegar. Fold in carefully the well-beaten whites of the
eggs, and stand aside until very cold.

GRANDMOTHER'S POTATO SALAD

Boil ten large potatoes in their jackets. Peel them and, when cool, cut
eight into dice. Peel and mash the remaining two while hot; add to them a
quarter pound of sweet butter, four tablespoonfuls of grated onion, two
teaspoonfuls of salt, a dash of cayenne, two drops of Tabasco sauce, and
press through a fine sieve. Hard boil two eggs; rub the yolks to a paste,
and add two raw yolks. When smooth, add to these gradually the potato
mixture. Thin to the consistency of good mayonnaise, with vinegar. At
serving time mix the potato blocks and one can of drained peas with the
dressing, being very careful not to break them. Dish on lettuce leaves,
and garnish with chopped red beets, or, better, chopped celery. This is an
excellent cheap salad, and will serve fifteen persons.

SALMON PUDDING

Remove the bone, skin and oil from two pound cans of salmon. Boil together
two cupfuls of white bread crumbs and one cupful of milk. Take from
the fire, and add one cupful of boiled rice, a teaspoonful of salt, a
saltspoonful of pepper, a teaspoonful of onion juice, and four eggs
slightly beaten. Mix and work in the fish. Press the whole through a
colander, and pack it at once into a mold. Cover and steam three-quarters
of an hour. Serve hot with cream sauce. This will serve twelve persons.

NUT CAKE

At suppers where the yolks of eggs are used for mayonnaise or cooked
dressing, the whites accumulate and are lost if not used in some white
cake.

1/2 cupful of butter
2 cupfuls of flour
1-1/2 cupfuls of sugar
3/4 cupful of water
1 cupful of English walnut or hickory nut meats
2 rounding teaspoonfuls of baking powder
Whites of four eggs

Cream the butter, add the water and flour, alternately, beating all the
while. Beat the whites, add half of them to the mixture, then all the nuts,
chopped, then the baking powder, dry, and beat well. Fold in the remaining
whites. Bake in a round cake pan in a moderate oven three-quarters of an
hour. When cool, ice the top and decorate it with nut meats.

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