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Ice Creams, Water Ices, Frozen Puddings Together with by Mrs. S. T. Rorer

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Ice Creams, Water Ices, Frozen Puddings

Together with

Refreshments for all Social Affairs

by Mrs. S. T. Rorer

Author of Mrs. Rorer's New Cook Book, Philadelphia Cook Book, Canning and
Preserving, and other Valuable Works on Cookery

CONTENTS

FOREWORD

PHILADELPHIA ICE CREAMS

NEAPOLITAN ICE CREAMS

ICE CREAMS FROM CONDENSED MILK

FROZEN PUDDINGS AND DESSERTS

WATER ICES AND SHERBETS OR SORBETS

FROZEN FRUITS

FRAPPE

PARFAIT

MOUSSE

SAUCES FOR ICE CREAMS

REFRESHMENTS FOR AFFAIRS

Soups
Sweetbreads
Shell Fish Dishes
Poultry and Game Dishes
Cold Dishes
Salads
Sandwiches

SUGGESTIONS FOR CHURCH SUPPERS

FOREWORD

CONTAINING GENERAL DIRECTIONS FOR ALL RECIPES

In this book, Philadelphia Ice Creams, comprising the first group, are
very palatable, but expensive. In many parts of the country it is quite
difficult to get good cream. For that reason, I have given a group of
creams, using part milk and part cream, but it must be remembered that
it takes smart "juggling" to make ice cream from milk. By far better use
condensed milk, with enough water or milk to rinse out the cans.

Ordinary fruit creams may be made with condensed milk at a cost of about
fifteen cents a quart, which, of course, is cheaper than ordinary milk and
cream.

In places where neither cream nor condensed milk can be purchased, a fair
ice cream is made by adding two tablespoonfuls of olive oil to each quart
of milk. The cream for Philadelphia Ice Cream should be rather rich, but
not double cream.

If pure raw cream is stirred rapidly, it swells and becomes frothy, like
the beaten whites of eggs, and is "whipped cream." To prevent this in
making Philadelphia Ice Cream, one-half the cream is scalded, and when it
is _very_ cold, the remaining half of raw cream is added. This gives the
smooth, light and rich consistency which makes these creams so different
from others.

USE OF FRUITS

Use fresh fruits in the summer and the best canned unsweetened fruits in
the winter. If sweetened fruits must be used, cut down the given quantity
of sugar. Where acid fruits are used, they should be added to the cream
after it is partly frozen.

TIME FOR FREEZING

The time for freezing varies according to the quality of cream or milk or
water; water ices require a longer time than ice creams. It is not well to
freeze the mixtures too rapidly; they are apt to be coarse, not smooth, and
if they are churned before the mixture is icy cold they will be greasy or
"buttery."

The average time for freezing two quarts of cream should be ten minutes; it
takes but a minute or two longer for larger quantities.

DIRECTIONS FOR FREEZING

Pound the ice in a large bag with a mallet, or use an ordinary ice shaver.
The finer the ice, the less time it takes to freeze the cream. A four quart
freezer will require ten pounds of ice, and a quart and a pint of coarse
rock salt. You may pack the freezer with a layer of ice three inches thick,
then a layer of salt one inch thick, or mix the ice and salt in the tub and
shovel it around the freezer. Before beginning to pack the freezer, turn
the crank to see that all the machinery is in working order. Then open the
can and turn in the mixture that is to be frozen. Turn the crank slowly and
steadily until the mixture begins to freeze, then more rapidly until it is
completely frozen. If the freezer is properly packed, it will take fifteen
minutes to freeze the mixture. Philadelphia Ice Creams are not good if
frozen too quickly.

TO REPACK

After the cream is frozen, wipe off the lid of the can and remove the
crank; take off the lid, being very careful not to allow any salt to fall
into the can. Remove the dasher and scrape it off. Take a large knife or
steel spatula, scrape the cream from the sides of the can, work and pack
it down until it is perfectly smooth. Put the lid back on the can, and put
a cork in the hole from which the dasher was taken. Draw off the water,
repack, and cover the whole with a piece of brown paper; throw over a heavy
bag or a bit of burlap, and stand aside for one or two hours to ripen.

TO MOLD ICE CREAMS, ICES OR PUDDINGS

If you wish to pack ice cream and serve it in forms or shapes, it must be
molded after the freezing. The handiest of all of these molds is either the
brick or the melon mold.

After the cream is frozen rather stiff, prepare a tub or bucket of coarsely
chopped ice, with one-half less salt than you use for freezing. To each ten
pounds of ice allow one quart of rock salt. Sprinkle a little rock salt in
the bottom of your bucket or tub, then put over a layer of cracked ice,
another layer of salt and cracked ice, and on this stand your mold, which
is not filled, but is covered with a lid, and pack it all around, leaving
the top, of course, to pack later on. Take your freezer near this tub.
Remove the lid from the mold, and pack in the cream, smoothing it down
until you have filled it to overflowing. Smooth the top with a spatula or
limber knife, put over a sheet of waxed paper and adjust the lid. Have a
strip of muslin or cheese cloth dipped in hot paraffin or suet and quickly
bind the seam of the lid. This will remove all danger of salt water
entering the pudding. Now cover the mold thoroughly with ice and salt.

Make sure that your packing tub or bucket has a hole below the top of the
mold, so that the salt water will be drained off.

If you are packing in small molds, each mold, as fast as it is closed,
should be wrapped in wax paper and put down into the salt and ice. These
must be filled quickly and packed.

Molds should stand two hours, and may stand longer.

TO REMOVE ICE CREAMS, ICES AND PUDDINGS FROM MOLDS

Ice cream may be molded in the freezer; you will then have a perfectly
round smooth mold, which serves very well for puddings that are to be
garnished, and saves a great deal of trouble and extra expense for salt and
ice.

As cold water is warmer than the ordinary freezing mixture, after you lift
the can or mold, wipe off the salt, hold it for a minute under the cold
water spigot, then quickly wipe the top and bottom and remove the lid.
Loosen the pudding with a limber knife, hold the mold a little slanting,
give it a shake, and nine times out of ten it will come out quickly, having
the perfect shape of the can or mold. If the cream still sticks and refuses
to come out, wipe the mold with a towel wrung from warm water. Hot water
spoils the gloss of puddings, and unless you know exactly how to use it,
the cream is too much melted to garnish.

All frozen puddings, water ices, sherbets and sorbets are frozen and molded
according to these directions.

The quantities given in these recipes are arranged in equal amounts, so
that for a smaller number of persons they can be easily divided.

QUANTITIES FOR SERVING

Each quart of ice cream will serve, in dessert plates, four persons. In
stem ice cream dishes, silver or glass, it will serve six persons. A quart
of ice or sherbet will fill ten small sherbet stem glasses, to serve with
the meat course at dinner. This quantity will serve in lemonade glasses
eight persons.

PHILADELPHIA ICE CREAMS

BURNT ALMOND ICE CREAM

1 quart of cream
1/2 pound of sugar
4 ounces of sweet almonds
1 tablespoonful of caramel
1 teaspoonful of vanilla extract
4 tablespoonfuls of sherry

Shell, blanch and roast the almonds until they are a golden brown, then
grate them. Put half the cream and all the sugar over the fire in a double
boiler. Stir until the sugar is dissolved, take it from the fire, add the
caramel and the almonds, and, when cold, add the remaining pint of cream,
the vanilla and the sherry. Freeze as directed on page 7.

This quantity will serve eight persons.

APRICOT ICE CREAM

6 ounces of sugar
1 quart of cream
1 can of apricots or
1 quart of fresh apricots

If fresh apricots are used, take an extra quarter of a pound of sugar. Put
half the cream and all the sugar over the fire in a double boiler and stir
until the sugar is dissolved; take from the fire and, when cold, add the
remaining cream. Turn the mixture into the freezer, and, when frozen fairly
stiff, add the apricots after having been pressed through a colander.
Return the lid, adjust the crank, and turn it slowly for five minutes, then
remove the dasher and repack.

This quantity should serve ten persons.

BANANA ICE CREAM

1 quart of cream
6 large bananas
1/2 pound of sugar
1 teaspoonful of vanilla

Put half the cream and all the sugar over the fire and stir until the
sugar is dissolved; take from the fire, and, when perfectly cold, add the
remaining half of the cream. Freeze the mixture, and add the bananas mashed
or pressed through a colander. Put on the lid, adjust the crank, and turn
until the mixture is frozen rather hard.

This quantity will serve ten persons.

BISCUIT ICE CREAM

6 wine biscuits
1 quart of cream
1/2 pound of sugar
1 teaspoonful of vanilla

Grate and sift the biscuits. Scald half the cream and the sugar; when cold,
add the remaining cream and the vanilla, and freeze. When frozen, remove
the dasher, stir in the powdered biscuits, and repack to ripen.

This quantity will serve six persons.

APPLE ICE CREAM

4 large tart apples
1 quart of cream
1/2 pound of sugar
1 tablespoonful of lemon juice

Put half the cream and all the sugar over the fire and stir until the sugar
is dissolved. When the mixture is perfectly cold, freeze it and add the
lemon juice and the apples, pared and grated. Finish the freezing, and
repack to ripen.

The apples must be pared at the last minute and grated into the cream. If
they are grated on a dish and allowed to remain in the air they will turn
very dark and spoil the color of the cream.

BROWN BREAD ICE CREAM

3 half inch slices of Boston Brown Bread
1 quart of cream
1/2 pound of sugar
1 teaspoonful of vanilla or
1/4 of a vanilla bean or a teaspoonful of vanilla extract

Dry and toast the bread in the oven, grate or pound it, and put it through
an ordinary sieve. Heat half the cream and all the sugar; take from the
fire, add vanilla, and, when cold, add the remaining cream, and freeze.
When frozen, remove the dasher, stir in the brown bread, repack and stand
aside to ripen.

This quantity will serve six persons.

CARAMEL ICE CREAM, No. 1

1 quart of cream
1/2 pound of sugar
1 teaspoonful of vanilla

Put four tablespoonfuls of the sugar in an iron frying pan over a strong
fire, shake until the sugar melts, turns brown, smokes and burns; add
quickly a half cupful of water; let it boil a minute, take from the fire,
and put it, with all the sugar and half the cream, in a double boiler over
the fire. Stir until the sugar is dissolved, take from the fire, and, when
cold, add the remaining cream and vanilla, and freeze.

This quantity will serve six persons.

CARAMEL ICE CREAM, No. 2

1 quart of cream
1 pint of milk
1/2 cupful of brown sugar
1/2 pound of granulated sugar
2 teaspoonfuls of vanilla

Put the brown sugar in a frying pan over the fire, shake it until it melts,
burns and smokes. Take it from the fire and add two tablespoonfuls of
water; heat until the sugar is again melted, put it in a double boiler with
the milk and all the sugar, stir until the sugar is dissolved, and stand
aside to cool. When cold, add half the cream and the vanilla, and freeze.
When frozen sufficiently stiff to remove the dasher, stir in the remaining
pint of cream whipped to a stiff froth, repack and stand aside for three
hours.

This quantity will serve ten persons.

BISQUE ICE CREAM

1 quart of cream
1/4 pound of almond macaroons
4 kisses
1/2 pound of sugar
1 slice of stale sponge cake or
2 stale lady fingers
1 teaspoonful of caramel
1 teaspoonful of vanilla
If you use it, 4 tablespoonfuls of sherry

Pound the macaroons, kisses, lady fingers or sponge cake, and put them
through a colander. Put half the cream and all the sugar over the fire in
a double boiler; when the sugar is dissolved, stand the mixture aside to
cool; when cold, add the remaining cream, the caramel, sherry and vanilla.
Turn the mixture into the freezer, and, when frozen, add the pounded cakes;
stir the mixture until it is perfectly smooth and well mixed, and repack.
Bisque ice cream is better for a three hour stand.

This quantity will serve six persons.

CHOCOLATE ICE CREAM

1 quart of cream
1 pint of milk
1/2 pound of sugar
4 ounces of chocolate
1 teaspoonful of vanilla or 1/4 of a vanilla bean
1/4 of a teaspoonful of cinnamon

Grate the chocolate, put it in a double boiler with the milk; stir until
hot, and add the sugar, vanilla, cinnamon and one pint of the cream. When
cold, freeze; when frozen, remove the dasher and stir in the remaining pint
of the cream whipped to a stiff froth.

This will serve ten persons.

COFFEE ICE CREAM

1 quart of cream
1/2 pound of pulverized sugar
4 ounces of so-called Mocha coffee

Grind the Mocha rather coarse, put it in the double boiler with one half
the cream, and steep over the fire for at least ten minutes. Strain through
a fine muslin or flannel bag, pressing it hard to get out all the strength
of the coffee. Add the sugar and stir until dissolved; when cold, add the
remaining pint of cream and freeze.

This will serve six persons.

CURACAO ICE CREAM

1 quart of cream
1 wineglassful of curacao
1/2 pound of sugar
2 tablespoonfuls of orange blossoms water
Juice of two oranges

Put the sugar and half the cream over the fire in a double boiler. When the
sugar is dissolved, take it from the fire, and, when cold, add the curacao,
orange juice and orange blossoms water; add the remaining cream, and
freeze.

This will serve six persons.

GINGER ICE CREAM

1 quart of cream
1/4 pound of preserved ginger
1/2 pound of sugar
1 tablespoonful of lemon juice

Put the ginger through an ordinary meat chopper. Heat the sugar, ginger and
half the cream in a double boiler; when the sugar is dissolved, take it
from the fire, and, when cold, add the lemon juice and remaining cream, and
freeze.

MARASCHINO ICE CREAM

1 quart of cream
1/2 pound of sugar
1 orange
2 wineglassfuls of maraschino
2 drops of Angostura Bitters, or
1/2 teaspoonful of extract of wild cherry

Put the sugar and half the cream in a double boiler, and stir until the
sugar is dissolved. When cold, add the remaining cream, the juice of the
orange, the bitters or wild cherry, and the maraschino, and freeze.

Serve in parfait glasses to six persons.

LEMON ICE CREAM

1 quart of cream
9 ounces of powdered sugar
4 tablespoonfuls of lemon juice
Juice of one orange
Grated yellow rind of 3 lemons

Mix the sugar, the grated rind and juice of the lemons, and the orange
juice together. Put half the cream in a double boiler over the fire; when
scalding hot, stand it aside until perfectly cold; add the remaining half
of the cream and freeze it rather hard. Remove the crank and the lid, add
the sugar mixture, replace the lid and crank, and turn rapidly for five
minutes; repack to ripen.

This will serve six people.

ORANGE ICE CREAM

1 quart of cream
10 ounces of sugar
Juice of 6 large oranges
Grated rind of one orange

Put the sugar, grated yellow rind of the orange and half the cream in a
double boiler over the fire; when the sugar is dissolved, take from the
fire, and, when _very cold_, add the remaining cream, and freeze. When
frozen rather hard, add the orange juice, refreeze, and pack to ripen.

PINEAPPLE ICE CREAM

1 quart of cream
12 ounces of sugar
1 large ripe pineapple or
1 pint can of grated pineapple
Juice of one lemon

Put half the cream and half the sugar in a double boiler over the fire;
when the sugar is dissolved, stand it aside until cold. Pare and grate the
pineapple, add the remaining half of the sugar and stand it aside. When the
cream is cold, add the remaining cream, and partly freeze. Then add the
lemon juice to the pineapple and add it to the frozen cream; turn the
freezer five minutes longer, and repack.

This will serve eight or ten persons.

GREEN GAGE ICE CREAM

1 quart of cream
4 ounces of sugar
1 pint of preserved green gages, free from syrup

Press the green gages through a sieve. Add the sugar to half the cream,
stir it in a double boiler until the sugar is dissolved; when cold, add the
remaining cream. When this is partly frozen, stir in the green gage pulp,
and finish the freezing as directed on page 7.

If the green gages are colorless, add three or four drops of apple green
coloring to the cream before freezing.

RASPBERRY ICE CREAM

1 quart of cream
1 quart of raspberries
12 ounces of sugar
Juice of one lemon

Mash the raspberries; add half the sugar and the lemon juice. Put the
remaining sugar and half the cream in a double boiler; stir until the sugar
is dissolved, and stand aside to cool; when cold, add the remaining cream,
turn the mixture into the freezer, and stir until partly frozen. Remove the
lid and add the mashed raspberries, and stir again for five or ten minutes
until the mixture is sufficiently hard to repack.

This will serve eight or ten persons.

STRAWBERRY ICE CREAM

Make precisely the same as raspberry ice cream, substituting one quart of
strawberries for the raspberries.

PISTACHIO ICE CREAM

1 quart of cream
1/2 pound of sugar
1/2 pound of shelled pistachio nuts
1 teaspoonful of almond extract
10 drops of green coloring

Blanch and pound or grate the nuts. Put half the cream and all the sugar in
a double boiler; stir until the sugar is dissolved and stand aside to cool;
when cold, add the nuts, the flavoring and the remaining cream, mix, add
the coloring, and turn into the freezer to freeze.

If green coloring matter is not at hand, a little spinach or parsley may be
chopped and rubbed with a small quantity of alcohol.

This quantity will serve six persons,

VANILLA ICE CREAM

1 quart of cream
1/2 pound of sugar
1 vanilla bean or two teaspoonfuls of vanilla extract

Put the sugar and half the cream in a double boiler over the fire. Split
the vanilla bean, scrape out the seeds and add them to the hot cream, and
add the bean broken into pieces. Stir until the sugar is dissolved, and
strain through a colander. When this is cold, add the remaining cream and
freeze. This should be repacked and given two hours to ripen. Four would be
better.

This will serve six persons.

WALNUT ICE CREAM

1 quart of cream
1/2 pound of sugar
1 teaspoonful of vanilla
1 teaspoonful of caramel
1/2 pint of black walnut meats

Put the sugar and half the cream over the fire in a double boiler; when the
sugar is dissolved, stand it aside to cool. When cold, add the remaining
cream, the walnuts, chopped, and the flavoring, and freeze.

This will serve six persons.

NEAPOLITAN CREAMS

In this group we have a set of frozen desserts called by many "ice creams,"
but which are really frozen custards, flavored. In localities where cream
is not accessible, the Neapolitan Creams are far better than milk thickened
with cornstarch or gelatin.

CHOCOLATE

1 pint of cream
1 pint of milk
1/2 pound of sugar
4 eggs
2 ounces of chocolate
1 small piece of stick cinnamon
1 teaspoonful of vanilla

Put the milk and cinnamon over the fire in a double boiler. Beat the yolks
of the eggs and sugar until very light, add the well-beaten whites, and
stir this into the hot milk. As soon as the mixture begins to thicken, take
it from the fire, add the grated chocolate, and, when cold, add the cream
and the vanilla. Freeze and pack as directed on page 7.

This is sufficient to serve ten persons.

CARAMEL

1 pint of cream
1 pint of milk
1/2 pound of sugar
4 eggs
3 tablespoonfuls of caramel
1 teaspoonful of vanilla

Beat the yolks of the eggs until creamy and add the sugar; beat until
light, and then add the well-beaten whites of the eggs. Put the milk over
the fire in a double boiler; when hot, add the eggs, and stir and cook
until the mixture begins to thicken. Take from the fire, strain through a
fine sieve, add the vanilla and caramel, and, when cold, add the cream, and
freeze.

This will serve ten persons.

COFFEE

1 pint of strong black coffee
1 pint of cream
2 eggs
1/2 pound of sugar
1 teaspoonful of vanilla

Beat the sugar and the yolks of the eggs until light, add the well-beaten
whites, and pour into them the coffee, boiling hot. Stir over the fire for
a minute, take from the fire, add the vanilla, and, when cold, add the
cream, and freeze.

This will serve eight persons.

VANILLA

1 pint of cream
1 pint of milk
1/2 pound of sugar
3 eggs
1/4 vanilla bean or a teaspoonful of good extract

Put the milk over the fire in a double boiler, and add the vanilla bean,
split. Beat the yolks of the eggs and the sugar until light, add the whites
beaten to a stiff froth, and stir into them the hot milk. Return the
mixture to the double boiler and cook until it begins to thicken, or will
coat a knife blade dipped into it. Take from the fire, strain through a
colander, and, when cold, add the cream, and freeze. Repack and stand to
ripen for three hours or longer.

This will serve eight persons.

WALNUT

1 pint of cream
1 pint of milk
2 eggs
1/2 pint of chopped black walnuts
1 teaspoonful of vanilla
1 teaspoonful of caramel

Beat the yolks of the eggs and the sugar until light; add the well-beaten
whites, and then the milk, scalding hot. Stir over the fire in a double
boiler until the mixture begins to thicken; take from the fire and add the
vanilla and caramel. When cold, add the walnuts and cream, and freeze.

This will serve eight persons.

NEAPOLITAN BLOCKS

These are made by putting layers of various kinds and colors of ice creams
into a brick mold. Pack and freeze. At serving time, cut into slices
crosswise of the brick, and serve each slice on a paper mat.

ICE CREAMS FROM CONDENSED MILK

These creams are not so good as those made from raw cream, but with care
and good flavoring are quite as good as the ordinary Neapolitan Creams.

There is one advantage--condensed milk is not so liable to curdle when
mixed with fresh fruits. These recipes will answer also for what is sold
under the name of "Evaporated Cream." Use unsweetened milk, or allow for
the sugar in the sweetened varieties.

BANANA

6 large bananas
1/4 pound of sugar
1 half pint can of condensed milk
1/2 cupful of water
Juice of one lemon

Press the bananas through a sieve, and add the lemon juice and sugar. Stand
aside a half hour, add milk and water, stir until the sugar is dissolved,
and freeze as directed on page 7.

This will serve six persons.

CARAMEL

1/4 cupful of brown sugar
1/2 cupful of granulated sugar
1 cupful of water
2 half pint cans of condensed milk
1 teaspoonful of vanilla

Put the brown sugar in an iron pan, melt and brown it. When it begins to
smoke, add two tablespoonfuls of hot water. Stir until liquid. Pour out
the milk, rinse the cans with the water, add the caramel, vanilla and
granulated sugar. When the sugar is dissolved, freeze as directed on page
7.

This will serve six persons.

COCOANUT

2 large cocoanuts
1 pint of boiling water
1/2 pint can of sweetened condensed milk

Grate the cocoanuts and pour over them the boiling water. Stir until it is
cool, and press in a sieve. Put the fibre in a cheese cloth and wring it
dry; add this to the water that was strained through the sieve. When cold,
add condensed milk, and freeze as directed on page 7.

This will serve eight persons.

CHOCOLATE, No. 1

2 ounces of Baker's chocolate
1/2 pint of water
1 saltspoonful of ground cinnamon
2 half pint cans of condensed milk
1 teaspoonful of vanilla
1/4 pound of sugar

Put the water, chocolate, sugar and cinnamon in a saucepan; stir until
boiling. Take from the fire, add the vanilla and the condensed milk. When
cold, freeze as directed on page 7.

This will serve six persons.

CHOCOLATE, No. 2

4 ounces of Baker's chocolate
1/2 pint of water
1/2 pound of sugar
2 half pint cans of condensed milk
1 pint of milk
2 teaspoonfuls of vanilla
1 saltspoonful of ground cinnamon

Put the chocolate, sugar, water and cinnamon in a saucepan over the fire.
Stir until the mixture boils. Take from the fire, and add all the remaining
ingredients. When cold, freeze as directed on page 7.

This will serve eight persons.

COFFEE

1 pint of strong black coffee
1/2 cupful of sugar
1/2 pint can of condensed milk
1 teaspoonful of vanilla

Add the sugar to the hot coffee, and stir until it is dissolved; add the
milk, using water enough to rinse out the cans; add the vanilla. When the
mixture is cold, freeze, turning it rapidly toward the end of the freezing.

This will serve four persons.

PEACH

12 ripe or canned peaches
4 peach kernels
1/2 pint of water
2 half pint cans of unsweetened condensed milk
1/2 pound of sugar

Put the sugar, water and peach kernels over the fire; stir until the sugar
is dissolved, and boil three minutes. Pare the peaches and press them
through a colander, add to them the strained syrup. When cold, turn the
mixture into the freezer and turn the crank slowly until partly frozen; add
the milk, and continue the freezing.

Omit the water and use less sugar with canned peaches.

This will serve ten persons.

ORANGE, No. 1

1 full pint of orange juice
2/3 cupful of sugar
1/2 pint can of condensed milk
Grated yellow rind of two oranges

Grate the rinds into the sugar, add milk and enough water to rinse cans.
When sugar is dissolved, stand it in a cold place. Put orange juice in the
freezer and freeze it quite hard; add sweetened milk, and freeze again
quickly.

This will serve four persons.

ORANGE, No. 2

Freeze a full quart of orange juice. When quite hard, add a can of
sweetened condensed milk, freeze it again, and serve at once.

This is very nice and will serve eight persons.

ORANGE GELATIN CREAM

1/2 pint of orange juice
1 package of orange Jello
1/2 pound of sugar
1 pint can of unsweetened condensed milk
1/2 pint of water

Add the grated yellow rind of two oranges to the Jello; add the sugar and
the water, boiling. Stir until the sugar and Jello are dissolved, add the
orange juice, and when the mixture is cold, put it in the freezer and stir
slowly until it begins to freeze. Add the condensed milk, and continue the
freezing.

This is nice served in tall glasses, with the beaten whites of the eggs
made into a meringue and heaped on top.

In this way it will serve eight persons.

SOUR SOP

1 large sour sop
1/4 pound of sugar
1/2 pint can of unsweetened condensed milk
4 tablespoonfuls of boiling water
Juice of one lime

Squeeze the sour sop, which should measure nearly one quart; add the sugar
melted in the water with the lime juice and milk, and freeze slowly.

This will serve ten persons.

FROZEN PUDDINGS AND DESSERTS

ALASKA BAKE

Make a vanilla ice cream, one or two quarts, as the occasion demands. When
the ice cream is frozen, pack it in a brick mold, cover each side of the
mold with letter paper and fasten the bottom and lid. Wrap the whole in wax
paper and pack it in salt and ice; freeze for at least two hours before
serving time. At serving time, make a meringue from the whites of six eggs
beaten to a froth; add six tablespoonfuls of sifted powdered sugar and beat
until fine and dry. Turn the ice cream from the mold, place it on a serving
platter, and stand the platter on a steak board or an ordinary thick plank.
Cover the mold with the meringue pressed through a star tube in a pastry
bag, or spread it all over the ice cream as you would ice a cake. Decorate
the top quickly, and dust it thickly with powdered sugar; stand it under
the gas burners in a gas broiler or on the grate in a hot coal or wood oven
until it is lightly browned, and send it quickly to the table. There is no
danger of the ice cream melting if you will protect the under side of the
plate. The meringue acts as a nonconductor for the upper part.

A two quart mold with meringue will serve ten persons.

ALEXANDER BOMB

1 pint of cream
1 pint of milk
4 eggs
4 tart apples
1 pint of water
1 glassful of orange blossoms water
1 wineglassful of curacao
1 pound of sugar
Juice of one lemon

Peel, core and quarter the apples; put them in a saucepan with the grated
yellow rind of the lemon, half the sugar and all the water; boil until
tender, and add the juice of the lemon; rub the apples through a sieve.
When cold, freeze. Whip the cream. Beat the eggs and the remaining sugar
and add them to the milk, hot; stir until the mixture thickens, take from
the fire, and, when cold, add the orange blossoms water and the Curacao;
freeze in another freezer. Divide the whipped cream, and stir one-half into
the first and one-half into the other mixture. Line a melon mold with the
custard mixture, fill the centre space with the frozen apples, and cover
over another layer of the custard; put over a sheet of letter paper and
put on the lid. Bind the seam with a strip of muslin dipped in paraffin or
suet, and pack the mold in salt and ice; freeze for at least two hours.
Serve plain, or it may be garnished with whipped cream.

This will serve twelve persons.

BISCUITS AMERICANA

1 quart of cream
1/2 pound of sugar
1/4 pound of Jordan almonds
1 teaspoonful of almond extract
1 teaspoonful of vanilla
Yolks of six eggs
Grated rind of one lemon

Put half the cream in a double boiler over the fire, and, when hot, add
the yolks of the eggs and sugar, beaten until very, very light; add all
the flavoring, and stand aside until very cold; when cold, freeze in an
ordinary freezer. Whip the remaining pint of cream, add one-half of it to
the frozen mixture, repack and stand aside to ripen. Blanch, dry and chop
the almonds. Put them in the oven and shake constantly until they are a
golden brown. At serving time, fill the frozen mixture quickly into paper
cases; have the remaining whipped cream in a pastry bag with star tube,
make a little rosette on the top of each case, dust thickly with the
chopped almonds, and send to the table.

This will fill twelve cases of ordinary size.

BISCUITS GLACES

1 pint of cream
3/4 pound of sugar
1 pint of water
1 gill of sherry
2 tablespoonfuls of brandy
1 teaspoonful of vanilla
Yolks of six eggs

Put the sugar and water in a saucepan over the fire and stir until the
sugar is dissolved; wipe down the sides of the pan, and boil until the
syrup spins a heavy thread or makes a soft ball when dropped into cold
water. Beat the yolks of the eggs to a cream, add them to the boiling
syrup, and with an egg beater whisk over the fire until you have a
custard-like mixture that will thickly coat a knife blade; strain through a
sieve into a bowl, and whisk until the mixture is stiff and cold. It should
look like a very light sponge cake batter. Add the flavoring. Whip the
cream and stir it carefully into the mixture. Fill the mixture into paper
cases or individual dishes, stand them in a freezing cave or in a tin
bucket that is well packed in salt and ice, cover and freeze for at least
four or five hours.

If you do not have a freezing cave, pack a good sized tin kettle in a small
tub or water bucket. The kettle must have a tight fitting lid. Stand your
cases or molds on the bottom of the tin kettle, which is packed in salt and
ice. Put on top a sheet of letter paper, on top of this another other layer
of molds or cases, and so continue until you have the kettle filled. Put
the lid on the kettle and cover with salt and ice. Make sure that you have
a hole half-way up in the packing bucket or tub, so that there is no danger
of salt water overflowing the kettle. This is a homely but very good
freezing cave.

At serving time, dust the tops of the biscuits with grated macaroons or
chopped almonds, dish on paper mats, and send to the table.

This will fill fifteen biscuit cases.

BISCUITS a la MARIE

1/2 pound of sugar
1 pint of water
1/2 pint of cream
1/2 pound of almond macaroons
1/4 pound of candied or Maraschino cherries
1 teaspoonful of bitter almond extract
Yolks of six eggs

Boil the sugar and water until the syrup will spin a heavy thread. Add the
eggs, beaten until very light. Whip this over the fire for three minutes,
take it from the fire, strain into a bowl, and whip until thick and cold.
Add the flavoring and the macaroons, that have been dried, grated and
sifted. Add the cream, whipped. Fill the mixture into paper cases, and
freeze as directed for Biscuits Glaces.

An extra half pint of cream may be whipped for garnish at serving time, if
desired; otherwise, garnish the top with chopped maraschino cherries, and
send to the table.

This will fill twelve biscuit cases.

BOMB GLACE

Pack a two quart bomb glace mold in salt and ice. Remove the lid, and line
the mold with a quart of well-made vanilla ice cream. Fill the centre with
one half the recipe for Biscuit Glace mixture, that has been packed in
a freezer until icy cold. Put on the lid, bind the edge with a piece of
muslin dipped in paraffin or suet, cover the mold with salt and ice, and
stand aside three hours to freeze.

This will serve twelve persons.

BISCUIT TORTONI

1 quart of cream
1/2 pound of sugar
1 gill of maraschino
2 tablespoonfuls of sherry
1 teaspoonful of vanilla
Yolks of six eggs

Put half the cream in a double boiler over the fire. Beat the sugar and
yolks together until very, very light, add them to the hot cream and stir
over the fire until the mixture begins to thicken. Take from the fire,
and, when very cold, add the vanilla, maraschino and sherry, and freeze.
When frozen, stir in the remaining cream, whipped to a stiff froth. Fill
individual dishes or paper cases, stand at once in the freezing kettle or
ice cave; pack and freeze from three to four hours.

This will fill twelve cases.

CABINET PUDDING, ICED

1 quart of milk
6 eggs
1/4 pound of powdered sugar
1 tablespoonful of powdered gelatin
1/4 pound of macaroons and lady fingers, mixed
1/2 pound of conserved cherries or pineapple
1/2 pound of stale sponge cake

Grate the macaroons and lady fingers, and rub them through a coarse sieve.
Cut the sponge cake into slices and then into strips. Put the milk over
the fire in a double boiler and add the eggs and sugar beaten together
until light; stir and cook until the mixture is sufficiently thick to coat
a knife blade. Take from the fire, add the gelatin, strain, and stand
it aside to cool. Garnish the bottom of a two quart melon mold with the
cherries or pineapple, put in a layer of the sponge cake, then a sprinkling
of the macaroons and lady fingers, another layer of the cherries, then the
sponge cake, and so continue until you have all the ingredients used. Add a
teaspoonful of vanilla to the custard, pour it in the mold, cover the mold
with the lid, bind the seam with muslin dipped in paraffin or suet, pack in
salt and ice, and stand aside for three hours.

At serving time, dip the mold quickly into hot water, wipe it off, remove
the lid and turn the pudding on to a cold platter. Pour around a well-made
Montrose Sauce, and send to the table.

This will serve ten or twelve persons.

ICED CAKE

Make an Angel Food or a Sunshine Cake and bake it in a square mold. Make
a plain frozen custard, and flavor it with vanilla; pack it and stand it
aside until serving time. Cut off the top of the cake, take out the centre,
leaving a bottom and wall one inch thick. At serving time, fill the cake
quickly with the frozen custard, replace the top, dust it thickly with
powdered sugar and chopped almonds, and send it to the table with a
sauceboat of cold Montrose Sauce.

This cake may be varied by using different garnishings. Maraschino cherries
may be used in place of almonds, or the base of the cake may be garnished
with preserved green walnuts or green gages, or the top and sides may be
garnished with rosettes of whipped cream.

This will serve twelve persons.

QUICK CARAMEL PARFAIT

Make a quart of Caramel Ice Cream, pack, and stand it aside for two hours.
At serving time, stir in a pint of cream, whipped to a stiff froth, dish
in parfait glasses, and send to the table. The top of the glasses may be
garnished with whipped cream, if desired.

This will fill eight glasses.

QUICK CAFE PARFAIT

Make a quart of plain Coffee Ice Cream, freeze and pack it. Whip one pint
of cream. At serving time, stir the whipped cream into the frozen coffee
cream, dish it at once into tall parfait glasses, garnish the top with a
rosette of whipped cream, and send at once to the table.

This will fill eight glasses.

QUICK STRAWBERRY PARFAIT

This is made precisely the same as other parfaits, with Strawberry Ice
Cream, and whipped cream stirred in at serving time. Serve in parfait
glasses, garnish the top with whipped cream, with a strawberry in the
centre on top.

This will fill eight glasses.

QUICK CHOCOLATE PARFAIT

Make one quart of Chocolate Ice Cream, and add one pint of whipped cream,
according to the preceding recipes.

This will serve eight persons.

MONTE CARLO PUDDING

1 quart of cream
6 ounces of sugar (2/3 of a cupful)
4 tablespoonfuls of creme de violette
1/2 pound of candied violets
1 teaspoonful of vanilla

Put half the cream over the fire in a double boiler. Pound or roll the
violets, sift them, add the sugar and sufficient hot cream to dissolve
them. Take the cream from the fire, add the violet sugar, and stir until it
is dissolved; when cold, add the flavoring and the remaining cream. Freeze,
and pack into a two quart pyramid mold; pack in salt and ice for at least
two hours. At serving time, turn the ice on to a platter, garnish the base
with whipped cream, and the whole with candied violets.

This will serve six to eight persons.

BOSTON PUDDING

Make Boston Brown Bread Ice Cream and half the recipe for Tutti Frutti.
When both are frozen, line a melon mold with the Brown Bread Ice Cream,
fill the centre with the Tutti Frutti, cover over more of the Brown Bread
Ice Cream, fasten tightly, and bind the seam of the lid with a strip of
muslin dipped in paraffin or suet. Pack in salt and ice for at least two
hours. At serving time, dip the mold quickly into hot water, turn the
pudding on to a cold platter, pour around the base caramel sauce, and serve
at once.

This will serve twelve persons.

MONTROSE PUDDING

1 quart of cream
1 cupful of granulated sugar
1 tablespoonful of vanilla
1 pint of strawberry water ice
Yolks of six eggs

Put half the cream over the fire in a double boiler. Beat the yolks and
sugar together until light, add them to the boiling cream, and cook and
stir for one minute until it begins to thicken. Take from the fire, add the
remaining pint of cream and the vanilla, and stand aside until very cold.
Freeze, and pack into a round or melon mold, leaving a well in the centre.
Fill this well with Strawberry Water Ice that has been frozen an hour
before, and cover it with some of the pudding mixture that you have left in
the freezer. Fasten the lid, bind the seam with a piece of muslin dipped in
suet or paraffin, and pack in salt and ice to stand for not less than two
hours, four is better. Serve with Montrose Sauce poured around it.

This will serve twelve persons.

NESSELRODE PUDDING

1 pint of Spanish chestnuts
1/2 pound of sugar
1 pint of boiling water
1/2 pint of shelled almonds
1 pound of French candied fruit, mixed
1 pint of heavy cream
1/4 pound of candied pineapple
Yolks of six eggs

Shell the chestnuts, scald and remove the brown skins, cover with boiling
water and boil until they are tender, not too soft, and press them through
a sieve. Shell, blanch and pound the almonds. Cut the fruit into tiny
pieces. Put the sugar and water in a saucepan, stir until the sugar is
dissolved, wipe down the sides of the pan, and boil without stirring until
the syrup forms a soft ball when dropped into ice water. Beat the yolks of
the eggs until very light, add them to the boiling syrup, and stir over
the fire until the mixture again boils; take it from the fire, and with an
ordinary egg beater, whisk the mixture until it is cold and thick as sponge
cake batter. Add the fruit, the chestnuts, almond paste, a teaspoonful of
vanilla and, if you use it, four tablespoonfuls of sherry. Turn the mixture
into the freezer, and, when it is frozen, stir in the cream whipped to a
stiff froth. The mixture may now be repacked in the can, or it may be put
into small molds or one large mold, and repacked for ripening.

If packed in a large mold, this will serve fifteen persons; in the small
molds or paper cases, it will serve eighteen persons.

NESSELRODE PUDDING, AMERICANA

1 small bottle, or sixteen preserved marrons
1 quart of cream
4 ounces of sugar
4 tablespoonfuls of sherry
1 tablespoonful of vanilla
Yolks of six eggs

Put half the cream in a double boiler over the fire; when hot, add the eggs
and sugar beaten until light. Cook a minute, and cool. When cold, add one
small bottle of marrons broken into quarters and the syrup from the bottle,
the sherry and vanilla. Freeze, stirring slowly. When frozen, stir in the
remaining cream whipped to a stiff froth. Pack in small molds in salt and
ice as directed. These should freeze three hours at least.

This will make twelve small molds.

ORANGE SOUFFLE

1 quart of cream
1 pint of orange juice
1/2 box of gelatin
3/4 pound of sugar
Yolks of six eggs

Cover the gelatin with a half cupful of cold water and soak for a half
hour. Add a half cupful of boiling water, stir until the gelatin is
dissolved, and add the sugar and the orange juice. Beat the yolks of the
eggs until very light. Whip the cream. Add the uncooked yolks to the orange
mixture, strain in the gelatin, stand the bowl in cold water and stir
slowly until the mixture begins to thicken; stir in carefully the whipped
cream, turn it in a mold or an ice cream freezer, pack with salt and ice,
and stand aside three hours to freeze. This should not be frozen as hard as
ice cream, and must not be stirred while freezing. Make sure, however, that
the gelatin is thoroughly mixed with the other ingredients before putting
the mixture into the freezer.

This will serve twelve people.

By changing the flavoring, using lemon in the place of orange, or a pint
of strawberry juice, or a pint of raspberry and currant juice, an endless
variety of souffles may be made from this same recipe. These may be served
plain, or with Montrose Sauce.

PLOMBIERE

1 quart of cream
1/2 pound of Jordan almonds
1/2 pound of sugar
1/2 pound of Sultana raisins
Yolks of six eggs

Blanch the almonds and pound them to a paste, or use a half pound of
ordinary almond paste. Put half the cream in a double boiler over the fire,
add the yolks and sugar beaten to a cream, add the almond paste. Stir until
the mixture begins to thicken, take from the fire and beat with an egg
beater for three minutes. Strain through a fine sieve, and, when very cold,
add the Sultanas and the remaining cream. Freeze, turning the dasher very
slowly at first and more rapidly toward the end. Remove the dasher, scrape
down the sides of the can and pull the cream up, making a well in the
centre. Fill this well half full with apricot jam, cover over the pudding
mixture, making it smooth; repack, and stand aside for two hours.

Serve plain or with a cold Puree of Apricots.

This will serve twelve persons.

QUEEN PUDDING

Make a Strawberry Water Ice or Frozen Strawberries. Pack a three quart mold
in a bucket or tub of ice and salt. Line the mold with the Strawberry Ice,
fill the centre with Tutti Frutti, using half recipe; put on the lid, bind
the seam, and stand aside for at least two hours. When ready to serve, turn
the pudding from the mold into the centre of a large round dish, garnish
the base with whipped cream pressed through a star tube, and garnish the
pudding with candied cherries. Here and there around the base of the
whipped cream place a marron glace.

This will serve fifteen persons.

ICE CREAM CROQUETTES

Mold vanilla ice cream with the ordinary pyramid ice cream spoon, roll them
quickly in grated macaroons, and serve on a paper mat.

ICED RICE PUDDING WITH A COMPOTE OF ORANGES

FOR THE PUDDING

1/2 cupful of rice
1 quart of cream
1 pint of milk
2 teaspoonfuls of vanilla extract or 1/2 vanilla bean
1/2 pound of sugar
Yolks of six eggs

Rub the rice in a dry towel, and put it over the fire in a pint of cold
water. Bring to a boil and boil twenty minutes; drain, add the milk and
cook it in a double boiler a half hour. While this is boiling, whip the
cream to a stiff froth, and stand it in a cold place until wanted. Press
the rice through a fine sieve and return it to the double boiler. Beat the
yolks of the eggs and the sugar until light, stir them into the hot rice,
and stir and cook about two minutes, until the mixture begins to thicken.
Take from the fire, add the vanilla, and stand aside until very cold. When
cold, freeze, turning the dasher rapidly toward the last. Remove the dasher
and stir in the whipped cream. Scrape down the sides of the can, and smooth
the pudding. Put on the lid, fasten the hole in the top with a cork, put
over the top a piece of waxed paper, and pack with salt and ice. Stand
aside for at least two or three hours. Be very careful that the hole in the
tub is open, to prevent the salt water from overflowing the can.

FOR THE COMPOTE

1 dozen nice oranges
1 pound of sugar
1/2 cupful of water
1 teaspoonful of lemon juice

Put the sugar and water over the fire to boil, wipe down the sides of the
pan, skim the syrup, add the lemon juice, and boil until it spins a thread.
Peel the oranges, cut them into halves crosswise, and with a sharp knife
remove the cores. Dip one piece at a time into the hot syrup and place them
on a platter to cool. Pour over any syrup that may be left.

This syrup must be thick, but not sufficiently thick to harden on the
oranges.

To dish the pudding, lift the can from the ice, wipe it carefully on the
outside, wrap the bottom of the mold in a towel dipped in boiling water,
or hold it half an instant under the cold water spigot. Then with a limber
knife or spatula loosen the pudding from the side of the can and shake it
out into the centre of a large round plate. Heap the oranges on top of
the pudding, making them in a pyramid, put the remaining quantity around
the base of the pudding, pour over the syrup and send to the table. This
pudding sounds elaborate and troublesome, but it is exceedingly palatable
and one of the handsomest of all frozen dishes.

This will serve twenty persons. In ice cream stem dishes it will serve
twenty-four persons.

SULTANA ROLL

1-1/2 quarts of cream
1/2 pound of granulated sugar
1/2 cupful of Sultanas
4 tablespoonfuls of sherry
2 ounces of shelled pistachio nuts
1 teaspoonful of almond extract
10 drops of green coloring

Put one pint of cream and the sugar over the fire in a double boiler, and
stir until the sugar is dissolved; take from the fire, and, when cold, add
a pint of the remaining cream. Chop the pistachio nuts very fine or put
them through the meat grinder, add them to the cream and add the flavoring
and coloring, and freeze. Whip the remaining pint of cream to a stiff
froth. Sprinkle the Sultanas with sherry and let them stand while you are
freezing the pudding. When the pudding is frozen, remove the dasher and
line a long round mold with the pistachio cream. If nothing better is at
hand, use pound baking powder cans, and line them to the depth of one inch.
Add the Sultanas to the whipped cream and stir in two tablespoonfuls of
powdered sugar. Fill the spaces in the cans with the whipped cream mixture,
and put another layer of the pistachio cream over the top. Put on the lids,
wrap each can in waxed paper, and put them down into coarse salt and ice,
to freeze for at least two hours. At serving time, turn the puddings on to
a long platter, fill the bottom of the platter with Claret or Strawberry
Sauce, and send to the table.

This quantity cut into half inch slices will serve twelve persons.

SULTANA PUDDING

1 pint of milk
1 pint of cream
6 ounces of sugar
1 cupful of Sultanas
1 teaspoonful of vanilla
4 tablespoonfuls of sherry (if you use it)
Yolks of four eggs

Put the milk in a double boiler, and, when hot, add the yolks and sugar
beaten together; stir until this begins to thicken. Take from the fire, add
the vanilla, and, when cold, freeze it. Put the sherry over the Sultanas.
Garnish the bottom of a melon mold with the Sultanas, pack it in coarse ice
and salt ready for the frozen pudding. Remove the dasher from the frozen
mixture, and stir in the cream that has been whipped to a stiff froth. Add
the remainder of the Sultanas and pack at once into the mold; put on the
lid and fasten as directed in other recipes.

This may be served plain or with whipped cream garnished with Sultanas.

This will serve eight persons.

THE MERRY WIDOW

Dish a pyramid of vanilla ice cream into a stem individual ice cream glass.
Garnish the base of the ice cream with fresh strawberries, dust the
cream thickly with toasted pinon nuts, and baste the whole with four
tablespoonfuls of Claret Sauce flavored with two tablespoonfuls of rum.

TUTTI FRUTTI PUDDING

1 pint of milk
1 pint of cream
1/2 pint of mixed candied fruits
4 eggs
1 cupful of sugar
1 teaspoonful of vanilla
2 tablespoonfuls of sherry
1 tablespoonful of brandy

Put the milk over the fire in a double boiler, add the yolks of the eggs
and the sugar beaten together until light. When the mixture begins to
thicken, take it from the fire and stand it aside until perfectly cold. Add
all the flavorings. When the mixture is cold, add the cream, and partly
freeze it; then add the fruit, and freeze to the right consistency. This
should be packed at least two hours to ripen.

This will serve eight persons.

TUTTI FRUTTI, ITALIAN FASHION

1/2 pound of sugar
1 pint of water
1 pint of cream
1/2 pint of chopped mixed candied fruits
1 teaspoonful of vanilla
4 tablespoonfuls of sherry
Yolks of six eggs

Pour the sherry over the fruit. Beat the yolks until creamy. Put the sugar
and water over the fire, stir until the sugar is dissolved, and boil five
minutes; add the yolks of the eggs, beat until it again reaches the boiling
point, take from the fire and beat until cold and thick. Add the cream, the
fruit and the vanilla. Freeze as directed on page 7.

This is usually served in small ice cream glasses garnished with whipped
cream, or may be served plain. In the absence of ice cream glasses, use
ordinary punch glasses.

This will fill ten glasses.

LALLA ROOKH

Fill a lemonade or ice cream glass two-thirds full of vanilla ice cream.
Make a little well in the centre and fill the space with rum and sherry
mixed. Allow four tablespoonfuls of rum and six of sherry to each half
dozen cups.

PEACHES MELBA

Dish a helping of vanilla ice cream in the centre of the serving plate,
place in the centre of the ice cream a whole brandied peach, press it down
into the ice cream, baste over four tablespoonfuls of Claret Sauce, and
serve.

LILLIAN RUSSELL

Cut into halves small very cold cantaloupes. Remove the seeds; fill the
centres of the half melons with vanilla ice cream, and garnish with whipped
cream pressed through a small star tube. Dish the halves on paper mats on a
dessert plate, and send to the table.

ARROWROOT CREAM

1 quart of milk
6 ounces of sugar
1 level tablespoonful of arrowroot
2 teaspoonfuls of vanilla

Moisten the arrowroot with a little cold milk; put the remaining milk in a
double boiler; when hot, add the arrowroot and cook ten minutes; add the
sugar, take from the fire, and add the vanilla, When perfectly cold, freeze
as directed on page 7.

This will serve six persons.

ENGLISH APRICOT CREAM

1/2 pint of apricot jam
1 pint of cream
1/2 pint of milk
2 tablespoonfuls of noyau
Juice of one lemon

Mix the jam and the cream, then carefully add the noyau and the lemon
juice. Press through a fine sieve, add the milk, and freeze as directed on
page 7.

This will serve six persons.

FROZEN CUSTARD

1 quart of milk
6 ounces of sugar
2 teaspoonfuls of vanilla
Yolks of four eggs

Put the milk in a double boiler, add the yolks of the eggs and the sugar
beaten together, and stir until the mixture thickens. Take from the fire,
and, when cold, add the vanilla. Turn into the freezer and freeze as
directed. A little chopped conserved fruit may be added at last when the
dasher is removed. Chopped black walnuts may also be added.

This will serve six persons.

GELATIN ICE CREAM

1 quart of milk
1/2 pint of cream
6 ounces of sugar
1 tablespoonful of granulated gelatin
2 teaspoonfuls of vanilla

Cover the gelatin with a little cold milk and stand it aside for fifteen
minutes. Put the remaining milk in a double boiler; when scalding hot, add
the sugar and the gelatin; stir until the sugar is dissolved, take from the
fire, and, when perfectly cold, add the cream and the vanilla. Freeze as
directed on page 7.

This will serve six persons.

FROZEN PLUM PUDDING

2 pint cans of condensed milk
1/2 cupful of seeded raisins
1/2 pound of sugar
24 almonds that have been blanched and chopped
2 ounces of shredded citron
1/4 pound of candied cherries
2 teaspoonfuls of vanilla
2 tablespoonfuls of sherry
1/2 pint of water
Yolks of four eggs

Put milk in a double boiler over the fire, and stir until the milk is
thoroughly heated; add the yolks of the eggs and the sugar beaten together,
cook until it begins to thicken, take from the fire and strain. When cold,
add the citron, raisins, the cherries cut into quarters, the almonds,
vanilla and sherry. When this is perfectly cold, freeze as directed. Do not
repack or allow the mixture to stand in the freezer more than a half hour.

Serve plain or with Montrose Sauce.

One quart of good rich milk may be used in place of the condensed milk.

This will serve twelve persons.

CHARLOTTE GLACE

Make a quart of vanilla ice cream and stir into it a pint of cream whipped
to a stiff froth. Line round stiff paper charlotte boxes with lady fingers,
fill them with the iced mixture, and place them at once in a can or bucket
packed in salt and ice to freeze for one or two hours.

This quantity will fill twelve boxes.

MAPLE PANACHEE

Fill stem ice cream dishes half full with caramel ice cream; on top put a
layer of vanilla ice cream. Smooth it down and dust thickly with toasted
pecan nuts chopped fine.

A pint of each cream will fill six dishes.

GERMAN CHERRY BISCUITS

Fill paper cases half full of pineapple water ice. Put over a layer of
candied cherries chopped, then a layer of vanilla ice cream; smooth it
quickly, place a marron glace in the centre, and garnish the cream with
a meringue made from the whites of two eggs and two tablespoonfuls of
powdered sugar. Dust this with grated macaroons, and send to the table.
Make the meringue and grate the macaroons before dishing the ice cream.

A pint of each cream will fill eight cases.

FRUIT SALAD, ICED

Make one quart of lemon or orange water ice and stand it aside for at least
one or two hours to ripen. Make a fruit salad from stemmed strawberries,
sliced bananas cut into tiny bits, a few very ripe cherries, a grated
pineapple if you have it, and the pulp of four or five oranges. After the
water ice is frozen rather hard, pack it in a border mold, put on the lid
or cover and bind the seam with a strip of muslin dipped in paraffin or
suet, and repack to freeze for three or four hours. Sweeten the fruit
combination, if you like, add a tablespoonful or two of brandy and sherry,
and stand this on the ice until _very cold_. At serving time, turn the mold
of water ice on to a round compote dish, quickly fill the centre with fruit
salad, garnish the outside with fresh roses or violets, and send at once to
the table.

This will serve eight or ten persons at luncheon.

COUPE ST. JACQUE

Make a fruit salad as in preceding recipe. Make a pint of orange or
strawberry ice. At serving time fill parfait or ice cream glasses half full
of the fruit salad, fill the remaining half with water ice, smooth it over,
garnish the top with whipped cream, put a maraschino cherry in the centre,
and serve. Other fruits may be used for the salad.

This should make twelve tumblers.

WATER ICES AND SHERBETS OR SORBETS

A water ice is a mixture of water, fruit and sugar, frozen without much
stirring; in fact, a water ice can be made in an ordinary tin kettle packed
in a bucket. If an ice cream freezer is used, the stirring should be done
occasionally. Personally, I prefer to pack the can, put on the lid and
fasten the hole with a cork rather than to use the dasher, stirring now and
then with a paddle. If you use the crank, turn slowly for a few minutes,
then allow the mixture to stand for five minutes; turn slowly again, and
again rest, and continue this until the water ice is frozen. A much longer
time is required for freezing water ice than ice cream.

When the mixture is thoroughly frozen, take out the dasher, scrape down the
sides of the can, give the ice a thorough beating with a wooden spoon; put
the cork in the lid of the can, draw the water from the tub, repack it with
coarse ice and salt, cover it with paper and a piece of blanket or burlap,
and stand aside for two or three hours to ripen just as you would ice
cream.

When it is necessary to make water ice every day or two, it is best to make
a syrup and stand it aside ready for use.

Fruit jellies may be used in the place of fresh fruits, allowing one pint
of jelly, the juice of one lemon and a half pound of sugar to each quart of
water.

When water ice is correctly frozen, it has the appearance of hard wet snow.
It must not be frothy nor light.

A sherbet or sorbet is made from the same mixture as a water ice, stirred
constantly while it is freezing, and has a meringue, made from the white of
one egg and a tablespoonful of powdered sugar, stirred in after the dasher
is removed.

APPLE ICE

1 pound of tart apples
1 cupful of sugar
1 pint of water
Juice of one lemon or lime

Quarter and core the apples, but do not pare them. Slice them, add the
water, cover and stew until tender, about five minutes. Press through a
sieve, add the sugar and lemon juice. When cold, freeze as directed. Serve
in lemonade glasses at dinner with roasted duck, goose or pork.

This will serve six persons.

APRICOT ICE

1 quart can of apricots
1/2 cupful of sugar
1 pint of water
Juice of one lemon

Press the apricots through a sieve, add all the other ingredients, and
serve. This is nice served in lemonade glasses for afternoon tea. Pass
sweet wafers.

This will serve eight persons.

CHERRY ICE

2 full quarts of sour cherries
1 pound of sugar
1 quart of water

Stew the cherries in the water for ten minutes and press through a sieve,
add the sugar, and, if you have it, two drops of Angostura Bitters; when
cold, freeze it as directed on page 63.

This will serve ten persons.

CURRANT WATER ICE

1 pint of currant juice
1 pound of sugar
1 pint of boiling water

Add the sugar to the water, and stir over the fire until it is dissolved.
Boil five minutes, take from the fire; when cool, add the currant juice.
When cold, freeze as directed on page 63.

This will serve six persons.

CURRANT AND RASPBERRY WATER ICE

1 pint of currant juice
1 pint of raspberry juice
1 pint of water
3/4 pound of sugar

Add the sugar to the water, stir until boiling, boil five minutes, and,
when cool, add the raspberry and currant juices, and freeze as directed.

This will serve six persons; in punch glasses, eight persons.

GRAPE WATER ICE

1 pint of grape juice
1 quart of water
1 pound of sugar
Juice of one lemon

Boil the sugar and water together for five minutes, take from the fire, add
the lemon juice, and skim. When cold, add the grape juice, and freeze as
directed.

If fresh grapes are to be used, select Muscatels or Concords. Pulp the
grapes, boil the pulps, press them through a sieve, and add the skins and
the pulps to the sugar and water. Boil five minutes, press as much as
possible through a sieve, and freeze.

This will serve eight persons.

LEMON WATER ICE

4 large lemons
1 quart of water
1-1/4 pounds of sugar

Grate the yellow rind of two lemons into the sugar, add the water, stir
over the fire until the sugar is dissolved, and boil for five minutes.
Strain, and stand aside to cool. When cold, add the juice of the lemons,
and freeze as directed on page 63.

This will serve six persons.

GINGER WATER ICE

6 ounces of preserved ginger
4 lemons
1 quart of water
1 pound of sugar

Put four ounces of the ginger through an ordinary meat grinder, and cut
the remaining two ounces into fine bits. Boil the sugar and water together
for five minutes, and add the lemon juice and ground ginger. Take from the
fire, add the bits of ginger, and, when cold, freeze as directed. Ginger
water ice is better for a two hour stand, after it is frozen. Nice to serve
with roasted or braised beef.

This will serve six persons; in small punch glasses, eight.

MILLE FRUIT WATER ICE

1/2 pint of grape juice
6 lemons
1 orange
4 tablespoonfuls of sherry
1/2 pound of preserved cherries or pineapple, or both mixed
1-1/2 pounds of sugar
1 quart of water

Grate the yellow rind of the orange and one lemon into the sugar, add the
water, stir over the fire until the sugar is dissolved, boil five minutes,
and strain. Add the fruit cut into small pieces, the juice of the orange
and the lemons; when cold, add the grape juice and sherry, and freeze,
using the dasher. Do not stir rapidly, but stir continuously, as slowly as
possible. When the mixture is frozen, remove the dasher and repack the can;
ripen at least two hours.

This is one of the nicest of all the water ices, and may be served on the
top of Coupe St. Jacque, or at dinner in sherbet glasses with roasted veal
or beef.

This will serve ten persons.

ORANGE WATER ICE

12 large oranges
1 pound of sugar
1 quart of water

Grate the yellow rind from three oranges into the sugar, add the water,
boil five minutes, and strain; when cold, add the orange juice, and freeze
as directed for water ices.

This will serve ten persons.

POMEGRANATE WATER ICE

12 good sized pomegranates
1 pint of water
1 pound of sugar

Cut the pomegranates into halves, remove the seeds carefully from the
inside bitter skin; press them with a potato masher in the colander,
allowing the juice to run through into a bowl; be careful not to mash the
seeds. Add the sugar to the juice and stir until it is dissolved; then add
the water, cold, and freeze. This is very nice to serve with a meat course,
and also nice for the garnish of a fruit salad.

This will serve six persons.

PINEAPPLE WATER ICE

2 ripe pineapples or
1 quart can of grated pineapple
1 quart of water
1-1/2 pounds of sugar
Juice of two lemons

Pare the pineapples, remove the eyes, and grate the fruit into the water.
Add the sugar and lemon juice, boil five minutes, and, when cold, freeze as
directed on page 63.

This will serve ten persons.

STRAWBERRY WATER ICE

1 quart of strawberries
1 pound of sugar
1 quart of water
Juice of two lemons

Add the sugar and the lemon juice to the stemmed strawberries, let them
stand one hour; mash them through a colander, and then, if you like, strain
through a fine sieve. Add the water, and freeze as directed on page 63.

This will serve eight persons.

RASPBERRY WATER ICE

1 quart of red raspberries
1 pound of sugar
1 quart of water
Juice of two lemons

Add the sugar and the lemon juice to the raspberries, stir and stand aside
one hour. Press through a sieve, add the water, and freeze as directed on
page 63.

This will serve eight persons.

ROMAN PUNCH

Make one quart of lemon water ice. When ready to serve, fill it into small
punch glasses, make a little well in the centre and fill the space with
good Jamaica rum.

This will serve eight persons.

SOUR SOP SHERBET OR ICE

Squeeze the juice from one large sour sop, strain, and add four
tablespoonfuls of sugar, boiled a moment with four tablespoonfuls of water.
Freeze as directed on page 63.

A quart of sour sop when frozen will serve six persons.

CRANBERRY SHERBET

1 pint of cranberries
1/2 pound of sugar
1/2 pint of water

Add the water to the cranberries, cover, bring to a boil; press through a
colander, return them to the fire, add the sugar, and stir until the sugar
dissolves. Take from the fire, and, when cold, freeze, stirring slowly all
the while.

Serve with the meat course at dinner.

This will serve eight persons.

CUCUMBER SORBET

2 large cucumbers
2 tart apples
1 pint of water
1 teaspoonful of sugar
1/2 teaspoonful of salt
1 tablespoonful of gelatin
1 saltspoonful of black pepper
Juice of one lemon

Peel the cucumbers, cut them into halves and remove the seeds. Dissolve the
gelatin in a half cupful of hot water. Grate the flesh of the cucumbers;
grate the apples, add them to the cucumbers, and add all the other
ingredients. Freeze as you would ordinary sherbet.

Serve in tiny glasses, with boiled cod or halibut.

This will fill eight small stem glasses.

GOOSEBERRY SORBET

1/2 pint of gooseberry jam
4 tablespoonfuls of sugar
1 pint of water
Juice of one lemon

Mix all the ingredients together and freeze, turning slowly all the while.
Serve in small glasses.

This is usually served at Christmas dinner with goose.

This will serve six persons.

ORANGE SHERBET

1 pint of orange juice
2 tablespoonfuls of gelatin
3/4 pound of sugar
1 pint of water

Cover the gelatin with an extra half cupful of cold water and soak for a
half hour. Add the sugar to the pint of water and stir it over the fire
until it boils; add the grated yellow rind of two oranges and the juice;
strain through a fine sieve and freeze, turning the freezer slowly all the
while. Remove the dasher, stir in a meringue made from the white of one
egg, and repack to ripen for an hour at least.

This will serve six persons.

MINT SHERBET

2 dozen stalks of spearmint
1/2 pound of sugar
1 quart of water
Juice of three lemons

Strip the leaves from the stalks of the mint, chop them to a pulp and rub
them with the sugar. Add the water, bring to a boil, boil five minutes,
and, when cold, add three drops of green coloring and the juice of the
lemons; strain and freeze, turning slowly all the while.

Serve at dinner with mutton or lamb.

This will serve six persons; in small stem glasses, eight persons.

TOMATO SORBET OR SHERBET

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