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Final Report of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition Commission by Louisiana Purchase Exposition Commission

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Add refund on expenses credited this account .......... 1,940.00
Total as per statement .............................. 146,538.48

We have verified the receipts from the German Tyrolean Alps
Company with the contract.

Premium on Souvenir Gold Coin, less Expense.

This total represents the premium of $2 per coin on $67,176.00
33,588 coins sold
Less expenses ....................................... 13,506.67
Total ............................................. 53,669.33

We have agreed the number of coins sold with the difference
between the number originally received and the number now
certified to be on hand.

Photo-Pass Receipts.

The system in regard to the collections in this department
appeared to be such as to insure the full amount of collections
being received by the company.

Photographic passes were charged in some cases at $1 and in
others at $2, and many were issued without charge, and it is not
therefore possible, without a very great amount of work, to
check the collections against the number of passes issued.

Interest on Deposits.

This total represents the amount of interest received on
balances from time to time remaining on hand in the company's
bank. We have included therein the amount of $2,580.68 received
In respect of the Pike rental fund and credited on the books of
the company to that fund.

Miscellaneous Collections.

This total is made up as follows:

Insurance premiums refunded .................... $63,983.17
Refrigerating plant receipts ................... 20,178.99
Garbage coupon books ........................... 11,506.80
Miscellaneous revenues ......................... 31,230.52
Refund account, overpayments ................... 4,715.96
Personal damage account, receipts .............. 2,572.50
Uniform special fund ........................... 2,514.89
Damage to property, receipts ................... 72.50
-----------
Total ........................................ 136,775.33

We have checked the insurance receipts with the report of the
agents of the policies canceled and of the amount of return
premiums due the company thereon.

We have agreed the receipts from the refrigerating plant, which
represent the company's proportion of the profits on the
operation thereof, with the report of the manager. A final audit
of the books of the plant is now being made by the Exposition
Company, and it is possible that a small further sum will be
received on this account.

We counted the garbage books remaining on hand and satisfied
ourselves that the number thereof, together with the number
reported as sold, made up the total number originally received.

The remainder of the receipts included under this head consists
of various incidental receipts which it is not possible to
verify completely.

Salvage.

This amount is made up as follows:

Contract price for salvage sold to Chicago House
Wrecking Company ............................ $450,000.00
Less amount not yet due or paid ............... 150,000.00
------------
300,000.00
Resale of cars and motors under original
purchase contract with St. Louis Car Company 158,667.25
Miscellaneous sales ........................... 4,198.03
------------
Total ....................................... 462,865.28

We have verified the two large items with the original
contracts.

Special Fund.

We have not been able to obtain a detailed statement of the
badge fund, which represents deposits made by employees in
respect of badges issued to them, and it is probable that the
greater part of this sum has been refunded and charged through
various departments to other accounts.

The pay-roll fund represents unclaimed wages and has been agreed
with a detailed list submitted to us.

Disbursements.

Properly approved vouchers have been produced to us for all
disbursements except as regards two payments aggregating
$252.45, the vouchers for which have, we understand, been
mislaid.

The only items calling for special comment are, we think, the
following:

Special Installation of Exhibits.

This sum represents the purchase price of the whole of the
capital stock of the General Service Company, which held a
concession for hauling and storage. From a balance sheet of that
company, recently prepared, it would appear that the amount to
be realized by the Exposition Company in respect of this
investment will be about $104,000. We are advised by the
president that in spite of the apparent loss of $21,000
involved, this transaction is regarded by the Exposition Company
as an advantageous one, inasmuch as, at the time it was
effected, there were serious controversies and substantial
claims in question between the two companies, and by the
purchase these claims were, of course, completely disposed of;
and, moreover, the installation of exhibits was much expedited
and serious inconvenience to exhibitors avoided.

Money Advanced.

The principal item included under this head is an amount of
$152,000 advanced to the emergency exploitation committee from
time to time to meet the expenses incurred by that committee.
Practically the whole of this amount has been expended, but up
to the date of our audit vouchers for the expenditures had not
been turned in by the committee or put through the general books
of the company. We understand that this is now being done.

Board of Lady Managers.

Included under this head is the full amount of $100,000
appropriated for the board out of the Government loan of
$4,600,000. This sum was paid by the company into a special
account, subject to the order of the board, and no details as to
the disbursement thereof appear on the books, owing, as we are
informed, to the fact that no report of such disbursements has
yet been made by the board to the Exposition Company.

Cash Balances.

Certificates of deposit have been produced to us, and we have
been furnished with a certificate from the bank as to the
balance on current account.

The cash immediately available for the general purposes of the
company amounts to $668,754.36, the remaining $182,846.41 being
deposited in a special account to secure the sureties under
various bonds given on behalf of the company.

Of this total of $182,846.41, the sum of $120,768.18 is derived
from Pike rentals, as hereinbefore explained. The balance of
$62,078.23 consists of receipts of the music bureau, which were
originally paid into a separate fund because of a difference
between the bureau of music and the division of concessions as
to the policy in operating Festival Hall. Subsequently the
president recommended that this fund be added to the fund held
for the protection of the sureties, in accordance with the
authority granted to the executive committee by the board of
directors to make such provision as might be deemed advisable to
protect these sureties, and the president informs us that this
suggestion was approved by the executive committee.

It will of course be understood that the maintenance of the
separate funds would become a matter of practical importance
only in the event of the funds of the company proving
insufficient to meet its liabilities, a condition which is not
now deemed likely to arise.

General Financial Condition of the Company.

We have been furnished by the president of the Exposition
Company with a statement of the estimated assets and liabilities
of the company on May 3, 1905, a copy of which we append hereto.
From this statement it will be seen that, subject to whatever
liability may eventually result in respect of suits and disputed
claims now pending against the company, it is estimated that the
assets will exceed the liabilities by $467,211.45.

In arriving at this figure, the liability of the company in
respect of the restoration of Forest Park is estimated at
$200,000. In this connection it may be well to point out that
the company is under obligation to restore the park without any
limit as to cost, and has, moreover, given the city of St. Louis
two bonds aggregating $650,000, being the amount of an estimate
made on behalf of the city of the probable cost of restoration.
Of the bonds given, one is for $100,000, secured by guarantee of
certain directors of the Exposition Company, and the second for
$550,000, secured as to $100,000 by personal guarantees and as
to the balance by a mortgage on the Art Building.

Legislation is now pending looking to the acceptance by the city
of a fixed sum in settlement of the company's liability and the
carrying out of the work of restoration by the city itself, but
it is not, of course, possible to say at the present time
whether the estimate of $200,000 now taken into account will
eventually prove sufficient.

It is not at present possible to estimate the liability on suits
and claims pending.

In conclusion, we would state that every facility was extended
to us by the officials of the company in the course of our
audits.

Yours, faithfully, Jones, Caesar, DICKINSON, WILMOT & Co.

LOUISIANA PURCHASE EXPOSITION COMMISSION, _Washington, D.C._

_Statement of receipts and disbursements from the incorporation of the
company to April 30, 1906 (inclusive)._

RECEIPTS.

Capital liabilities:
Collections on account of sales of
capital stock ........................... $4,821,456.11
Proceeds of sale of city of St. Louis
bonds .................................... 5,000,050.00
United States Government aid ............... 4,752,968.45
------------ $14,574,474.56

Loans contracted:
United States Government ................... 4,600,000.00
Loan on security of capital stock
subscriptions, etc ....................... 438,000.00
------------ 5,038,000.00
Revenue:
Admissions collections (Exhibit A) ......... 6,240,480.90
Concessions collections (Exhibit B) ........ 3,076,958.69
Intramural railway receipts ................ 627,473.84
Service, power, light, and water receipts
(Exhibit C) .............................. 655,684.00
Transportation collections (Exhibit D) ..... 218,207.20
Music Department collections ............... 146,538.48
Premium on souvenir gold coin
(less expenses) .......................... 53,669.33
Photo pass receipts ........................ 51,469.00
Interest on deposits (Exhibit E) ........... 131,407.83
Miscellaneous collections (Exhibit F) ...... 136,775.33
Salvage .................................... 462,865.28
------------ 11,801,529.88
Special funds
Badge ...................................... 6,830.00
Pay roll ................................... 5,769.04
----------- 12,599.04
-------------
31,426,603.48

DISBURSEMENTS.

Preliminary expenses ...................................... $37,418.78
Construction (Exhibit G) .................................. 16,729,755.48
Rent of grounds and buildings (Exhibit H) ................. 1,240,113.80
Maintenance and operating (Exhibit I) ..................... 1,070,537.51
Special installation of exhibits .......................... 125,000.00
Exhibits division (Exhibit J) ............................. 2,189,125.93
Exploitation division (Exhibit K) ......................... 1,327,337.11
Protection--Fire, police, insurance, etc. (Exhibit L) ..... 1,089.992.35
Concessions and admissions division (Exhibit M) ........... 564,112.28
Executive and administrative division (Exhibit N) ......... 440,874.46
Transportation bureau (Exhibit O) ......................... 321,074.58
Money advanced (Exhibit P) ................................ 167,350.14
Sundry disbursements (Exhibit Q) .......................... 114,920.78
Board of lady managers:
Government appropriation .................... $100,000.00
Miscellaneous disbursements ................. 16,831.20
Furnishing rooms ............................ 2,558.31
----------- 119,389.51
-------------
25,537,002.71
Loans repaid .............................................. 5,038,000.00
Cash balances:
Cash in bank, general fund .................. 5,067.22
Local treasurer's cash ...................... 24.58
Certificates of deposit ..................... 663,662.56
-----------
668,754.36
Certificates of deposit, D.R. Francis and
W.H. Thompson, trustees (Exposition
Company sureties) ......................... 182,846.41
----------- 851,600.77
-------------
31,426,603.48

We have examined the above statement of receipts and
disbursements, with the books of the Louisiana Purchase
Exposition Company, and certify the same to be correct.
Satisfactory evidence has been produced to us as to all
payments made, and proper certificates have been furnished
as to the balance of cash in bank, on deposit, and on current
account.

JONES, CAESAR, DICKINSON, WILMOT & Co.,
_Certified Public Accountants_.

St. Louis, _June 9, 1905_.

Estimate of current assets and liabilities at close of business,
May 3, 1905.

ASSETS.

Cash on hand with treasurer ............................... $199,888.36
Cash on hand with local treasurer ......................... 508.33
Cash on hand with paymaster ............................... 1,500.00
Cash on hand with police court ............................ 300.00
Bills receivable, S.W. Bolles ............................. 153.10
Due from Alexander on account of insurance ................ 2,040.80
Due from bonding company on account of gatemen ............ 335.20
Estimated revenue from admissions, three months ........... 3,750.00
Estimated collections from concessions,
balance due ................................. $281,252.98
Estimated collections from Pike rentals,
balance due ................................. 23,862.00
------------ 20,000.00
Estimated collections from service bills,
balance due ................................. 109,211.01 10,000.00
Estimated collections from capital stock,
balance due ................................. 473,741.69 20,000.00
Estimated collections from other sources .................. 5,000.00
Salvage, per certificates of deposit 463,662.56
Salvage, per bills receivable 150,000.00
------------ 613,662.56
Assets of General Service Company
(excluding bills against Louisiana
Purchase Exposition Company) ............................ 40,000.00
Cash in hands of trustees, on account of
ground rent .................................. 120,768.18
Cash in hands of trustees, on account of
music ........................................ 62,078.23
----------- 182,846.41
----------
$1,099,984.76

(See note.)

LIABILITIES.

Warrants unpaid ................................ $43,863.60
Less warrants payable to General Service
Company ...................................... 13,706.33
----------- 30,157.27
Special and trust fund .................................... 12,599.04
Vouchered accounts, no warrants drawn .......... 56,664.66
Less General Service Company vouchers .......... 26,255.93
----------- 30,408.73
Ground rent ............................................... 9,500.00
Tesson heirs' claim ....................................... 5,300.00
Unvouchered accounts:
Division of works--
Electrical department ...................... $31,257.10
Mechanical department ...................... 12,702.44
Civil engineering .......................... 7,723.56
Director's office .......................... 2,994.24
----------- 54,677.34
Concessions and admissions--
Woodward & Tiernan ......................... 2,945.15
J.E. Allison ............................... 39.28
David L. Grey .............................. 456.00
----------- 3.440.43
Division of exhibits--
Director's office .......................... 2,140.50
Awards ..................................... 1,784.50
Art ........................................ 262.87
Live stock ................................. 59.25
Electricity ................................ 30.25
Education .................................. 4.10
Manufactures ............................... .25
Physical culture ........................... $30.70
Anthropology ............................... 387.40
Machinery .................................. 76.00
Mines and metallurgy ....................... 200.00
Model street ............................... 30.70
Salary, three days in May .................. 107.46
----------- $5,113.98
Park restoration, three days' salaries and wages .......... 448.41
Park restoration, Art Museum, salaries and wages .......... 117.17
Transportation, salaries and wages ........................ 29.04
Legal department, salaries and wages ...................... 112.11
Secretary's office, salaries and wages .................... 426.20
Auditor's office, salaries and wages ...................... 128.61
Collector and local treasurer, salaries and wages ......... 54.40
Treasurer's office, salaries and wages .................... 27.76
Care of buildings (janitors), salaries and wages .......... 17.91
Report of Congress of Arts and Sciences ................... 4,213.91
Diplomas .................................................. 44,000.00
Unmatured liabilities:
Administration expenses during liquidation of
Exposition Company (estimated) ........................ 100,000.00
Publication of president's report ....................... 10,000.00
Publication reports Congress of Arts and
Sciences .............................................. 18,000.00
Publication of physical-culture reports ................. 5,000.00
Restoration of Forest Park (estimated) .................. 200,000.00
Restoration of leased tracts and additional
rental thereon (estimated) ............................ 50,000.00
Taxes for three years on leased tracts, in litigation
(estimated) ........................................... 25,000.00
Contingent fund ......................................... 20,000.00
Administration expenses of superior jury ................ 4,000.00
Excess of current assets over current liabilities,
which is exclusive of contingent liabilities in the
shape of suits pending versus Louisiana Purchase
Exposition Company, and other items as per memorandum
below ................................................... 467,211.45
----------
$1,099,984.76

CONTINGENT LIABILITIES.

Suits pending against Exposition Company:
Exposition Water Company ................................ 63,000.00
Fraternal Identification Company ........................ 50,000.00
Charles Holloway ........................................ 2,000.00
Star Bottling Company ................................... 235,449.79
Do .................................................... 30,600.00
Gardner T. Voorhees ..................................... 25,000.00
Exposition Water Company ................................ 63,000.00
Bessie M. Liggett (two suits), action for rent
of New York office .................................... 1,500.00
Willis .................................................. 15,000.00
John Culligan ........................................... 100.00
-------------
$562,849.79

(In addition to the above there are a number of claims made by
concessionaires, aggregating a large amount, which have not yet
been put in suit.)

CONTINGENT ASSETS.

There may be an appropriation made at next session of Congress
to pay amount due Louisiana Purchase Exposition Company on
account of Philippine exhibit, which amounts to ............ $100,000.00

(This is so uncertain that it can not be counted as a probable asset.)

NOTE.--In the assets is listed trustees' fund, $182,846.41. This
amount is not at present an available asset, for the reason that
it is a trust fund placed to secure bondsmen for ground rent and
other purposes, and may be partially or totally absorbed for the
reimbursement of bondsmen who may be defendants in suits that may
be instituted.

* * * * *

EXHIBITS TO STATEMENTS OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS, APRIL 30, 1905.

EXHIBIT A.--_Admissions collections, April 30, 1905_.

Admissions collections:
Preexposition ........................................... $175,906.25
Exposition .............................................. 5,704,846.15
Postexposition ......................................... 16,156.50
Chicago day tickets ....................................... 270.00
National Commission season tickets ........................ 28,637.50
November tickets .......................................... 4,870.00
St. Louis day admissions .................................. 39,536.00
Season tickets ............................................ 94,030.00
Single admission tickets .................................. 14,651.00
Special August tickets .................................... 1,410.00
Stockholders' tickets ..................................... 160,167.50
-------------
Total ................................................. 6,240,480.90

EXHIBIT B.--_Concessions collections, April 30, 1905_.

Concessions revenue:
Preexposition ........................................... $32,366.06
Exposition .............................................. 2,808,995.59
Postexposition .......................................... 1,855.54
Concessions receipts, subsequently refunded (contra) ...... 15,554.00
Catlin tract Pike rentals ................................. 218,187.50
-------------
Total ................................................. 3,076,958.69

EXHIBIT C.--_Receipts account of service, power, light, and
water bills, etc., April 30, 1905_.

Miscellaneous, prior to September 3, 1902 ................. $434.45
Animals, care of .......................................... 55.00
Bags ...................................................... 1,971.30
Blacksmith shop ........................................... 121.35
Building permits .......................................... 1,015.58
Cinders ................................................... 142.50
Coal sold ................................................. 1,040.70
Cleaning closets .......................................... 263.50
Cord wood ................................................. 3,020.94
Cremating animals ......................................... 141.30
Damages ................................................... 11.41
Dam in Arrowhead .......................................... 3,068.93
Draft returned ............................................ 1,000.00
Electric connections, various service ..................... 686.00
Electric power service .................................... 7,609.09
Force account ............................................. 21,798.14
Freight charges ........................................... 119.11
Garbage cans .............................................. 465.00
Gas connections and inspections ........................... 530.00
Hauling garbage, etc ...................................... 871.54
Light service ............................................. 7,639.57
Miscellaneous ............................................. 5,264.41
Miscellaneous hauling ..................................... 22.75
Paving .................................................... 138.60
Permits other than buildings .............................. $830.59
Piling .................................................... 589.10
Rebates on collections .................................... 15,011.58
Removing garbage .......................................... 1,767.85
Removing rubbish .......................................... 435.60
Rent of cross arms ........................................ 438.95
Rent of conduits .......................................... 1,108.04
Repairs ................................................... 24.12
Salvage ................................................... 87.26
Sawmill ................................................... 950.42
Alternating currents ...................................... 26.26
Amperes oven service ...................................... 41.25
Compressed air service .................................... 1,310.50
Electric heater service ................................... 533.31
Fan power service ......................................... 1,948.36
Furnace service ........................................... 5.71
Gaslight service .......................................... 5,799.75
Arc light service ......................................... 13,112.32
Incandescent service ...................................... 243,578.64
Miscellaneous service ..................................... 17,246.36
Changing electric service ................................. 150.00
Miscellaneous electric service ............................ 81,425.68
Miscellaneous light service ............................... 3,907.45
Picture machine service ................................... 27.50
Searchlight service ....................................... 202.20
Motor service ............................................ 82,597.25
Steam service ............................................. 1,661.02
Telephone service ......................................... 540.56
Water service ............................................. 68,023.74
Water applications and inspections ........................ 14,672.50
Sewer applications and inspections ........................ 6,240.00
Plumbing applications and inspections ..................... 5,436.00
Compressed air connections ................................ 35.00
Electric heater connections ............................... 40.00
Fan power applications and connections .................... 150.00
Gas connections ........................................... 1.059.40
Gas inspections ........................................... 211.00
Arc light connections ..................................... 170.64
Incandescent light connections ............................ 5,780.32
Miscellaneous electric connections ........................ 116.85
Miscellaneous light connections ........................... 210.00
Light applications, etc. .................................. 413.00
Miscellaneous connections ................................. 60.64
Miscellaneous inspections ................................. 6.50
Motor applications and connections ........................ 2,556.43
Picture machine connections ............................... 5.00
Plumbing applications ..................................... 1,202.75
Plumbing inspections ...................................... 1,055.50
Sewer applications ........................................ 647.00
Sewer inspections ......................................... 420.00
Sanitary sewer applications ............................... 1,820.00
Sanitary sewer inspections ................................ 1,530.00
Steam pipe connections .................................... 7.50
Steam sewer connections ................................... 191.35
Water applications ........................................ 2,702.35
Water inspections ......................................... 1,605.00
High pressure applications ................................ 3,125.00
High pressure inspections ................................. 1,047.50
Various direct currents ................................... 26.00
Force account, post-exposition ............................ 78.33
Arc light service, post-exposition ........................ 591.41
Gas connections, post-exposition .......................... 10.00
Gaslight service, post-exposition ......................... 92.16
Crane service, post-exposition ............................ 19.50
Incandescent light service, post-exposition ............... 112.93
Miscellaneous service, post-exposition .................... 89.98
Water service, post-exposition ............................ $1,333.02
Removing garbage, post-exposition ......................... .40
Gas inspections ........................................... .50
-------------
Total ................................................... 655,684.00

EXHIBIT D.--_Transportation collections, April 30, 1905._

Switching:
Exposition period ....................................... $135,087.12
Postexposition period ..................................... 71,169.34
Car service ............................................... 5,148.30
Parking private cars ...................................... 2,506.00
Drayage ................................................... 5.32
Miscellaneous ............................................. 4,291.12
-------------
Total ................................................... 218,207.20

EXHIBIT E.--_Interest receipts, April 30, 1905._

Interest on deposits ...................................... $116,356.03
Interest on Government loan ............................... 3,926.63
Washington University, special fund ....................... 8,544.49
Pike rental, special fund ................................. 2,580.68
-------------
Total ................................................... 131,407.83

EXHIBIT F.--_Miscellaneous collections, April 30, 1905._

Refunds prior to September 3, 1902 ........................ $4,870.46
Admissions, exposition .................................... 201.61
Admissions department ..................................... 102.66
Ceremonies, dedication .................................... 22.40
Conscience fund ........................................... 31.25
Drafts returned ........................................... 186.00
Freight charges refunded .................................. 367.70
Miscellaneous collections ................................. 2,411.98
Interest on stock notes ................................... 1,260.04
Interest on stock of estate ............................... 3.90
Interest and costs, delinquent subscriptions .............. 111.52
Janitor service ........................................... 1,650.62
Lost property ............................................. .50
Miscellaneous sales ....................................... 9,516.84
Percentages, Bell Telephone Company pay stations .......... 1,363.51
Postage ................................................... 5.39
Redemption of horses and vehicles ......................... 86.00
Rent ...................................................... 13.00
Sale of buildings ......................................... 50.00
Sale of property .......................................... 3,248.78
Geo. F. Parker, resident representative, London ........... 145.03
Intramural railway maintenance ............................ 180.55
Concessions department, ticket account .................... 47.50
Concessions ............................................... 10.50
Ticket sellers, change account ............................ 40.00
Impounding vehicles ....................................... 1.00
Force account, postexposition ............................. 228.00
Miscellaneous, postexposition ............................. 75.62
Postage, postexposition ................................... 2.85
Physical-culture fund ..................................... 3,495.31
Aeronautics entry fees .................................... 1,500.00
Insurance premiums refunded ............................... 63,983.17
Refrigerating plant receipts .............................. 20,178.99
Garbage coupon books ...................................... 11,506.80
Refund account, overpayments .............................. 4,715.96
Personal damage receipts .................................. 2,572.50
Property damage receipts .................................. 72.50
Uniform account, special fund ............................. 2,514.89
-------------
Total ................................................... 136,775.33

EXHIBIT G.--_Construction, April 30, 1905._

Architecture, department of ............................... $138,395.61
Architects' commissions ................................... 81,000.00
Architects' fees and expense .............................. 94,019.88
Agriculture Building ...................................... 524,185.51
Approaches to Government Building ......................... 34,585.90
Art Building .............................................. 945,849.45
Athletic field ............................................ 16,000.00
Band stands ............................................... 25,793.00
Barracks buildings ........................................ 26,925.75
Bridges, permanent ........................................ 102,785.07
Bridges, temporary ........................................ 1,666.78
Building, engineers ....................................... 11,578.85
Cascades and terraces, excavating ......................... 142,629.08
Civil engineers ........................................... 308,031.74
Dairy barn building ....................................... 27,570.08
Day nursery building ...................................... 6,035.82
Drainage .................................................. 100,813.86
Drinking fountains ........................................ 898.00
Director's office ......................................... 224,008.48
Electricity and Machinery ................................. 444,553.70
Electricity and machinery department ...................... 122,589.49
Electric and power plant .................................. 2,868,047.38
Electrical subway ......................................... 23,494.33
Emergency installation .................................... 13,746.91
Engine house .............................................. 41,152.18
Exhibitors' exposition power plant ........................ 201,099.93
Exhibitors' pre-exposition power plant .................... 16,989.63
Entrances ................................................. 31,736.00
Finish on bridges, lagoons, and cascades .................. 155,488.72
Festival Hall ............................................. 221,999.45
Fire department, temporary building ....................... 220.71
Fire plant ................................................ 370,622.09
Forestry, Fish, and Game Building ......................... 174,317.38
Fences .................................................... 37,325.16
Filtration plant .......................................... 11,689.20
Freight platforms ......................................... 14,298.51
Furniture and fixtures .................................... 19,727.83
Garbage crematory ......................................... 8,746.90
Grading ................................................... 269,454.94
Gas piping ................................................ 44,665.62
Horticulture Building ..................................... 225,408.27
Horses, harness, and vehicles ............................. 7,069.30
Hospital building ......................................... 20,508.38
Hauling and piling up soil ................................ 1,720.80
Implements and tools ...................................... 9,271.02
Intramural railway ........................................ 498,393.90
Landscape gardening ....................................... 500,566.59
Louisiana Purchase Monument ............................... 7,593.93
Liberal Arts Building ..................................... 475,370.95
Live stock exhibit buildings .............................. 147,464.55
Machinery Building ........................................ 497,408.35
Manufactures Building ..................................... 710,284.49
Mines and Metallurgy Building ............................. 491,802.41
Mural decorations ......................................... 41,467.88
Philippine Commission ..................................... 198,442.15
Police station ............................................ 6,646.17
Preparing grounds ......................................... 738,508.51
Press building ............................................ 4,899.32
Pump well, pavilion, and conduit .......................... 37,845.24
Plumbing .................................................. 129,834.02
Refrigerating and ice plants .............................. 37,177.84
Restaurants and colonades ................................. 174,106.80
Reservoirs ................................................ 3,013.53
Roadways .................................................. 441,676.12
Sculpture ................................................. 518,039.87
Sculpture Hall Building ................................... $39,388.99
Service building .......................................... 41,743.81
Shelter houses ............................................ 4,924.35
Stables ................................................... 6,167.01
Sewers .................................................... 62,700.14
Sawmill ................................................... 6,781.24
Street railway, private right of way ...................... 12,788.98
Supplies, miscellaneous ................................... 9,053.73
Temporary boiler house .................................... 1,808.50
Textiles Building ......................................... 381,446.85
Ticket booths ............................................. 6,940.00
Turnstiles ................................................ 25,416.15
Town Hall Building ........................................ 15,398.34
Transportation Building ................................... 675,586.39
Triumphal causeway ........................................ 7,885.00
Uniforms .................................................. 1,054.42
United States life-saving exhibit ......................... 925.25
Varied Industries Building ................................ 733,831.21
Warehouse Building ........................................ 24,446.87
Water mains ............................................... 159,650.94
Waterways ................................................. 34,643.38
Water rent ................................................ 72,207.50
West pavilion ............................................. 5,722.50
Widening and straightening river Des Peres ................ 115,159.78
World's fair terminals .................................... 454,824.81
-------------
Total .................................................. 16,729,755.48

EXHIBIT H.--_Rent of grounds and buildings, April 30, 1905._

Washington University tract ............................... $750,000.00
Other tracts west of Skinker road ......................... 230,250.00
Catlin tract .............................................. 200,000.00
Sundry ground rents ....................................... 25,403.36
Coliseum .................................................. 18,666.66
Offices ................................................... 15,793.78
-------------
Total ................................................... 1,240,113.80

EXHIBIT I.--_Maintenance and operating, April 30, 1905._

Care of buildings ......................................... $89,251.97
Electric and power plant .................................. 675,462.29
Electric power rentals .................................... 28,438.91
Fuel not yet distributed .................................. 2,299.43
Gas-light buildings ....................................... 1,474.16
Garbage cremation ......................................... 5,083.08
Maintenance of--
Grounds ................................................. 77,902.63
Roads ................................................... 20,228.49
Lagoons, cascades, and basins ........................... 2,408.33
Fire plant .............................................. 3,499.69
Operating expenses:
Buildings ............................................... 11,914.50
Landscape gardening ..................................... 24,365.86
Lavatories .............................................. 583.83
Waterways ............................................... 1,405.87
Miscellaneous ........................................... 5,308.30
Repairing buildings ....................................... 46,672.38
Refrigeration ............................................. 14,735.53
Removal of garbage and rubbish ............................ 21,227.60
Sewers, water supply system ............................... 1,824.17
Special police ............................................ 7,034.94
Telephone rentals ......................................... 29,102.97
United States Life-saving station ......................... 312.52

Total ................................................... 1,070,537.51

EXHIBIT J.--_Exhibits division, April 30, 1905._

Aeronautics ............................................... $42,405.98
Agriculture ............................................... 77,382.24
Agriculture, live-stock section ........................... 281,275.37
Anthropology .............................................. 76,443.95
Art ....................................................... 131,138.89
Director's office ......................................... 145,899.05
Education ................................................. 49.684.59
Electricity ............................................... 52,934.65
Fish and game ............................................. 27,664.88
Forestry .................................................. 13,409.84
Horticulture .............................................. 91,174.48
International congresses .................................. 131,842.43
International jury of awards .............................. 109,882.62
Liberal arts .............................................. 45,094.44
Machinery ................................................. 61,686.62
Manufactures .............................................. 86,487.23
Mines and metallurgy ...................................... 85,042.23
Music ..................................................... 494,984.48
Physical culture .......................................... 87,876.53
Social economy ............................................ 42,376.81
Transportation ............................................ 54,438.62
-------------
Total ................................................... 2,189,125.93

EXHIBIT K.--_Exploitation division, April 30, 1905._

Argentina ................................................. $29,958.08
Australia ................................................. 4,452.20
Alabama ................................................... 22.30
Arkansas .................................................. 98.41
Bureau of information ..................................... 9,728.37
Brazil .................................................... 16,789.30
Central American States ................................... 12,643.84
Cuba ...................................................... 5,503.48
California ................................................ 600.20
Colorado .................................................. 61.91
Connecticut ............................................... 689.77
Director's office ......................................... 22,865.10
Domestic office ........................................... 36,415.86
Domestic incidentals ...................................... 32,722.72
Delaware .................................................. 125.43
Dutch manufacturers in Holland ............................ 1,012.33
Egypt ..................................................... 5,432.26
Europe .................................................... 43,773.46
Eastern headquarters ...................................... 9,310.59
Emblem account ............................................ 1,035.38
Emergency exploitation .................................... 872.27
Fourth of July celebration ................................ 8,561.24
Florida ................................................... 1,019.40
Germany ................................................... 10,724.77
Georgia ................................................... 191.61
Foreign incidentals ....................................... 18,232.25
India ..................................................... 4,949.36
Italy ..................................................... 11,011.31
Idaho ..................................................... 80.60
Illinois .................................................. 22.05
Incidentals, various States ............................... 3,696.96
Indiana ................................................... 35.75
Indian Territory .......................................... 755.43
Iowa ...................................................... 164.03
Kansas .................................................... 15.00
Kentucky .................................................. 1,524.99
London ................................................... 17,807.78
Maine ..................................................... $94.25
Maryland .................................................. 671.66
Massachusetts ............................................. 264.14
Michigan .................................................. 1,339.55
Minnesota ................................................. 959.58
Mississippi ............................................... 193.05
Municipal exhibits ........................................ 52.55
Nebraska .................................................. 417.41
New England States ........................................ 78.00
New York .................................................. 657.19
New York, New Jersey, and Rhode Island .................... 455.90
North Carolina ............................................ 1,499.92
New Hampshire ............................................. 150.25
North Dakota .............................................. 317.96
Netherlands ............................................... 45.00
Oriental countries ........................................ 46,388.68
Ohio ...................................................... 429.80
Paris ..................................................... 11,229.17
Portugal .................................................. 1,384.62
Press representative to Europe ............................ 14,144.79
Pan-American Exposition Building .......................... 15,826.09
Press and publicity ....................................... 435,118.82
Pennsylvania .............................................. 241.10
Peru, Ecuador, and Venezuela .............................. 17,652.97
Rhode Island .............................................. 965.80
Russia .................................................... 600.00
South Carolina ............................................ 1,826.18
Southern States ........................................... 3,737.28
South Dakota .............................................. 123.85
South Africa .............................................. 945.33
Spain ..................................................... 2,261.23
Special Commissioner Buchanan ............................. 25,070.45
New York and Massachusetts ................................ 159.50
Special Commissioner Hayward .............................. 3,000.73
Sweden and Norway ......................................... 12,318.15
South Carolina and Interstate and West Indian Exposition .. 11,948.82
Saengerfest subscription .................................. 5,000.00
Tennessee ................................................ 697.51
Texas ..................................................... 159.00
Transportation day ........................................ 7,908.22
Vermont ................................................... 10.00
Virginia .................................................. 1,122.80
Windward Islands and Trinidad ............................. 1,200.00
World's Fair Fraternal Association ........................ 2,945.00
Dedication ceremonies ..................................... 233,341.16
Ceremonies ................................................ 2,744.13
Bureau of ceremonies ...................................... 39,693.86
Entertainments ............................................ 70,583.36
Receptions and entertainments ............................. 8,736.73
Competitive drills ........................................ 7,500.00
Pike day expenses ......................................... 9,190.57
Promotion ................................................. 5,928.26
Firemen's convention and tournament ....................... 2,814.60
Good roads conventions .................................... 2,286.35
-------------
Total ................................................... 1,327,337.11

Exhibit L.--_Protection, April 30, 1905._

Fire department ........................................... $162,471.26
Medical department ........................................ 37,559.01
Jefferson Guards .......................................... 471,245.74
Custodian of buildings .................................... 2,354.07
Fire-fighting exhibit:
Preexposition ........................................... 16,500.00
Exposition .............................................. 25,000.00
Insurance:
Accident ................................................ $86,174.33
Boilers ................................................. 541.28
Buildings ............................................... 260,172.35
Contents of buildings ................................... 24,607.07
Miscellaneous ........................................... 1,404.90
Premium on Fidelity bonds ................................. 1,962.34
-------------
Total ................................................... 1,089,992.35

EXHIBIT M.--_Concessions and admissions division, April 30, 1905._

Advance payments, concessions ............................. $27.00
Admissions department ..................................... 280,337.55
Concessions department .................................... 222,664.57
Collector's office ........................................ 36,756.99
Ticket account ............................................ 138.00
-------------
Total ................................................... 564,112.28

EXHIBIT N.--_Executive and administrative division, April 30, 1905._

Auditor's office .......................................... $61,025.11
Collector's office ........................................ 36,756.99
Incidental expenses ....................................... 24,341.83
Legal department .......................................... 87,598.15
Local treasurer's office .................................. 12,703.22
President's office ........................................ 9,963.17
President's contingent fund ............................... 1,413.63
Secretary's office ........................................ 155,687.16
Supply department ......................................... 21,430.07
Treasurer's office ........................................ 29,954.53
-------------
Total ................................................... 440,874.46

EXHIBIT O.--_Transportation bureau, April 30, 1905._

Director's office ......................................... $12,003.04
Equipment ................................................. 805.00
Intramural Railway:
Operating ............................................... 59,578.81
Maintenance ............................................. 5,694.39
Operating department ...................................... 210,976.38
Traffic manager ........................................... 15,449.05
World's Fair terminal, maintenance ........................ 16,567.91
-------------
Total ................................................... 321,074.58

EXHIBIT P.--_Money advanced, April 30, 1905._

Board of lady managers .................................... $3,000.00
Bolles, S. W .............................................. 153.10
Buchanan W. I ............................................. 71.02
Chase, C.A., paymaster .................................... 1,500.00
Emergency exploitation committee .......................... 152,986.49
Kurtz & Watrous ........................................... 8,000.00
Money changers at entrances ............................... 665.20
Moore, Thomas M ........................................... 1,100.37
Thompson, J.C., jr ........................................ 16.00
-------------
Total ................................................... 167,350.14

EXHIBIT Q.--_Miscellaneous, April 30, 1905._

Accrued interest, city of St. Louis bonds ................. $35,901.34
Band contests ............................................. 500.00
Bond for rent of land ..................................... 540.00
Disbursement agent, United States Government .............. $8,500.38
Interest on bills payable and advances on capital stock ... 15,625.55
Inside Inn ................................................ 147.49
National Civic Federation ................................. 73.13
Operating expenses, sanitation ............................ 400.44
Press parliament .......................................... 1,132.90
Personal damages .......................................... 6,171.70
Postage ................................................... 21.64
Refund:
Admissions .............................................. 405.20
Concessions collections ................................. 15,554.00
Grounds and buildings collections ....................... 1,656.97
Photo pass account ...................................... 1,154.00
Transportation collections .............................. 502.53
Sanitation ................................................ 430.90
Supervision of sanitation ................................. 382.19
Telegrams ................................................. 2,254.46
Refund, overpayment of capital stock ...................... 1,816.33
Ways and means committee .................................. 65.26
Million Population Club ................................... 20.00
Park restoration .......................................... 9,527.35
Park restoration, Art Museum .............................. 1,043.39
Salvage expense ........................................... 240.31
Damage to property ........................................ 5,269.00
Refund, season tickets .................................... 75.00
Special exhibit, Agricultural Hall ........................ 5,509.32
-------------
Total ..................................................... 114,920.78

Condensed statement showing estimated financial result of the exposition.

RECEIPTS.

Subscribed funds:
United States Government ................................. $4,752,968.45
City of St Louis ......................................... 4,964.148.66
Individual subscriptions ................................. 4,839,867.28
-------------- $14,556,984.39
Loans:
United States Government ................................. 4,600,000.00
Loan on stock subscriptions, etc. ........................ 438,000.00
--------------
5,038,000.00
Less repaid .............................................. 5,038,000.00
--------------
Revenue:
Admissions ............................................... 6,244,544.65
Concessions .............................................. 3,081,406.78
All other sources ........................................ 1,931,571.35
--------------
11,257,522.78
--------------
25,814,507.17

DISBURSEMENTS.

Expenditures:
Construction .............................................$16,729,755.49
Less salvage 625,680.90
--------------
16,104,074.59
Rents of grounds and buildings ........................... 1,279,913.80
All other expenses ....................................... 7,713,307.34
Estimated liability for restoration of site .............. 250,000.00
-------------
$25,347,295.73
Surplus, subject to liability on pending suits and claims 467,211.45
--------------
25,814,507.18

The above condensed statement has been prepared from the
accounts of the company to May 3, 1905, and from an estimate of
future receipts and expenditures furnished us by the president
of the Exposition Company.

JONES, CAESAR, DICKINSON, WILMOT & CO.

ST. Louis, _June 12, 1905_.

APPENDIX 2.

DISPOSAL OF SALVAGE OF LOUISIANA PURCHASE EXPOSITION.

State of Missouri, _City of St. Louis_, ss:

Before me, this the 16th day of March, 1905, personally appeared H.S.
Albrecht, who, being duly sworn, on his oath says:

My name is H.S. Albrecht. I reside in St. Louis. Have lived here the
past twenty-five years. I am engaged in business in St. Louis. In regard
to the sale of the salvage of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition Company
I herewith make the following statement:

When I saw by the papers that bids were requested for the wrecking and
removal of certain exhibit buildings now on the World's Fair grounds I
decided that I would make a bid on same. I submitted a bid on that part
of the salvage to be disposed of as shown in the specifications prepared
by Director of Works Taylor and on following buildings:

Mines and Metallurgy; Liberal Arts; Education and Social Economy;
Manufactures; Electricity; Varied Industries; Machinery; Transportation;
Forestry, Fish, and Game; Agricultural; Horticulture; four dairy barns,
octagonal; live-stock forum; Live-Stock Congress Hall; stock barns;
Steam, Gas, and Fuel Building, and cooling towers; Festival Hall;
terrace of States, including pedestals and statuary; two pagoda
restaurant buildings on Art Hill; four fire-engine houses; five
toilet-room buildings; five band stands.

The time limit set for the removal of the buildings and debris was
short--namely, three months--and no one could make a reasonable bid. I
made my bid in the sum of only $50,000 for that reason, and accompanied
same by a certified check for $25,000, as required by the Exposition
Company.

The bids were to be opened at 12 o'clock noon of November 10. I, with a
number of other bidders, was present in an anteroom adjoining the office
of Mr. Isaac S. Taylor, director of works. The bids were not opened at
the appointed hour, and we waited there for three hours and until 3
o'clock. We expected the bids to be opened in public, as is done by the
United States Government and the city when they dispose of large
properties. We were called into Mr. Taylor's office and were informed by
President D.R. Francis that the bids would not be opened in public, but
in private. I immediately arose and offered an objection to this mode of
procedure, as I did not think it was the proper way to handle the
matter. I told them what I thought of the whole proposition. My protest
was a vigorous one. A Mr. Harris, a representative of the Chicago House
Wrecking Company, immediately arose and stated that he desired to have
his bid kept secret. Mr. Francis overruled my objection and sustained
Mr. Harris. Mr. Francis asked the other bidders present what they
desired as to the manner of handling the bids, and they all stated that
the bids should be opened in public and not in private. Not only as a
contractor, but as a stockholder of the Exposition Company, I demanded
that the bids be opened publicly, in a straightforward manner. We were
instructed to go out into the anteroom and remain until called for.
About fifteen minutes later I was recalled alone to the meeting room of
the salvage committee, where President Francis questioned me in regard
to the $50,000 bid, and asked whether I could remove the property in the
time limit set. I informed the gentlemen that I could make my bid
considerably higher if I was granted more time in which to remove the
debris. President Francis asked me how much more I could bid, and I told
him I could not state offhand. The conditions as to the removal of the
wreckage in the specified time, namely, three months, were somewhat
prohibitive, as it would be impossible to fulfill the requirements
without an enormous expense. It would be well-nigh impossible to get
sufficient men and teams on the work to complete the same in the
specified time. President Francis stated to me that it was probable that
all the bids would be rejected. I requested him to ask for new bids,
which were to be opened in public, or that the property be sold at
public auction. I saw by the newspapers a few days later that all bids
had been rejected, and my check for $25,000 was returned to me. I later
saw by the papers that the Exposition Company contemplated forming a
company among the directors and wreck the buildings themselves and
dispose of the salvage. Later on I saw in the papers that the Chicago
House Wrecking Company was figuring to buy all the World's Fair
property, and was about to close a deal for the purchase of the salvage
in the sum of $386,000.

No further information as to the sale of the salvage was ever furnished
me, nor was any notice given me that further or additional bids would be
received.

I had never at any time been furnished a list of the property for sale,
and made my bid on the buildings as shown by the specifications prepared
by Mr. Taylor, director of works. I requested a list of the property for
sale, but was never able to get one.

As soon as I heard that the property of the exposition was to be sold to
the Chicago House Wrecking Company for the sum of $386,000 I wrote a
letter to President Francis as follows:

DECEMBER 5, 1905.

GENTLEMEN: Noticing in the daily papers that you will sell the
entire property owned by the Louisiana Purchase Exposition,
including railway tracks, exhibit and other buildings, fencing,
furniture, wiring, lamps, piping, plumbing, machinery, etc.--in
fact, everything owned by the company. If this is the fact we
can pay you about $400,000 and perhaps more. Will you kindly
furnish us a complete list of everything that you have for sale
and specified time of removal, so we can give you an intelligent
bid or proposition?

Very respectfully,
SCHOELLHORN-ALBRECHT REAL ESTATE CO.,
Per H.S. ALBRECHT, _President_.

President D.R. FRANCIS and
BOARD OF DIRECTORS ON SALVAGE,
_Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis._

I failed to receive a reply to the above letter or to receive a list of
the property to be sold, and was not notified that further bids would be
received therefor. As far as I know, none of the former bidders, nor any
one else, for that matter, were given the slightest opportunity to bid
on the whole property, except the Chicago House Wrecking Company.

There seemed to be a disposition on the part of the salvage committee to
observe the greatest secrecy in procuring the bids and the awarding of
the contract. The property was not properly advertised and lists were
not furnished to bidders, as is customary in public sales, where large
amounts of valuable property is to be sold.

From the contract between the Exposition Company and the Chicago House
Wrecking Company, now a matter of record here, I have noticed the nature
of the material and property sold to the Chicago House Wrecking Company,
and had I been furnished a list of that property I would have bid
$750,000, all cash, and would have made a great profit on it at that
price. If the property had been properly listed and widely advertised,
much higher bids would have been made. If the property had been properly
advertised and had been sold at public auction, in detail, I am safe in
saying that the Exposition Company would have realized more than
$1,000,000 out of the salvage. In my opinion the property delivered to
the Chicago House Wrecking Company was of the market value of fully
$1,500,000.

H.S. ALBRECHT.

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 16th day of March, 1905. My
commission expires on the 22d day of July, 1909.

[SEAL.] IRA C. MONEY,
_Notary Public, City of St. Louis, Mo._

STATE OF MISSOURI, _City of St. Louis, ss:_

Before me, this the 16th day of March, 1905, personally appeared Charles
L. McDonald, who, being duly sworn, on his oath says:

My name is Charles L. McDonald. I reside in the city of St. Louis. Am
connected with the St. Louis Steam Forge and Iron works. I saw by the
St. Louis Globe-Democrat of October 17, 1904, that Mr. Isaac S. Taylor,
director of works of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, had requested
sealed proposals addressed to the "Committee on Salvage and Sale of
Buildings," for the wrecking and removal of certain exhibit buildings
now on the World's Fair grounds, and that specifications and
instructions for the above-mentioned work and drawings and
specifications of the buildings to be wrecked could be seen at the
office of Mr. Taylor. All bids were to be in Mr. Taylor's office by 12
o'clock noon of Thursday, November 10, 1904.

The specifications and instructions as prepared by Mr. Taylor for the
wrecking of the buildings, and for which sealed proposals were
requested, only applied to the following buildings: Mines and
Metallurgy; Liberal Arts; Education and Social Economy; Manufactures;
Electricity; Varied Industries; Machinery; Transportation; Forestry,
Fish, and Game; Agriculture; Horticulture; four dairy barns, octagonal;
live stock forum; Live Stock Congress Hall; stock barns; steam, gas, and
fuel buildings and cooling towers; Festival Hall; terrace of States,
including pedestals and statuary; two pagoda restaurant buildings on Art
Hill; four fire-engine houses; five toilet-room buildings; five band
stands; and excluded, or rather did not include, all electrical wiring,
piping, plumbing, roadmaking machinery, fire hose in the various
buildings, two hospitals complete, Jefferson Guards' uniforms and
accouterments, railroad tracks in the various buildings, the Intramural
Railway, which included all the equipment (except the cars), hothouses,
horses, wagons, and vehicles of all kinds, and many other valuable
items.

I submitted a bid on one of the buildings only. However, I was
associated with Mr. Albrecht and others when he submitted a bid on all
the buildings as shown by the printed list, and was also concerned with
him in his proposition of December 5, wherein he offered $400,000 cash
for the property, and more if a list of all the property could be
secured.

The conditions embodied in the specifications and contract, with
reference to the time limit for the removal of all the debris from day
to day as the work progressed were too exacting, in that they did not
allow sufficient time, and if the same were strictly enforced by
Director of Works Taylor would materially add to the expense of the
contractor. The time was too short for the amount of work to be done.

On November 10, at the hour called for the opening of the bids, I was
present and appeared with other bidders before the committee on salvage.
I, with a number of other bidders, waited until after 3 o'clock for the
committee to get together and open the bids, and was very much surprised
when President Francis announced that all bids would be opened in secret
by the committee. This procedure was not in accordance with the custom
of the Government and city in the handling of its property when same is
for sale under bids. Mr. Albrecht objected to the bids being opened in
secret session and demanded that they be opened before the bidders.
President Francis asked me what I had to say about the way in which the
bids were to be handled, and I answered that I could do nothing more
than emphasize the protests of Mr. Albrecht.

I have been a bidder at many sales of both Government and city,
property, and the method employed at such sales provided for the opening
of bids in public in the presence of such bidders as desired to be
present.

A few days later I saw by the papers that the Exposition Company had
rejected all bids. After the rejection of our first sealed bids, I
learned through another bidder, with whom I was interested, that the
World's Fair officials had announced that it was probable that they
would wreck the exposition buildings themselves. Upon this information I
dropped the matter and heard nothing further about the bidding until it
was announced that the Chicago House Wrecking Company had secured the
contract. When I heard that the Fair Company proposed to do its own
wrecking I thought it a good plan.

The carrying on of the bidding through private negotiations, as
President Francis terms it, was not, I contend, the most advantageous to
the Exposition Company and its stockholders. If they had given all the
bidders an equal show in the matter, and had furnished a list of the
property to be sold, much higher bids would have been obtained.

The secrecy with which the contracts were handled did not give the
bidders a fair opportunity, and was, I believe, an injustice to the
thousands of stockholders of the exposition. The United States
Government, the city of St. Louis, and the stockholders were partners in
the exposition, which made the fair unquestionably a public institution.
Why, then, were not the bids opened in public, thus securing the largest
amount for the exposition and for the stockholders? This was not done.
If it had been the bidding would have been greatly stimulated, bringing
results quite different. The salvage committee refused to allow the bids
to be opened publicly before the contractors, but held them for their
eyes only. This is not in accordance with the manner of handling bids on
big public works. When the partial list of property was given out the
requirements in the specifications almost made the bidding prohibitive.
The Exposition Company demanded a check for half of the amount of the
bid. In all my experience I have never before been asked to meet such a
requirement. In itself that was almost enough to drive off the bidders.
The Chicago House Wrecking Company put up less than one-fourth of the
price to be paid, or $100,000.

I am of the opinion that had the Exposition Company properly prepared a
list of its properties and holdings and furnished the prospective
bidders with such lists and an opportunity for the examination of the
articles mentioned therein, together with a reasonable period of time
for removal of the buildings and debris, they could easily have obtained
$750,000.

I have obtained a more comprehensive knowledge of the amount and
character of the material and property since put into the hands of the
Chicago House Wrecking Company, and am of the opinion that at the time
the contract was made with the Chicago House Wrecking Company the
property sold represented a value in excess of $1,000,000.

There was present in the office of Mr. Taylor, director of works, at the
time the bids were to be opened the following members of the salvage
committee: President Francis, Director of Works Taylor, John A. Holmes,
Mr. Samuel Kennard, and Mr. John Scullin.

Had I been furnished with a list of all the properties that I have since
learned was acquired by the Chicago House Wrecking Company I would have
gladly submitted a bid in the amount of $500,000.

C.L. MCDONALD.

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 16th day of March, 1905. My
commission expires on the 22d day of January, 1909.
[SEAL.] IRA C. MONEY,
_Notary Public, City of St. Louis, Mo._

STATE OF ILLINOIS, _County of Cook, ss_:

Before me this the 28th day of March, 1905, personally appeared Mr. S.
Krug, who, being duly sworn, on his oath says:

My name is S. Krug. I am a resident of Chicago. Have resided here for
the past thirty-seven years. For the past twenty-seven years I have been
engaged in the excavating and sand business. During this time I have
also been engaged on contracts for wrecking large buildings. I wrecked
the First National Bank Building, the Metropolitan Building, the Montauk
Block; Hibbard, Spencer & Bartlett store, and numerous other large
buildings in Chicago.

In regard to the sale of the World's Fair salvage at St. Louis I will
make the following statement:

I was told by a friend of mine that bids had been requested for wrecking
and removal of certain World's Fair buildings at St. Louis, and that
specifications and instructions could be obtained from Mr. Isaac S.
Taylor, director of works. For business reasons I did not wish the
Exposition Company to know that I wanted to figure on the contract. I
asked a friend of mine to procure a copy of the specifications for me.
It was necessary for him to deposit $10 for the specifications. He sent
the specifications to me. Mr. John M. Dunphy, who is in my employ, and I
went over the specifications at length and studied them pretty
thoroughly. The specifications only referred to exhibit buildings, band
stands, fire-department houses, live-stock barns, dairy barns, Festival
Hall, fuel building, terrace of States, and toilet-room buildings. On
October 24, 1904, some ten days after we read over the specifications
and instructions, Mr. Dunphy, Mr. Powers, and myself went to St. Louis
to look over the plans to see the nature of the material and the
construction of the various buildings. We went to Mr. Taylor's office
and were informed that Mr. Taylor was busy and could not see us. Mr.
Taylor's secretary, Mr. Carl Hoblitzelle, took us into an adjoining
room. He did not ask our names, and we did not tell him who we were.
While we were waiting in this room--I presume we were there about five
minutes--Mr. Frank Harris, a member of the Chicago House Wrecking
Company, came into the room. It looked to me as if he had been posted as
to our, being there and came to see who we were. Mr. Harris remained
there three or four minutes and then left. We asked the clerk in charge
of the office there for the plans of the various buildings to be
wrecked. He handed us two sets of plans--one for the Agricultural and
one for the Horticultural Building. We requested more plans of him, but
he said he was too busy to take them down and immediately left the room
and remained out all the time we were in there. We went to the shelves
and took out the plans ourselves and looked them over. After we had
looked over the plans for a couple of hours we went out on the
exposition grounds, and spent the rest of that day and the next on the
grounds, and on the following day we returned to Chicago. The bids were
to be in Mr. Taylor's office by 12 o'clock noon Thursday, November 10,
1904. Mr. Schmitt, my bookkeeper, and myself went to St. Louis on
November 9 and were present at Mr. Taylor's office in the Administration
Building before the hour of 12 o'clock noon, November 10. I had prepared
my bid. At this time I only bid on the stock barns, live-stock forum,
Congress Hall, Agricultural and Horticultural buildings. I also had a
separate bid prepared for the Transportation Building, which I
submitted. I took my bids and handed them to Mr. Carl Hoblitzelle, Mr.
Taylor's private secretary. He placed them in his desk and said he would
bring them to the attention of the committee when the time came to open
the bids. Mr. Schmitt and I then went into an anteroom, where the other
bidders were gathered. There were present at the time Mr. H.S. Albrecht,
of the firm of Schoellhorn & Albrecht, St. Louis; Mr. Charles McDonald,
of the St. Louis Steam Forge Company, St. Louis; Mr. W. Ware, of the
Columbia Wrecking Company, St. Louis; a Mr. Schaeffer and son, of St.
Louis, and Mr. Frank and Abraham Harris, who represented the Chicago
House Wrecking Company. There were one or two other gentlemen present,
but I can not now recall their names. Some middle-aged man came in with
the Harris Brothers. He seemed to have free access to the room where the
salvage committee was in session, and ran back and forth two or three
times and held a conversation with the Harris Brothers in the hall. We
expected the bids to be opened at 1 o'clock. It was now some time after
1 o'clock. We were all waiting there when President Francis came in and
announced that they were going to lunch, and for us to come back later
on. We all left the room and I with several other gentlemen went to get
a little lunch. We were back in the anteroom of Mr. Taylor's office by
2.30 p. in. We waited there until 4 o'clock when Mr. Taylor's secretary
came into the room and requested all the bidders to go into the room
where the salvage committee was in session. The committee met in Mr.
Taylor's office. President Francis, Mr. Taylor, Samuel Kennard, Mr.
Holmes, and some other gentleman, I can not call his name now. President
Francis arose and said: "Gentlemen, the bids are all there on the table
and we will open them shortly." He asked how we wished the bids
handled--that is, whether we wanted them opened in our presence or in a
secret session of the Committee. Mr. H.S. Albrecht, of St. Louis,
immediately arose and stated that he wanted the bids opened in the
presence of the bidders present, as he wanted everything to be open and
above board. All the other bidders present requested that the bids be
opened in their presence, except Mr. Abraham Harris, president of the
Chicago House Wrecking Company, who arose and offered an objection to
the bids being opened in public, and stated that he did not want his bid
to be opened in public, but wanted it opened in private, for the reason
that he did not want everybody to know what his bid was; that if he was
the successful bidder his bid would be published and everybody would
know what it was, but if he was not the successful bidder he did not
want it known what amount he bid. President Francis held a whispered
conversation with several members of the committee and then turned to
the bidders and said: "Gentlemen, we have decided to open the bids in
secret session." He thus favored Mr. Harris and ignored the demand of
the other bidders. Mr. Albrecht again demanded that the bids be opened
in our presence. We were then told to repair to the anteroom and wait
until called for. While we were waiting in the anteroom Mr. Taylor's
secretary called Mr. Abe Harris into the committee room, where the
salvage committee was opening the bids. He remained in there some little
time. As soon as Mr. Harris came out Mr. H.S. Albrecht was called in. He
told me when he came out that he had entered a vigorous protest as to
the way the bids were being handled, and that he as a stockholder and a
bidder had again demanded that the bids be opened in the presence of the
bidders. Mr. Schmitt and myself were next called into the room where the
salvage committee was in session. Mr. Taylor asked me if I knew a Mr.
Schluetter, of Chicago. I told him that I was well acquainted with the
gentleman, that I had done considerable work for him in Chicago, and
that he had always paid me for it. When I made this remark President
Francis looked at Mr. Taylor and laughed in rather a sneering way. I
presumed from his actions that the Exposition Company had had some
trouble with Mr. Schluetter. President Francis said to me, "Mr. Krug,
you have some excellent recommendations here from prominent people and
banks of Chicago." I told him that I was well able to carry out any
contract I undertook, as I had good financial backing and understood my
business. He said to me, "Mr. Krug, your bid is very satisfactory, but
why have you not submitted a bid on all the buildings shown in the
specifications?" I told him I had taken into consideration the insurance
on the various buildings and that I was afraid I might have trouble in
getting insurance on all the buildings, and therefore submitted a bid on
buildings that were quite a distance apart and less liable to fire. I
told President Francis at this time that I was willing to submit a bid
for $76,600 on all the buildings shown in the specifications prepared by
Mr. Taylor. My first bid did not include all the buildings shown in the
specifications. I made this offer offhand. He asked me if I wanted to
figure on wrecking the buildings for the Exposition Company on a
percentage basis, they to own all the material and sell it and I to get
a per cent for doing the work. I told him I would take it by contract
for an agreed figure or would do the work for him on a percentage basis,
and that I would be glad to do anything for him I could. President
Francis said to me, "Mr. Krug, you put in your bid for $76,600 in
writing and have it in this office to-morrow morning." We were then
asked to wait out in the anteroom. We waited there until about 6
o'clock. At about 6 o'clock Mr. Taylor's secretary came in and announced
that the meeting had adjourned until the next day. We all left the room
then. At 10 o'clock the next morning, November 11, 1904, Mr. Schmitt and
myself went to Mr. Taylor's office, where I filed my bid in writing for
$76,600 to cover all the buildings shown in the specifications. We
waited there until about 4 o'clock, expecting some decision from the
salvage committee. About 4 o'clock Mr. Taylor's secretary came in and
announced that the meeting of the salvage committee had adjourned until
the following Monday.

The conditions embodied in the specifications as to the time allowed for
removal of the wreckage were so prohibitive as to render it almost
impossible to carry them out. The time limit--namely, three months--was
too short. It would entail an enormous expense and waste of material to
try to comply with the time conditions stated in the specifications.

The amount required by the specifications to be deposited in the form of
a certified check, payable to the Exposition Company, viz, 50 per cent
of the amount of bid, was very exorbitant. This check was to be
forfeited to the Exposition Company in the event the successful bidder
failed to enter into a contract with the salvage committee within five
days after they accepted the bid. I consider the amount demanded, 50 per
cent, very excessive, and it had the effect of frightening bidders away.
A 5 to 10 per cent deposit is usually the amount required by the
Government and the city.

The specifications also stipulated that the full amount of the contract,
less the amount of the certified check, held and to be appropriated by
the Exposition Company, must be paid to the Exposition Company at the
time the contract is signed. I consider this out of all reason, and in
itself would have a tendency to prohibit bidding.

The time-limit clause, namely, three months, from March 1 to June 1,
1905, in which all the buildings must be torn down and the grounds
cleared, was entirely too short a time, and out of all reason, as it
would be physically impossible for any contractor to do the work in the
time specified, and no contractor would attempt it under the terms of
the specifications unless he knew he would be favored with an extension
of time later on.

The specifications appear to me to have been drawn up with the intent
and purpose of discouraging bidders. In all my experience I have never
encountered such requirements as set forth in those specifications.

I told Mr. Taylor and President Francis that the time limit was too
short, and that I would be glad to make a much higher bid if they would
extend the time. They said, "We cannot extend the time one day--the
grounds must be cleared by June 1, 1905."

On the following Monday, November 14, 1904, I went to Mr. Taylor's
office at 10 a.m. I was informed by Mr. Taylor's private secretary that
all bids had been rejected, and that I would be notified if further bids
would be requested. I returned to Chicago that night, and awaited some
advice from the Exposition Company as to what disposition was to be made
of the property, and if new bids would be requested. For fear that
something might happen that I would get slipped up on, and the contract
be given to some one else, I sent my agent, Mr. John M. Dunphy, to St.
Louis, so that he would be on the ground and be in touch with what was
going on, and told him to watch the papers to see if new bids were
requested. Mr. Dunphy was in St. Louis from November 20 to 26,
inclusive, and he informed me that during all this time he was unable to
get any information as to what the Exposition Company was going to do
with the property or whether new bids would be asked for. Mr. Dunphy was
compelled to return to Chicago on the night of November 26. He asked a
friend of his, a Mr. William H. Ranstead, who lives in St. Louis, to
look out for news in regard to the wrecking of the World's Fair
buildings, and if new bids were requested to notify him immediately by
telephone or by telegraph. On November 28 I received a telegram from Mr.
Ranstead, as follows:

ST. Louis, _November 28._
S. KRUG and John Dunphy,
_167 Dearborn street, Chicago, Ill._:

Salvage committee met at 2 p. m. At the adjournment Mr. Taylor
and President Francis called me in and wished me to wire you to
come on first train. Everything looks well. Meet me at the
Lindell Hotel before you go to the grounds. Also wire me in care
Lindell Hotel when you leave.

W.H. RANSTEAD.

This message was received by me at about 8.40 a. m. November 29. Mr.
Dunphy and I took the first train out to St. Louis. We left here at
11.03 a. m. and arrived St. Louis at 6 p. m. November 29. We met Mr.
Ranstead at the hotel and talked matters over. The next day, November
30, Mr. Ranstead, Mr. Dunphy, and myself went to the fair grounds and
called at office of Mr. Stevens, secretary of the Exposition Company.
This was about 10.30 a. m. At about 11 a. m. Mr. Stevens took us to the
room where the salvage committee was holding a meeting. Mr. Stevens did
not remain in the room during the meeting. There were present President
Francis, Mr. Taylor, Mr. Kennard, and Mr. Holmes, members of the salvage
committee. After a short preliminary talk, we were told by Mr. Francis
that we would have to put in our bid for all the buildings shown in the
specifications, including copper wire and railroad iron, and that we
would have to have the bid in by 4 o'clock that afternoon. It was then
about: 12 o'clock. We protested against such short time for figuring on
all the property shown by the specifications. I requested more time and
told them I would be able to make an intelligent bid if granted more
time. I asked President Francis to give me the figures on the steel
rails and the copper wire, and stated that he should have the figures
showing the amount on hand, as it was all bought by weight; that if I
could get an idea of the amount of wire and rail I could get my bid in
all right in time. He stated he could not give me the figures on the
rail and the wire. Mr. Kennard then stated that I could put in a bid for
the buildings that were shown in the specifications, including the
intramural stations, the fences, and the bridges by 4 o'clock that day,
and that I could have until Friday, December 2, to put in my bid on the
railroad iron and the copper wire. I asked if it would be possible for
me to get an extension of time in which to do the work, providing I
secured the contract. President Francis stated that the time could not
be extended one day. I then asked for a list of the property so I could
figure on all of it. President Francis stated that they did not have any
lists and that it would be necessary for us to go over the ground and
get our own data. He stated to me then that there were 2,000 tons of
steel rails. We then left the office and walked over the grounds and
looked at the buildings, the intramural stations, the fences, and
bridges, on which we were asked to submit a bid that afternoon. We did
not look over the rail and the wire, as we thought we would have more
time the following day for that. We went back to Mr. Taylor's office at
4 o'clock p. in. We waited there in the anteroom until about 5.30 p. in.
While we were waiting in the anteroom Mr. Frank and Mr. Abe Harris, of
the Chicago House Wrecking Company were closeted with the salvage
committee in Mr. Taylor's office. While we were waiting there they came
out of Mr. Taylor's office without their overcoats or hats on. They had
left them in the room where the salvage committee was in session. Mr.
Dunphy, Mr. Ranstead, and myself were then requested to enter the room
where the salvage committee was in session. Mr. Frank and Abe Harris
waited outside until we got through. The same members of the salvage
committee present at the morning session were present at this meeting,
including Mr. John Scullin, but Mr. Scullin only remained a few minutes
after we entered the room. There was another gentleman present, but I do
not know who he was. President Francis told me later that he was an
insurance agent and that he held insurance on all the buildings then. I
handed the bid, or rather Mr. Dunphy handed the bid to President
Francis, who in turn handed it to Mr. Kennard, who opened it and read it
aloud. The bid was for $101,000 for the buildings mentioned in the
specifications, the intramural stations, the fence around the grounds
(except the stadium fence), and the bridges. Mr. Francis held a
whispered conversation with Mr. Taylor, and then turned to us and said
that the committee had decided to let the contract that day, and that
they would not wait until Friday for the bid on the other material, that
is the rails and the copper wire, and that it would be necessary for me
to put in my bid that night, as they would be in session until 11 p. m.
I stated that I could not make an intelligent bid on such short notice,
unless I was furnished with figures showing amount of rail and wire
purchased by them. Mr. Taylor spoke up and asked me if I knew a man by
the name of Evans, of Chicago, who was in the wrecking business, I told
him that I did not know a Mr. Evans, of Chicago, who was engaged in the
wrecking business, and that I was well acquainted with all the prominent
wrecking concerns and contractors in Chicago but had never heard of or
met Mr. Evans, the gentleman referred to. Mr. Taylor asked me why I
could not get in a bid in the same time that Mr. Evans got his in, and
stated that Mr. Evans had submitted a bid on all the property from
Chicago by wire in three hours. I stood up then and spoke to President
Francis and said, "President Francis, how do you know but that this bid
of Mr. Evans may be a dummy?" President Francis arose from the table and
stood opposite me, and, scratching his head, said: "Well, Mr. Drug, you
have got me a guessing. There may be something in that."

President Francis said to me, "Mr. Drug, I made a mistake this morning
in giving you the number of tons of steel rail; there are 4,000 tons
instead of 2,000 tons of rail." I then told him that it would be
impossible for me to give him any kind of an intelligent bid without
some kind of a list of the property to figure on. President Francis
stated that the matter would be settled that night and that I had until
11 p. m. to bring in my figures on all the property to be disposed of as
shown by the specifications, and including the intramural stations, the
bridges, the fence around the grounds, the copper wire, and the railroad
rails. We then left the room, and as we were passing out President
Francis asked our names and where we were stopping as they would call us
up later on that day.

As soon as we walked out of the room Mr. Frank and Abe Harris of the
Chicago House Wrecking Company went in.

We left the fair grounds immediately and went to the Lindell Hotel,
where we prepared a new bid. About 7.30 p. m. we decided to put in our
bid by telephone. Mr. Dunphy called up Mr. Taylor's office and was
informed by the party who answered the telephone that the salvage
committee had adjourned at 7 o'clock p.m. Mr. Dunphy told me that the
salvage committee had adjourned, and I supposed they had adjourned to
get something to eat and would be back shortly. I told him to call up
again. About 8.30 p. in. Mr. Dunphy called up Mr. Taylor's office and
was told that the salvage committee had adjourned at 7 p. m. and would
not be back that night. About 10 p.m. he called up President Francis's
residence and was inform that President Francis was not at home, and
also received the same reply when he called up Mr. Taylor's house, and
when he called up Mr. Holmes's residence he was informed that Mr. Holmes
had gone to bed. We were unable to reach any of the salvage committee.
were not called up that evening, nor did we hear anything from the
salvage committee that evening, although we waited in the corridor of
the Lindell Hotel until after 12 o'clock midnight.

During our conversation with the committee nothing was said about fire
engines, office furniture and furnishings, hose carriages, fire hose,
horses, buggies, wagons, steam rollers, roadmaking machinery, three
steel greenhouses, with plants of every description, surveying
instruments, engineering tools, two hospitals complete, 2,000 folding
cots, 2,500 opera chairs, 400 revolving chairs, 25,000 kitchen chairs,
200 roller-top desks, 300 flat-top desks, 200 typewriter desks, the
brick in the roadways, and the various buildings, or numerous other
valuable articles and pieces of property.

About 8.30 a. m. Thursday, December 1, Mr. Dunphy, my agent, called up
Mr. Holmes's residence to find out what Mr. Holmes knew about the
disposition of the bids. He was told by some lady who answered the
telephone that Mr. Holmes was on his way to his office. He came and told
me that Mr. Holmes was on his way to his office. I requested Mr. Dunphy
to go to Mr. Holmes's office and try and ascertain what the committee
had done about the bids. Later in the day Mr. Dunphy came to me and told
me that Mr. Holmes had told him that the contract had been awarded to
the Chicago House Wrecking Company between the hours of 6 and 7 p. m. of
November 30.

On December 3, 1904, I addressed a letter to President Francis in which
I offered him $199,000 for all railroad iron and ties and all wire in
and about the exposition grounds. I also, in the same letter, offered to
pay him $101,000 for the buildings, fences, bridges, and intramural
stations on the exposition grounds, which would total $300,000.

On December 5 I addressed a letter to President Francis as follows:

St. Louis, _December 5, 1904._

Dear Sir: Since I have made an examination of the property
belonging to the Exposition Company I find a great deal more
property than was stated to me at your meeting last Wednesday.
If you will furnish me with a correct list of the property I
think now that I can make you a bid of from $400,000 to $450,000
for same, half cash, balance to be paid when property is turned
over. I am prepared to make my bid in three hours after I
receive a list of the property. Should my proposition meet with
your consideration call me up at the Lindell Hotel and I will
call for the copy at once.

Yours, truly,
S. Krug.

Hon. D.R. Francis,
_President Louisiana Purchase Exposition Company,
St. Louis, Mo._

I never received a reply to either of the letters referred to.

In the specifications as prepared by Mr. Taylor it was stipulated that a
charge of $6 per car would be made for switching empty cars into the
exposition grounds, while I notice the contract between the Chicago
House Wrecking Company provides that only $3 per car shall be charged
for this service.

The specifications as prepared by Mr. Isaac S. Taylor, director of
works, provides that--

All bids must be made out upon blanks furnished by the director
of works, and with each bid there shall be deposited a certified
check, payable to the exposition, upon a responsible bank doing
business in St. Louis, for the amount of 50 per cent of the
amount of bid submitted, the sum indicated in said check to be
forfeited to the Exposition Company in case the party or parties
to whom award is made does not enter into contract with the
Exposition Company within five days from date of said award for
the work called for in these specifications and instructions--

while I see by the contract between the Exposition Company and the
Chicago House Wrecking Company, which is of record in office of recorder
of deeds, city of St. Louis, in book 1811, page 195 and following pages,
that the bid of the Chicago House Wrecking Company was accompanied by a
check for $100,000, which amount represented less than 25 per cent of
the amount of their bid, viz, $450,000.

The specifications further stipulate that "A contract will be written by
the Exposition Company for the faithful performance of this work, and
upon the signing of same by the parties thereto, the full amount of said
contract, less the amount of the certified check held and to be
appropriated by the exposition Company, must be paid to the said
Exposition Company by the contractor," while the contract between the
Chicago House Wrecking Company and the Exposition Company, which is of
record, provides that the Chicago House Wrecking Company shall execute
and deliver to the said Exposition Company at the time the contract is
signed four promissory notes three for $100,000 each, and one for
$50,000, making a total, all told including the certified check, of
$450,000, and allows them six months in which to make the payments.

The specifications further required--

That a surety company's bond for an amount equal to the amount
of contract must also be given to the Exposition Company by the
said contractor to protect the said Exposition Company from loss
during the execution of the work and for faithful performance
contract--

while the contract referred to shows that the Chicago House Wrecking
Company furnished a bond in the small sum of $40,000, or less than
one-tenth the amount required by the specifications.

From the above it is my belief that the Chicago House Wrecking Company
was shown favoritism and that they were favored from the beginning of
the deal.

I was never furnished a full list of the property to be disposed of by
the Exposition Company. I personally requested a list two or three
times, as did Mr. Dunphy, but we were unable to get one. Had I been
furnished a list of the property that I learn has since been turned over
to the Chicago House Wrecking Company under their contract I would have
gladly bid $800,000, and would have made a very handsome profit on the
deal at that price.

I consider the value of all the property turned over to the Chicago
House Wrecking Company on November 30 was more than $1,000,000.

I consider the manner in which the bids were handled was very irregular
and not the usual custom in that the bids were opened in secret and not
in the presence of the bidders, as requested by a majority of the
bidders present, but as requested by Mr. Abraham Harris, who represented
the Chicago House Wrecking Company. This is not the customary procedure
when bids are called for by the city or the Government.

From what I saw there in the anteroom and in the presence of the salvage
committee the several times we were there I am convinced that the
Chicago House Wrecking Company was furnished inside information and that
they were shown favoritism.

Mr. W.B. Stevens, the secretary of the Exposition Company, was not
present in the committee room at any time while I was there talking over
the bids and he does not know what was going on in there, except what
has been told him and what he has gained from the papers he handled.

The contract between the Exposition Company and the Chicago House
Wrecking Company, which is of record in St. Louis, bears date of
November 30, 1904, while I note by a letter dated March 7 and signed by
Mr. W.B. Stevens, he states the contract was not closed until December
13, 1904, on which date the board of directors of the exposition met.
This was eight days after my letter of December 5 was delivered to Mr.
Stevens in person by Mr. Ranstead.

If the sale of the exposition buildings and the property to be disposed
of had been properly advertised there would have been much more
competition in the bidding. If a list of all the property to be disposed
of had been furnished the bidders much higher bids would have been made.
If the property had been sold at public auction, building for building,
and other property in detail, so anyone could have bought what he wanted
and had use for, I am confident that the Exposition Company would have
received more than a million and a half dollars.

I consider the manner in which the salvage committee handled the bids
very irregular in that great secrecy was observed, and will state that
the awarding of the contract to the Chicago House Wrecking Company for
the sum of $450,000 was unjust to other bidders, and detrimental to the
interests of the United States, the city of St. Louis, and the
stockholders of the Exposition Company.

S. KRUG.

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 28th day of March, 1905. My
commission expires on the 15th day of October, 1905.
[SEAL] HARRIET A. Dumas,
_Notary Public._

STATE OF ILLINOIS, _County of Cook, ss_:

Before me, this, the 28th day of March, 1905, personally appeared Mr.
George J. Schmitt, who, being duly sworn on his oath, says:

My name is George J. Schmitt. I reside in Chicago, Ill.; have resided
here for the past thirty-five years. Am employed as clerk and bookkeeper
in office of Mr. S. Krug, contractor, of Chicago. I have been in Mr.
Krug's employ for the past eight years. On November 9 I left Chicago for
St. Louis with Mr. Krug, to look after his bids and do any clerical work
that he might want done. We arrived St. Louis on morning of November 10,
1904. Mr. Krug had his bid made up, and upon arrival at St. Louis we
immediately went to the National Bank of Commerce, where Mr. Krug wanted
to have his draft cashed and his check certified. We then went to the
Administration Building and called at the office of Mr. Isaac S.
Taylor, director of works, where Mr. Krug handed his bid to Mr. Taylor's
clerk. This was about 12 o'clock noon on November 10. We were requested
to go into the anteroom and wait until called for. There were present in
the anteroom at the time Mr. Albrecht, Mr. McDonald, Mr. Schaeffer and
son, Mr. Ware, of the Columbia Wrecking Company. One or two other
gentlemen were present. I do not now recall their names. After we had
been there some little time, Messrs. Frank and Abraham Harris, of the
Chicago House Wrecking Company, came in. We all waited there until about
2 p. m. About this time President Francis passed through the room and
went into Mr. Taylor's office. He came back shortly and said to us to
come back in about an hour, as the salvage committee was going to lunch
then. We went back again about 3 p. m. The same crowd of bidders present
in the room. There, was some gray-haired gentleman who came in with the
Harris brothers. When I first saw him I thought he was a member of the
salvage committee, on account of his running back and forth into the
room where the salvage committee was in session. I learned from Mr.
Albrecht later on that the gentleman referred to was working for the
Harris brothers. While we were waiting there to be called in he made two
trips into the room where the salvage committee was in session, and came
back each time and went and held a whispered conversation with the
Harris brothers in the hall.

We waited in the room there until 4 o'clock, when Mr. Taylor's private
secretary requested all the bidders to go into Mr. Taylor's office,
where the salvage committee was in session. We all went in there.
President Francis asked the bidders how they wanted the bids handled,
whether opened in their presence or opened in secret session of the
salvage committee. All the bidders present requested that the bids be
opened in their presence, except Mr. Abe Harris, who got up and told
President Francis that he did not want his bid opened in the presence of
the bidders, as he did not want everybody to know what he had bid, and
that if he was the successful bidder we would all know later on what he
had bid, and if he was not the successful bidder he did not want his bid
to be known. Mr. Albrecht got up and stated that he wanted his bid to be
opened in the presence of the bidders, as he wanted everything to be
open and aboveboard. President Francis then held a whispered
conversation with Mr. Taylor and some other gentleman there, and then in
a few minutes turned to the bidders and said, "Gentlemen, we have
decided to open these bids in secret session of the salvage committee."
and requested us to go into the anteroom and wait until called for. We
all went back into the anteroom. In a few minutes President Francis
requested the Harris brothers to come in the room where they were
holding the meeting. They did so, and remained in there about ten or
fifteen minutes. As soon as they came out Mr. Albrecht went in, and when
Mr. Albrecht came out Mr. Krug and myself went in. President Francis
spoke to Mr. Krug and said, "Mr. Krug, you seem to have some very good
letters of recommendation here, and from the letters I judge you have
done considerable work." Mr. Taylor asked Mr. Krug if he knew a Mr.
Schluetter, of Chicago. Mr. Krug said that he was acquainted with Mr.
Schluetter, had done considerable work for him, and had always been paid
his money. I inferred from their actions that they had had some trouble
with Mr. Schluetter. President Francis said, "Mr. Krug, your bid is very
satisfactory." Mr. Krug had only submitted a bid on part of the
buildings, as shown by the specifications. President Francis asked Mr.
Krug if he could not put in a bid on all the buildings, and why he had
not done so. Mr. Krug said that he was afraid he would have some trouble
getting insurance on all the buildings, and for that reason only
submitted a bid on buildings that were more isolated and less liable to
fire. President Francis told him it would be an easy matter for him to
get insurance, and he asked Mr. Krug what he would bid on all the
buildings, according to the specifications. Mr. Krug said that he would
be willing to bid $76,600 on all the buildings as shown in the
specifications. President Francis asked Mr. Krug what he would wreck the
buildings for on a percentage basis, or if he would take the work on a
contract at a figure to be agreed upon, and they to own and dispose of
all the material themselves. Mr. Krug studied awhile and said that he
would be willing to do the work for President Francis, but it would take
him some time to figure on the proposition so as to submit an
intelligent figure. President Francis said that if they decided to wreck
the buildings themselves on a contract that he would let him know when
his bid would be wanted. At this time President Francis requested Mr.
Krug to submit in writing his bid for $76,600 and have it in by 10
o'clock the next morning. We then left the room, and they requested us
to remain in the anteroom. We were there until about 6 o'clock. During
that time they called in other bidders. About 6 o'clock Mr. Taylor's
secretary came into the room and announced that the salvage committee
had adjourned until the next day at 2 p. m. We then left the grounds and
went to the Lindell Hotel. When we reached the hotel that night we made
up a revised bid. The next day we went to Mr. Taylor's office about 10
a. m. and gave to Mr. Taylor's clerk the bid in writing for $76,600, and
he said he would bring it to the attention of the committee when they
met. We waited there from 10 a. m. until 2 p. m. In the meantime Mr.
Krug sent in his card to Mr. Taylor's office and asked if any action
would be taken on the bids that afternoon. We were informed that nothing
would be done with the bids that day, and that the salvage committee had
adjourned until the following Monday. I left St. Louis that night for
Chicago. I returned to St. Louis on Monday, November 14, 1904, arriving
there at 10 a. m. Mr. Krug remained in St. Louis all the time. When I
returned to St. Louis Mr. Krug and I went to Mr. Taylor's office. We
reached there about 10 a. m., Monday, November 14. We waited there until
about 2.30 or 3 p. m. While we were waiting in the anteroom Mr. Taylor's
private secretary came in and told us that all bids had been rejected.
We then left the grounds, and Mr. Krug and I returned to Chicago that
night.

I never saw by the papers or otherwise where new bids were requested
after the announcement that the first bids had been rejected. I watched
the papers very closely, as we were desirous of submitting a new bid
when called for.

From what I saw while I was in the anteroom and in the committee room I
am fully convinced that the Chicago House Wrecking Company was given
inside information as to what property was to be sold, and I consider
that they were given privileges and favored from the beginning of the
deal, in view of the fact that a majority of the bidders desired their
bids opened in public, while the Harris brothers protested against such
procedure, and they were sustained in their protest by the salvage
committee.

I have had considerable experience in handling bids and being present
when bids are opened, and I never before saw such proceedings as took
place in the meeting room of the salvage committee on November 10, 1904.

I am sure that had the Exposition Company properly advertised the sale
and furnished a list of the property to be disposed of, which I have
since seen published in a catalogue gotten out by the Chicago House
Wrecking Company and listed in the contract between the Exposition
Company and the Wrecking Company, was turned over to the Chicago House

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