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Final Report of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition Commission by Louisiana Purchase Exposition Commission

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whole list I find only two foreigners--one from Toronto, Canada,
and the other from Taxco, Guerrero, Mexico, both such near
neighbors to our own country as hardly to seem foreign. The one
making exhibition from Mexico, Esther Lopez, is associated with
a man, Hernano, brother or husband, I presume. Group 118 devoted
to metallurgy, had only one woman exhibitor, Mrs. Abbie Krebs,
San Francisco, Cal., who submitted redwood tanks for an award.

I do not recall any award made to a woman in the Department of
Mines and Metallurgy. Many mercantile houses and large
corporations were competitors, and, as I said before, many women
sent their specimens to their respective State exhibits, and so
increased the chances of the State to an award.

The fine Alaskan exhibition in the Alaska Building was collated,
I understand, by a woman. I did not see it and did not learn the
woman's name, though I made an effort to do so.

From my observation, I think the work of the women would have
been better appreciated and the effect more pronounced had they
been placed in a separate building. In this Department of Mines,
for instance, every woman would have sent to the Woman's
Building instead of to the State exhibit, and a greater number
would have been on record as exhibitors.

The only two exhibitions, or expositions rather, at all
approaching the one in St. Louis that I have attended were the
Centennial at Philadelphia, in 1876, and the International
Cotton Exposition at Atlanta, in 1895. At the first I do not
recall any emphasis on what women had done, except in the lines
in which she had always worked--art, needlework, and dairy
products. In Atlanta, as at Chicago, there was a Woman's
Building, and here were found her work in all lines, and many
visitors enjoyed the exhibition.

The recognition of woman as evidenced by her appointment on the
juries of the different departments, both group and department,
was the most striking development of the recent great
expositions.

The list submitted below contains the names of all women whose
names appear in the official catalogue of exhibits in the
Department of Mines and Metallurgy:

Sophie Newcombe Memorial College for the Higher Education of
Girls, of New Orleans, La. Clays and pottery produced in the
interest of artistic handicraft. Group 116, class 690. Mrs.
Abbie Krebs, San Francisco, Cal. Redwood tanks. Group 118, class
702. Mrs. George Rupp, Bessemer, Mich. Collection of iron ores,
needle, grape, kidney, and blackberry ore. Group 116, class 682.
Woman's Club, Pipestone, Minn. Pipestone and jasper. Group 116,
class 682. Mrs. Helen M. Schneider, Eureka, Nev. Collection of
minerals. Group 116, class 682. Mrs. George W. Pritchard, White
Oaks, N. Mex., Lincoln County. Ores. Group 116, class 682. Mrs.
D.D. Menges, Allentown, Pa. Iron ores. Group 116, class 682.
Mrs. C. Robinson, Spokane, S. Dak. Arsenopyrite ore. Group 116,
class 682. Mrs. Haliburton, Bridgewood, Bridgewood Company,
Ontario, Canada. Minerals. Group 116, class 682. Esther y
Hernano Lopez, Taxco, province of Guerrero, Mexico. Silver ores.
Group 116, class 682.

Department M, Fish and Game, Mr. Tarleton H. Bean, Chief; Mrs. Mary
Stuart Armstrong, Chicago, Ill., Department Juror.

This department comprised 5 groups and 19 classes, the group
headings being: Hunting equipment; Products of hunting; Fishing;
equipment and products; Products of fisheries; Fish culture.

No report.

Department N, Anthropology, Dr. W.J. McGee, Chief; Mrs. Zelia Nuttall,
Cambridge, Mass., Department Juror.

This department comprised 4 groups and 5 classes, under the
group headings: Literature; Somatology; Ethnology; Ethnography.

Mrs. Nuttall reports, as group juror, this department.

(Report not on file.)

Department O, Social Economy, Dr. Howard J. Rogers, Chief; Miss Jane
Addams, Chicago, Ill., Department Juror.

This department comprised 13 groups and 58 classes, the group
headings being: Study and investigation of social and economic
conditions; Economic resources and organization; State
regulation of industry and labor; Organization of industrial
workers; Methods of industrial remuneration; Cooperative
institutions; Provident institutions; Housing of the working
classes; The liquor question; General betterment movements;
Charities and correction; Public health; Municipal improvement.

Miss Addams says in her report as department juror of the above:

The general advance in social betterment has been very marked in
the eleven years intervening since the Columbian Exposition, at
Chicago, and women have not only shared that advance, but have
undoubtedly contributed more than their proportionate share, if
tested by the proportionate value of their exhibits at Chicago
and at St. Louis. This is also true if tested by the social
economy exhibits made in Paris in 1900, where I was a juror in
the department of social economy. No separate exhibit was there
made of the work of women save that implied in the exhibition of
women's philanthropic societies. At the Louisiana Purchase
Exposition their separate exhibits were not only larger, but
more definite and coherent. The work of women was as much
appreciated when placed by the side of men as if it had been
installed by itself, and the results would have been no better
if separately exhibited. Certainly nothing in the entire
department at St. Louis was more successfully installed and
attracted more favorable attention than the Twin City Museum,
which occupied an entire building upon the Model street and was
under the direction of Mrs. Conde Hamlin, of St. Paul, who had
also planned it from the beginning and was made commissioner. It
was certainly a notable achievement to have one such exhibit as
that standing absolutely upon its merits and dealing with the
civic and general social conditions as they are constantly
developing in our large and growing cities. It had suggestions
of activities along a dozen lines which make for amelioration of
urban conditions as they bear hardest upon the people of the
most crowded quarters. To quote from the report of another on
this subject: "It is now a well-established fact that women most
effectively supplement the best interests and the furthering of
the highest aims of all government by their numberless
charitable, reformatory, educational, and other beneficent
institutions which she has had the courage and the ideality to
establish for the alleviation of suffering, for the correction
of many forms of social injustice and neglect, and these
institutions exert a strong and steady influence for good, an
influence which tends to decrease vice, to make useful citizens
of the helpless or depraved, to elevate the standard of
morality, and to increase the sum of human happiness."

Department P, Physical Culture, J.E. Sullivan, Chief; Miss Clara
Hellwig, Plainfield, N.J., Department Juror.

This department comprised 3 groups and 6 classes, the group
headings being: Training of the child and adult-theory and
practice; Games and sports for children and adults; Equipment
for games and sports.

Unfortunately Miss Hellwig was abroad and did not receive
notification in time to reach St. Louis for the jury work.

Superior Jury.

Mrs. Philip N. Moore, of St. Louis, Mo., was appointed to represent the
board of lady managers on the superior jury, and in a general resume of
the Louisiana Purchase Exposition Mrs. Moore says:

If the organization of a world's exposition begins years before
its doors open, if public opinion changes in a decade, it may be
well, before summing up the work of women at St. Louis, to look
first at the record of achievement from Chicago in 1893 through
Atlanta, Nashville, Omaha, Paris, and Buffalo, all of which led
gradually to the high plane upon which we now stand.

Segregation of the sexes was the limited understanding of most
of those in charge of former expositions. Not for a moment would
I imply by this statement that there was a desire to give the
work of women a lower grade than that of men; rather was it the
mistaken idea of drawing attention to it, as something better
and apart. By this very means there was often a serious and
hurtful comparison, since many women with undoubted ability
would not thus place their exhibits. It implied that in the
special group, where exhibit was made, woman's mind differed
from that of man's to the extent that there was also a
difference in the result.

We owe sincere thanks to the progressive men in charge of the
Louisiana Purchase Exposition, that they listened with
intelligent appreciation to the plea from women for equal
representation, wherever their work was found worthy.

There is no mistaking the dignified effect of this edict, and
only the best in various lines gained admission to the exhibit
palaces.

In most exhibits the larger proportion was presented by men; and
in similar proportion the awards were assigned. There was,
however, no distinction made as to sex; and the members of the
various juries, including women, paid as careful attention to
the one exhibit as to the other, without reference to name,
often the only indication of sex.

There were some art, educational, and economic exhibits, placed
entirely by women, showing marvelous adaptability to the
limitations of environment, and also skill in artistic and
practical setting. Looking closely at the work in the several
departments, my opinion is that, while woman has not gained
greatly in inventive or constructive arts, she has gained
breadth in the applied arts and has grown immeasurably in
freedom of execution. This has been obtained partly by the
contact with man's work, extending through many centuries in
advance, and partly by the very fact that she must now stand
only on her own merits.

Women from foreign lands entered into competition in the
departments of art, education, and liberal arts to a very slight
extent, with some investigation in science, but in all a very
small proportion. This was natural, on account of the great
distance, and may be applied equally to the number of exhibitors
from across the water, whether men or women.

American women were found in nearly every field open to
competition, though it was the apparently proud statement of the
director of Mines and Metallurgy that there were no women on his
juries, which meant, of course, no exhibit. (NOTE.--Mrs. M.G.
Scrutchin was evidently appointed after this statement.)

The congresses were open to women, who appeared on the same
programmes with men, were paid the compliment of as large
audiences, were listened to with interest, and their opinions in
discussions answered with freedom. This occurred also in the
various associations, where men and women work side by side.

In the work of the superior jury, where for the first time the
right of membership was given to a representative of women, the
application of deliberation and judgment was made to the work of
men and women alike. Courtesy and the hand of fellowship were
extended to all. Exhibits were not specially investigated,
unless appeals from former jury awards were sent in. In such
case most careful and detailed investigation was made by the
special boards, to which were assigned certain departments.
There was no distinction of sex mentioned in the jury room; and
the time has evidently arrived when no less will be expected
from women--no more from men--than the quality of work merits.

FINAL REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE OF AWARDS.

The chairman of the committee of awards of the board of lady
managers begs leave to present the story and the report of that
committee to your honorable board.

We will not begin by saying "once upon a time," for this is no
fairy story, but we will hark back to that time when we, as a
board, were not, that we may refer to the vital words of the act
of Congress of March 3, 1901, which act provided for the
creation of a board of lady managers, gave the excuse for its
existence, and named specifically one duty it would be called
upon to perform, to wit: "To appoint one member of all
committees authorized to award prizes for such exhibits as shall
have been produced in whole or in part by female labor."

This phase of woman's work at the World's Fair formed the
principal topic of talk at the informal conference held in New
York, December 5, 1901, between the National Commission and the
members of the board of lady managers that had been appointed up
to that time.

The committee of awards was one of the last of the standing
committees to be appointed, but was the first committee
appointed by Mrs. Daniel Manning after her election to the
presidency of the board of lady managers in December, 1903, and
was as follows: Mrs. Frederick Hanger, chairman, Little Rock,
Ark.; Mrs. Richard W. Knott, Louisville, Ky.; Miss Lavinia H.
Egan, Shreveport, La.; Mrs. Fannie Lowry Porter, Atlanta, Ga.;
Mrs. Helen Boice-Hunsicker, Hoboken, N.J.

From the organization of the board its influence had been sought
and besought by women wishing positions connected with the
exposition work. The appointing of the committee of awards acted
like a wireless-telegraphy message throughout the country and
brought applications from "would be" jurors or recommendations
from friends of "would be" jurors until the files of the board
room were filled to the limit, and the colored postman of the
free-delivery postal service in the southern home of the
chairman thought he had relapsed into a "previous condition of
servitude."

The rules regulating the system of awards, enacted by the
Exposition Company, stated that the nomination for jurors must
be in the hands of the director of exhibits thirty days before
the opening of the exposition, for the approval of the
Exposition Company and the National Commission.

The division of exhibits had issued a list of all exhibits that
could be entered at the exposition, dividing them into 144
groups.

As woman's work is never done, and as she has worked her way
into almost every industrial avenue, to find out the "woman" in
the work of exhibits required more light than the act of
Congress or the rules of the Exposition Company gave on the
subject.

The chairman of the committee of awards made a special journey
to St. Louis, a month after the committee was appointed, and in
company with Miss Egan, a member of the committee, waited upon
the director of exhibits and asked that the World's Fair light,
for femininity, might be thrown on the 144 groups of exhibits,
that woman's work, "in whole or in part," might have a juror
appointed by the board of lady managers to judge of its merits.

The director of exhibits, with much genial graciousness, threw
up his official hands and said he was helpless, that not until
the exhibits were placed could the groups that would admit of
women jurors be determined, and that there would be women jurors
appointed by the Exposition Company as well as by the board of
lady managers. He suggested that we look carefully through the
144 groups and use our "judgment" as to which groups would call
for women jurors.

We asked the advisability of conferring with the heads of the
different departments, and were told that the information must
come through the director of exhibits. We were told to remember
that the list of women jurors must be limited to keep down the
expense of the jury work.

From this time until the 25th of July the board waited for the
classified list.

By correspondence among the members of the committee of awards,
by meeting of the same, and by suggestions from the entire
board, a long list of names of women eminent for intellectual,
artistic, material, and practical achievements was obtained from
which to choose women jurors. It seemed impossible for the
committee to make a report to present to the board for
acceptance until information in regard to the classified list
had been obtained.

Partial tentative reports were read at the March meeting, to
report progress and secure suggestions.

At a meeting of the board held April 29 a list of 83 names for
women jurors and their alternates was submitted by the committee
and accepted by the board. A motion carried to the effect that
power to act was left with the committee, as the classified list
had not been received from the Exposition Company and the
committee's use of "judgment" might be tempered with the blue
pencil of the Exposition Company.

The confirmation of names for jurors was made very
comprehensive, as the board at that time did not expect to meet
until after the jurors had served.

The president of the board was untiring in her efforts in behalf
of the jury work of the board. The chairman of the committee was
called to St. Louis twice on the special work of the jury list,
and the members of the board and committee by consultation with
members of the National Commission, officials of the Exposition
Company, and heads of departments, held out for what they
considered the full rights of the nominating power of the board,
with the hope of bringing American womanhood in touch, as near
as possible, with the work of the exposition.

The following communications indicate the progress made:

ST. Louis, _July 22, 1904._

DEAR SIR: In regard to the appointment of women jurors the board
of lady managers begs leave to state that names of women jurors
for 83 groups have been approved by the board. We have been
informed that the classified list of groups is in your hands,
and we would be glad to receive it at the earliest possible
date.

Very respectfully,
M. MARGARETTA MANNING,
_President._

Hon. DAVID R. FRANCIS,
_President Louisiana Purchase Exposition,_
_Exposition Grounds, St. Louis, Mo._

St. Louis, _July 25, 1904._

MADAM PRESIDENT: The Exposition Company, through the executive
committee, has approved the accompanying report of the director
of exhibits, and hereby certifies to the board of lady managers
the number of groups in which the exhibits have been produced in
whole or in part by female labor.

This is in response to your letter addressed to the president
under date of July 22, and this day submitted to the executive
committee.

The groups so certified are as follows:

_Education_.--Group 1, Elementary education. Group 2, Secondary
education. Group 3, Higher education. Group 4, Special education
in fine arts. Group 7, Education of defectives.

_Fine arts_.--Group 9, Paintings and drawings. Group 11,
Sculpture. Group 12, Architecture. Group 14, Original objects in
art workmanship.

_Liberal arts_.--Group 16, Photography. Group 17, Books and
publications--Bookbinding. Group 18, Maps and apparatus for
geography, cosmography, topography.

_Manufactures_.--Group 37, Decoration and fixed furniture of
buildings and dwellings. Group 45, Ceramics. Group 52, Equipment
and processes used in bleaching, dyeing, printing, and finishing
textiles in their various stages. Group 53, Equipment and
processes used in sewing and making wearing apparel. Group 58,
Laces, embroidery, and trimmings. Group 59, Industries,
producing wearing apparel for men, women, and children. Group
61, Various industries connected with clothing.

_Machinery_.--None.

_Electricity_.--None.

_Transportation_.--None.

_Agriculture_.--Group 78, Farm equipment--Methods of improving
land. Group 84, Vegetable food products--Agricultural seeds.
Group 88, Bread and pastry. Group 89, Preserved meat, fish,
vegetables, and fruit. Group 90, Sugar and
confectionery--Condiments and relishes. Group 92, Wines and
brandies.

_Live stock_.--None.

_Horticulture_.--Group 107, Pomology.

_Forestry_.--None.

_Mines and metallurgy_.--None.

_Fish and game_.--None.

_Anthropology_.--None.

_Social economy_.--Group 129, Study and investigation of social
and economic conditions. Group 133, Methods of industrial
remuneration. Group 136, Housing of the working classes. Group
137, The liquor question. Group 139, Charities and corrections.
Group 141, Municipal improvement.

_Physical culture_.--None

Very respectfully,
DAVID R. FRANCIS,
_President._

MRS. DANIEL MANNING,
_President Board of Lady Managers._

St. Louis, Mo., _July 30, 1904._

DEAR SIR: The accompanying list of 83 women jurors, to serve on
the committee of awards of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition,
has been made by the board of lady managers and is hereby
submitted for approval to the Exposition Company and to the
National Commission.

This list has been made according to the authorization granted
to the board in section 6 of the acts of Congress approved March
3, 1901, to wit, "To nominate one member of all committees
authorized to award prizes for such exhibits as shall have been
produced in whole or in part by female labor."

Yours, truly,
M. MARGARETTA MANNING,
_President._

FRANCES MARION HANGER,
_Chairman Committee of Awards._

Hon. DAVID R. FRANCIS,
_President Louisiana Purchase Exposition,_
_Administration Building._

AUGUST 4, 1904.

MY DEAR MADAM PRESIDENT: Responding to your communication of
July 30, transmitting a list of women jurors and alternate
jurors, that you recommend for appointment, and which you submit
for approval by the Louisiana Purchase Exposition Company and
the Louisiana Purchase Exposition Commission, I beg to state
that under the rules and regulations of the Louisiana Purchase
Exposition Company, approved by the National Commission, the
board of lady managers may appoint 32 women jurors and women
alternate jurors.

As the number of names submitted by you greatly exceeds the
number you are permitted to nominate under the rules and
regulations above referred to, the list is herewith returned for
revision. If the names you have submitted for appointment upon
the groups for which the board of lady managers are entitled to
make nominations are the ones you desire in these particular
groups, they will be entertained for confirmation, but it may be
you will desire to readjust your list.

Very respectfully,

D.R. FRANCIS,
_President._

MRS. DANIEL MANNING,
_President Board Lady Managers._

AUGUST 9, 1904.

DEAR SIR: In response to your letter received August 8, in
relist of nominations for the women jurors made by the board of
lady managers, I beg leave to state that said list was made
under what the board believed to be the interpretation of
section 6 of the act of Congress approved March 3, 1901, which
would seem to provide for the appointment of "one member of all
committees authorized to award prizes for such exhibits as may
have been produced in whole or in part by female labor."

We regret exceedingly that "in the discretion of said commission
and corporation" referred to in said act, the list of groups has
been reduced from 83 to 32.

We respectfully ask, however, that a favorable consideration may
be given to four additional groups, viz: No. 125, Literature;
No. 126, Somatology; No. 127, Ethnology, and No. 128,
Ethnography. These groups have been specially designated by the
chief of the Department of Anthropology, the names of nominees
submitted are those approved by him, and it is most desirable
that this request be granted.

We herewith hand you revised list, readjusted as per your
instructions.

Respectfully submitted.

FRANCES MARION HANGER,
_Chairman on Committee of Awards_.

Hon. DAVID R. FRANCIS,
_President Louisiana Purchase Exposition Company_.

EDUCATION (DEPARTMENT A).

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Number and title of group. | Principals. | Alternates.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Group 1, Elementary education|Miss Anna Tolman Smith, |Miss Clara Hellwig,
| Washington, D.C. | Plainfield, N.J.
Group 2, Secondary education |Miss Anna G. MacDougal, |Miss Mary Boyce Temple,
| Chicago, Ill. | Knoxville, Tenn.
Group 3, Higher education |Miss Caroline Hazzard, |Mrs. Charles Perkins,
| Wellesley College, | Knoxville, Tenn.
| Wellesley, Mass. |
Group 4, Fine arts |Mrs. E.A. Thayer, Denver, |Mrs. Charles Cary, Delaware
| Colo. | avenue, Buffalo, N.Y.
Group 7, State institutions |Mrs. Sarah Platt Decker, |Mrs. George Noyes,
| Denver, Colo. | Milwaukee, Wis.
Group 9, Painting and |Mrs. J. Montgomery Sears, |Miss Mary Solari,
drawing | Boston, Mass. | Memphis, Tenn.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ART (DEPARTMENT B).

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Group 11, Sculpture |Mrs. Elizabeth St. John |Miss Enid Yandell,
| Matthews, New York, N.Y. | Louisville, Ky.
Group 12, Architecture |Miss Rose Weld, Newport |Miss Susan N. Ketcham,
| News. Va. | Carnegie Hall, N.Y.
Group 14, Art workmanship |Mrs. Eugene Field, Buena |Miss Alice Barber Stevens,
| Park, Ill. | Philadelphia, Pa.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

LIBERAL ARTS (DEPARTMENT C).

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Group 16, Photography |Miss Francis B. Johnston, |Mrs. Charles Ladd,
| Washington, D.C. | Portland, Oreg.
Group 17, Publishing and |Mrs. Horace S. Smith, |Miss Bulkley, Hillside,
bookbinding. | Chicago, Ill. | Mo.
Group 18, Maps, apparatus for|Mrs. Fannie Hicks Woolwine,|Mrs. M.G. Scrutchin,
geography. | Nashville, Tenn. | Atlanta, Ga.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

MANUFACTURES (DEPARTMENT D).

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Number and title of group. | Principals. | Alternates.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Group 37, Furniture and |Mrs. Candace Wheeler, New |Mrs. R.A. Edgerton,
household decoration. | York, N.Y. | Berwyn, Ill.
Group 45, Ceramics |Mrs. Isaac Boyd, Atlanta, |Miss Henrietta Ord Jones,
| Ga. | New York City.
Group 52, Bleaching and |Miss Madolin Wynn, |Mrs. W.S. Major,
dyeing, etc. | Deerfield, Mass. | Shelbyville, Ind.
Group 53, Equipment and |Mrs. Elisha Dyer, sr., |Mrs. Frederick Nathan,
processes used in making | Providence, R.I. | New York City.
clothes. | |
Group 58, Lace trimming and |Mrs. E.D. Wood, |Mrs. Noble Prentiss,
embroidery. | Indianapolis, Ind. | Leavenworth, Kans.
Group 59, Industries |Miss Margaret Summers, |
producing wearing apparel. | Louisville, Ky. |
Group 61, Industries |Mrs. F.K. Bowes, Chicago, |Miss Runley, Clinton,
connected with clothing. | Ill. | N.Y.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

AGRICULTURE (DEPARTMENT H).

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Group 78, Agriculture-- |Mrs. W.H. Felton, |Miss Myra Dock,
Methods of improving lands. | Cartersville, Ga. | Harrisburg, Pa.
Group 84, Vegetable products |Mrs. Christine Terhune |Mrs. E.W. Williams,
| Herrick, Haworth, N.Y. | Winona, Minn.
Group 88, Bread and pastry |Mrs. F.H. Pugh, Bellevue, |Mrs. John B. Henderson,
| Nebr. | Washington, D.C.
Group 89, Preserved meats, |Mrs. E.L. Lamb, Jackson, |Mrs. Minnie H. Lawton,
fish, vegetables, and fruit.| Miss. | Omaha, Nebr.
Group 90, Sugar and |Miss Carolyn Hempstead, |Mrs. R.P. Bland, Lebanon,
confectionery--Condiments | Little Rock, Ark. | Mo.
and relishes. | |
Group 92, Wines and brandies.|Miss Cruse, Helena, Mont. |Mrs. W.C. Ralston, San
| | Francisco, Cal.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

HORTICULTURE (DEPARTMENT J).

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Group 107, Pomology |Mrs. M.B.R. Day, Frankfort,|Mrs. Robert Fulton,
| Ky. | Buffalo, N.Y.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ANTHROPOLOGY (DEPARTMENT N).

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Group 125, Literature |Miss Grace King, New |Miss Annie Scoville,
| Orleans, La. | Stamford, Conn.
Group 126, Somatology |Miss Alice Fletcher, |Mrs. Nelson H. Doubleday,
| Washington, D.C. | New York, N.Y.
Group 127, Ethnology |Mrs. Alice P. Henderson, |Miss Matilda Coxe
| Tacoma Wash. | Stevenson, Washington, D.C.
Group 128, Ethnography |Mrs. Zelia Nuttall, |Miss Cora Peters,
| Cambridge, Mass. | Washington, D.C. (United
| | States Indian Bureau).
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

SOCIAL ECONOMY (DEPARTMENT 0).

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Group 129, Study and |Miss Caroline Greisheimer, |Mrs. J.M. Glenn, Baltimore,
investigation of social and | Washington, D.C. | Baltimore, Md.
economic conditions. | |
Group 135, Provident |Mrs. Eliza Eads How, St. |Miss Margaret Wade,
institutions. | Louis, Mo. | Washington, D.C.
Group 136, Housing of the |Miss Jane Addams, Chicago, |Mrs. H.G.R. Wright,
working classes. | Ill. | Denver, Colo.
Group 137, The liquor |Countess of Aberdeen |Mrs. Ralph Trautman,
question | | New York, N.Y.
Group 139, Charities and |Miss Mary E. Perry, St. |Miss Josephine Woodward,
correction. | Louis, Mo. | Cincinnati Ohio.
Group 141, Municipal |Mrs. E.P. Turner, Dallas, |Mrs. Conde Hamlin,
improvement. | Tex. | St. Paul, Minn.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The foregoing list was confirmed by the Exposition Company and
the National Commission (August 21).

The group jurors were notified at the earliest possible moment
of their appointment.

The time that most of the jurors began to serve was September 1.

The list of jurors who served under appointment from the board
of lady managers was as follows:

List of Group Jurors--Board of Lady Managers.

Education:
Group 1, Miss Anna Tolman Smith, Washington, D.C.
Group 2, Miss Anna G. MacDougal, Chicago, Ill.
Group 3, Miss Mary Boyce Temple, Knoxville, Tenn.
Group 4, Mrs. E.A. Thayer, Denver, Colo.
Group 7, Miss Hope Loughborough, Cleveland, Ohio.

Art:
Group 9, Miss Mary Solari, Memphis, Tenn.
Group 11, Mrs. Elizabeth St. John Matthews, New York.
Group 12, Miss Rose Weld, Newport News, Va.
Group 14, Mrs. Eugene Field, Buena Park, Ill.

Liberal Arts:
Group 16, Miss Frances Benjamin Johnston, Washington, D.C.
Group 17, Mrs. Horace S. Smith, Chicago, Ill.
Group 18, Mrs. W.M. Woolwine, Nashville, Tenn.

Manufactures:
Group 37, Mrs. R.A. Edgerton, Milwaukee, Wis.
Group 45, Mrs. Isaac Boyd, Atlanta, Ga.
Groups 53 and 61, Mrs. F.K. Bowes, Chicago, Ill.; Mrs. A.G.
Harrow, Ottumwa, Iowa.
Groups 58 and 59, Mrs. E.D. Wood, Indianapolis, Ind.; Mrs.
Margaret Summers, Louisville, Ky.; Mrs. W.S. Major,
Shelbyville, Ind.

Agriculture:
Group 78, Mrs. W.H. Felton, Cartersville, Ga.
Group 88, Mrs. F.H. Pugh, Bellevue, Nebr.
Group 89, Mrs. E.L. Lamb, Jackson, Miss.
Group 90, Miss Carolyn Hempstead, Little Rock, Ark.

Horticulture:
Group 107, Mrs. M.B.R. Day, Frankfort, Ky.

Anthropology:
Group 125, Miss Alice C. Fletcher, Washington, D.C.
Group 126, Mrs. Alice Palmer Henderson, Washington, D.C.
Group 127, Miss Cora Peters, Washington, D.C.
Group 128, Mrs. Zelia Nuttall, Cambridge, Mass.

Social Economy:
Group 129, Miss Caroline Greisheimer, Washington, D.C.
Group 135, Miss Margaret Wade, Washington, D.C.
Group 136, Miss Jane Addams, Chicago, Ill.
Group 139, Miss Mary Perry, St. Louis, Mo.
Group 141, Mrs. E.P. Turner, Dallas, Tex.; Mrs. Conde Hamlin,
St. Paul, Minn.

The appointment of the departmental jurors had been provided for
in the extensive jury list approved April 29, but at the request
of three of the members of the National Commission the list of
departmental jurors was further confirmed by a meeting of the
board called for that purpose on September 20, and these jurors
began their work almost immediately.

The following list of department jurors was sent to the
Exposition Company and the National Commission:

Department A, Education:
Mrs. W.E. Fischel (principal), 3841 Washington Boulevard, St.
Louis, Mo.
Miss Anna Tolman Smith (alternate), care Mr. Howard J. Rogers, chief
department of education.

Department B, Art:
Mrs. Montgomery Sears (principal), Boston, Mass.
Miss Cecelia Beaux (alternate), South Washington square, New York
City.

Department C, Liberal Arts:
Miss Olive Seward (principal), 1725 Nineteenth street, Washington,
D.C.
Mrs. H.A. Langford (alternate), 5817 Rosalie court, Chicago, Ill.

Department D, Manufactures:
Miss Thekla M. Bernays (principal), St. Louis, Mo.
Mrs. W.H. Clapp (alternate), 28 West Eighth street, New York City.

Department E, Machinery:
Miss Kate Gleason (principal), care The Gleason Works, Rochester,
N.Y.
Miss Edith J. Griswold (alternate), St. Paul Building, New York
City.

Department F, Electricity:
Miss Hope Loughborough (principal), Euclid avenue, Cleveland, Ohio.
Miss Madolin Wynn (alternate), Deerfield, Mass.

Department G, Transportation exhibits:
Miss Rose Weld (principal), care Mrs. Dimmock, Newport News, Va.
Mrs. Robert Fulton (alternate), care Mrs. J.M. Horton, Buffalo,
N.Y.

Department H, Agriculture:
Mrs. Martha Shute (principal), secretary State board agriculture,
Denver, Colo.
Mrs. Edward Gilchrist Low (alternate), Lothrop, Groton, Mass.

Department J, Horticulture:
Mrs. Ida L. Turner (principal), Fort Worth, Tex.
Mrs. M.B.R. Day (alternate), Frankfort, Ky.

Department K, Forestry:
Miss Myra Dock (principal), State forestry restoration commissioner,
Harrisburg, Pa.
Mrs. J.M. Glenn (alternate), 617 Columbia avenue, Baltimore, Md.

Department L, Mines and Metallurgy:
Mrs. M.G. Scrutchin (principal), 96 East Linden street, Atlanta,
Ga.
Mrs. E.L. Lamb (alternate), Jackson, Miss.

Department M, Fish and Game:
Miss Mary Stuart Armstrong (principal), editor Elite, Chicago, Ill.
Mrs. C.E. Hatch (alternate), Kentland, Ind.

Department N, Anthropology:
Mrs. Zelia Nuttall (principal), care Peabody Museum, Cambridge,
Mass.
Mrs. Emily Cook (alternate), Bureau Indian Affairs, Washington, D.C.

Department O, Social Economy:
Miss Jane Addams (principal), Hull House, Chicago, Ill.
Mrs. Lilian Cantrell Bay (alternate), 5904 Clemens avenue, St.
Louis, Mo.

Department P, Physical Culture:
Miss Clara S. Helwig (principal), Plainfield, N.J.
Miss Margaret Wade (alternate), 912 Nineteenth street, Washington,
D.C.

It was found, upon communicating with the above named, that very
many could not serve, and no provision having been made for
alternates many changes became necessary. The following list was
subsequently transmitted to the Exposition Company and National
Commission, two of even these, however, failing to serve:

Department A, Education, Mrs. W.E. Fischel, 3341 Washington
Boulevard, St. Louis, Mo.

Department B, Art, Miss Mary Bullock, Hillside, Mo.

Department C, Liberal Arts, Mrs. H.A. Langford, Chicago, Ill.

Department D, Manufactures, Miss Thekla M. Bernays, St. Louis,
Mo.

Department E, Machinery, Miss Edith J. Griswold, New York City.

Department F, Electricity, Miss Hope Loughborough, Cleveland,
Ohio.

Department G, Transportation exhibits, Miss Rose Weld, Newport
News, Va.

Department H, Agriculture, Mrs. Richard P. Bland, Lebanon, Mo.

Department J, Horticulture, Mrs. Ida L. Turner, Fort Worth, Tex.

Department K, Forestry, Mrs. J.M. Glenn, Baltimore, Md.

Department L, Mines and Metallurgy, Mrs. M.G. Scrutchin,
Atlanta, Ga.

Department M, Fish and Game, Miss Mary Stuart Armstrong,
Chicago, Ill.

Department N, Anthropology, Mrs. Zelia Nuttall, Cambridge, Mass.

Department O, Social Economy, Miss Jane Addams, Chicago, Ill.

The committee of awards regrets that the discretionary power of
the Exposition Company restricted the appointive power of the
board, and that the late hour of the appointments prevented a
number of the jurors from accepting.

It was a great pleasure to the members of the board and the
committee to meet and to entertain the clever and attractive
women jurors, who served with distinction in their work and who
in every possible way showed their appreciation of the honor
conferred upon them by the board of lady managers of the
Louisiana Purchase Exposition.

Respectfully submitted.

FRANCES MARION HANGER,
_Chairman._
JENNIE GILMORE KNOTT.
LAVINIA H. EGAN.
FANNIE LOWRY PORTER.
HELEN BOICE-HUNSICKER.

Madam PRESIDENT,
_Board of Lady Managers._

The tenth meeting of the board was called on November 9, 1904. Many
matters in connection with the closing of the work of the board in St.
Louis were disposed of, and the following resolution passed concerning
the preparation of its final report:

I move that the president of this board be requested to make a
final report of the work of this board.

On December 2 the last session of the board was held in the building
which it had occupied during all the months of the exposition, and it
was with a feeling of genuine regret that the members separated, never
to meet again in the house which had been the scene of many interesting
gatherings.

On the day following the official closing of the exposition the
Louisiana Purchase Exposition Company sent their representative to make
an inventory of the contents of the building, preparatory to the
dismantling of the house which was thereafter to be known as the Physics
Building and be occupied by students of the Washington University. On
December 13 formal and final surrender was made by the president on
behalf of the board of lady managers to the Exposition Company.

The following is the final report of the house committee for the
exposition period:

On the 30th day of April, 1904, at the opening of the greatest
exposition the world has ever known, and commemorating one of
the most important events in the history of our country, the
board of lady managers, created by act of Congress and appointed
by the National Commission, designed by the wisdom and
forethought of one of our most dearly beloved Chief Executives,
to represent the women of America in setting forth to the world
woman's part, not only in the making of the exposition but in
the real expansion and development of our great nation, found
itself, by a combination of circumstances fortuitous or
otherwise, resolved into a committee on entertainment, with a
commodious and elegantly appointed home to call its own and the
appropriation of $100,000 to spend on furnishing, entertaining,
and necessary expenses of the board. It is therefore the
pleasure of this your house committee to report for the entire
exposition period beginning April 30, 1904, and ending December
1, 1905, the house in order each day from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., for
the reception of the public and for a series of entertainments,
which, by reason of the number of distinguished men and women
thus brought together, were international in character, and of a
nature and brilliancy in the highest degree pleasing to the
board itself. During this time some 25,000 guests were
entertained by the board at the special functions and the
informal afternoon teas, the latter having been made a most
attractive and interesting feature, dispensing the board's
hospitality toward the close of the Fair. For every month, save
August, a number of formal affairs were given, including
luncheons, receptions, and dinners.

It was particularly fitting that the initial feast spread by the
board of lady managers in its exposition home should have been
given in honor of the National Commission, the Government's
representative in the great World's Fair. To this dinner, given
on the evening of the 30th of April, under the trying
circumstances attendant upon a day strenuous with opening
exercises and the disadvantages of the rapid adjustment of
household arrangements, 100 guests were bidden, among them
Secretary Taft, who represented the President of the United
States in the opening events, members of the Senate and House
committees, and governors of States. President Carter of the
National Commission was toastmaster on this occasion, and toasts
were given by President David R. Francis, Senator Daniel,
Congressman Tawney, and Hon. M.H. de Young.

A reception in honor of Mrs. David R. Francis followed on May 9,
to which 500 guests were invited.

On May 17 a brilliant company of 500 was entertained at an
afternoon reception in honor of the representatives of the Army
and Navy in and near St. Louis. Ladies of the Army and Navy
assisted in receiving, and many distinguished persons were
present.

On May 19, immediately following the Louisiana Purchase Day
exercises of the General Federation of Women's Clubs, a luncheon
was given by the board of lady managers in honor of the
delegates to the General Federation.

Miss Alice Roosevelt was the honoree of a luncheon given on May
31, to which 600 guests were bidden. The affair was most
charming and successful.

Having thus during the opening month announced itself, the board
of lady managers continued during the exposition to contribute
its quota to the social life of the great fair.

The distinguished foreigners whom it was the privilege of the
board to especially honor were the representatives of foreign
governments, with a reception on June 17; Prince Pu Lun, to whom
a dinner of 52 covers was given on July 10, and Prince Fushimi,
for whom a reception was held on November 22. Receptions to the
Interparliamentary Union on September 12 and to the Congress of
Arts and Sciences on September 20 were also international in
character, a number of distinguished foreigners being present.

Among the special functions given, none was more successful or
more brilliant than the dinner in honor of President David R.
Francis, on November 12, to which 140 guests were invited.

The building of the board of lady managers, with the changes
made by the board, was, both in its appointments and location,
admirably adapted for the purpose for which it was set aside,
and in itself was a tribute to the necessity and advantage of
cooperation on the part of the board.

The whole lower floor of the building was beautifully fitted up
for the reception and entertainment of guests and the upper
floor was reserved for the private use of the board, being
divided into board room, secretary's room, reception room,
apartments for the president of the board, and quarters for all
members of the board who wished to avail themselves of the
hospitality of the home while in the city.

The house was conducted as any well-organized household under
the direction of the rotating committee, composed of the
resident members in St. Louis, and the members rotating each
month. They were ably assisted by a very capable hostess.

The house committee are greatly indebted to Miss Julia McBlair,
for the gracious manner in which she served the board as hostess
during the period of the exposition.

The work of the house committee is so closely allied to that of
the committee on ceremonies that it is somewhat difficult to
draw a line between the duties of the two or to set forth in a
formal report the differences.

For details of the work of house committee preliminary to
entertainments, reference is made to report of entertainment and
ceremonies committees, and for details of house furnishings
reference is made to house furnishing committee.

Without wishing to discriminate in the least, thanks are
especially due to Weil's band, of St. Louis, Mo., for their
never-failing courtesy in supplying music for the entertainments
of the board whenever it was possible for their engagements to
permit, and to the leader, Mr. William Weil, for his personal
interest.

To the commissioner from Ceylon, Mr. Stanley Bois, the board
would especially express their thanks for the tea from his
commission, which was used and enjoyed by the members of the
board and their guests, and also to the representatives of the
Japanese commission, who presented the chests of tea from which,
together with that sent by the commissioner from Ceylon, all
afternoon teas and receptions and luncheons of the board were
supplied, to the great pleasure and enjoyment of their
tea-drinking friends. Department of Horticulture for their gifts
of choice fruit, and the California commission for beautiful
basket of fruit on "California Day." To the agent who, through
Messrs. Nicholson & Co., of St. Louis, presented two cases of
champagne; and Colorado horticulture for baskets of fruit.

The house committee particularly appreciated the courtesy
extended to the board of lady managers by Lieutenant-Colonel
Kingsbury and Lieutenant-Colonel Fountain and officers of the
Jefferson Guards for constantly providing a guard for their
building.

SALENA V. ERNEST,
Chairman.

Immediately upon the adjournment of the board the president began to
collect material for the report, and pursuant to the power given her by
the resolution at the last session, held in St. Louis, a special meeting
was called on June 9, 1905, at the Murray Hill Hotel, New York, to pass
upon the final report.

There were present: Mrs. Daniel Manning, president, presiding, and Mrs.
Buchwalter; Mrs. Hanger, acting secretary; Mrs. Knott, Mrs. Daly, Mrs.
Holcombe, Mrs. Ernest, Mrs. Coleman, Miss Dawes, Mrs. Hunsicker, Mrs.
Moores, and Miss Egan.

The report was to be transmitted to the Louisiana Purchase Exposition
Commission, whose final meeting was called at Portland, Oreg., for June
15. It was, therefore, necessary that the report of the board should be
in the hands of the Commission by that time, and it was most fortunate
that immediate action could be taken upon the copy and forwarded to the
Commission.

Among the reports made by special committees was that of the committee
to edit minutes, which showed that a resolution adopted, at the meeting
of the board on November 14, 1904, provided for the editing the minutes
of the board and had named the following committee: Mrs. Frederick
Hanger, chairman; Mrs. Finis P. Ernest, and Miss Anna L. Dawes. At the
meeting of the board on June 10 the chairman of the committee reported
that the stenographic reports of the proceedings of the ten meetings of
the board, covering about 700 typewritten pages, had been carefully
edited; that all motions and resolutions had been retained inviolate;
that these, with roll call, time and place of meeting, and in some
instances limited discussion, made up the subject-matter of the minutes,
the same covering some 240 typewritten pages. The report of the editing
committee was adopted, the minutes accepted and ordered placed on file
with the archives of the board.

A committee on resolutions, consisting of Mrs. Edward Buchwalter and
Mrs. Richard W. Knott, presented as one of the finalities of the
eleventh meeting of the board the following resolutions, which were
unanimously adopted:

Whereas the Louisiana Purchase Exposition Commission by
authority vested in it by an act of Congress appointed the
members of the board of lady managers; therefore, be it

_Resolved_, That the board of lady managers of the Louisiana
Purchase Exposition expresses its appreciation of the high honor
conferred on its members by their appointment; and

_Be it further resolved_, That the thanks of the board of lady
managers be extended to the Louisiana Purchase Exposition
Commission for the privileges and pleasures it enjoyed as a
board.

The members of the board of lady managers of the Louisiana
Purchase Exposition wish to express their appreciation of the
courtesy and kindness shown them by the Exposition Company
during the exposition period.

The board of lady managers express their appreciation to the
Louisiana Purchase Exposition Company for the commemorative
diplomas and medals conferred upon them by the Exposition
Company.

The board of lady managers of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition
wishes to express its appreciation of its officers for their
services not only in their official work but in all the duties
that devolved upon them as members of the board.

Mrs. William H. Coleman was elected treasurer of the board of lady
managers at its first formal meeting, held on October 1, 1902.

The first appropriation received was from the Louisiana Purchase
Exposition Company and was for the sum of $3,000 for incidental
expenses. On February 18, 1904, the appropriation of $100,000 for the
use of the board was made by Congress, at which time the real
responsibilities of the treasurer began.

Her duties were fully defined in rule 6 of the rules and regulations
adopted by the board, and the custody of all funds was placed in her
hands to be disbursed "only upon order of the board and the approval of
its president."

Regular itemized statements were rendered to the board at each regular
meeting showing receipts and expenditures. These accounts were each time
fully set forth and always found to be absolutely correct and clearly
rendered.

At the meeting called for June 9, 1905, Mrs. Coleman read her last
report, the following being the final summary of all funds received and
disbursed on behalf of the board of lady managers:

REPORT OF THE TREASURER OF THE BOARD OF LADY MANAGERS OF THE LOUISIANA PURCHASE
EXPOSITION FROM MARCH 17, 1903, TO JUNE 10, 1905.

Receipts:
Received from Louisiana Purchase Exposition Company, by
appropriation of February 16, 1903 ................................... $3,000.00
Received from appropriation of Congress, by act of
February 18, 1904 .................................................... 100,000.00
Received interest on $100,000 account .................................. 1,502.29
--------------
104,502.29
Disbursements:
Tinting walls, staining floors, heating apparatus,
wiring for bells, awnings, screens, and plumbing--
From $100,000 ............................ $2,263.32
From $3,000 .............................. 64.30
----------- $2,327.62
Furniture, china, linen, freight, and packing charges--
From $100,000 ............................ 11,692.65
From $3,000 .............................. 652.25
----------- 12,344.90
Mileage and per diem, board meetings and rotating
committees, paid from all sources ..................... 30,272.76
Entertainment, all sources .............................. 10,672.85
Stationery, engraving, and printing ..................... 5,906.15
Postage and telegrams ................................... 1,196.94
Telephones .............................................. 281.24
Clerical and household force expenses ................... 5,096.17
Office incidentals ...................................... 274.14
House incidentals ....................................... 1,007.84
Other incidentals ....................................... 2,255.77
Model playground ........................................ 5,100.00
Miscellaneous expenses, resolution June 10, 1905, in
payment ............................................... 2,000.00
-----------
Total disbursements ................................... 78,736.38
Less returned from incidental account ................... 900.75
-----------
Grand total of all disbursements to June 10, 1905 ..... 77,835.63
Balance in hands of treasurer June 10, 1905 ............... 26,666.66
----------- 104,502.29
===========
Amount brought forward from the treasurer's report as balance in
hands of treasurer June 10, 1905, which is the amount to be returned
to the Exposition Company by the board of lady managers,
from all funds ......................................................... 26,666.66
To the above amount to be returned to the Exposition Company by
the board of lady managers, as a credit, is to be added the sum
paid to the company in cash on December 14, 1904, for furniture
and articles purchased by the members of the board, amounting to ....... 2,150.00
-----------
Making the total amount returned to the Exposition Company
from all sources ................................................... 28,816.66

Mrs. WILLIAM H. COLEMAN,
_Treasurer._

The auditing committee, composed of Mrs. William E. Andrews, chairman,
Mrs. Mary Phelps Montgomery, and Mrs. Finis P. Ernest, was elected by
the board of lady managers March 4, 1904, for the purpose of examining
and auditing the accounts of the treasurer, Mrs. William H. Coleman.

The committee met at stated intervals and examined the vouchers and
checks numbered 1 to 253, inclusive, and reported that these were found
to be correct, and accounted fully for all moneys received by the
treasurer to that date, and this report was accepted.

The exposition closed on December 1, and the auditing committee was not
again called until the time for rendering a final account of the funds
of the board. At this time the absence of the chairman, Mrs. Andrews,
and Mrs. Montgomery necessitated the appointment of two other members to
fill said vacancies, in order to audit the bills contracted by the board
from November 1, 1904, to June 10, 1905. Mrs. Hanger and Mrs. Knott were
thereupon elected. Mrs. Montgomery arriving later, Mrs. Hanger withdrew
from the committee, leaving the membership--Mrs. Ernest, chairman, Mrs.
Montgomery, and Mrs. Knott--all present.

On June 12 and subsequently this committee met and examined the vouchers
and checks from November 1, 1904, to June 10, 1905, inclusive, and found
the accounts between the above-mentioned dates to be correct.

Total receipts:
From Louisiana Purchase Exposition Company ..................... $3,000.00
From appropriation by Congress ................................. 100,000.00
Total interest received on above $100,000 account .............. 1,502.29
-----------
104,502.29
Total expended from $3,000 ............................ $3,000.00
Total expended from $100,000 .......................... 74,146.83
Total amount interest expended as per resolution of
June 10 ............................................. 688.80
-----------
Total expenditures ............................... 77,835.63
Balance on hand from interest .............. $813.49
Balance on hand from $100,000 appropriation 25,853.17
----------- 26,666.66
Balance on hand from all sources ................................... 104,502.29

A certified public accountant has been engaged to prepare a classified
summary of all receipts and disbursements, and we refer to the figures
of his report for details and totals, which we hereby approve and accept
as final.

In witness whereof we have hereunto set our hands this 17th day of June,
1905.

SALENA V. ERNEST,
MARY PHELPS MONTGOMERY,
JENNIE GILLMORE KNOTT,
_Members Auditing Committee._

NEW YORK, _June 16, 1905._

In accordance with your instructions, I have made an examination of your
treasurer's accounts from March 17, 1903, to June 10, 1905, and herewith
submit to you my report thereon.

All vouchers covering the disbursements from the appropriation made by
Congress of $100,000 are in due form and properly approved and attested,
vouchers being on file for all amounts paid, each voucher containing a
"paid" check signed by the treasurer and countersigned by the president,
excepting a few, which, in the ordinary course of business, have not as
yet been presented at bank for payment.

All disbursements from the $3,000 received from the Louisiana Purchase
Exposition Company and from the interest received from banks have been
made by treasurer's check and all have been approved by the president of
the board. The total disbursements and receipts to June 10 are as
follows:

Total amount received by the treasurer to June 10, 1905:
From Louisiana Purchase Exposition Company ........................ $3,000.00
From Congress ..................................................... 100,000.00
Interest received from banks ...................................... 1,502.29
-----------
Total received from all sources to June 10, 1905 ................ 104,502.29
===========
Total amount disbursed by treasurer to June 10, 1905:
From the $3,000 received from the Louisiana Purchase Exposition
Company ......................................................... 3,000.00
From the appropriation from Congress .............................. 74,146.83
From the interest received from banks ............................. 688.80
-----------
Total disbursed from all sources to June 10, 1905 ............... 77,835.63
===========
Balance in hands of treasurer on June 10, 1905:
From the $100.000 appropriation from Congress ..................... 25,853.17
From interest received from banks ................................. 813.49
-----------
Balance in hands of treasurer June 10, 1905 ..................... 26,666.66

Respectfully submitted.
JOHN PROUD,
_Certified Public Accountant._

The PRESIDENT AND AUDITING COMMITTEE,
_Board of Lady Managers, Louisiana Purchase Exposition._

It has been said that "an exposition should be as broad and
comprehensive as the efforts of mankind." In all human activities in
recent years advancement has been so marvelously rapid that important
expositions might be held from time to time in which would be included
nothing but inventions, discoveries, and accomplishments that belong to
the intervening epoch-making periods.

That all nations take a deep interest in world's fairs is made manifest
by the large attendance of people from all parts of the globe. It is
self-evident that they appreciate the fact that most beneficial results
may be derived by all, not only by means of the practical and tangible
demonstration and comparison of objects assembled, but through the
opportunity afforded for interchange of thought so conspicuously made
available to advanced thinkers and workers. And it is hoped and believed
that in its own time and in its own way each exposition will accomplish
much for the good of both men and women of every country.

It would seem from the division of work as shown at the exposition by
the Filipinos and the Indian tribes that women have not only, from the
remotest times of which we have record, originated and practiced most of
the industrial arts, but, among primitive nations, they still continue
to ply the same occupations. The exhibits showed that the work of the
men was still that of the hunter and trapper, while the Filipino woman
who sat on the floor making cotton cloth, would indicate that it had
fallen to the share of women not only to fashion garments, but the
material from which they were made. And was not the stick which she so
deftly handled, upon which she wound her thread to carry the woof to and
fro transversely across the warp of her hand-woven fabric, the
forerunner of the swiftly moving shuttle of today? And if the primitive
woman still makes garments from the skins which the hunter brings home,
and cooks the game which he shoots or traps, and has originated the
method of cooking other articles of food, has she not earned for herself
the right to be termed the first "home maker?" It is true the home
originally had to be maintained by force of arms, but when this
necessity no longer existed, and man, "the protector," had time to
examine this woman-made home, he put his ingenuity to work to aid in the
increased demands large households made upon women and invented and
applied machinery to do the heavy tasks that had theretofore been done
by them. He found it a vastly remunerative occupation, and promptly
removed her work of spinning, weaving, dyeing, and even the making of
every kind of garment, and the preparation of foods, to his factories.

Women did not take kindly to the innovation at first--their occupations
were gone--but, with their usual adaptability, they immediately invented
new ones. They now had time and opportunity to acquire education, enter
the professions, and prepare themselves to take their equal place by the
side of men.

President Francis, in his address on opening day, said of the Louisiana
Purchase Exposition:

So thoroughly does it represent the world's civilization that if
all man's other works were, by some unspeakable catastrophe,
blotted out the records here established by the assembled
nations would afford all necessary standards for the rebuilding
of our entire civilization.

And at this great exposition, by the elimination of the special woman's
department, the exhibits of woman's work for the first time in this
country stood solely and independently by the side of the exhibits by
men, and the industrial equality and the value of the contributions to
the industries, sciences, and arts of both were judged by the same
standards. Let no concern, therefore, be felt as to the future
advancement of women. Their strength and powers have been tested, and
the new era upon which they entered but a few years ago under the
leadership of the women of America is now so far advanced for the women
of all nations in every country that their undeniable right to education
and training is being acknowledged, their consequent recognition as a
factor for increased usefulness is being accorded, and their development
is swift, their progress sure.

The Louisiana Purchase Exposition is passing into the realm wherein lies
forgetfulness; its beauties are even now fading from the memories of its
millions of visitors. The buildings have been razed, and the broad acres
it covered have been laid waste; the labor of years, the result of
thought, perseverance, patience, energy, and untiring application on the
part of hundreds of its promoters and workers, already seems as
intangible as a dream. But the things for which those buildings stood,
the intellectual, moral, and material prosperity which they expressed
are real, lasting, and glorious. These are permanently recorded in
history. And forming an important part of these records is the work of
woman.

The board of lady managers of this vast world's fair earnestly hopes
that at every future exposition woman may be accorded that dignified
position that she has so splendidly earned by her own endeavors, and
that each time a resume of her work achieved is recorded new fields of
usefulness may be found added thereto. No fear need be entertained that
she will not always demonstrate that she does contribute her full share
toward the progress and prosperity of nations and the uplifting of
humanity.

APPENDIX 6.

STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES OF LOUISIANA PURCHASE EXPOSITION COMMISSION

FROM APRIL 23, 1901, TO JUNE 30, 1905.

* * * * *

_Statement of expenditures of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition Commission
from April 23, 1901, to June 30, 1901, inclusive._

OFFICE OF SECRETARY.

APRIL.

Scarritt Comstock Furniture Company, furniture ............ $71.00
Miller & Spalding Stationery Company, stationery .......... 32.90
Broadway Furniture Company, rug ........................... 19.00
Smith-Premier Typewriter Company, one typewriter .......... 99.00
Woodward & Tiernan Printing Company, letter heads ......... 31.50
William Corcoran, stenographer, eight days at $8.33-1/3
per day ................................................. 66.67
-------------- $320.07

MAY.

Imperial Building Company, rent of office ................. 25.00
Joseph Flory, advanced for stamps ......................... 15.00
Woodward & Tiernan Printing Company, envelopes ............ 22.75
Miller & Spalding Stationery Company, stationery .......... 7.80
Joseph Flory, express charges ............................. .55
Gould Directory Company, city directory ................... 7.00
William Corcoran, stenographer, four days at $8.33-1/3
per day ................................................. 33.33
F.A. Burrelle, press clippings ............................ 10.00
St. Louis Toilet Supply Company, towels for office ........ .75
Claude Hough, stenographer, salary, twenty-five days, $75 62.90
Western Union Telegraph Company, service .................. 1.02
-------------- 186.10

JUNE.

Miller & Spalding Stationery Company, supplies ............ .50
William H. Corcoran, stenographer, copying minutes ........ 25.00
Imperial Building Company, rent of office ................. 25.00
St. Louis Toilet Supply Company, towels ................... .75
St. Louis Express Company, moving office furniture ........ 2.50
F.A. Burrelle, press bureau, press clippings .............. 10.00
Claude Hough, official stenographer, salary ............... 75.00
Western Union Telegraph Company, service .................. 19.55
Do ..................................................... 2.08
-------------- 160.38
-----------
Total to June 30, 1901 ............................... 666.55

_Statement of expenditures of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition Commission
from July 1, 1901, to June 30, 1902, inclusive._

OFFICE OF SECRETARY.

JULY.

Woodward & Tiernan Printing Company, envelopes ............ $6.75
Herring-Hall Marvin Safe Company, one safe ................ 85.00
Scarritt-Comstock Furniture Company, desk ................. 52.00
National Railway Publishing Company, railway guide one
year .................................................... 5.00
Miller & Spalding Stationery Company, supplies ............ 5.55
Bell Telephone Company, rent telephone for quarter ........ 22.23
Burrelle Press Bureau, press clippings .................... 10.00
Claude Hough, stenographer, salary ........................ 75.00
Southern Hotel Company, rent of office rooms .............. 100.00
Wilfred A. Simpson, messenger, salary ..................... 30.00
Western Union Telegraph Company, service .................. 7.21
------------- $398.74

AUGUST.

Woodward & Tiernan Printing Company, supplies ............. 12.00
Spalding Stationery Company, supplies ..................... 1.40
Southern Hotel Company, rent office rooms ................. 100.00
Claude Hough, stenographer, salary ........................ 75.00
Wilfred A. Simpson, messenger, salary ..................... 30.00
Burrelle Press Bureau, press clippings .................... 10.00
Bell Telephone Company, long-distance charges ............. 6.80
Western Union Telegraph Company, service .................. 28.46
------------- 263.66

SEPTEMBER.

Southern Hotel Company, rent office rooms ................. 100.00
Claude Hough, stenographer, salary ........................ 75.00
John H. Grosse, messenger, salary ......................... 30.00
Burrelle Press Bureau, press clippings .................... 10.00
Bell Telephone Company, long-distance charges ............. 2.50
Western Union Telegraph Company, service .................. 4.04
------------- 221.54

OCTOBER.

Woodward & Tiernan Printing Company, envelopes and letter
heads ..................................................... 16.25
Southern Hotel Company, rent office rooms ................. 100.00
Claude Hough, stenographer, salary ........................ 75.00
John H. Grosse, messenger, salary ......................... 30.00
Miss Gertrude Jenkins, stenographer, copying rules ........ 15.00
Spalding Stationery Company, supplies ..................... 7.45
Bell Telephone Company, long-distance charges ............. 2.25
Burrelle Press Bureau, press clippings .................... 10.00
Western Union Telegraph Company, service .................. 9.74
------------- 265.69

NOVEMBER.

United Typewriter and Supplies Company, stationery ........ 5.49
Library Bureau, one file case, complete ................... 65.75
F.W. Baumhoff, postmaster, to stamps ...................... 5.00
Higgins Map Company, 20 maps of St. Louis ................. 5.00
Southern Hotel Company, rent office rooms ................. 100.00
Claude Hough, stenographer, salary ........................ 100.00
John H. Grosse, messenger, salary ......................... 30.00
Woodward & Tiernan Printing Company, letter heads ......... 4.75
Bell Telephone Company, long-distance charges ............. 3.25
F.A. Burrelle Press Bureau, press clippings ............... 10.00
Western Union Telegraph Company, service .................. 22.13
------------- 351.37

DECEMBER.

Spalding Stationery Company, supplies ..................... $5.35
Skinner & Kennedy, Eureka bath and supplies ............... 5.60
Library Bureau, two sets file guides ...................... 1.50
Bell Telephone Company, rent of telephone, long-distance
charges ................................................. 35.35
Southern Hotel Company, rent of office rooms .............. 100.00
John H. Grosse, messenger, salary ......................... 30.00
Claude Hough, stenographer, salary ........................ 100.00
Burrelle Press Bureau, press clippings .................... 10.00
Western Union Telegraph Company, service .................. 13.88
------------- $301.68

JANUARY.

Woodward & Tiernan Printing Company, supplies ............. 7.50
Spalding Stationery Company, supplies ..................... 7.45
Burrelle Press Bureau, press clippings .................... 10.00
Remington Typewriter Company, two machines ................ 180.00
Southern Hotel Company, rent of office rooms .............. 100.00
Claude Hough, stenographer, salary ........................ 100.00
John H. Grosse, messenger, salary ......................... 30.00
Western Union Telegraph Company, service .................. 17.70
------------- 452.65

FEBRUARY.

Southern Hotel Company, rent of office rooms .............. 100.00
Claude Hough, stenographer, salary ........................ 100.00
John H. Grosse, messenger, salary ......................... 30.00
Carroll Purman, clerk John M. Thurston .................... 50.00
Isaac Hamburger, clerk Thomas H. Carter ................... 50.00
Western Union Telegraph Company, service .................. 2.25
------------- 332.25

MARCH.

Spalding Stationery Company, supplies ..................... 20.60
Superintendent of Documents, Revised Statutes ............. 7.90
Southern Hotel Company, rent of office rooms .............. 100.00
Claude Hough, stenographer, salary ........................ 100.00
John H. Grosse, messenger, salary ......................... 30.00
Bell Telephone Company, rent of telephone, long-distance
charges ................................................. 50.95
Isaac Hamburger, clerk Thomas H. Carter ................... 50.00
Carroll Purman, clerk John M. Thurston .................... 50.00
Hon. Thomas H. Carter, expense typewriting ................ 7.30
------------- 416.75

APRIL.

Mermod & Jaccard Jewelry Company, letter heads ............ 333.00
Skinner & Kennedy, supplies ............................... 9.10
Gould Directory, one city directory ....................... 6.00
A.C. McDonald, one Webster's Dictionary ................... 10.00
Isaac Hamburger, clerk Thomas H. Carter ................... 50.00
John H. Grosse, messenger, salary ......................... 30.00
Southern Hotel Company, rent of office rooms .............. 100.00
Claude Hough, stenographer, salary ........................ 109.00
Carroll Purman, clerk John M. Thurston .................... 50.00
Western Union Telegraph Company, service .................. 14.84
------------- 702.94

MAY.

Southern Hotel Company, rent of office rooms .............. $100.00
Claude Hough, stenographer, salary ........................ 100.00
John H. Grosse, messenger, salary ......................... 30.00
Miss Margaret McElvain, clerk Thomas H. Carter ............ 50.00
Carroll Purman, clerk John M. Thurston .................... 50.00
Western Union Telegraph Company, service .................. 4.40
------------- $334.40

JUNE.

Southern Hotel Company, rent of office rooms .............. 100.00
Claude Hough, stenographer, salary ........................ 100.00
Eugene Nahler, messenger, salary .......................... 30.00
Carroll Purman, clerk John M. Thurston .................... 50.00
Miss Margaret McElvain, clerk Thomas H. Carter ............ 50.00
Bell Telephone Company, rent of telephone, long-distance
charges ................................................. 31.55
Miss Minnie Moran, clerk F.A. Betts ....................... 50.00
Western Union Telegraph Company, service .................. 8.62
------------- 420.17
-------------
Total .................................................................. 4,461.84

_Statement of expenditures of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition Commission
from July 1, 1902, to June 30, 1903, inclusive._

OFFICE OF SECRETARY.

JULY.

National Railway Publishing Company, railway guide one
year .................................................... $8.00
Southern Hotel Company, rent of office rooms .............. 100.00
Claude Hough, stenographer, salary ........................ 100.00
Eugene Nahler, messenger, salary .......................... 30.00
Spalding Stationery Company, supplies ..................... 10.40
Carroll Purman, clerk John M. Thurston .................... 50.00
Isaac Hamburger, clerk Thomas H. Carter ................... 50.00
Densmore Typewriter Company, desk and chair ............... 32.00
Western Union Telegraph Company, service .................. 1.60
------------- $382.00

AUGUST.

Southern Hotel Company, rent of office rooms .............. 100.00
Claude Hough, stenographer, salary ........................ 100.00
Eugene Nahler, messenger, salary .......................... 30.00
Carroll Purman, clerk John M. Thurston .................... 50.00
Smith Premier Typewriter Company, repairs machine ......... 2.00
Isaac Hamburger, clerk Thomas H. Carter ................... 50.00
Western Union Telegraph Company, service .................. 2.97
------------- 334.97

SEPTEMBER.

Spalding Stationery Company, supplies ..................... 7.40
Southern Hotel Company, rent of office rooms .............. 100.00
Claude Hough, stenographer, salary ........................ 100.00
Eugene Nahler, messenger, salary .......................... 30.00
Bell Telephone Company, rent of telephone for quarter ..... 31.25
Miss Margaret McElvain, clerk Thomas H. Carter ............ 50.00
Carroll Purman, clerk John M. Thurston .................... 50.00
Western Union Telegraph Company, service .................. 6.40
------------- 375.05

OCTOBER.

Southern Hotel Company, rent of office rooms .............. $31.10
Claude Hough, stenographer, salary ........................ 100.00
Eugene Nahler, messenger, salary .......................... 30.00
J. Kennard & Sons, four Wilton rugs ....................... 72.75
Mrs. M.E. Schuerman, stenographer services, board of lady
managers ................................................ 66.10
Spalding Stationery Company, supplies ..................... 14.70
Carroll Purman, clerk John M. Thurston .................... 50.00
Fidelity Storage and Moving Company, moving office ........ 25.00
Miss Margaret McElvain, clerk Thomas H. Carter ............ 50.00
Western Union Telegraph Company, service .................. 2.28
------------- $441.93

NOVEMBER.

Claude Hough, stenographer, salary ........................ 100.00
Eugene Nahler, messenger, salary .......................... 30.00
Carroll Purman, clerk John M. Thurston .................... 50.00
Southern Hotel, rent of meeting rooms ..................... 35.00
Miss Minnie Moran, clerk F.A. Betts, July to November ..... 50.00
A.S. Aloe Company, hauling McKinley portrait .............. 5.00
Miss M. McElvain, clerk Thomas H. Carter .................. 50.00
Western Union Telegraph Company, service .................. .91
Miss Minnie Moran, clerk F.A. Betts, November ............. 25.00
------------- 345.91

DECEMBER.

Linze Electrical Supply Company, call bell ................ 2.45
John R. Parson, two silk flags, one 15-foot flag .......... 18.00
Mermod & Jaccard Jewelry Company, stationery .............. 355.00
J. Kennard & Sons Carpet Company, matting and pillow ...... 83.01
Miss Blanch Barth, clerk John F. Miller, six months ....... 50.00
Claude Hough, stenographer, salary ........................ 100.00
Jos. A. Carlin, messenger, salary ......................... 40.00
Spalding Stationery Company, stationery and supplies ...... 9.45
Bell Telephone Company, rent and long distance ............ 34.80
Carroll Purman, clerk John M. Thurston .................... 50.00
J.J. Ferguson, to 10 photographs of commissioners, framed.. 110.00
Scarritt-Comstock Furniture Company, office furniture ..... 349.00
Miss Margaret McElvain, clerk Thomas H. Carter ............ 50.00
Western Union Telegraph Company, service .................. 5.91
Miss Minnie T. Moran, clerk F.A. Betts .................... 25.00
------------- 1,282.62

JANUARY.

Claude Hough, stenographer, salary ........................ 100.00
Jos. Carlin, messenger, salary ............................ 40.00
Carroll Purman, clerk John M. Thurston .................... 50.00
Henry O'Flynn, insurance agent, insuring McKinley
photograph .............................................. 20.00
Miss Margaret McElvain, clerk Thomas H. Carter ............ 50.00
Geo. W. Conrad, clerk John F. Miller ...................... 25.00
Western Union Telegraph Company, service .................. 6.60
Miss Minnie T. Moran, clerk F.A. Betts .................... 25.00
--------------- 316.60

FEBRUARY.

Lambert-Deacon & Hull Printing Company, supplies .......... $20.00
Carroll Purman, clerk John M. Thurston .................... 50.00
J. Kennard & Sons, three Smyrna rugs ...................... 18.90
Claude Hough, stenographer, salary ........................ 100.00
Eugene Nahler, messenger, salary .......................... 40.00
Miss Margaret McElvain, clerk Thomas H. Carter ............ 50.00
Miss Minnie T. Moran, clerk F.A. Betts .................... 25.00
Western Union Telegraph Company, service .................. 8.43
Geo. W. Conrad, clerk John F. Miller ...................... 10.00
------------- $322.32

MARCH.

Skinner & Kennedy Stationery Company, supplies ............ 3.00
Postal Telegraph Company, service ......................... 1.93
Miss Lulu R. Colvin, stenographer, extra service .......... 5.00
Claude Hough, stenographer, salary ........................ 100.00
Eugene Nahler, messenger, salary .......................... 40.00
Carroll Purman, clerk John M. Thurston .................... 50.00
Bell Telephone Company, rent of telephone long distance
service ................................................. 34.72
Geo. W. Conrad, clerk John F. Miller ...................... 10.00
Spalding Stationery Company, supplies ..................... 7.45
Southern Hotel Company, rent meeting rooms ................ 177.15
Miss Margaret McElvain, clerk Thomas H. Carter ............ 50.00
Miss Minnie T. Moran, clerk F.A. Betts .................... 25.00
Western Union Telegraph Company, service .................. 39.50
------------- 543.75

APRIL.

St. Louis Express Company, moving office records .......... 2.50
Mermod & Jaccard Company, engraving cards, dedication ..... 37.50
John R. Parson, one large flag ............................ 15.00
The Postal Telegraph Company, service ..................... 1.66
Mesker & Bro., steel flag pole ............................ 63.00
Mook Brothers, painting office of Commission .............. 50.00
Chas. Rippe Tent Company, one streamer for flag pole ...... 15.50
Wm. E. Barclay Printing Company, printing minutes ......... 91.50
Wand Livery Company, carriages furnished dedication ....... 45.00
Steiner Engraving and Badge Company, badges for
Commissioners ........................................... 15.00
E.C. Giltner, clerk George W. McBride, six months ......... 100.00
Carroll Purman, clerk John M. Thurston .................... 50.00
Claude Hough, stenographer, salary ........................ 125.00
Eugene Nahler, messenger, salary .......................... 40.00
Miss Margaret McElvain, clerk Thomas H. Carter ............ 50.00
Western Union Telegraph Company, service .................. 21.70
Miss Minnie T. Moran, clerk F.A. Betts .................... 25.00
J.S. Dunham, clerk P.D. Scott ............................. 50.00
------------- 823.36

MAY.

Wand Livery Company, carriages for dedication ............. 90.00
Southern Hotel Company, rent of meeting rooms ............. 358.85
Claude Hough, stenographer, salary ........................ 125.00
Eugene Nahler, messenger, salary .......................... 40.00
Carroll Purman, clerk John M. Thurston .................... 50.00
Spalding Stationery Company, supplies ..................... 9.80
Edward M. Gould, city directory ........................... $6.00
Western Union Telegraph Company, service .................. 10.26
Miss Minnie T. Moran, clerk F.A. Betts .................... 25.00
J.S. Dunham, clerk P.D. Scott ............................. 50.00
Miss Margaret McElvain, clerk Thomas H. Carter ............ 50.00
------------- $814.91

JUNE.

Claude Hough, stenographer, salary ........................ 125.00
Eugene Nahler, messenger, salary .......................... 40.00
Carroll Purman, clerk John M .............................. 50.00
Miss Minnie T. Moran, clerk F.A. Betts .................... 50.00
W.C. Tyler, expert accountant, auditing accounts .......... 178.75
W.E. Andrews, per diem allowance while auditing ........... 60.00
Jones, Caesar & Co., expert accountants, to May 31 ........ 1,250.00
Bell Telephone Company, rent and long-distance charges .... 14.54
Southern Hotel Company, rent of meeting rooms ............. 17.55
J.S. Dunham, clerk P.D. Scott ............................. 50.00
Geo. W. Conrad, clerk John F. Miller ...................... 25.00
Bell Telephone Company, long-distance charges ............. .75
Miss Margaret McElvain, clerk Thomas H. Carter ............ 50.00
Pullman Sleeping-Car Company, accommodations W.E. Andrews . 10.00
Baltimore and Ohio Railway, transportation W.E. Andrews,
W.C. Tyler .............................................. 82.50
Western Union Telegraph Company, service .................. 8.29
------------- 2,012.38
-------------
Total to June 30,1903...................................... 7,995.81

_Statement of expenditures of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition Commission
from July 1, 1903, to June 30, 1904, inclusive_.

OFFICE OF SECRETARY.

JULY.

National Railway Publishing Company, railway guide
one Year ................................................ $8.00
Claude Hough, stenographer, salary ........................ 125.00
Eugene Nahler, messenger, salary .......................... 40.00
Carroll Purman, clerk John M. Thurston .................... 50.00
Lambert-Deacon & Hull, stationery and supplies ............ 17.35
Miss Minnie T. Moran, clerk F.A. Betts .................... 25.00
Miss Margaret McElvain, clerk Thomas H. Carter ............ 50.00
Western Union Telegraph Company, service .................. 1.73
J.S. Dunham, clerk P.D. Scott.............................. 50.00
------------- $367.08

AUGUST.

Claude Hough, stenographer, salary ........................ 125.00
Eugene Nahler, messenger, salary .......................... 40.00
Carroll Purman, clerk John M. Thurston .................... 50.00
Miss Minnie T. Moran, clerk F.A. Betts .................... 25.00
Miss Margaret McElvain, clerk Thomas H. Carter ............ 50.00
Western Union Telegraph Company, service .................. 2.78
J.S. Dunham, clerk P.D. Scott.............................. 50.00
------------- 342.78

SEPTEMBER.

Jones, Caesar & Co., auditing Exposition Company's books .. $500.00
John R. Parsons, one large United States flag ............. 15.00
Claude Hough, stenographer, salary ........................ 125.00
Eugene Nahler, messenger, salary .......................... 40.00
Carroll Purman, clerk John M. Thurston .................... 50.00
Bell Telephone Company, rent for one quarter and long-
distance charges ........................................ 33.35
Geo. W. Conrad, clerk John F. Miller ...................... 25.00
J.S. Dunham, clerk P.D. Scott ............................. 50.00
Miss Margaret McElvain, clerk Thomas H. Carter ............ 50.00
Miss Minnie T. Moran, clerk F.A. Betts .................... 50.00
Western Union Telegraph Company, service .................. 9.41
------------- $947.76

OCTOBER.

The Kellogg Company, desk telephone bracket ............... 2.50
Spalding Stationery Company, supplies ..................... 7.75
Claude Hough, stenographer, salary ........................ 125.00
Eugene Nahler, messenger, salary .......................... 40.00
Miss Minnie T. Moran, clerk F.A. Betts .................... 50.00
Carroll Purman, clerk John M. Thurston .................... 50.00
Miss Margaret McElvain, clerk Thomas H. Carter ............ 50.00
J.S. Dunham, clerk P.D. Scott ............................. 50.00
Geo. W. Conrad, clerk John F. Miller ...................... 10.00
Western Union Telegraph Company, service .................. 1.10
------------- 386.35

NOVEMBER.

Woodward & Tiernan Printing Company, binding report ....... 8.00
Smith-Premier Company, new feed roll ...................... 3.00
Eugene Nahler, messenger, salary .......................... 40.00
Claude Hough, stenographer, salary ........................ 125.00
Carroll Purman, clerk John M. Thurston .................... 50.00
Geo. W. Conrad, clerk John F. Miller ...................... 10.00
Miss Margaret McElvain, clerk Thomas H. Carter ............ 50.00
J.S. Dunham, clerk P.D. Scott ............................. 50.00
Jones, Caesar & Co., checking financial reports ........... 75.00
Miss Minnie T. Moran, clerk F.A. Betts .................... 50.00
Western Union Telegraph Company, service .................. 4.74
------------- 465.74

DECEMBER.

Mermod & Jaccard Jewelry Company, letter heads ............ 154.00
Spalding Stationery Company, supplies ..................... 21.90
Claude Hough, stenographer, salary ........................ 125.00
Eugene Nahler, messenger, salary .......................... 40.00
Miss Margaret McElvain, clerk Thomas H. Carter ............ 50.00
Carroll Purman, clerk John M. Thurston .................... 50.00
Miss Blanch Barth, clerk John F. Miller ................... 10.00
J.S. Dunham, clerk P.D. Scott ............................. 50.00
The Bell Telephone Company, rent one quarter and long-
distance charges ........................................ 33.20
Southern Hotel, rent of meeting rooms ..................... $16.95
Miss Minnie T. Moran ...................................... 50.00
Western Union Telegraph Company, service .................. 1.45
------------- $602.50

JANUARY.

John R. Parson, two United States flags, flag pole ........ 26.00
Carrol Purman, clerk John M. Thurston ..................... 50.00
Eugene Nahler, messenger, salary .......................... 40.00
Claude Hough, stenographer, salary ........................ 125.00
Claude Hough, traveling expenses to New York and Washington 124.25
Miss Minnie T. Moran, clerk F.A. Betts .................... 50.00
W.D. Tipton, clerk Thomas H. Carter ....................... 50.00
J.S. Dunham, clerk P.D. Scott ............................. 50.00
Western Union Telegraph Company, service .................. 4.57
------------- 519.82

FEBRUARY.

Spalding Stationery Company, supplies ..................... 6.80
Carrol Purman, clerk John M. Thurston ..................... 50.00
Claude Hough, stenographer, salary ........................ 125.00
Eugene Nahler, messenger, salary .......................... 40.00
W.D. Tipton, clerk Thomas H. Carter ....................... 50.00
J.S. Dunham, clerk P.D. Scott ............................. 50.00
Jones, Caesar & Co., auditing Exposition Company's books .. 45.00
Miss Minnie T. Moran, clerk F.A. Betts .................... 50.00
Western Union Telegraph Company, service .................. 1.08
------------- 417.88

MARCH.

Eugene Nahler, messenger, salary .......................... 40.00
Carrol Purman, clerk John M. Thurston ..................... 50.00
Claude Hough, stenographer, salary ........................ 125.00
J.S. Dunham, clerk P.D. Scott ............................. 50.00
Enterprise Cleaning Company, cleaning office .............. 20.00
Simmons Hardware Company, ice-water cooler ................ 7.50
Bell Telephone Company, rent one quarter and long distance 33.20
Geo. W. Conrad, clerk John F. Miller ...................... 25.00
W.D. Tipton, clerk Thomas H. Carter ....................... 50.00
Miss Minnie T. Moran, clerk F.A. Betts .................... 50.00
Western Union Telegraph Company, service .................. 3.59
------------- 454.29

APRIL.

Mermod & Jaccard Jewelry Company, letter heads ............ 90.00
Sexton-Stubinger Range Company, water-cooler stand ........ 3.25
Claude Hough, stenographer, salary ........................ 125.00
Eugene Nahler, messenger, salary .......................... 40.00
Carrol Purman, clerk John M. Thurston ..................... 50.00
Miss Minnie T. Moran, clerk F.A. Betts .................... 50.00
W.D. Tipton, clerk Thomas H. Carter ....................... 50.00
Spalding Stationery Company, supplies ..................... 19.75
J.S. Dunham, clerk P.D. Scott ............................. 50.00
Western Union Telegraph Company, service .................. 4.27
------------- 482.27

MAY.

Claude Hough, stenographer, salary ........................ $125.00
Eugene Nahler, messenger, salary .......................... 40.00
Lambert-Deacon & Hull, stationery ......................... 25.15
Carroll Purman, clerk John M. Thurston .................... 50.00
Oliver J. Grace, 10 keys for office ....................... 2.40
Wm. E. Barclay Printing Company, printing order books ..... 54.60
Scarritt-Comstock Furniture Company, two desks ............ 45.00
Keyes & Marshall Brothers Livery Company, conveyance one
month ................................................... 140.00
W.D. Tipton, clerk Thomas H. Carter ....................... 50.00
Mermod & Jaccard Jewelry Company, paper and envelopes ..... 94.50
J.S. Durham, clerk P.D. Scott ............................. 50.00
Miss Minnie T. Moran, clerk F.A. Betts .................... 50.00
Laurence H. Grahame, salary, assistant secretary, nine days 72.58
------------- $799.33

JUNE.

Kennard & Sons Carpet Company, screens and sofa cover ..... 15.50
Spalding Stationery Company, supplies ..................... 12.20
Wm. Prufrock Furniture Company, one sofa .................. 27.00

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