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English Housewifery Exemplified by Elizabeth Moxon

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Take twenty pounds of malaga raisins, pick and chop them, then put them
into a tub with twenty quarts of water, let the water be boiled and
stand till it be cold again before you put in your raisins, let them
remain together ten days, stirring it twice a day, then strain the
liquor very well from the raisins, through a canvas strainer or
hair-sieve; add to it six quarts of elder juice, five pounds of loaf
sugar, and a little juice of sloes to make it acid, just as you please;
put it into a vessel, and let it stand in a pretty warm place three
months, then bottle it; the vessel must not be stopp'd up till it has
done working; if your raisins be very good you may leave out the sugar.

302. _To make_ GOOSEBERRY WINE _of ripe_ GOOSEBERRIES.

Pick, clean and beat your gooseberries in a marble mortar or wooden
bowl, measure them in quarts up-heap'd, add two quarts of spring water,
and let them stand all night or twelve hours, then rub or press out the
husks very well, strain them through a wide strainer, and to every
gallon put three pounds of sugar, and a jill of brandy, then put all
into a sweet vessel, not very full, and keep it very close for four
months, then decant it off till it comes clear, pour out the grounds,
and wash the vessel clean with a little of the wine; add to every
gallon a pound more sugar, let it stand a month in a vessel again, drop
the grounds thro' a flannel bag, and put it to the other in the vessel;
the tap hole must not be over near the bottom of the cask, for fear of
letting out the grounds.

The same receipt will serve for curran wine the same way; let them be
red currans.

303. _To make_ BALM WINE.

Take a peck of balm leaves, put them in a tub or large pot, heat four
gallons of water scalding hot, ready to boil, then pour it upon the
leaves, so let it stand all night, then strain them thro' a hair-sieve;
put to every gallon of water two pounds of fine sugar, and stir it very
well; take the whites of four or five eggs, beat them very well, put
them into a pan, and whisk it very well before it be over hot, when the
skim begins to rise take it off, and keep it skimming all the while it
is boiling, let it boil three quarters of an hour, then put it into the
tub, when it is cold put a little new yeast upon it, and beat it in
every two hours, that it may head the better, so work it for two days,
then put it into a sweet rundlet, bung it up close, and when it is fine
bottle it.

304. _To make_ RAISIN WINE.

Take ten gallons of water, and fifty pounds of malaga raisins, pick out
the large stalks and boil them in your water, when your water is
boiled, put it into a tub; take the raisins and chop them very small,
when your water is blood warm, put in your raisins, and rub them very
well with your hand; when you put them into the water, let them work
for ten days, stirring them twice a day, then strain out the raisins in
a hair-sieve, and put them into a clean harden bag, and squeeze it in
the press to take out the liquor, so put it into your barrel; don't let
it be over full, bung it up close, and let it stand whilst it is fine;
when you tap your wine you must not tap it too near the bottom, for
fear of the grounds; when it is drawn off, take the grounds out of the
barrel, and wash it out with a little of your wine, then put your wine
into the barrel again, draw your grounds thro' a flannel bag, and put
them into the barrel to the rest; add to it two pounds of loaf sugar,
then bung it up, and let it stand a week or ten days; if it be very
sweet to your taste, let it stand some time longer, and bottle it.

305. _To make_ BIRCH WINE.

Take your birch water and boil it, clear it with whites of eggs; to
every gallon of water take two pounds and a half of fine sugar, boil it
three quarters of an hour, and when it is almost cold, put in a little
yeast, work it two or three days, then put it into the barrel, and to
every five gallons put in a quart of brandy, and half a pound of ston'd
raisins; before you put up your wine burn a brimstone match in the
barrel.

306. _To make_ WHITE CURRAN WINE.

Take the largest white currans you can get, strip and break them in
your hand, whilst you break all the berries; to every quart of pulp
take a quart of water, let the water be boiled and cold again, mix them
well together, let them stand all night in your tub, then strain them
thro' a hair-sieve, and to every gallon put two pounds and a half of
six-penny sugar; when your sugar is dissolved, put it into your barrel,
dissolve a little isinglass, whisk it with whites of eggs, and put it
in; to every four gallons put in a quart of mountain wine, so bung up
your barrel; when it is fine draw it off, and take off the grounds,
(but don't tap the barrel over low at the bottom) wash out the barrel
with a little of your wine, and drop the grounds thro' a bag, then put
it to the rest of your wine, and put it all into your barrel again, to
every gallon add half a pound more sugar, and let it stand another week
or two; if it be too sweet let it stand a little longer, then bottle
it, and it will keep two or three years.

307. _To make_ ORANGE ALE.

Take forty seville oranges, pare and cut them in slices, the best
coloured seville you can get, put them all with the juice and seeds
into half a hogshead of ale; when it is tunned up and working, put in
the oranges, and at the same time a pound and a half of raisins of the
sun stoned; when it has done working close up the bung, and it will be
ready to drink in a month.

308. _To make_ ORANGE BRANDY.

Take a quart of brandy, the peels of eight oranges thin pared, keep
them in the brandy forty-eight hours in a close pitcher, then take
three pints of water, put into it three quarters of a pound of loaf
sugar, boil it till half be consumed, and let it stand till cold, then
mix it with the brandy.

309. _To make_ ORANGE WINE.

Take six gallons of water and fifteen pounds of powder sugar, the
whites of six eggs well beaten, boil them three quarters of an hour,
and skim them while any skim will rise; when it is cold enough for
working, put to it six ounces of the syrrup of citron or lemons, and
six spoonfuls of yeast, beat the syrrup and yeast well together, and
put in the peel and juice of fifty oranges, work it two days and a
night, then tun it up into a barrel, so bottle it at three or four
months old.

310. _To make_ COWSLIP WINE.

Take ten gallons of water, when it is almost at boiling, add to it
twenty one pounds of fine powder sugar, let it boil half an hour, and
skim it very clean; when it is boiled put it in a tub, let it stand
till you think it cold to set on the yeast; take a poringer of new
yeast off the fat, and put to it a few cowslips; when you put on the
yeast, put in a few every time it is stirred, till all the cowslips be
in, which must be six pecks, and let it work three or four days; add to
it six lemons, cut off the peel, and the insides put into your barrel,
then add to it a pint of brandy; when you think it has done working,
close up your vessel, let it stand a month, and then bottle it; you may
let your cowslips lie a week or ten days to dry before you make your
wine, for it makes it much finer; you may put in a pint of white wine
that is good, instead of the brandy.

311. _To make_ ORANGE WINE _another Way_.

Take six gallons of water, and fifteen pounds of sugar, put your sugar
into the water on the fire, the whites of six eggs, well beaten, and
whisk them into the water, when it is cold skim it very well whilst any
skim rises, and let it boil for half an hour; take fifty oranges, pare
them very thin, put them into your tub, pour the water boiling hot upon
your oranges, and when it is bloodwarm put on the yeast, then put in
your juice, let it work two days, and so tun it into your barrel; at
six weeks or two months old bottle it; you may put to it in the barrel
a quart of brandy.

312. _To make_ BIRCH WINE _another Way_.

To a gallon of birch water put two pounds of loaf or very fine lump
sugar, when you put it into the pan whisk the whites of four eggs;
(four whites will serve for four gallons) whisk them very well together
before it be boiled, when it is cold put on a little yeast, let it work
a night and a day in the tub, before you put it into your barrel put in
a brimstone match burning; take two pounds of isinglass cut in little
bits, put to it a little of your wine, let it stand within the air of
the fire all night; takes the whites of two eggs, beat it with your
isinglass, put them into your barrel and stir them about with a stick;
this quantity will do for four gallons; to four gallons you must have
two pounds of raisins shred, put them into your barrel, close it up,
but not too close at the first, when it is fine, bottle it.

313. _To make_ APRICOCK WINE.

Take twelve pounds of apricocks when full ripe, stone and pare them,
put the paring into three gallons of water, with six pounds of powder
sugar, boil them together half an hour, skim them well, and when it is
blood-warm put it on the fruit; it must be well bruised, cover it
close, and let it stand three days; skim it every day as the skim
rises, and put it thro' a hair sieve, adding a pound of loaf sugar;
when you put it into the vessel close it up, and when it is fine bottle
it.

314. _To make_ ORANGE SHRUB.

Take seville oranges when they are full ripe, to three dozen of oranges
put half a dozen of large lemons, pare them very thin, the thinner the
better, squeeze the lemons and oranges together, strain the juice thro'
a hair sieve, to a quart of the juice put a pound and a quarter of loaf
sugar; about three dozen of oranges (if they be good) will make a quart
of juice, to every quart of juice, put a gallon of brandy, put it into
a little barrel with an open bung with all the chippings of your
oranges, and bung it up close; when it is fine bottle it.

This is a pleasant dram, and ready for punch all the year.

315. _To make_ STRONG MEAD.

Take twelve gallons of water, eight pounds of sugar, two quarts of
honey, and a few cloves, when your pan boils take the whites of eight
or ten eggs, beat them very well, put them into your water before it be
hot, and whisk them very well together; do not let it boil but skim it
as it rises till it has done rising, then put it into your tub; when it
is about blood warm put to it three spoonfuls of new yeast; take eight
or nine lemons, pare them and squeeze out the juice, put them both
together into your tub, and let them work two or three days, then put
it into your barrel, but it must not be too full; take two or three
pennyworth of isinglass, cut as small as you can, beat it in a mortar
about a quarter of an hour, it will not make it small; but that it may
dissolve sooner, draw out a little of the mead into a quart mug, and
let it stand within the air of the fire all night; take the whites of
three eggs, beat them very well, mix them with your isinglas, whisk
them together, and put them into your barrel, bung it up, and when it
is fine bottle it.

You may order isinglass this way to put into any sort of made wine.

316. _To make_ MEAD _another Way_.

Take a quart of honey, three quarts of water, put your honey into the
water, when it is dissolved, take the whites of four or five eggs,
whisk and beat them very well together and put them into your pan; boil
it while the skim rises, and skim it very clean; put it into your tub,
when it is warm put in two or three spoonfuls of light yeast, according
to the quantity of your mead, and let it work two nights and a day. To
every gallon put in a large lemon, pare and strain it, put the juice
and peel into your tub, and when it is wrought put it into your barrel;
let it work for three or four days, stir twice a day with a thible, so
bung it up, and let it stand two or three months, according to the
hotness of the weather.

You must try your mead two or three times in the above time, and if you
find the sweetness going off, you must take it sooner.

317. _To make_ CYDER.

Draw off the cyder when it hath been a fortnight in the barrel, put it
into the same barrel again when you have cleaned it from the grounds,
and if your apples were sharp, and that you find your cyder hard, put
into every gallon of cyder a pound and half of sixpenny or five-penny
sugar; to twelve gallons of this take half an ounce of isinglass, and
put to it a quart of cyder; when your isinglass is dissolved, put to it
three whites of eggs, whisk them altogether, and put them into your
barrel; keep it close for two months and then bottle it.

318. _To make_ COWSLIP WINE.

Take two pecks of peeps, and four gallons of water, put to every gallon
of water two pounds and a quarter of sugar, boil the water and sugar
together a quarter of an hour, then put it into a tub to cool, put in
the skins of four lemons, when it is cold bruise your peeps, and put
into your liquor, add to it a jill of yeast, and the juice of four
lemons, let them be in the tub a night and a day, then put it into your
barrel, and keep it four days stirring, then clay it up close for three
weeks and bottle it. Put a lump of sugar in every bottle.

319. _To make_ RED CURRAN WINE.

Let your currans be the best and ripest you can get, pick and bruise
them; to every gallon of juice add five pints of water, put it to your
berries in a stand for two nights and a day, then strain your liquor
through a hair sieve; to every gallon of liquor put two pounds of
sugar, stir it till it be well dissolved, put it into a rundlet, and
let it stand four days, then draw it off clean, put in a pound and a
half of sugar, stirring it well, wash out the rundlet with some of the
liquor, so tun it up close; if you put two or three quarts of rasps
bruised among your berries, it makes it taste the better.

You may make white curran wine the same way, only leave out the rasps.

320. _To make_ CHERRY WINE.

Take eight pounds of cherries and stone them, four quarts of water, and
two pounds of sugar, skim and boil the water and sugar, then put in the
cherries, let them have one boil, put them into an earthen pot till the
next day, and set them to drain thro' a sieve, then put your wine into
a spigot pot, clay it up close, and look at it every two or three days
after; if it does not work, throw into it a handful of fresh cherries,
so let it stand six or eight days, then if it be clear, bottle it up.

321. _To make_ CHERRY WINE _another Way_.

Take the ripest and largest kentish cherries you can get, bruise them
very well, stones and stalks altogether, put them into a tub, having a
tap to it, let them stand fourteen days, then pull out the tap, let the
juice run from them and put it into a barrel, let it work three or four
days, then stop it up close three or four weeks and bottle it off.

The wine will keep many years and be exceeding rich.

322. _To make_ LEMON DROPS.

Take a pound of loaf sugar, beat and sift it very fine, grate the rind
of a lemon and put into your sugar; take the whites of three eggs and
wisk them to a froth, squeeze in some lemon to your taste, beat them
for half an hour, and drop them on white paper; be sure you let the
paper be very dry, and sift a little fine sugar on the paper before you
drop them. If you would have them yellow, take a pennyworth of
gumbouge, steep it in some rose-water, mix to it some whites of eggs
and a little sugar, so drop them, and bake them in a slow oven.

323. _To make_ Gooseberry Wine _another Way_.

Take twelve quarts of good ripe gooseberries, stamp them, and put to
them twelve quarts of water, let them stand three days, stir them twice
every day, strain them, and put to your liquor fourteen pounds of
sugar; when it is dissolved strain it through a flannel bag, and put it
into a barrel, with half an ounce of isinglass; you must cut the
isinglass in pieces, and beat it whilst it be soft, put to it a pint of
your wine, and let it stand within the air of the fire; take the whites
of four eggs and beat them very well to a froth, put in the isinglass,
and whisk the wine and it together; put them into the barrel, clay it
close, and let it stand whilst fine, then bottle it for use.

324. _To make_ Red Curran Wine _another Way_.

Take five quarts of red currans, full ripe, bruise them, and take from
them all the stalks, to every five quarts of fruit put a gallon of
water; when you have your quantity, strain them thro' a hair-sieve, and
to every gallon of liquor put two pounds and three quarters of sugar;
when your sugar is dissolved tun it into your cask, and let it stand
three weeks, then draw it off, and put to every gallon a quarter of a
pound of sugar; wash your barrel with cold water, tun it up, and let it
stand about a week; to every ten gallons put an ounce of isinglass,
dissolve it in some of the wine, when it is dissolved put to it a quart
of your wine, and beat them with a whisk, then put it into the cask,
and stop it up close; when it is fine bottle it.

If you would have it taste of rasps, put to every gallon of wine a
quart of rasps; if there be any grounds in the bottom of the cask, when
you draw off your wine, drop them thro' a flannel bag, and then put it
into your cask.

325. _To make_ MULBERRY WINE.

Gather your mulberries when they are full ripe, beat them in a marble
mortar, and to every quart of berries put a quart of water; when you
put 'em into the tub rub them very well with your hands, and let them
stand all night, then strain 'em thro' a sieve; to every gallon of
water put three pounds of sugar, and when the sugar is dissolved put it
into your barrel; take two pennyworth of isinglass and clip it in
pieces, put to it a little wine, and let it stand all night within the
air of the fire; take the whites of two or three eggs, beat them very
well, then put them to the isinglass, mix them well together, and put
them into your barrel, stirring it about when it is put in; you must
not let it be over full, nor bung it close up at first; set it in a
cool place and bottle it when fine.

326. _To make_ BLACKBERRY WINE.

Take blackberries when they are full ripe, and squeeze them the same
way as you did the mulberries. If you add a few mulberries, it will
make your wine have a much better taste.

327. _To make_ SYRRUP OF MULBERRIES.

Take mulberries when they are full ripe, break them very well with your
hand, and drop them through a flannel bag; to every pound of juice take
a pound of loaf sugar; beat it small, put to it your juice, so boil and
skim it very well; you must skim it all the time it is boiling; when
the skim has done rising it is enough; when it is cold bottle it and
keep it for use.

You may make rasberry syrrup the same way.

328. _To make_ RASBERRY BRANDY.

Take a gallon of the best brandy you can get, and gather your
rasberries when they are full ripe, and put them whole into your
brandy; to every gallon of brandy take three quarts of rasps, let them
stand close covered for a month, then clear it from rasps, and put to
it a pound of loaf sugar; when your sugar is dissolved and a little
settled, boil it and keep it for use.

329. _To make Black_ CHERRY BRANDY.

Take a gallon of the best brandy, and eight pounds of black cherries,
stone and put 'em into your brandy in an earthen pot; bruise the stones
in a mortar, then put them into your brandy, and cover them up close,
let them steep for a month or six weeks, so drain it and keep it for
use.

You may distil the ingredients if you please.

330. _To make_ RATIFIE BRANDY.

Take a quart of the best brandy, and about a jill of apricock kernels,
blanch and bruise them in a mortar, with a spoonful or two of brandy,
so put them into a large bottle with your brandy; put to it four ounces
of loaf sugar, let it stand till you think it has got the taste of the
kernels, then pour it out and put in a little more brandy if you
please.

331. _To make_ COWSLIP SYRRUP.

Take a quartern of fresh pick'd cowslips, put to 'em a quart of boiling
water, let 'em stand all night, and the next morning drain it from the
cowslips; to every pint of water put a pound of fine powder sugar, and
boil it over a slow fire; skim it all the time in the boiling whilst
the skim has done rising; then take it off, and when it is cold put it
into a bottle, and keep it for use.

332. _To make_ LEMON BRANDY.

Take a gallon of brandy, chip twenty-five lemons, (let them steep
twenty-four hours) the juice of sixteen lemons, a quarter of a pound of
almonds blanched and beat, drop it thro' a jelly bag twice, and when
it is fine bottle it; sweeten it to your taste with double refined
sugar before you put it into your jelly bag. You must make it with the
best brandy you can get.

333. _To make_ CORDIAL WATER _of_ COWSLIPS.

Take two quarts of cowslip peeps, a slip of balm, two sprigs of
rosemary, a stick of cinnamon, half an orange peel, half a lemon peel,
a pint of brandy, and a pint of ale; lay all these to steep twelve
hours, then distil them on a cold still.

334. _To make_ MILK PUNCH.

Take two quarts of old milk, a quart of good brandy, the juice of six
lemons or oranges, whether you please, and about six ounces of loaf
sugar, mix them altogether and drop them thro' a jelly bag; take off
the peel of two of the lemons or oranges, and put it into your bag,
when it is run off bottle it; 'twill keep as long as you please.

335. _To make_ MILK PUNCH _another Way_.

Take three jills of water, a jill of old milk, and a jill of brandy,
sweeten it to your taste; you must not put any acid into this for it
will make it curdle.

This is a cooling punch to drink in a morning.

336. _To make_ PUNCH _another Way_.

Take five pints of boiling water and one quart of brandy, add to it the
juice of four lemons or oranges, and about six ounces of loaf sugar;
when you have mixed it together strain it thro' a hair sieve or cloth,
and put into your bowl the peel of a lemon or orange.

337. _To make_ ACID _for_ PUNCH.

Take gooseberries at their full growth, pick and beat them in a marble
mortar, and squeeze them in a harden bag thro' a press, when you have
done run it thro' a flannel bag, and then bottle it in small bottles;
put a little oil on every bottle, so keep it for use.

338. _To bottle_ GOOSEBERRIES.

Gather your gooseberries when they are young, pick and bottle them, put
in the cork loose, set them in a pan of water, with a little hay in the
bottom, put them into the pan when the water is cold, let it stand on a
slow fire, and mind when they are coddled; don't let the pan boil, if
you do it will break the bottles: when they are cold fasten the cork,
and put on a little rosin, so keep them for use.

339. _To bottle_ DAMSINS.

Take your damsins before they are full ripe, and gather them when the
dew is off, pick of the stalks, and put them into dry bottles; don't
fill your bottles over full, and cork them as close as you would do for
ale, keep them in a cellar, and cover them over with sand.

340. _To preserve Orange Chips to put in glasses_.

Take a seville orange with a clear skin, pare it very thin from the
white, then take a pair of scissars and clip it very thin, and boil it
in water, shifting it two or three times in the boiling to take out the
bitter; then take half a pound of double refined sugar, boil it and
skim it, then put in your orange, so let it boil over a slow fire
whilst your syrrup be thick, and your orange look clear, then put it
into glasses, and cover it with papers dipt in brandy; if you have a
quantity of peel you must have the larger quantity of sugar.

341. _To preserve_ ORANGES _or_ LEMONS.

Take seville oranges, the largest and roughest you can get, clear of
spots, chip them very fine, and put them into water for two days,
shifting them twice or three times a day, then boil them whilst they
are soft: take and cut them into quarters, and take out all the pippens
with a penknife, so weigh them, and to every pound of orange, take a
pound and half of loaf sugar; put your sugar into a pan, and to every
pound of sugar a pint of water, set it over the fire to melt, and when
it boils skim it very well, then put in your oranges; if you would have
any of them whole, make a little hole at the top, and take out the meat
with a tea spoon, set your oranges over a slow fire to boil, and keep
them skimming all the while; keep your oranges as much as you can with
the skin downwards; you may cover them with a delf-plate, to bear them
down in the boiling; let them boil for three quarters of an hour, then
put them into a pot or bason, and let them stand two days covered, then
boil them again whilst they look clear, and the syrrup be thick, so put
them into a pot, and lie close over them a paper dip'd in brandy, and
tie a double paper at the top, set them in a cool place, and keep them
for use. If you would have your oranges that are whole to look pale and
clear, to put in glasses, you must make a syrrup of pippen jelly; then
take ten or a dozen pippens, as they are of bigness, pare and slice
them, and boil them in as much water as will cover them till they be
thoroughly tender, so strain your water from the pippens through a hair
sieve, then strain it through a flannel bag; and to every pint of jelly
take a pound of double refined sugar, set it over a fire to boil, and
skim it, let it boil whilst it be thick, then put it into a pot and
cover it, but they will keep best if they be put every one in different
pots.

342. _To make_ JELLY _of_ CURRANS.

Take a quartern of the largest and best currans you can get, strip them
from the stalks, and put them in a pot, stop them close up, and boil
them in a pot of water over the fire, till they be thoroughly coddled
and begin to look pale, then put them in a clear hair sieve to drain,
and run the liquor thro' a flannel bag, to every pint of your liquor
put in a pound of your double refin'd sugar; you must beat the sugar
fine, and put it in by degrees, set it over the fire, and boil it
whilst any skim will rise, then put it into glasses for ale; the next
day clip a paper round, and dip it in brandy to lie on your jelly; if
you would have your jelly a light red, put in half of white currans,
and in my opinion it looks much better.

343. _To preserve_ APRICOCKS.

Take apricocks before they be full ripe, stone and pare 'em; then weigh
'em, and to every pound of apricocks take a pound of double refined
sugar, beat it very small, lie one part of your sugar under the
apricocks, and the other part at the top, let them stand all night, the
next day put them in a stew-pan or brass pan; don't do over many at
once in your pan, for fear of breaking, let them boil over a slow fire,
skim them very well, and turn them two or three times in the boiling;
you must but about half do 'em at the first, and let them stand whilst
they be cool, then let them boil whilst your apricocks look clear, and
the syrrup thick, put them into your pots or glasses, when they are
cold cover them with a paper dipt in brandy, then tie another paper
close over your pot to keep out the air.

344. _To make_ MARMALADE _of_ APRICOCKS.

Take what quantity of apricocks you shall think proper, stone them and
put them immediately into a skellet of boiling water, keep them under
water on the fire till they be soft, then take them out of the water
and wipe them with a cloth, weigh your sugar with your apricocks,
weight for weight, then dissolve your sugar in water, and boil it to a
candy height, then put in your apricocks, being a little bruised, let
them boil but a quarter of a hour, then glass them up.

345. _To know when your_ SUGAR _is at_ CANDY HEIGHT.

Take some sugar and clarify it till it comes to a candy-height, and
keep it still boiling 'till it becomes thick, then stir it with a stick
from you, and when it is at candy-height it will fly from your stick
like flakes of snow, or feathers flying in the air, and till it comes
to that height it will not fly, then you may use it as you please.

346. _To make_ Marmalade _of_ Quinces _white_.

Take your quinces and coddle them as you do apples, when they are soft
pare them and cut them in pieces, as if you would cut them for apple
pies, then put your cores, parings, and the waste of your quinces in
some water, and boil them fast for fear of turning red until it be a
strong jelly; when you see the jelly pretty strong strain it, and be
sure you boil them uncovered; add as much sugar as the weight of your
quinces into your jelly, till it be boiled to a height, then put in
your coddled quinces, and boil them uncovered till they be enough, and
set them near the fire to harden.

347. _To make_ Quiddeny _of_ Red Curranberries.

Put your berries into a pot, with a spoonful or two of water, cover it
close, and boil 'em in some water, when you think they are enough
strain them, and put to every pint of juice a pound of loaf sugar, boil
it up jelly height, and put them into glasses for use.

348. _To preserve_ GOOSEBERRIES.

To a pound of ston'd gooseberries put a pound and a quarter of fine
sugar, wet the sugar with the gooseberry jelly; take a quart of
gooseberries, and two or three spoonfuls of water, boil them very
quick, let your sugar be melted, and then put in your gooseberries;
boil them till clear, which will be very quickly.

349. _To make little_ ALMOND CAKES.

Take a pound of sugar and eight eggs, beat them well an hour, then put
them into a pound of flour, beat them together, blanch a quarter of a
pound of almonds, and beat them with rose-water to keep 'em from
oiling, mix all together, butter your tins, and bake them half an hour.

Half an hour is rather too long for them to stand in the oven.

350. _To preserve_ RED GOOSEBERRIES.

Take a pound of sixpenny sugar, and a little juice of currans, put to
it a pound and a half of Gooseberries, and let them boil quick a
quarter of an hour; but if they be for jam they must boil better than
half an hour.

They are very proper for tarts, or to eat as sweet-meats.

351. _To bottle_ BERRIES _another Way_.

Gather your berries when they are full grown, pick and bottle them, tie
a paper over them, prick it with a pin, and set it in the oven; after
you have drawn, and when they are coddled, take them out and when they
are cold cork them up; rosin the cork over, and keep them for use.

352. _To keep_ BARBERRIES _for_ TARTS _all the Year_.

Take barberries when they are full ripe, and pick 'em from the stalk,
put them into dry bottles, cork 'em up very close and keep 'em for use.

You may do cranberries the same way.

353. _To preserve_ BARBERRIES _for_ TARTS.

Take barberries when full ripe, strip them, take their weight in sugar,
and as much water as will wet your sugar, give it a boil and skim it;
then put in your berries, let them boil whilst they look clear and your
syrrup thick, so put them into a pot, and when they are cold cover them
up with a paper dip'd in brandy.

354. _To preserve_ DAMSINS.

Take damsins before they are full ripe, and pick them, take their
weight in sugar, and as much water as will wet your sugar, give it a
boil and skim it, then put in your damsins, let them have one scald,
and set them by whilst cold, then scald them again, and continue
scalding them twice a day whilst your syrrup looks thick, and the
damsins clear; you must never let them boil; do 'em in a brass pan, and
do not take them out in the doing; when they are enough put them into a
pot, and cover them up with a paper dip'd in brandy.

355. _How to keep_ DAMSINS _for_ TARTS.

Take damsins before they are full ripe, to every quart of damsins put a
pound of powder sugar, put them into a pretty broad pot, a layer of
sugar and a layer of damsins, tie them close up, set them in a slow
oven, and let them have a heat every day whilst the syrrup be thick,
and the damsins enough; render a little sheep suet and pour over them,
to keep them for use.

356. _To keep_ DAMSINS _another Way_.

Take damsins before they be quite ripe, pick off the stalks, and put
them into dry bottles; cork them as you would do ale, and keep them in
a cool place for use.

357. _To make_ MANGO _of_ CODLINS.

Take codlins when they are at their full growth, and of the greenest
sort, take a little out of the end with the stalk, and then take out
the core; lie them in a strong salt and water, let them lie ten days or
more, and fill them with the same ingredients as you do other mango,
only scald them oftner.

358. _To pickle_ CURRANBERRIES.

Take currans either red or white before they are thoroughly ripe; you
must not take them from the stalk, make a pickle of salt and water and
a little vinegar, so keep them for use.

They are proper for garnishing.

359. _To make_ Barberries _instead of preserving_.

Take barberries and lie them in a pot, a layer of barberries and a
layer of sugar, pick the seeds out before for garnishing sweet meats,
if for sauces put some vinegar to them.

360. _To keep_ Asparagus _or_ Green Pease _a Year_.

Take green pease, green them as you do cucumbers, and scald them as you
do other pickles made of salt and water; let it be always new pickle,
and when you would use them boil them in fresh water.

361. _To make white Paste of_ PIPPENS.

Take some pippens, pare and cut them in halves, and take out the cores,
then boil 'em very tender in fair water, and strain them thro' a sieve,
then clarify two pounds of sugar with two whites of eggs, and boil it
to a candy height, put two pounds and a half of the pulp of your
pippens into it, let it stand over a slow fire drying, keeping it
stirring till it comes clear from the bottom of your pan, them lie them
upon plates or boards to dry.

362. _To make green Paste of_ PIPPENS.

Take green pippens, put them into a pot and cover them, let them stand
infusing over a slow fire five or six hours, to draw the redness or
sappiness from them and then strain them thro' a hair sieve; take two
pounds of sugar, boil it to a candy height, put to it two pounds of the
pulp of your pippens, keep it stirring over the fire till it comes
clean from the bottom of your pan, then lay it on plates or boards, and
set it in an oven or stove to dry.

363. _To make red Paste of_ PIPPENS.

Take two pounds of sugar, clarify it, then take rosset and temper it
very well with fair water, put it into your syrrup, let it boil till
your syrrup is pretty red colour'd with it, then drain your syrrup
thro' a fine cloth, and boil it till it be at candy-height, then put to
it two pounds and a half of the pulp of pippens, keeping it stirring
over the fire till it comes clean from the bottom of the pan, then lie
it on plates or boards, so dry them.

364. _To preserve_ FRUIT _green_.

Take your fruit when they are green, and some fair water, set it on the
fire, and when it is hot put in the apples, cover them close, but they
must not boil, so let them stand till thye be soft, and there will be a
thin skin on them, peel it off, and set them to cool, then put them in
again, let them boil till they be very green, and keep them whole as
you can; when you think them ready to take up, make your syrrup for
them; take their weight in sugar, and when your syrrup is ready put the
apples into it, and boil them very well in it; they will keep all the
year near some fire.

You may do green plumbs or other fruit.

365. _To make_ ORANGE MARMALADE.

Take three or four seville oranges, grate them, take out the meat, and
boil the rinds whilst they are tender; shift them three or four times
in the boiling to take out the bitter, and beat them very fine in a
marble mortar; to the weight of your pulp take a pound of loaf sugar,
and to a pound of sugar you may add a pint of water, boil and skim it
before you put in your oranges, let it boil half an hour very quick,
then put in your meat, and to a pint take a pound and a half of sugar,
let it boil quick half an hour, stir it all the time, and when it is
boiled to a jelly, put it into pots or glasses; cover it with a paper
dipp'd in brandy.

366. _To make_ QUINCES WHITE _another Way_.

Coddle your quinces, cut them in small pieces, and to a pound of
quinces take three quarters of a pound of sugar, boil it to a candy
height, having ready a quarter of a pint of quince liquor boil'd and
skim'd, put the quinces and liquor to your sugar, boil them till it
looks clear, which will be very quickly, then close your quince, and
when cold cover it with jelly of pippens to keep the colour.

367. _To make_ GOOSEBERRY VINEGAR.

To every gallon of water take six pounds of ripe gooseberries, bruise
them, and pour the water boiling hot upon your berries, cover it close,
and set it in a warm place to foment, till all the berries come to the
top, then draw it off, and to every gallon of liquor put a pound and a
half of sugar, then tun it into a cask, set it in a warm place, and in
six months it will be fit for use.

368. _To make_ Gooseberry Wine _another Way_.

Take three pounds of ripe gooseberries to a quart of water, and a pound
of sugar, stamp your berries and throw them into your water as you
stamp them, it will make them strain the better; when it is strained
put in your sugar, beat it well with a dish for half an hour, then
strain it thro' a finer strainer than before into your vessel, leaving
it some room to work, and when it is clear bottle it; your berries must
be clean pick'd before your use them, and let them be at their full
growth when you use them, rather changing colour.

369. _To make_ Jam of Cherries.

Take ten pounds of cherries, stone and boil them till the juice be
wasted, then add to it three pounds of sugar, and give it three or four
good boils, then put it into your pots.

370. _To preserve_ Cherries.

To a pound of cherries take a pound of sugar finely sifted, with which
strow the bottom of your pan, having stoned the cherries, lay a layer
of cherries and a layer of sugar, strowing the sugar very well over
all, boil them over a quick fire a good while, keeping them clean
skim'd till they look clear, and the syrrup is thick and both of one
colour; when you think them half done, take them off the fire for an
hour, after which set them on again, and to every pound of fruit put in
a quarter of a pint of the juice of cherries and red currans, so boil
them till enough, and the syrrup is jellied, then put them in a pot,
and keep them close from the air.

371. _To preserve_ CHERRIES _for drying_.

Take two pounds of cherries and stone them, put to them a pound of
sugar, and as much water as will wet the sugar, then set them on the
fire, let them boil till they look clear, then take them off the fire,
and let them stand a while in the syrrup, and then take them up and lay
them on papers to dry.

372. _To preserve_ FRUIT _green all the Year_.

Gather your fruit when they are three parts ripe, on a very dry day,
when the sun shines on them, then take earthen pots and put them in,
cover the pots with cork, or bung them that no air can get into them,
dig a place in the earth a yard deep, set the pots therein and cover
them with the earth very close, and keep them for use.

When you take any out, cover them up again, as at the first.

373. _How to keep_ KIDNEY BEANS _all Winter_.

Take kidney beans when they are young, leave on both the ends, lay a
layer of salt at the bottom of your pot, and then a layer of beans, and
so on till your pot be full, cover them close at the top that they get
no air, and set them in a cool place; before you boil them lay them in
water all night, let your water boil when you put them in, (without
salt) and put into it a lump of butter about the bigness of a walnut.

374. _To candy_ ANGELICA.

Take angelica when it is young and tender take off all the leaves from
the stalks, boil it in the pan with some of the leaves under, and some
at the top, till it be so tender that you can peel off all the skin,
then put it into some water again, cover it over with some of the
leaves, let it simmer over a slow fire till it be green, when it is
green drain the water from it, and then weigh it; to a pound of
angelica take a pound of loaf sugar, put a pint of water to every pound
of sugar, boil and skim it, and then put in your angelica; it will take
a great deal of boiling in the sugar, the longer you boil it and the
greener it will be, boil it whilst your sugar be candy height by the
side of your pan; if you would have it nice and white, you must have a
pound of sugar boiled candy height in a copper-dish or stew pan, set it
over a chafing dish, and put it into your angelica, let it have a boil,
and it will candy as you take it out.

375. _To dry_ PEARS.

Take half a peck of good baking pears, (or as many as you please) pare
and put them in a pot, and to a peck of pears put in two pounds of
sugar; you must put in no water but lie the parings on the top of your
pears, tie them up close, and set them in a brown bread oven; when they
are baked lay them in a dripping pan, and flat them a little in your
pan; set them in a slow oven, and turn them every day whilst they be
through y dry; so keep them for use.

You may dry pippens the same way, only as your turn them grate over
them a little sugar.

376. _To preserve_ CURRANS _in bunches_.

Boil your sugar to the fourth degree of boiling, tie your currans up in
bunches, then place them in order in the sugar, and give them several
covered boilings, skim them quick, and let them not have above two or
three seethings, then skim them again, and set them into the stove in
the preserving pan, the next day drain them, and dress them in bunches,
strow them with sugar, and dry them in a stove or in the sun.

377. _To dry_ APRICOCKS.

To a pound of apricocks put three quarter of a pound of sugar, pare and
stone them, to a layer of fruit lie a layer of sugar, let them stand
till the next day, then boil them again till they be clear, when cold
take them out of the syrrup, and lay them upon glasses or china, and
sift them over with double refined sugar, so set them on a stove to
dry, next day if they be dry enough turn them and sift the other side
with sugar; let the stones be broke and the kernels blanch'd, and give
them a boil in the syrrup, then put them into the apricocks; you must
not do too many at a time, for fear of breaking them in the syrrup; do
a great many, and the more you do in it, the better they will taste.

378. _To make_ JUMBALIS _another Way_.

Take a pound of meal dry, a pound of sugar finely beat, mix them
together; then take the yolks of five or six eggs, as much thick cream
as will make it up to a paste, and some corriander seeds; roll them and
lay them on tins, prick and bake them in a quick oven; before you set
them in the oven wet them with a little rose-water and double refin'd
sugar, and it will ice them.

379. _To preserve_ ORANGES _Whole_.

Take what quantity of oranges you have a mind to preserve, chip off the
rind, the thiner and better, put them into water twenty-four hours, in
that time shift them in the water (to take off the bitter) three times;
you must shift them with boiling water, cold water makes them hard; put
double the weight of sugar for oranges, dissolve your sugar in water,
skim it, and clarify it with the white of an egg; before you put in
your oranges, boil them in syrrup three or four times, three or four
days betwixt each time; you must take out the inmeat of the oranges
very clean, for fear of mudding the syrup.

380. _To make_ JAM _of_ DAMSINS.

Take damsins when they are ripe, and to two pounds of damsins take a
pound of sugar, put your sugar into a pan with a jill of water, when
you have boiled it put in your damsins, let them boil pretty quick,
skim them all the time they are boiling, when your syrrup looks thick
they are enough put them into your pots, and when they are cold cover
them with a paper dip'd in brandy, tie them up close, and keep them for
use.

381. _To make clear_ Cakes _of_ Gooseberries.

Take a pint of jelly, a pound and a quarter of sugar, make your jelly
with three or four spoonfuls of water, and put your sugar and jelly
together, set it over the fire to heat, but don't let it boil, then put
it into the cake pots, and set it in a slow oven till iced over.

382. _To make_ BULLIES CHEESE.

Take half a peck or a quartern of bullies, whether you please, pick off
the stalks, put them in a pot, and stop them up very close, set them in
a pot of water to boil for two hours, and be sure your pot be full of
water, and boil them whilst they be enough, then put them in a
hair-sieve to drain the liquor from the bullies; and to every quart of
liquor put a pound and a quarter of sugar, boil it over a slow fire,
keeping it stirring all the time: You may know when it is boiled high
enough by the parting from the pan, and cover it with papers dip'd in
brandy, so tie it up close, and keep it for use.

383. _To make_ JAM _of_ BULLIES.

Take the bullies that remained in the sieve, to every quart of it take
a pound of sugar, and put it to your jam, boil it over a slow fire, put
it in pots, and keep it for use.

384. _To make_ SYRRUP _of_ GILLIFLOWERS.

Take five pints of clipt gilliflowers, two pints of boiling water and
put to them, then put them in an earthen pot to infuse a night and a
day, take a strainer and strain them out; to a quart of your liquor put
a pound and half of loaf sugar, boil it over a slow fire, and skim it
whilst any skim rises; so when it is cold bottle it for use.

385. _To pickle_ GILLIFLOWERS.

Take clove gilliflowers, when they are at full growth, clip them and
put them into a pot, put them pretty sad down, and put to them some
white wine vinegar, as much as will cover them; sweeten them with fine
powder sugar, or common loaf; when you put in your sugar stir them up
that your sugar may go down to the bottom; they must be very sweet; let
them stand two or three days, and then put in a little more vinegar; so
tie them up for use.

386. _To pickle_ CUCUMBERS _sliced_.

Pare thirty large cucumbers, slice them into a pewter dish, take six
onions, slice and strow on them some salt, so cover them and let them
stand to drain twenty four hours; make your pickle of white wine
vinegar, nutmeg, pepper, cloves and mace, boil the spices in the
pickle, drain the liquor clean from the cucumbers, put them into a deep
pot, pour the liquor upon them boiling hot, and cover them very close;
when they are cold drain the liquor from them, give it another boil,
and when it is cold pour it on them again; so keep them for use.

387. _To make_ CUPID HEDGE-HOG'S.

Take a quarter of a pound of jordan almonds, and half a pound of loaf
sugar, put it into a pan with as much water as will just wet it, let it
boil whilst it be so thick as will stick to your almonds, then put in
your almonds and let them boil in it; have ready a quarter of a pound
of small coloured comfits; take your almonds out of the syrrup one by
one, and turn them round whilst they covered over, so lie them on a
pewter dish as you do them, and set them before the fire, whilst you
have done them all.

They are pretty to put in glasses, or to set in a desert.

388. _To make_ ALMOND HEDGE-HOGS.

Take half a pound of the best almonds, and blanch them, beat them with
two or three spoonfuls of rose-water in a marble-mortar very small,
then take six eggs, (leave out two of the whites) beat your eggs very
well, take half a pound of loaf sugar beaten, and four ounces of
clarified butter, mix them all well together, put them into a pan, set
them over the fire, and keep it stirring whilst it be stiff, then put
it into a china-dish, and when it is cold put it up into the shape of
an hedge hog, put currans for eyes, and a bit of candid orange for
tongue; you may leave out part of the almonds unbeaten; take them and
split them in two, then cut them in long bits to stick into your hedge
hog all over, then rake two pints of cream custard to pour over your
hedge hog, according to the bigness of your dish; lie round your dish
edge slices of candid or preserved orange, which you have, so serve it
up.

389. _To pot_ SALMON _to keep half a Year_.

Take a side of fresh salmon, take out the bone, cut off the head and
scald it; you must not wash it but wipe it with a dry cloth; cut it in
three pieces, season it with mace, pepper, salt and nutmeg, put it into
a flat pot with the skin side downward, lie over it a pound of butter,
tie a paper over it, and send it to the oven, about an hour and a half
will bake it; if you have more salmon in your pot than three pieces it
will take more baking, and you must put in more butter; when it is baked
take it out of your pot, and lie it on a dish plate to drain, and take
off the skin, so season it over again, for if it be not well seasoned
it will not keep; put it into your pot piece by piece; it will keep best
in little pots, when you put it into your pots, press it well down with
the back of your hand, and when it is cold cover it with clarified
butter, and set it in a cool place; so keep it for use.

390. _To make a_ CODDLIN PIE.

Take coddlins before they are over old, hang them over a slow fire to
coddle, when they are soft peel off the skin, so put them into the water
again, then cover 'em up with vine leaves, and let them hang over the
fire whilst they be green; be sure you don't let them boil; lie them
whole in the dish, and bake them in puff-paste, but leave no paste
in the bottom of the dish; put to 'em a little shred lemon-peel, a
spoonful of verjuice or juice of lemon, and as much sugar as you think
proper, according to the largeness of your pie.

391. _To make a_ COLLIFLOWER PUDDING.

Boil the flowers in milk, take the tops and lay then in a dish, then take
three jills of cream, the yolks of eight eggs, and the whites of two,
season it with nutmeg, cinnamon, mace, sugar, sack or orange-flower water,
beat all well together, then pour it over the colliflower, put it into
the oven, bake it as you would a custard, and grate sugar over it when
it comes from the oven.

Take sugar, sack and butter for sauce.

392. _To make Stock for_ HARTSHORN JELLY.

Take five or six ounces of hartshorn, put it into a gallon of water,
hang it over a slow fire, cover it close, and let it boil three or four
hours, so strain it; make it the day before you use it, and then you
may have it ready for your jellies.

393. _To make_ SYRRUP OF VIOLETS.

Take violets and pick them; to every pound of violets put a pint of
water, when the water is just ready to boil put it to your violets, and
stir them well together, let them infuse twenty four hours and strain
them; to every pound of syrrup, take almost two pounds of sugar, beat
the sugar very well and put it into your syrrup, stir it that the sugar
may dissolve, let it stand a day or two, stirring it two or three
times, then set it on the fire, let be but warm and it will be thick
enough.

You may make your syrrup either of violets or gilliflowers, only take
the weight of sugar, let it stand on the fire till it be very hot, and
the syrrup of violets must be only warm.

394. _To pickle_ COCKLES.

Take cockles at a full moon and wash 'em, then put them in a pan, and
cover them with a wet cloth, when they are enough put them into a stone
bowl, take them out of the shells and wash them very well in their own
pickle; let the pickle settle every time you wash them then clear it
off; when you have cleaned 'em, put the pickle into a pan, with a
spoonful or two of white wine and a little white wine vinegar, to you
taste, put in a little Jamaica and whole pepper, boil it very well in
the pickle, then put in you cockles, let 'em have a boil and skim 'em,
when they are cold put them in a bottle with a little oil over them,
set 'em in a cool place and keep 'em for use.

395. _To preserve Quinces whole or in quarters_.

Take the largest quinces when they are at full growth, pare them and
throw them into water, when you have pared them cut them into quarters,
and take out the cores; if you would have any whole you must take out
the cores with a scope; save all the cores and parings, and put them in
a pot or pan to coddle your quinces in, with as much water as will
cover them, so put in your quinces in the middle of your paring into
the pan, (be sure you cover them close up at the top) so let them hang
over a slow fire whilst they be thoroughly tender, then take them out
and weigh them; to every pound of quince take a pound of loaf sugar,
and to every pound of sugar take a pint of the same water you coddled
your quinces in, set your water and sugar over the fire, boil it and
skim it, then put in your quinces, and cover it close up, set it over a
slow fire, and let it boil whilst your quinces be red and the syrrup
thick, then put them in pots for use, dipping a paper in brandy to lie
over them.

396. _To pickle_ SHRIMPS.

Take the largest shrimps you can get, pick them out of the shells, boil
them in a jill of water, or as much water as will cover them according
as you have a quantity of shrimps, strain them thro' a hair-sieve, then
put to the liquor a little spice, mace, cloves, whole pepper, white
wine, white wine vinegar, and a little salt to your taste; boil them
very well together, when it is cold put in your shrimps, they are fit
for use.

397. _To pickle_ MUSCLES.

Wash your muscles, put them into a pan as you do your cockles, pick
them out of the shells, and wash them in the liquor; be sure you take
off the beards, so boil them in the liquor with spices, as you do your
cockles, only put to them a little more vinegar than you do to cockles.

398. _To pickle_ WALNUTS _green_.

Gather walnuts when they are as you can run a pin through them, pare
them and put them in water, and let them lie four or five days,
stirring it twice a day to take out the bitter, then put them in strong
salt and water, let them lie a week or ten days, stirring it once or
twice a day, then put them in fresh salt and water, and hang them over
a fire, put to them a little allum, and cover them up close with vine
leaves, let them hang over a slow fire whilst they be green, but be
sure don't let them boil, when they are green pat them into a sieve to
drain the water from them.

399. _To make_ PICKLE _for them_.

Take a little good alegar, put to it a little long pepper and Jamaica
pepper, a few bay leaves, a little horse-radish, a handful or two of
mustard-seed, a little salt and a little rockambol if you have any, if
not a few shalots; boil them altogether in the alegar, which put to
your walnuts and let it stand three or four days, giving them a scald
once a day, then tie them up for use.

A spoonful of this pickle is good for fish-sauce, or a calf's head ash.

400. _To pickle_ WALNUTS _black_.

Gather walnuts when they are so tender that you can run a pin thro'
them, prick them all with a pin very well, lie them in fresh water, and
let them lie for a week, shifting them once a day; make for them a
strong salt and water, and let them lie whilst they be yellow, stirring
them once a day, then take 'em out of the salt and water, and boil it,
put it on the top of your walnuts, and let your pot stand in the corner
end, scald them once or twice a day whilst they be black.

You may make the same pickle for those, as you did for the green ones.

401. _To pickle_ OYSTERS.

Take the largest oysters you can get, pick them whole out of the shell,
and take off the beards, wash them very well in their own pickle, so
let the pickle settle, and clear it off, put it into a stew-pan, put to
it two or three spoonfuls of white wine, and a little white wine
vinegar; don't put in any water, for if there be not pickle enough of
their own get a little cockle-pickle and put to it, a little Jamaica
pepper, white pepper and mace, boil and skim them very well; you must
skim it before you put in your spices, then put in your oysters, and
boil them in the pickle, when they are cold put them into a large
bottle with a little oil on the top, set them in a cool place and keep
them for use.

402. _To pickle large_ CUCUMBERS.

Take cucumbers and put them in a strong salt and water, let them lie
whilst they be throughly yellow, then scald them in the same salt and
water they lie in, set them on the fire, and scald them once a day
whilst they are green; take the best alegar you can get, put to it a
little Jamaica pepper and black pepper, some horse-radish in slices, a
few bay leaves, and a little dill and salt, so scald your cucumbers
twice or thrice in this pickle; then put them up for use.

403. _To pickle_ ONIONS.

Take the smallest onions you can get, peel and put them into a large
quantity of fair water, let them lie two days and shift them twice a
day; then drain them from the water, take a little distill'd vinegar,
put to 'em two or three blades of mace, and a little white pepper and
salt, boil it, and pour it upon your onions, let them stand three days,
so put them into little glasses, and tie a bladder over them; they are
very good done with alegar; for common use, only put in Jamaica pepper
instead of mace.

404. _To pickle_ ELDER BUDS.

Take elder buds when they are the bigness of small walnuts, lie them in
a strong salt and water for ten days, and then scald them in fresh salt
and water, put in a lump of allum, let them stand in the corner end
close cover'd up, and scalded once a day whilst green.

You may do radish cods or brown buds the same way.

405. _To make the_ Pickle.

Take a little alegar or white wine vinegar, and put to it two or three
blades of mace, with a little whole pepper and Jamaica pepper, a few
bay leaves and salt, put to your buds, and scald them two or three
times, then they are fit for use.

406. _To pickle_ MUSHROOMS.

Take mushrooms when fresh gather'd, sort the large ones from the
buttons, cut off the stalks, wash them in water with a flannel, have a
pan of water ready on the fire to boil 'em in, for the less they lie in
the water the better; let them have two or three boils over the fire,
then put them into a sieve, and when you have drained the water from
them put them into a pot, throw over them a handful of salt, stop them
up close with a cloth, and let them stand two or three hours on the hot
hearth or range end, giving your pot a shake now and then; then drain
the pickle from them, and lie them in a cloth for an hour or two, so
put into them as much distill'd vinegar as will cover them, let them
lie a week or ten days, then take them out, and put them in dry
bottles; put to them a little white pepper, salt and ginger sliced,
fill them up with distill'd vinegar, put over 'em a little sweet oil,
and cork them up close; if your vinegar be good they will keep two or
three years; I know it by experience.

You must be sure not to fill your bottles above three parts full, if
you do they will not keep.

407. _To pickle_ MUSHROOMS _another Way_.

Take mushrooms and wash them with a flannel, throw them into water as
you wash them, only pick the small from the large, put them into a pot,
throw over them a little salt, stop up your pot close with a cloth,
boil them in a pot of water as you do currans when you make a jelly,
give them a shake now and then; you may guess when they are enough by
the quantity of liquor that comes from them; when you think they are
enough strain from them the liquor, put in a little white wine vinegar,
and boil it in a little mace, white pepper, Jamaica pepper, and slic'd
ginger; then it is cold put it to the mushrooms, bottle 'em and keep
'em for use.

They will keep this way very well, and have more of the taste of
mushrooms, but they will not be altogether so white.

408. _To pickle_ POTATOE CRABS.

Gather your crabs when they are young, and about the bigness of a large
cherry, lie them in a strong salt and water as you do other pickles,
let them stand for a week or ten days, then scald them in the same
water they lie in twice a day whilst green; make the same pickle for
them as you do for cucumbers; be sure you scald them twice or thrice in
the pickle and they will keep the better.

409. _To pickle large_ BUTTONS.

Take your buttons, clean 'em and cut 'em in three or four pieces, put
them into a large sauce-pan to stew in their own liquor, put to them a
little Jamaica and whole pepper, a blade or two of mace, and a little
salt, cover it up, let it stew over a slow fire whilst you think they
are enough, then strain from them their liquor, and put to it a little
white wine vinegar or alegar, which you please, give it a boil
together, and when it is cold put it to your mushrooms, and keep them
for use.

You may pickle flaps the same way.

410. _To make_ CATCHUP.

Take large mushrooms when they are fresh gathered, cut off the dirty
ends, break them small in your hands, put them in a stone-bowl with a
handful or two of salt, and let them stand all night; if you don't get
mushrooms enough at once, with a little salt they will keep a day or
two whilst you get more, so put 'em in a stew-pot, and set them in an
oven with household bread; when they are enough strain from 'em the
liquor, and let it stand to settle, then boil it with a little mace,
Jamaica and whole black pepper, two or three shalots, boil it over a
slow fire for an hour, when it is boiled let it stand to settle, and
when it is cold bottle it; if you boil it well it will keep a year or
two; you must put in spices according to the quantity of your catchup;
you must not wash them, nor put to them any water.

411. _To make_ MANGO _of_ CUCUMBERS _or_ SMALL MELONS.

Gather cucumbers when they are green, cut a bit off the end and take
out all the meat; lie them in a strong salt and water, let them lie for
a week or ten days whilst they be yellow, then scald them in the same
salt and water they lie in whilst green, then drain from them the
water; take a little mustard-seed, a little horse-radish, some scraped
and some shred fine, a handful of shalots, a claw or two of garlick if
you like the taste, and a little shred mace; take six or eight
cucumbers shred fine, mix them amongst the rest of the ingredients,
then fill your melons or cucumbers with the meat, and put in the bits
at the ends, tie them on with a string, so as will well cover them, and
put into it a little Jamaica and whole pepper, a little horse-radish
and a handful or two of mustard-seed, then boil it, and pour it upon
your mango; let it stand in the corner end two or three days, scald
them once a day, and then tie them up for use.

412. _To pickle_ GARKINS.

Take garkins of the first growth, pick 'em clean, put 'em in a strong
salt and water, let 'em lie a week or ten days whilst they be throughly
yellow, then scald them in the same salt and water they lie in, scald
them once a day, and let them lie whilst they are green, the set them
in the corner end close cover'd.

413. _To make_ PICKLE _for your_ Cucumbers.

Take a little alegar, (the quantity must be equal to the quantity of
your cucumbers, and so must your seasoning) a little pepper, a little
Jamaica and long pepper, two or three shalots, a little horse-radish
scraped or sliced, and little salt and a bit of allum, boil them
altogether, and scald your cucumbers two or three times with your
pickle, so tie them up for use.

414. _To pickle_ COLLIFLOWER _white_.

Take the whitest colliflower you can get, break it in pieces the
bigness of a mushroom; take as much distill'd vinegar as will cover it,
and put to it a little white pepper, two or three blades of mace, and a
little salt, then boil it and pour it on your colliflowers three times,
let it be cold, then put it into your glasses or pots, and wet a
bladder to tie over it to keep out the air.

415. _To pickle_ Red Cabbage.

Take a red cabbage, chuse it a purple red, for the light red never
proves a good colour; so take your cabbage and shred it in very thin
slices, season it with pepper and salt very well, let it lie all night
upon a broad tin, or a dripping-pan; take a little alegar, put to it a
little Jamaica pepper, and two or three rases of ginger, boil them
together, and when it is cold pour it upon your cabbage, and in two or
three days time it will be fit for use.

You may throw a little colliflower among it, and it will turn red.

416. _To pickle_ Colliflower _another Way_.

Take the colliflower and break it in pieces the bigness of a mushroom,
but leave on a short stalk with the head; take some white wine vinegar,
into a quart of vinegar, put six-pennyworth of cochineal beat well,
also a little Jamaica and whole pepper, and a little salt, boil them in
vinegar, pour it over the colliflower hot, and let it stand two or
three days close covered up; you may scald it once in three days whilst
it be red, when it is red take it out of pickle, and wash the cochineal
off in the pickle, so strain it through a hair sieve, and let it stand
a little to settle, then put it to your colliflower again, and tie it
up for use; the longer it lies in the pickle the redder it will be.

417. _To pickle_ WALNUTS _white_.

Take walnuts when they are at full growth and can thrust a pin through
them, the largest sort you can get, pare them, and cut a bit off one
end whilst you see the white, so you must pare off all the green, if
you cut through the white to the kernel they will be spotted, and put
them in water as you pare them; you must boil them in salt and water as
you do mushrooms, and will take no more boiling than a mushroom; when
they are boiled lay them on a dry cloth to drain out of the water, then
put them into a pot, and put to them as much distill'd vinegar as will
cover them, let them lie two or three days; then take a little more
vinegar, put to it a few blades of mace, a little white pepper and
salt, boil 'em together, when it is cold take your walnuts out of the
other pickle and put into that, let them lie two or three days, pour it
from them, give it another boil and skim it, when it is cold put to it
your walnuts again, put them into a bottle, and put over them a little
sweet oil, cork them up, and set them in a cool place; if your vinegar
be good they will keep as long as the mushrooms.

418. _To pickle_ BARBERRIES.

Take barberries when full ripe, put them into a pot, boil a strong salt
and water, then pour it on them boiling hot.

419. _To make_ BARLEY-SUGAR.

Boil barley in water, strain it through a hair-sieve, then put the
decoction into clarified sugar brought to a candy height, or the last
degree of boiling, then take it off the fire, and let the boiling
settle, then pour it upon a marble stone rubb'd with the oil of olives,
when it cools and begins to grow hard, cut it into pieces, and rub it
into lengths as you please.

420. _To pickle_ PURSLAIN.

Take the thickest stalks of purslain, lay them in salt and water six
weeks, then take them out, put them into boiling water, and cover them
well; let them hang over a slow fire till they be very green, when they
are cold put them into pot, and cover them well with beer vinegar, and
keep them covered close.

421. _To make_ PUNCH _another Way_.

Take a quart or two of sherbet before you put in your brandy, and the
whites of four or five eggs, beat them very well, and set it over the
fire, let it have a boil, then put it into a jelly bag, so mix the rest
of your acid and brandy together, (the quantity you design to make)
heat it and run it all through your jelly bag, change it in the running
off whilst it look fine; let the peel of one or two lemons lie in the
bag; you may make it the day before you use it, and bottle it.

422. _To make new_ COLLEGE PUDDINGS.

Grate an old penny loaf, put to it a like quantity of suet shred, a
nutmeg grated, a little salt and some currans, then beat some eggs in a
little sack and sugar, mix all together, and knead it as stiff as for
manchet, and make it up in the form and size of a turkey's egg, but a
little flatter; take a pound of butter, put it in a dish or stew-pan,
and set it over a clear fire in a chafing-dish, and rub your butter
about the dish till it is melted, then put your puddings in, and cover
the dish, but often turn your puddings till they are brown alike, and
when they are enough grate some sugar over them, and serve them up hot.

For a side-dish you must let the paste lie for a quarter of an hour
before you make up your puddings.

423. _To make a_ CUSTARD PUDDING.

Take a pint of cream, mix it with six eggs well beat, two spoonfuls of
flour, half a nutmeg grated, a little salt and sugar to your taste;
butter your cloth, put it in when the pan boils, baste it just half an
hour, and melt butter for the sauce.

424. _To make_ FRYED TOASTS.

Chip a manchet very well, and cut it round ways in toasts, then take
cream and eight eggs seasoned with sack, sugar, and nutmeg, and let
these toasts steep in it about an hour, then fry them in sweet butter,
serve them up with plain melted butter, or with butter, sack and sugar
as you please.

425. _To make_ SAUCE _for_ Fish or Flesh.

Take a quart of vinegar or alegar, put it into a jug, then take Jamaica
pepper whole, some sliced ginger and mace; a few cloves, some
lemon-peel, horse radish sliced, sweet herbs, six shalots peeled, eight
anchovies, and two or three spoonfuls of shred capers, put all those in
a linen bag, and put the bag into your alegar or vinegar, stop the jug
close, and keep it for use.

A spoonful cold is an addition to sauce for either fish or flesh.

426. _To make a_ savoury Dish of VEAL.

Cut large collops of a leg of veal, spread them abroad on a dresser,
hack them with the back of a knife, and dip them in the yolks of eggs,
season them with nutmeg, mace, pepper and salt, then make forc'd-meat
with some of your veal, beef-suit, oysters chop'd, and sweet herbs
shred fine, and the above spice, strow all these over your collops,
roll and tie them up, put them on skewers, tie them to a spit and roast
them; and to the rest of your forc'd-meat add the yolk of an egg or
two, and make it up in balls and fry them, put them in a dish with your
meat when roasted, put a little water in the dish under them, and when
they are enough put to it an anchovy, a little gravy, a spoonful of
white wine, and thicken it up with a little flour and butter, so fry
your balls and lie round the dish, and serve it up.

This is proper for a side-dish either at noon or night.

427. _To make_ FRENCH BREAD.

Take half a peck of fine flour, the yolks of six eggs and four whites,
a little salt, a pint of ale yeast, and as much new milk made warm as
will make it a thin light paste, stir it about with your hand, but be
sure you don't knead them; have ready six wooden quarts or pint dishes,
fill them with the paste, (not over full) let them stand a quarter of
an hour to rise, then turn them out into the oven, and when they are
baked rasp them. The oven must be quick.

428. _To make_ GINGER-BREAD _another Way_.

Take three pounds of fine flour, and the rind of a lemon dried and
beaten to powder, half a pound of sugar, or more if you like it, a
little butter, and an ounce and a half of beaten ginger, mix all these
together and wet it pretty stiff with nothing but treacle; make it into
rolls or cakes which you please; if you please you may add candid
orange peel and citron; butter your paper to bake it on, and let it be
baked hard.

429. _To make_ QUINCE CREAM.

Take quinces when they are full ripe, cut them in quarters, scald them
till they be soft, pare them, and mash the clear part of them, and the
pulp, and put it through a sieve, take an equal weight of quince and
double refin'd sugar beaten and sifted; and the whites of eggs beat
till it is as white as snow, then put it into dishes.

You may do apple cream the same way.

430. _To make_ CREAM _of any preserved Fruit_.

Take half a pound of the pulp of any preserved fruit, put it in a large
pan, put to it the whites of two or three eggs, beat them well together
for an hour, then with a spoon take off, and lay it heaped up high on
the dish and salver without cream, or put it in the middle bason.

Rasberries will not do this way.

431. _To dry_ PEARS _or_ PIPPENS _without Sugar_.

Take pears or apples and wipe them clean, take a bodkin and run it in
at the head, and out at the stalk, put them in a flat earthen pot and
bake them, but not too much; you must put a quart of strong new ale to
half a peck of pears, tie twice papers over the pots that they are
baked in, let them stand till cold then drain them, squeeze the pears
flat, and the apples, the eye to the stalk, and lay 'em on sieves with
wide holes to dry, either in a stove or an oven not too hot.

432. _To preserve_ MULBERRIES _whole_.

Set some mulberries over the fire in a skellet or preserving pan, draw
from them a pint of juice when it is strain'd; then take three pounds
of sugar beaten very fine, wet the sugar with the pint of juice, boil
up your sugar and skim it, put in two pounds of ripe mulberries, and
let them stand in the syrrup till they are throughly warm, then set
them on the fire, and let them boil very gently; do them but half
enough, so put them by in the syrrup till next day, then boil them
gently again; when the syrrup is pretty thick and well stand in round
drops when it is cold, they are enough, so put all in a gally-pot for
use.

433. _To make_ ORANGE CAKES.

Cut your oranges, pick out the meat and juice free from the strings and
seeds, set it by, then boil it, and shift the water till your peels are
tender, dry them with a cloth, mince them small, and put them to the
juice; to a pound of that weigh a pound and a half of double refin'd
sugar; dip your lumps of sugar in water, and boil it to a candy height,
take it off the fire and put in your juice and peel, stir it well, when
it is almost cold put it into a bason, and set it in a stove, then lay
it thin on earthen plates to dry, and as it candies fashion it with a
knife, and lay them on glasses; when your plate is empty, put more out
of your bason.

434. _To dry_ APRICOCKS _like_ PRUNELLOS.

Take a pound of apricocks before they be full ripe, cut them in halves
or quarters, let them boil till they be very tender in a thin syrrup,
and let them stand a day or two in the stove, then take them out of the
syrrup, lay them to dry till they be as dry as prunellos, then box 'em,
if you please you may pare them.

You may make your syrrup red with the juice of red plumbs.

435. _To preserve great white_ PLUMBS.

To a pound of white plumbs take three quarters of a pound of double
refin'd sugar in lumps, dip your sugar in water, boil and skim it very
well, slit your plumbs down the seam; and put them into the syrrup with
the slit downwards; let them stew over the fire a quarter of an hour,
skim them very well, then take them off, and when cold cover them up;
turn them in the syrrup two or three times a day for four or five days,
then put them into pots and keep them for use.

436. _To make_ Gooseberry Wine _another Way_.

Take gooseberries when they are full ripe, pick and beat them in a
marble mortar; to every quart of berries put a quart of water, and put
them into a tub and let them stand all night, then strain them through
a hair-sieve, and press them very well with your hand; to every gallon
of juice put three pounds of four-penny sugar; when your sugar is
melted put it into the barrel, and to as many gallons of juice as you
have, take as many pounds of Malaga raisins, chop them in a bowl, and
put them in the barrel with the wine; be sure let not your barrel be
over full, so close it up, let it stand three months in the barrel, and
when it is fine bottle it, but not before.

437. _To pickle_ NASTURTIUM BUDS.

Gather your little nobs quickly after the blossoms are off, put them in
cold water and salt three days, shifting them once a day; then make a
pickle for them (but don't boil them at all) of some white wine, and
some white wine vinegar, shalot, horse-radish, whole pepper and salt,
and a blade or two of mace; then put in your seeds, and stop 'em close
up. They are to be eaten as capers.

438. _To make_ ELDER-FLOWER WINE.

Take three or four handfuls of dry'd elder-flowers, and ten gallons of
spring water, boil the water, and pour in scalding hot upon the
flowers, the next day put to every gallon of water five pounds of
Malaga raisins, the stalks being first pick'd off, but not wash'd, chop
them grosly with a chopping knife, then put them into your boiled
water, stir the water, raisins and flowers well together, and do so
twice a day for twelve days, then press out the juice clear as long as
you can get any liquor; put it into a barrel fit for it, stop it up two
or three days till it works, and in a few days stop it up close, and
let it stand two or three months, then bottle it.

439. _To make_ PEARL BARLEY PUDDING.

Take half a pound of pearl barley, cree it in soft water, and shift it
once or twice in the boiling till it be soft; take five eggs, put to
them a pint of good cream, and half a pound of powder sugar, grate in
half a nutmeg, a little salt, a spoonful or two of rose-water, and half
a pound of clarified butter; when your barley is cold mix them
altogether, so bake it with a puff-paste round your dish-edge.

Serve it up with a little rose-water, sugar and butter for your sauce.

440. _To make_ Gooseberry Vinegar _another Way_.

Take gooseberries when they are full ripe, bruise them in a marble
mortar or wooden bowl, and to every upheap'd half peck of berries take
a gallon of water, put it to them in the barrel, let it stand in a warm
place for two weeks, put a paper on the top of your barrel, then draw
it off, wash out the barrel, put it in again, and to every gallon add a
pound of coarse sugar; set it in a warm place by the fire, and let it
stand whilst christmas.

441. _To preserve_ APRICOCKS _green_.

Take apricocks when they are young and tender, coddle them a little,
rub them with a coarse cloth to take off the skin, and throw them into
water as you do them, and put them in the same water they were coddled
in, cover them with vine leaves, a white paper, or something more at
the top, the closer you keep them the sooner they are green; be sure
you don't let them boil; when they are green weigh them, and to every
pound of apricocks take a pound of loaf sugar, put it into a pan, and
to every pound of sugar a jill of water, boil your sugar and water a
little, and skim it, then put in your apricocks, let them boil together
whilst your apricocks look clear, and your syrrup thick, skim it all
the time it is boiling, and put them into a pot covered with a paper
dip'd in brandy.

442. _To make_ ORANGE CHIPS _another Way_.

Pare your oranges, not over thin but narrow, throw the rinds into fair
water as you pare them off, then boil them therein very fast till they
be tender, filling up the pan with boiling water as it wastes away,
then make a thin syrrup with part of the water they are boiled in, put
in the rinds, and just let them boil, then take them off, and let them
lie in the syrrup three or four days, then boil them again till you
find the syrrup begin to draw between your fingers, take them off from
the fire and let them drain thro' your cullinder, take out but a few at
a time, because if they cool too fast it will be difficult to get the
syrrup from them, which must be done by passing every piece of peel
through your fingers, and lying them single on a sieve with the rind
uppermost, the sieve may be set in a stove, or before the fire; but in
summer the sun is hot enough to dry them.

Three quarters of a pound of sugar will make syrrup to do the peels of
twenty-five oranges.

443. _To make_ MUSHROOM POWDER.

Take about half a peck of large buttons or slaps, clean them and set
them in an earthen dish or dripping pan one by one, let them stand in a
slow oven to dry whilst they will beat to powder, and when they are
powdered sift them through a sieve; take half a quarter of a ounce of
mace, and a nutmeg, beat them very fine, and mix them with your
mushroom powder, then put it into a bottle, and it will be fit for use.

You must not wash your mushrooms.

444. _To preserve_ APRICOCKS _another Way_.

Take your apricocks before they are full ripe, pare them and stone
them, and to every pound of apricocks take a pound of lump loaf sugar,
put it into your pan with as much water as will wet it; to four pounds
of sugar take the whites of two eggs beat them well to a froth, mix
them well with your sugar whilst it be cold, then set it over the fire
and let it have a boil, take it off the fire, and put in a spoonful or
two of water, then take off the skim, and do so three or four times
whilst any skim rises, then put in your apricocks, and let them have a
quick boil over the fire, then take them off and turn them over, let
them stand a little while covered, and then set them on again, let them
have another boil and skim them, then take them out one by one; set on
your syrrup again to boil down, and skim it, then put in your apricocks
again, and let them boil whilst they look clear, put them in pots, when
they are cold cover them over with a paper dipt in brandy, and tie
another paper at the top, set them in a cool place, and keep them for
use.

445. _To pickle_ MUSHROOMS _another Way_.

When you have cleaned your mushrooms put them into a pot, and throw
over them a handful of salt, and stop them very close with a cloth, and
set them in a pan of water to boil about an hour, give them a shake now
and then in the boiling, then take them out and drain the liquor from
them, wipe them dry with a cloth, and put them up either in white wine
vinegar or distill'd vinegar, with spices, and put a little oil on the
top.

They don't look so white this way, but they have more the taste of
mushrooms.

446. _How to fry_ MUSHROOMS.

Take the largest and freshest flaps you can get, skin them and take out
the gills, boil them in a little salt and water, then wipe them dry
with a cloth; take two eggs and beat them very well, half a spoonful of
wheat-flour, and a little pepper and salt, then dip in your mushrooms
and fry them in butter.

They are proper to lie about stew'd mushrooms or any made dish.

447. _How to make an_ ALE POSSET.

Take a quart of good milk, set it on the fire to boil, put in a handful
or two of breadcrumbs, grate in a little nutmeg, and sweeten it to your
taste; take three jills of ale and give it a boil; take the yolks of
four eggs, beat them very well, then put to them a little of your ale,
and mix all your ale and eggs together; then set it on the fire to
heat, keep stirring it all the time, but don't let it boil, if you do
it will curdle; then put it into your dish, heat the milk and put it in
by degrees; so serve it up.

You may make it of any sort of made wine; make it half an hour before
you use it, and keep it hot before the fire.

448. _To make_ MINC'D PIES _another Way_.

Take half a pound of Jordan almonds, blanch and beat them with a little
rose-water, but not over small; take a pound of beef-suet shred very
fine, half a pound of apples shred small, a pound of currans well
cleaned, half a pound of powder sugar, a little mace shred fine, about a
quarter of a pound of candid orange cut in small pieces, a spoonful or
two of brandy, and a little salt, so mix them well together, and bake
it in a puff-paste.

449. _To make_ SACK POSSET _another Way_.

Take a quart of good cream, and boil it with a blade or two of mace,
put in about a quarter of a pound of fine powder sugar; take a pint of
sack or better, set it over the fire to heat, but don't let it boil,
then grate in a little nutmeg, and about a quarter of a pound of powder
sugar; take nine eggs, (leave out six of the whites and strains) beat
'em very well, then put to them a little of your sack mix the sack and
eggs very well together, then put to 'em the rest of your sack, stir it
all the time you are pouring it in, set it over a slow fire to thicken,
and stir it till it be as thick as custard; be sure you don't let it
boil, if you do it will curdle, then pour it into your dish or bason;
take your cream boiling hot, and pour to your sack by degrees, stirring
it all the time you are pouring it in, then set it on a
hot-hearth-stone; you must make it half an hour before you use it;
before you set on the hearth cover it close with a pewter dish.

_To make a_ FROTH _for them_.

Take a pint of the thickest cream you can get, and beat the whites of
two eggs very well together, take off the cream by spoonfuls, and lie
it in a sieve to drain; when you dish up the posset lie over it the
froth.

450. _To dry_ CHERRIES _another Way_.

Take cherries when full ripe, stone them, and break 'em as little as
you can in the stoning; to six pounds of cherries take three pounds of
loaf sugar, beat it, lie one part of your sugar under your cherries,
and the other at the top, let them stand all night, then put them into
your pan, and boil them pretty quick whilst your cherries change and
look clear, then let them stand in the syrrup all night, pour the
syrrup from them, and put them into a pretty large sieve, and set them
either in the sun or before the fire; let them stand to dry a little,
then lay them on white papers one by one, let them stand in the sun
whilst they be thoroughly dry, in the drying turn them over, then put
them into a little box; betwixt every layer of cherries lie a paper,
and so do till all are in, then lie a paper at the top, and keep them
for use.

You must not boil them over long in the syrrup, for if it be over thick
it will keep them from drying; you may boil two or three pounds more
cherries in the syrrup after.

451. _How to order_ STURGEON.

If your sturgeon be alive, keep it a night and a day before you use it;
then cut off the head and tail, split it down the back, and cut it into
as many pieces as you please; salt it with bay salt and common salt, as
you would do beef for hanging, and let it lie 24 hours; then tie it up
very tight, and boil it in salt and water whilst it is tender; (you
must not boil it over much) when it is boiled throw over it a little
salt, and set it by till it be cold. Take the head and split it in two
and tye it up very tight; you must boil it by itself, not so much as
you did the rest, but salt it after the same manner.

452. _To make the_ PICKLE.

Take a gallon of soft water, and make it into a strong brine; take a
gallon of stale beer, and a gallon of the best vinegar, and let it boil
together, with a few spices; when it is cold put in your sturgeon; you
may keep it (if close covered) three or four months before you need to
renew the pickle.

453. _To make_ HOTCH-POTCH.

Take five or six pounds of fresh beef, put it in a kettle with six
quarts of soft water, and an onion; set it on a slow fire, and let it
boil til your beef is almost enough; then put in the scrag of a neck of
mutton, and let them boil together till the broth be very good; put in
two or three handfuls of breadcrumbs, two or three carrots and turnips
cut small, (but boil the carrots in water before you put them in, else
they will give your broth a taste) with half a peck of shill'd pease,
but take up the meat before you put them in, when you put in the pease
take the other part of your mutton and cut it in chops, (for it will
take no more boiling than the pease) and put it in with a few sweet
herbs shred very small, and salt to your taste.

You must send up the mutton chops in the dish with the hotch-potch.

When there are no pease to be had, you may put in the heads of
asparagus, and if there be neither of these to be had, you may shred in
a green savoy cabbage.

This is a proper dish instead of soop.

454. _To make_ MINC'D COLLOPS.

Take two or three pounds of any tender parts of beef, (according as you
would have the dish in bigness) cut it small as you would do minc'd
veal; take an onion, shred it small, and fry it a light brown, in
butter seasoned with nutmeg, pepper and salt, and put it into your pan
with your onion, and fry it a little whilst it be a light brown; then
put to it a jill of good gravy, and a spoonful of walnut pickle, or a
little catchup; put in a few shred capers or mushrooms, thicken it up
with a little flour and butter; if you please you may put in a little
juice of lemon; when you dish it up, garnish your dish with pickle; and
a few forc'd-meat-balls.

It is proper for either side-dish or top-dish.

455. _To make white_ Scotch Collops _another Way_.

Take two pounds of the solid part of a leg of veal, cut it in pretty
thin slices, and season it with a little shred mace and salt, put it
into your stew-pan with a lump of butter, set it over the fire, keep it
stirring all the time, but don't let it boil; when you are going to
dish up the collops, put to them the yolks of two or three eggs, three
spoonfuls of cream, a spoonful or two of white wine, and a little juice
of lemon, shake it over the fire whilst it be so thick that the sauce
sticks to the meat, be sure you don't let it boil.

Garnish your dish with lemon and sippets, and serve it up hot.

This is proper for either side-dish or top-dish, noon or night.

456. _To make_ VINEGAR _another Way_.

Take as many gallons of water as you please, and to every gallon of
water put in a pound of four-penny sugar, boil it for half an hour and
skim it all the time; when it is about blood warm put to it about three
or four spoonfuls of light yeast, let it work in the tub a night and a
day, put it into your vessel, close up the top with a paper, and set it
as near the fire as you have convenience, and in two or three days it
will be good vinegar.

457. _To preserve_ QUINCES _another Way_.

Take quinces, pare and put them into water, save all the parings and
cores, let 'em lie in the water with the quinces, set them over the
fire with the parings and cores to coddle, cover them close up at the
top with the parings, and lie over them either a dishcover or pewter
dish, and cover them close; let them hang over a very slow fire whilst
they be tender; but don't let them boil; when they are soft take them
out of the water, and weigh your quinces, and to every pound put a pint
of the same water they were coddled in (when strained) and put to your
quinces, and to every pound of quinces put a pound of sugar; put them
into a pot or pewter flagon, the pewter makes them a much better
colour; close them up with a little coarse paste, and set them in a
bread oven all night; if the syrrup be too thin boil it down, put it to
your quinces, and keep it for use.

You may either do it with powder sugar or loaf sugar.

458. _To make_ Almond Cheesecakes _another Way_.

Take the peel of two or three lemons pared thick, boil them pretty
soft, and change the water two or three times in the boiling; when they
are boiled beat them very fine with a little loaf sugar, then take
eight eggs, (leaving out six of the whites) half a pound of loaf or
powder sugar, beat the eggs and sugar for half an hour, or better; take
a quarter of a pound of the best almonds, blanch and beat them with
three or four spoonfuls of rose-water, but not over small; take ten
ounces of fresh butter, melt it without water, and clear off from it
the butter-milk, then mix them altogether very well, and bake them in a
slow oven in a puff-paste; before you put them into the tins, put in
the juice of half a lemon.

When you put them in the oven grate over them a little loaf sugar.

You may make them without almonds, if you please.

You may make a pudding of the same, only leave out the almonds.

_FINIS_.

English Housewifry _improved_;

OR,

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