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Dr. Faustus by Christopher Marlowe

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FREDERICK. Come, soldiers, follow me unto the grove:
Who kills him shall have gold and endless love.
[Exit FREDERICK with SOLDIERS.]

BENVOLIO. My head is lighter, than it was, by the horns;
But yet my heart's<181> more ponderous than my head,
And pants until I see that<182> conjurer dead.

MARTINO. Where shall we place ourselves, Benvolio?

BENVOLIO. Here will we stay to bide the first assault:
O, were that damned hell-hound but in place,
Thou soon shouldst see me quit my foul disgrace!

Re-enter FREDERICK.

FREDERICK. Close, close! the conjurer is at hand,
And all alone comes walking in his gown;
Be ready, then, and strike the<183> peasant down.

BENVOLIO. Mine be that honour, then. Now, sword, strike home!
For horns he gave I'll have his head anon.

MARTINO. See, see, he comes!

Enter FAUSTUS with a false head.

BENVOLIO. No words. This blow ends all:
Hell take his soul! his body thus must fall.
[Stabs FAUSTUS.]

FAUSTUS. [falling.] O!

FREDERICK. Groan you, Master Doctor?

BENVOLIO. Break may his heart with groans!--Dear Frederick, see,
Thus will I end his griefs immediately.

MARTINO. Strike with a willing hand.
[BENVOLIO strikes off FAUSTUS' head.]
His head is off.

BENVOLIO. The devil's dead; the Furies now<184> may laugh.

FREDERICK. Was this that stern aspect, that awful frown,
Made the grim monarch of infernal spirits
Tremble and quake at his commanding charms?

MARTINO. Was this that damned head, whose art<185> conspir'd
Benvolio's shame before the Emperor?

BENVOLIO. Ay, that's the head, and there<186> the body lies,
Justly rewarded for his villanies.

FREDERICK. Come, let's devise how we may add more shame
To the black scandal of his hated name.

BENVOLIO. First, on his head, in quittance of my wrongs,
I'll nail huge forked horns, and let them hang
Within the window where he yok'd me first,
That all the world may see my just revenge.

MARTINO. What use shall we put his beard to?

BENVOLIO. We'll sell it to a chimney-sweeper: it will wear out
ten birchen brooms, I warrant you.

FREDERICK. What shall his<187> eyes do?

BENVOLIO. We'll pull<188> out his eyes; and they shall serve for
buttons to his lips, to keep his tongue from catching cold.

MARTINO. An excellent policy! and now, sirs, having divided him,
what shall the body do?
[FAUSTUS rises.]

BENVOLIO. Zounds, the devil's alive again!

FREDERICK. Give him his head, for God's sake.

FAUSTUS. Nay, keep it: Faustus will have heads and hands,
Ay, all<189> your hearts to recompense this deed.
Knew you not, traitors, I was limited
For four-and-twenty years to breathe on earth?
And, had you cut my body with your swords,
Or hew'd this flesh and bones as small as sand,
Yet in a minute had my spirit return'd,
And I had breath'd a man, made free from harm.
But wherefore do I dally my revenge?--
Asteroth, Belimoth, Mephistophilis?

Enter MEPHISTOPHILIS, and other Devils.

Go, horse these traitors on your fiery backs,
And mount aloft with them as high as heaven:
Thence pitch them headlong to the lowest hell.
Yet, stay: the world shall see their misery,
And hell shall after plague their treachery.
Go, Belimoth, and take this caitiff hence,
And hurl him in some lake of mud and dirt.
Take thou this other, drag him through<190> the woods
Amongst<191> the pricking thorns and sharpest briers;
Whilst, with my gentle Mephistophilis,
This traitor flies unto some steepy rock,
That, rolling down, may break the villain's bones,
As he intended to dismember me.
Fly hence; despatch my charge immediately.

FREDERICK. Pity us, gentle Faustus! save our lives!

FAUSTUS. Away!

FREDERICK. He must needs go that the devil drives.
[Exeunt MEPHISTOPHILIS and DEVILS with BENVOLIO, MARTINO,
and FREDERICK.]

Enter the ambushed SOLDIERS.<192>

FIRST SOLDIER. Come, sirs, prepare yourselves in readiness;
Make haste to help these noble gentlemen:
I heard them parley with the conjurer.

SECOND SOLDIER. See, where he comes! despatch and kill the slave.

FAUSTUS. What's here? an ambush to betray my life!
Then, Faustus, try thy skill.--Base peasants, stand!
For, lo, these<193> trees remove at my command,
And stand as bulwarks 'twixt yourselves and me,
To shield me from your hated treachery!
Yet, to encounter this your weak attempt,
Behold, an army comes incontinent!
[FAUSTUS strikes the door,<194> and enter a DEVIL playing
on a drum; after him another, bearing an ensign; and divers
with weapons; MEPHISTOPHILIS with fire-works. They set upon
the SOLDIERS, drive them out, and exeunt.]

Enter, at several doors, BENVOLIO, FREDERICK, and MARTINO,
their heads and faces bloody, and besmeared with mud and
dirt; all having horns on their heads.

MARTINO. What, ho, Benvolio!

BENVOLIO. Here.--What, Frederick, ho!

FREDERICK. O, help me, gentle friend!--Where is Martino?

MARTINO. Dear Frederick, here,
Half smother'd in a lake of mud and dirt,
Through which the Furies dragg'd me by the heels.

FREDERICK. Martino, see, Benvolio's horns again!

MARTINO. O, misery!--How now, Benvolio!

BENVOLIO. Defend me, heaven! shall I be haunted still?

MARTINO. Nay, fear not, man; we have no power to kill.

BENVOLIO. My friends transformed thus! O, hellish spite!
Your heads are all set with horns.

FREDERICK. You hit it right;
It is your own you mean; feel on your head.

BENVOLIO. Zounds,<195> horns again!

MARTINO. Nay, chafe not, man; we all are<196> sped.

BENVOLIO. What devil attends this damn'd magician,
That, spite of spite, our wrongs are doubled?

FREDERICK. What may we do, that we may hide our shames?

BENVOLIO. If we should follow him to work revenge,
He'd join long asses' ears to these huge horns,
And make us laughing-stocks to all the world.

MARTINO. What shall we, then, do, dear Benvolio?

BENVOLIO. I have a castle joining near these woods;
And thither we'll repair, and live obscure,
Till time shall alter these<197> our brutish shapes:
Sith black disgrace hath thus eclips'd our fame,
We'll rather die with grief than live with shame.
[Exeunt.]

Enter FAUSTUS, a HORSE-COURSER, and MEPHISTOPHILIS.

HORSE-COURSER. I beseech your worship, accept of these forty dollars.

FAUSTUS. Friend, thou canst not buy so good a horse for so small
a price. I have no great need to sell him: but, if thou likest
him for ten dollars more, take him, because I see thou hast a
good mind to him.

HORSE-COURSER. I beseech you, sir, accept of this: I am a very
poor man, and have lost very much of late by horse-flesh, and
this bargain will set me up again.

FAUSTUS. Well, I will not stand with thee: give me the money
[HORSE-COURSER gives FAUSTUS the money]. Now, sirrah, I must
tell you that you may ride him o'er hedge and ditch, and spare
him not; but, do you hear? in any case, ride him not into the
water.

HORSE-COURSER. How, sir! not into the water! why, will he not
drink of all waters?

FAUSTUS. Yes, he will drink of all waters; but ride him not into
the water: o'er hedge and ditch, or where thou wilt, but not into
the water. Go, bid the hostler deliver him unto you, and remember
what I say.

HORSE-COURSER. I warrant you, sir!--O, joyful day! now am I a
made man for ever.
[Exit.]

FAUSTUS. What art thou, Faustus, but a man condemn'd to die?
Thy fatal time draws to a final end;
Despair doth drive distrust into my thoughts:
Confound these passions with a quiet sleep:
Tush, Christ did call the thief upon the Cross;
Then rest thee, Faustus, quiet in conceit.
[He sits to sleep.]

Re-enter the HORSE-COURSER, wet.

HORSE-COURSER. 0, what a cozening doctor was this! I, riding
my horse into the water, thinking some hidden mystery had been
in the horse, I had nothing under me but a little straw, and had
much ado to escape<198> drowning. Well, I'll go rouse him, and
make him give me my forty dollars again.--Ho, sirrah Doctor, you
cozening scab! Master Doctor, awake, and rise, and give me my
money again, for your horse is turned to a bottle of hay, Master
Doctor! [He pulls off FAUSTUS' leg]. Alas, I am undone! what
shall I do? I have pulled off his leg.

FAUSTUS. O, help, help! the villain hath murdered me.

HORSE-COURSER. Murder or not murder, now he has<199> but one leg,
I'll outrun him, and cast this leg into some ditch or other.
[Aside, and then runs out.]

FAUSTUS. Stop him, stop him, stop him!--Ha, ha, ha! Faustus hath
his leg again, and the Horse-courser a bundle of hay for his
forty dollars.

Enter WAGNER.

How now, Wagner! what news with thee?

WAGNER. If it please you, the Duke of Vanholt doth earnestly
entreat your company, and hath sent some of his men to attend
you,<200> with provision fit for your journey.

FAUSTUS. The Duke of Vanholt's an honourable gentleman, and one
to whom I must be no niggard of my cunning. Come, away!
[Exeunt.

Enter ROBIN, DICK, the HORSE-COURSER, and a CARTER.

CARTER. Come, my masters, I'll bring you to the best beer in
Europe.--What, ho, hostess! where be these whores?

Enter HOSTESS.

HOSTESS. How now! what lack you? What, my old guess!<201> welcome.

ROBIN. Sirrah Dick, dost thou<202> know why I stand so mute?

DICK. No, Robin: why is't?

ROBIN. I am eighteen-pence on the score. but say nothing; see
if she have forgotten me.

HOSTESS. Who's this that stands so solemnly by himself? What,
my old guest!

ROBIN. O, hostess, how do you? I hope my score stands still.

HOSTESS. Ay, there's no doubt of that; for methinks you make no
haste to wipe it out.

DICK. Why, hostess, I say, fetch us some beer.

HOSTESS. You shall presently.--Look up into the hall there, ho!
[Exit.--Drink is presently brought in.]

DICK. Come, sirs, what shall we do now<203> till mine hostess comes?

CARTER. Marry, sir,<204> I'll tell you the bravest tale how a
conjurer served me. You know Doctor Faustus?

HORSE-COURSER. Ay, a plague take him! here's some on's have cause
to know him. Did he conjure thee too?

CARTER. I'll tell you how he served me. As I was going to
Wittenberg, t'other day,<205> with a load of hay, he met me, and
asked me what he should give me for as much hay as he could eat.
Now, sir, I thinking that a little would serve his turn, bad him
take as much as he would for three farthings: so he presently
gave me my<206> money and fell to eating; and, as I am a cursen<207>
man, he never left eating till he had eat up all my load of hay.

ALL. O, monstrous! eat a whole load of hay!

ROBIN. Yes, yes, that may be; for I have heard of one that has eat
a load of logs.

HORSE-COURSER. Now, sirs, you shall hear how villanously he
served me. I went to him yesterday to buy a horse of him, and
he would by no means sell him under forty dollars. So, sir,
because I knew him to be such a horse as would run over hedge
and ditch and never tire, I gave him his money. So, when I had
my horse, Doctor Faustus bad me ride him night and day, and spare
him no time; but, quoth he, in any case, ride him not into the
water. Now, sir, I thinking the horse had had some quality<208>
that he would not have me know of, what did I but rid<209> him
into a great river? and when I came just in the midst, my horse
vanished away, and I sate straddling upon a bottle of hay.

ALL. O, brave doctor!

HORSE-COURSER. But you shall hear how bravely I served him for
it. I went me home to his house, and there I found him asleep.
I kept a hallooing and whooping in his ears; but all could not
wake him. I, seeing that, took him by the leg, and never rested
pulling till I had pulled me his leg quite off; and now 'tis at
home in mine hostry.

ROBIN. And has the doctor but one leg, then? that's excellent;
for one of his devils turned me into the likeness of an ape's face.

CARTER. Some more drink, hostess!

ROBIN. Hark you, we'll into another room and drink a while, and
then we'll go seek out the doctor.
[Exeunt.]

Enter the DUKE OF VANHOLT, his DUCHESS, FAUSTUS, MEPHISTOPHILIS,
and ATTENDANTS.

DUKE. Thanks, Master Doctor, for these pleasant sights; nor know
I how sufficiently to recompense your great deserts in erecting
that enchanted castle in the air,<210> the sight whereof so
delighted<211> me as nothing in the world could please me more.

FAUSTUS. I do think myself, my good lord, highly recompensed in
that it pleaseth<212> your grace to think but well of that which
Faustus hath performed.--But, gracious lady, it may be that you
have taken no pleasure in those sights; therefore, I pray you
tell me, what is the thing you most desire to have; be it in the
world, it shall be yours: I have heard that great-bellied women
do long for things are rare and dainty.

DUCHESS. True, Master Doctor; and, since I find you so kind,
I will make known unto you what my heart desires to have; and,
were it now summer, as it is January, a dead time of the winter,
I would request no better meat than a dish of ripe grapes.

FAUSTUS. This is but a small matter.--Go, Mephistophilis; away!
[Exit MEPHISTOPHILIS.]
Madam, I will do more than this for your content.

Re-Enter MEPHISTOPHILIS with grapes.

Here now, taste you these: they should be good, for they come<213>
from a far country, I can tell you.

DUKE. This makes me wonder more than all the rest, that at this
time of the year, when every tree is barren of his fruit, from
whence you had these ripe grapes.<214>

FAUSTUS. Please it your grace, the year is divided into two
circles over the whole world; so that, when it is winter with
us, in the contrary circle it is likewise summer with them, as
in India, Saba, and such countries that lie far east, where
they have fruit twice a-year; from whence, by means of a swift
spirit that I have, I had these grapes brought, as you see.

DUCHESS. And, trust me, they are the sweetest grapes that e'er
I tasted.

[The CLOWNS bounce<215> at the gate, within.]

DUKE. What rude disturbers have we at the gate?
Go, pacify their fury, set it ope,
And then demand of them what they would have.

[They knock again, and call out to talk with FAUSTUS.]

SERVANT. Why, how now, masters! what a coil is there!
What is the reason you disturb the Duke?

DICK [within]. We have no reason for it; therefore a fig for him!

SERVANT. Why, saucy varlets, dare you be so bold?

HORSE-COURSER [within]. I hope, sir, we have wit enough to be
more bold than welcome.

SERVANT. It appears so: pray, be bold elsewhere, and trouble
not the Duke.

DUKE. What would they have?

SERVANT. They all cry out to speak with Doctor Faustus.

CARTER [within]. Ay, and we will speak with him.

DUKE. Will you, sir?--Commit the rascals.

DICK [within]. Commit with us! he were as good commit with his
father as commit with us.

FAUSTUS. I do beseech your grace, let them come in;
They are good subject for<216> a merriment.

DUKE. Do as thou wilt, Faustus; I give thee leave.

FAUSTUS. I thank your grace.

Enter ROBIN, DICK, CARTER, and HORSE-COURSER.

Why, how now, my good friends!
Faith, you are too outrageous: but, come near;
I have procur'd your pardons:<217> welcome, all.

ROBIN. Nay, sir, we will be welcome for our money, and we will
pay for what we take.--What, ho! give's half a dozen of beer here,
and be hanged!

FAUSTUS. Nay, hark you; can you tell me<218> where you are?

CARTER. Ay, marry, can I; we are under heaven.

SERVANT. Ay; but, Sir Saucebox, know you in what place?

HORSE-COURSER. Ay, ay, the house is good enough to drink in.
--Zouns, fill us some beer, or we'll break all the barrels in
the house, and dash out all your brains with your bottles!

FAUSTUS. Be not so furious: come, you shall have beer.--
My lord, beseech you give me leave a while;
I'll gage my credit 'twill content your grace.

DUKE. With all my heart, kind doctor; please thyself;
Our servants and our court's at thy command.

FAUSTUS. I humbly thank your grace.--Then fetch some beer.

HORSE-COURSER. Ay, marry, there spake<219> a doctor, indeed!
and, faith, I'll drink a health to thy wooden leg for that word.

FAUSTUS. My wooden leg! what dost thou mean by that?

CARTER. Ha, ha, ha!--Dost hear him,<220> Dick? he has forgot his
leg.

HORSE-COURSER. Ay, ay, he does not stand much upon that.

FAUSTUS. No, faith; not much upon a wooden leg.

CARTER. Good Lord, that flesh and blood should be so frail with
your worship! Do not you remember a horse-courser you sold a
horse to?

FAUSTUS. Yes, I remember I sold one a horse.

CARTER. And do you remember you bid he should not ride him<221>
into the water?

FAUSTUS. Yes, I do very well remember that.

CARTER. And do you remember nothing of your leg?

FAUSTUS. No, in good sooth.

CARTER. Then, I pray you,<222> remember your courtesy.

FAUSTUS. I<223> thank you, sir.

CARTER. 'Tis not so much worth. I pray you, tell me one thing.

FAUSTUS. What's that?

CARTER. Be both your legs bed-fellows every night together?

FAUSTUS. Wouldst thou make a Colossus of me, that thou askest me
such questions?

CARTER. No, truly, sir; I would make nothing of you; but I would
fain know that.

Enter HOSTESS with drink.

FAUSTUS. Then, I assure thee certainly, they are.

CARTER. I thank you; I am fully satisfied.

FAUSTUS. But wherefore dost thou ask?

CARTER. For nothing, sir: but methinks you should have a wooden
bed-fellow of one of 'em.

HORSE-COURSER. Why, do you hear, sir? did not I<224> pull off
one of your legs when you were asleep?

FAUSTUS. But I have it again, now I am awake: look you here, sir.

ALL. O, horrible! had the doctor three legs?

CARTER. Do you remember, sir, how you cozened me, and eat up my
load of----

[FAUSTUS, in the middle of each speech, charms them dumb.]

DICK. Do you remember how you made me wear an ape's----

HORSE-COURSER. You whoreson conjuring scab, do you remember how
you cozened me with a ho----

ROBIN. Ha'<225> you forgotten me? you think to carry it away with
your hey-pass and re-pass: do you remember the dog's fa----
[Exeunt CLOWNS.]

HOSTESS. Who pays for the ale? hear you, Master Doctor; now you
have sent away my guess,<226> I pray who shall pay me for my a----
[Exit HOSTESS.]

DUCHESS. My lord,
We are much beholding<227> to this learned man.

DUKE. So are we, madam; which we will recompense
With all the love and kindness that we may:
His artful sport<228> drives all sad thoughts away.
[Exeunt.]

Thunder and lightning. Enter DEVILS with covered dishes;
MEPHISTOPHILIS leads them into FAUSTUS'S study; then enter
WAGNER.

WAGNER. I think my master<229> means to die shortly; he has made
his will, and given me his wealth, his house, his goods,<230> and
store of golden plate, besides two thousand ducats ready-coined.
I wonder what he means: if death were nigh, he would not frolic
thus. He's now at supper with the scholars, where there's such
belly-cheer as Wagner in his life ne'er<231> saw the like: and,
see where they come! belike the feast is ended.<232>
[Exit.]

Enter FAUSTUS, MEPHISTOPHILIS, and two or three SCHOLARS.

FIRST SCHOLAR. Master Doctor Faustus, since our conference
about fair ladies, which was the beautifulest in all the world,
we have determined with ourselves that Helen of Greece was the
admirablest lady that ever lived: therefore, Master Doctor, if
you will do us so much favour as to let us see that peerless
dame of Greece, whom all the world admires for majesty, we should
think ourselves much beholding unto you.

FAUSTUS. Gentlemen,
For that I know your friendship is unfeign'd,
It is not Faustus' custom to deny
The just request of those that wish him well:
You shall behold that peerless dame of Greece,
No otherwise for pomp or majesty
Than when Sir Paris cross'd the seas with her,
And brought the spoils to rich Dardania.
Be silent, then, for danger is in words.

Music sounds. MEPHISTOPHILIS brings in HELEN; she passeth
over the stage.

SECOND SCHOLAR. Was this fair Helen, whose admired worth
Made Greece with ten years' war<233> afflict poor Troy?

THIRD SCHOLAR. Too simple is my wit<234> to tell her worth,
Whom all the world admires for majesty.

FIRST SCHOLAR. Now we have seen the pride of Nature's work,
We'll take our leaves: and, for this blessed sight,
Happy and blest be Faustus evermore!

FAUSTUS. Gentlemen, farewell: the same wish I to you.
[Exeunt SCHOLARS.]

Enter an OLD MAN.

OLD MAN. O gentle Faustus, leave this damned art,
This magic, that will charm thy soul to hell,
And quite bereave thee of salvation!
Though thou hast now offended like a man,
Do not persever in it like a devil:
Yet, yet thou hast an amiable soul,
If sin by custom grow not into nature;
Then, Faustus, will repentance come too late;
Then thou art banish'd from the sight of heaven:
No mortal can express the pains of hell.
It may be, this my exhortation
Seems harsh and all unpleasant: let it not;
For, gentle son, I speak it not in wrath,
Or envy of thee,<235> but in tender love,
And pity of thy future misery;
And so have hope that this my kind rebuke,
Checking thy body, may amend thy soul.

FAUSTUS. Where art thou, Faustus? wretch, what hast thou done?
Hell claims his right, and with a roaring voice
Says, "Faustus, come; thine hour is almost come;"
And Faustus now will come to do thee right.

[MEPHISTOPHILIS gives him a dagger.]

OLD MAN. O, stay, good Faustus, stay thy desperate steps!
I see an angel hover o'er thy head,
And, with a vial full of precious grace,
Offers to pour the same into thy soul:
Then call for mercy, and avoid despair.

FAUSTUS. O friend, I feel
Thy words to comfort my distressed soul!
Leave me a while to ponder on my sins.

OLD MAN. Faustus, I leave thee; but with grief of heart,
Fearing the enemy of thy hapless soul.
[Exit.]

FAUSTUS. Accursed Faustus, wretch, what hast thou done?
I do repent; and yet I do despair:
Hell strives with grace for conquest in my breast:
What shall I do to shun the snares of death?

MEPHIST. Thou traitor, Faustus, I arrest thy soul
For disobedience to my sovereign lord:
Revolt, or I'll in piece-meal tear thy flesh.

FAUSTUS. I do repent I e'er offended him.
Sweet Mephistophilis, entreat thy lord
To pardon my unjust presumption,
And with my blood again I will confirm
The former vow I made to Lucifer.

MEPHIST.<236> Do it, then, Faustus, with unfeigned heart,
Lest greater dangers do attend thy drift.

FAUSTUS. Torment, sweet friend, that base and aged man,
That durst dissuade me from thy Lucifer,
With greatest torments<237> that our hell affords.

MEPHIST. His faith is great; I cannot touch his soul;
But what I may afflict<238> his body with
I will attempt, which is but little worth.

FAUSTUS. One thing, good servant, let me crave of thee,
To glut the longing of my heart's desire,--
That I may have unto my paramour
That heavenly Helen which I saw of late,
Whose sweet embraces may extinguish clean<239>
Those thoughts that do dissuade me from my vow,
And keep my oath<240> I made to Lucifer.

MEPHIST. This, or what else my Faustus shall desire,
Shall be perform'd in twinkling of an eye.

Re-enter HELEN, passing over the stage between two CUPIDS.

FAUSTUS. Was this the face that launch'd a thousand ships,
And burnt the topless towers of Ilium?--
Sweet Helen, make me immortal with a kiss.--
[Kisses her.]
Her lips suck forth my soul: see, where it flies!--
Come, Helen, come, give me my soul again.
Here will I dwell, for heaven is in these lips,
And all is dross that is not Helena.
I will be Paris, and for love of thee,
Instead of Troy, shall Wittenberg be sack'd;
And I will combat with weak Menelaus,
And wear thy colours on my plumed crest;
Yea, I will wound Achilles in the heel,
And then return to Helen for a kiss.
O, thou art fairer than the evening<241> air
Clad in the beauty of a thousand stars;
Brighter art thou than flaming Jupiter
When he appear'd to hapless Semele;
More lovely than the monarch of the sky
In wanton Arethusa's azur'd<242> arms;
And none but thou shalt<243> be my paramour!
[Exeunt.]

Thunder. Enter LUCIFER, BELZEBUB, and MEPHISTOPHILIS.

LUCIFER. Thus from infernal Dis do we ascend
To view the subjects of our monarchy,
Those souls which sin seals the black sons of hell;
'Mong which, as chief, Faustus, we come to thee,
Bringing with us lasting damnation
To wait upon thy soul: the time is come
Which makes it forfeit.

MEPHIST. And, this gloomy night,
Here, in this room, will wretched Faustus be.

BELZEBUB. And here we'll stay,
To mark him how he doth demean himself.

MEPHIST. How should he but in desperate lunacy?
Fond worldling, now his heart-blood dries with grief;
His conscience kills it; and his<244> labouring brain
Begets a world of idle fantasies
To over-reach the devil; but all in vain;
His store of pleasures must be sauc'd with pain.
He and his servant Wagner are at hand;
Both come from drawing Faustus' latest will.
See, where they come!

Enter FAUSTUS and WAGNER.

FAUSTUS. Say, Wagner,--thou hast perus<'>d my will,--
How dost thou like it?

WAGNER. Sir, So wondrous well,
As in all humble duty I do yield
My life and lasting service for your love.

FAUSTUS. Gramercy,<245> Wagner.

Enter SCHOLARS.

Welcome, Gentlemen.
[Exit WAGNER.]

FIRST SCHOLAR. Now, worthy Faustus, methinks your looks are chang'd.

FAUSTUS. O, gentlemen!

SECOND SCHOLAR. What ails Faustus?

FAUSTUS. Ah, my sweet chamber-fellow, had I lived with thee,
then had I lived still! but now must die eternally. Look, sirs,
comes he not? comes he not?

FIRST SCHOLAR. O my dear Faustus, what imports this fear?

SECOND SCHOLAR. Is all our pleasure turn'd to melancholy?

THIRD SCHOLAR. He is not well with being over-solitary.

SECOND SCHOLAR. If it be so, we'll have physicians,
And Faustus shall be cur'd.

THIRD SCHOLAR. 'Tis but a surfeit, sir;<246> fear nothing.

FAUSTUS. A surfeit of deadly<247> sin, that hath damned both
body and soul.

SECOND SCHOLAR. Yet, Faustus, look up to heaven, and remember
mercy is infinite.

FAUSTUS. But Faustus' offence can ne'er be pardoned: the serpent
that tempted Eve may be saved, but not Faustus. O gentlemen,
hear me<248> with patience, and tremble not at my speeches! Though
my heart pant and quiver to remember that I have been a student
here these thirty years, O, would I had never<249> seen Wittenberg,
never read book! and what wonders I have done, all Germany can
witness, yea, all the world; for which Faustus hath lost both
Germany and the world, yea, heaven itself, heaven, the seat of
God, the throne of the blessed, the kingdom of joy; and must
remain in hell for ever, hell. O, hell, for ever! Sweet friends,
what shall become of Faustus, being in hell for ever?

SECOND SCHOLAR. Yet, Faustus, call on God.

FAUSTUS. On God, whom Faustus hath abjured! on God, whom Faustus
hath blasphemed! O my God, I would weep! but the devil draws in
my tears. Gush forth blood, instead of tears! yea, life and soul!
O, he stays my tongue! I would lift up my hands; but see, they
hold 'em, they hold 'em? <'?' sic>

ALL. Who, Faustus?

FAUSTUS. Why, Lucifer and Mephistophilis. O gentlemen, I gave
them my soul for my cunning!

ALL. O, God forbid!

FAUSTUS. God forbade it, indeed; but Faustus hath done it: for
the vain pleasure of four-and-twenty years hath Faustus lost
eternal joy and felicity. I writ them a bill with mine own blood:
the date is expired; this is the time, and he will fetch me.

FIRST SCHOLAR. Why did not Faustus tell us of this before,
that divines might have prayed for thee?

FAUSTUS. Oft have I thought to have done so; but the devil
threatened to tear me in pieces, if I named God, to fetch me
body and soul, if I once gave ear to divinity: and now 'tis<250>
too late. Gentlemen, away, lest you perish with me.

SECOND SCHOLAR. O, what may we do to save Faustus?

FAUSTUS. Talk not of me, but save yourselves, and depart.

THIRD SCHOLAR. God will strengthen me; I will stay with Faustus.

FIRST SCHOLAR. Tempt not God, sweet friend; but let us into the
next room, and pray for him.

FAUSTUS. Ay, pray for me, pray for me; and what noise soever
you hear, come not unto me, for nothing can rescue me.

SECOND SCHOLAR. Pray thou, and we will pray that God may have mercy
upon thee.

FAUSTUS. Gentlemen, farewell: if I live till morning, I'll visit
you; if not, Faustus is gone to hell.

ALL. Faustus, farewell.
[Exeunt SCHOLARS.]

MEPHIST. Ay, Faustus, now thou hast no hope of heaven;
Therefore despair; think only upon hell,
For that must be thy mansion, there to dwell.

FAUSTUS. O thou bewitching fiend, 'twas thy temptation
Hath robb'd me of eternal happiness!

MEPHIST. I do confess it, Faustus, and rejoice:
'Twas I that, when thou wert i'the way to heaven,
Damm'd up thy passage; when thou took'st the book
To view the Scriptures, then I turn'd the leaves,
And led thine eye.<251>
What, weep'st thou? 'tis too late; despair! Farewell:
Fools that will laugh on earth must weep in hell.
[Exit.]<252>

Enter GOOD ANGEL and EVIL ANGEL at several doors.

GOOD ANGEL. 0 Faustus, if thou hadst given ear to me,
Innumerable joys had follow'd thee!
But thou didst love the world.

EVIL ANGEL. Gave ear to me,
And now must taste hell-pains<253> perpetually.

GOOD ANGEL. O, what will all thy riches, pleasures, pomps,
Avail thee now?

EVIL ANGEL. Nothing, but vex thee more,
To want in hell, that had on earth such store.

GOOD ANGEL. 0, thou hast lost celestial happiness,
Pleasures unspeakable, bliss without end
Hadst thou affected sweet divinity,
Hell or the devil had had no power on thee:
Hadst thou kept on that way, Faustus, behold,
[Music, while a throne descends.]
In what resplendent glory thou hadst sit<254>
In yonder throne, like those bright-shining saints,
And triumph'd over hell! That hast thou lost;
And now, poor soul, must thy good angel leave thee:
The jaws of hell are open<255> to receive thee.
[Exit. The throne ascends.]

EVIL ANGEL. Now, Faustus, let thine eyes with horror stare
[Hell is discovered.]
Into that vast perpetual torture-house:
There are the Furies tossing damned souls
On burning forks; there bodies boil<256> in lead;
There are live quarters broiling on the coals,
That ne'er can die; this ever-burning chair
Is for o'er-tortur'd souls to rest them in;
These that are fed with sops of flaming fire,
Were gluttons, and lov'd only delicates,
And laugh'd to see the poor starve at their gates:
But yet all these are nothing; thou shalt see
Ten thousand tortures that more horrid be.

FAUSTUS. O, I have seen enough to torture me!

EVIL ANGEL. Nay, thou must feel them, taste the smart of all:
He that loves pleasure must for pleasure fall:
And so I leave thee, Faustus, till anon;
Then wilt thou tumble in confusion.
[Exit. Hell disappears.--The clock strikes eleven.]

FAUSTUS. O Faustus,
Now hast thou but one bare hour to live,
And then thou must be damn'd perpetually!
Stand still, you ever-moving spheres of heaven,
That time may cease, and midnight never come;
Fair Nature's eye, rise, rise again, and make
Perpetual day; or let this hour be but
A year, a month, a week, a natural day,
That Faustus may repent and save his soul!
O lente, lente currite, noctis equi!
The stars move still, time runs, the clock will strike,
The devil will come, and Faustus must be damn'd.
O, I'll leap up to heaven!--Who pulls me down?--
See, where Christ's blood streams in the firmament!<257>
One drop of blood will save me: O my Christ!--
Rend not my heart for naming of my Christ;
Yet will I call on him: O, spare me, Lucifer!--
Where is it now? 'tis gone:
And, see, a threatening arm, an<258> angry brow!
Mountains and hills, come, come, and fall on me,
And hide me from the heavy wrath of heaven!
No!
Then will I headlong run into the earth:
Gape, earth! O, no, it will not harbour me!
You stars that reign'd at my nativity,
Whose influence hath<259> allotted death and hell,
Now draw up Faustus, like a foggy mist,
Into the entrails of yon<260> labouring cloud[s],
That, when you<261> vomit forth into the air,
My limbs may issue from your smoky mouths;
But let my soul mount and ascend to heaven!
[The clock strikes the half-hour.]
O, half the hour is past! 'twill all be past anon.
O, if<262> my soul must suffer for my sin,
Impose some end to my incessant pain;
Let Faustus live in hell a thousand years,
A hundred thousand, and at last<263> be sav'd!
No end is limited to damned souls.
Why wert thou not a creature wanting soul?
Or why is this immortal that thou hast?
O, Pythagoras' metempsychosis, were that true,
This soul should fly from me, and I be chang'd
Into some brutish beast! all beasts are happy,
For, when they die,
Their souls are soon dissolv'd in elements;
But mine must live still to be plagu'd in hell.
Curs'd be the parents that engender'd me!
No, Faustus, curse thyself, curse Lucifer
That hath depriv'd thee of the joys of heaven.
[The clock strikes twelve.]
It strikes, it strikes! Now, body, turn to air,
Or Lucifer will bear thee quick to hell!
O soul, be chang'd into small water-drops,
And fall into the ocean, ne'er be found!

Thunder. Enter DEVILS.

O, mercy, heaven! look not so fierce on me!
Adders and serpents, let me breathe a while!
Ugly hell, gape not! come not, Lucifer!
I'll burn my books!--O Mephistophilis!
[Exeunt DEVILS with FAUSTUS.]

Enter SCHOLARS.<264>

FIRST SCHOLAR. Come, gentlemen, let us go visit Faustus,
For such a dreadful night was never seen;
Since first the world's creation did begin,
Such fearful shrieks and cries were never heard:
Pray heaven the doctor have escap'd the danger.

SECOND SCHOLAR.
O, help us, heaven!<265> see, here are Faustus' limbs,
All torn asunder by the hand of death!

THIRD SCHOLAR.
The devils whom Faustus serv'd have<266> torn him thus;
For, twixt the hours of twelve and one, methought,
I heard him shriek and call aloud for help;
At which self<267> time the house seem'd all on fire
With dreadful horror of these damned fiends.

SECOND SCHOLAR. Well, gentlemen, though Faustus' end be such
As every Christian heart laments to think on,
Yet, for he was a scholar once admir'd
For wondrous knowledge in our German schools,
We'll give his mangled limbs due burial;
And all the students, cloth'd in mourning black,
Shall wait upon his heavy funeral.
[Exeunt.]

Enter CHORUS.

CHORUS. Cut is the branch that might have grown full straight,
And burned is Apollo's laurel-bough,
That sometime grew within this learned man.
Faustus is gone: regard his hellish fall,
Whose fiendful fortune may exhort the wise,
Only to wonder at unlawful things,
Whose deepness doth entice such forward wits
To practise more than heavenly power permits.
[Exit.]

Terminat hora diem; terminat auctor opus.

<1> Carthagens] So 4tos 1616, 1624, (and compare 4to 1604,
p. 79).--2to 1631 "Carthagen."

"Where Mars did mate the Carthaginians;">

<2> her] Old eds. "his."

<3> of] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "and."

<4> upon] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624<,> 1631<,> "on the."

<5> thousand] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "diuers."

<6> them] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "men."

<7> legatur] Old eds. "legatus."

<8> petty] I may notice that 4to 1604 has "pretty," which is
perhaps the right reading.

<9> &c.] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--Not in 4to 1616.

<10> circles, scenes, letters, and characters] So 4to 1604 (see
note ‡‡, p. 80).--The later 4tos "circles, letters, characters."

"scenes] "And sooner may a gulling weather-spie
By drawing forth heavens SCEANES tell certainly," &c.
Donne's FIRST SATYRE,--p. 327, ed. 1633.">

<11> gain] So 4tos 1624, 1631 (and so 4to 1604).--2to 1616 "get."

<12> these] See note §, p. 80.

"these elements] So again, "Within the bowels of THESE
elements," &c., p. 87, first col,--"THESE" being
equivalent to THE. (Not unfrequently in our old writers
THESE is little more than redundant.)">

<13> enterprise] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "enterprises."

<14> make swift Rhine circle fair] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631,
"WITH swift Rhine circle ALL."

<15> silk] Old eds. "skill."

<16> blest] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "wise."

<17> Swarm] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--2to 1616 "Sworne."

<18> to] So 4to 1616.--Not in 4tos 1624, 1631.

<19> have] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--2to 1616 "has."

<20> shall they] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "they shall."

<21> huge] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "whole."

<22> stuffs] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--2to 1616 "stuff'd."

<23> renowm'd] So 4to 1616 (See note ||, p. 11).--2tos 1624,
1631, "renown'd."

Great):

"renowmed] i.e. renowned.--So the 8vo.--The 4to "renowned."
--The form "RENOWMED" (Fr. RENOMME) occurs repeatedly
afterwards in this play, according to the 8vo. It is
occasionally found in writers posterior to Marlowe's
time. e.g.
"Of Constantines great towne RENOUM'D in vaine."
Verses to King James, prefixed to Lord Stirling's
MONARCHICKE TRAGEDIES, ed. 1607.">

<24> Albertus'] Old eds. "Albanus."

<25> that] So 4tos 1616, 1624.--2to 1631 "the."

<26> him] So 4to 1616.--Not in 4tos 1624, 1631.

<27> Enter Faustus] Old eds. "Thunder. Enter Lucifer and
4 deuils, Faustus to them with this speech,"--wrongly.

<28> her] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "his."

<29> erring] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--2to 1616 "euening."

<30> Mephistophilis Dragon, quod tumeraris] See note *, p. 83.

"surgat Mephistophilis, quod tumeraris] The later 4tos have
"surgat Mephistophilis DRAGON, quod tumeraris."--There is a
corruption here, which seems to defy emendation. For "quod
TUMERARIS," Mr. J. Crossley, of Manchester, would read
(rejecting the word "Dragon") "quod TU MANDARES" (the
construction being "quod tu mandares ut Mephistophilis
appareat et surgat"): but the "tu" does not agree with the
preceding "vos."--The Revd. J. Mitford proposes "surgat
Mephistophilis, per Dragon (or Dagon) quod NUMEN EST AERIS."">

<31> dicatus] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--2to 1616 "dicatis."

<32> came hither] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--2to 1616 "came NOW hether."

<33> speeches] So 4to 1604.--Not in the later 4tos.

<34> accidens] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--2to 1616 "accident."

<35> fell] So 4to 1604.--The later 4tos "liue."

<36> strike] So 4to 1631.--2tos 1616, 1624, "strikes."

<37> thorough] So 4to 1631.--2tos 1616, 1624, "through."

<38> Sirrah] So 4to 1616.--Not in 4tos 1624, 1631.

<39> save] So 4tos 1616, 1624.--2to 1631 "spare."

<40> again] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--Not in 4to 1616.

<41> or] Old eds. "for."

<42> vestigiis nostris] Old eds. "vestigias nostras."

<43> backward] So 4to 1616 (and so 4to 1604).--2tos 1624, 1631,
"backe."

<44> Why] So 4to 1616 (and so 4to 1604).--Not in 4tos 1624, 1631.

<45> that famous] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "that MOST famous."

<46> of] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "be."

<47> men] So 4tos 1624, 1631 (and so 4to 1604).--2to 1616 "them."

<48> Mephistophile] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "Mephostophilis."

<49> thee] So 4to 1604.--The later 4tos "him."

<50> thine] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--2to 1616 "thy."

<51> And] So 4to 1616.--Not in 4tos 1624, 1631.

<52> my] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "thy."

<53> Is it] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "It is."

<54> soul] So 4to 1616.--Not in 4tos 1624, 1631.

<55> an] So 4tos 1616, 1631.--Not in 4to 1624.

<56> should] So 4tos 1616, 1624.--2to 1631 "shall."

<57> God] So 4to 1604.--The later 4tos "heauen."

<58> this scroll] So 4to 1616.--Not in 4tos 1624, 1631.

<59> he desires] Not in the 4tos. See note ‡, p. 86.

"he desires] Not in any of the four 4tos. In the tract just
cited, the
"3d Article" stands thus,--"That Mephostophiles should bring
him any thing, and doe for him whatsoever." Sig. A 4, ed.
1648. A later ed. adds "he desired." Marlowe, no doubt,
followed some edition of the HISTORY in which these words,
or something equivalent to them, had been omitted by mistake.
(2to 1661, which I consider as of no authority, has "he
requireth.")">

<60> and] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--Not in 4to 1616.

<61> with] So 4to 1604.--Not in the later 4tos.

<62> the] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "that."

<63> are] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--2to 1616 "is."

<64> hell's a fable] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "hell's a
MEERE fable."

<65> thine] So 4tos 1616, 1624.--2to 1631 "thy."

<66> thy] So 4tos 1616, 1631.--2to 1624 "thine."

<67> was] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "were."

<68> harness] i.e. armour.

<69> This will I keep as chary as my life.
[Exeunt.]

Enter FAUSTUS, in his study, and MEPHISTOPHILIS.

FAUSTUS. When I behold the heavens, &c.]

Old eds. (that is, 4tos 1616, 1624, 1631) thus;

"This will I keepe, as chary as my life.
[Exeunt.]

Enter WAGNER solus.

WAGNER. Learned Faustus
To know the secrets of Astronomy
Grauen in the booke of Joues high firmament,
Did mount himselfe to scale Olympus top,
Being seated in a chariot burning bright,
Drawne by the strength of yoaky [2to 1624 "yoaked"] Dragons necks,
He now is gone to proue Cosmography,
And as I gesse will first arriue at Rome,
To see the Pope and manner of his Court;
And take some part of holy Peters feast,
That to [2tos 1624, 1631, "on"] this day is highly solemnized.
Exit WAGNER.

Enter FAUSTUS in his Study, and MEPHISTOPHILIS.

FAUSTUS. When I behold the heauens," &c.

The lines which I have here omitted belong to a subsequent part
of the play, where they will be found with considerable additions,
and are rightly assigned to the CHORUS. (As given in the present
place by the 4tos 1616, 1624, 1631, these lines exhibit the text
of the earlier FAUSTUS; see p. 90, sec. col.) It would seem that
something was intended to intervene here between the exit of Faustus
and Mephistophilis, and their re-appearance on the stage: compare,
however, the preceding play, p. 88, first col.

"FAUSTUS. Great thanks, mighty Lucifer!
This will I keep as chary as my life.

LUCIFER. Farewell, Faustus, and think on the devil.

FAUSTUS. Farewell, great Lucifer.
[Exeunt LUCIFER and BELZEBUB.]

Come, Mephistophilis.
[Exeunt.]

Enter CHORUS.

CHORUS. Learned Faustus,
To know the secrets of astronomy
Graven in the book of Jove's high firmament,
Did mount himself to scale Olympus' top,
Being seated in a chariot burning bright,
Drawn by the strength of yoky dragons' necks.
He now is gone to prove cosmography,
And, as I guess, will first arrive at Rome,
To see the Pope and manner of his court,
And take some part of holy Peter's feast,
That to this day is highly solemniz'd.
[Exit.]

Enter FAUSTUS and MEPHISTOPHILIS.

FAUSTUS. Having now, my good Mephistophilis,
Pass'd with delight the stately town of Trier," etc.>

leaving the stage and re-entering.>

"RALPH. O, brave, Robin! shall I have Nan Spit, and to mine
own use? On that condition I'll feed thy devil with horse-
bread as long as he lives, of free cost.

ROBIN. No more, sweet Ralph: let's go and make clean our
boots, which lie foul upon our hands, and then to our conjuring
in the devil's name.
[Exeunt.]

Enter ROBIN and RALPH with a silver goblet.

ROBIN. Come, Ralph: did not I tell thee, we were for ever
made by this Doctor Faustus' book? ecce, signum! here's a
simple purchase for horse-keepers: our horses shall eat
no hay as long as this lasts.

RALPH. But, Robin, here comes the Vintner.">

<70> thine] So 4tos 1616, 1624.--2to 1631 "thy."

<71> is] So 4to 1616.--Not in 4tos 1624, 1631.

<72> breathes] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--2to 1616 "breathe."

<73> ears] So 4tos 1616, 1631.--2to 1624 "eare."

<74> this I] So 4tos 1616, 1631.--2to 1624 "this TIME I."

<75> termine] I may notice that 4to 1604 (see p. 88, sec. col.)
has "terminine," which at least is better for the metre.

"Whose terminine is term'd the world's wide pole;">

<76> erring] So 4to 1604.--The later 4tos "euening."

<77> motion] So 4tos 1616, 1631.--2to 1624 "motions."

<78> Ay] So 4to 1616.--Not in 4tos 1624, 1631.

<79> and] So 4to 1631.--Not in 4tos 1616, 1624.

<80> the] So 4tos 1616, 1631.--Not in 4to 1624.

<81> lips] So 4to 1604.--Not in the later 4tos.

<82> and ever since have run] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631,
"and HAUE EUER SINCE run."

<83> this] So 4to 1604.--The later 4tos "these."

<84> come] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "came."

<85> I] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--2to 1616 "I I."

<86> L] Old eds. "Lechery." See note †, p. 90.

"L.] All the 4tos "Lechery."--Here I have made the alteration
recommended by Mr. Collier in his Preface to COLERIDGE'S
SEVEN LECTURES ON SHAKESPEARE AND MILTON, p. cviii.">

<87> Tut] So 4to 1604.--The later 4tos "But."

<88> Robin] Old eds. "the Clowne" (and so frequently afterwards):
but he is evidently a distinct person from the "Clown," Wagner's
attendant, who has previously appeared (see p. 111). Most probably
the parts of the Clown and Robin were played by the same actor;
and hence the confusion in the old eds.

"Enter WAGNER and CLOWN.

WAGNER. Come hither, sirrah boy." etc.>

<89> faith] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631 "i'faith." (And so
afterwards in this scene.)

<90> not tell] So 4to 1616.--Not in 4tos 1624, 1631.

<91> as fair a] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "a faire."

<92> need'st] So 4tos 1616, 1624.--2to 1631 "needs."

<93> hold, belly, hold] Compare Florio's DICT., 1611; "IOSA,
GOOD STORE, hold-bellie-hold."

<94> Prithee] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "I prithee."

<95> him] So 4tos 1616, 1624.--Not in 4to 1631.

<96> He views] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "To view."

<97> with this] So 4tos 1616, 1631.--2to 1624 "with HIS." This
passage is sufficiently obscure.

<98> round] So 4to 1616.--Not in 4tos 1624, 1631.

<99> Rhine] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--2to 1616 "Rhines."

<100> up to] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "vnto."

<101> Quarter the town in four equivalents] So 4to 1604.--Not
in the later 4tos.

<102> Thorough] so 4to 1631.--2tos 1616, 1624, "Through."

<103> rest] So 4to 1604.--The later 4tos "East."

<104> me] So 4tos 1616, 1631.--Not in 4to 1624.

<105> us] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "you."

<106> through] So 4tos 1616, 1624.--2to 1631 "thorow."

<107> Ponte] Old eds. "Ponto."

<108> match] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--2to 1616 "watch."

<109> the] so 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "those."

<110> in state and] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--2to 1616 "this day with."

<111> whilst] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "while."

<112> thorough] So 4to 1631.--2tos 1616, 1624, "through."

<113> my] Qy. "one"?

<114> cunning] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--2to 1616 "comming." (And so
in the fourth line of the next speech.)

<115> this] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "his."

<116> at] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "to."

<117> it] So 4to 1616.--Not in 4tos 1624, 1631.

<118> And smite with death thy hated enterprise] So 4to 1616.
--Not in 4tos 1624, 1631.

<119> our] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "the."

<120> this] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "the."

<121> have right] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--2to 1616 "haue SOME right."

<122> shall] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--2to 1616 "shalt."

<123> hath] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--2to 1616 "haue."

<124> synod] Qy. "HOLY synod"?

<125> Ponte] Old eds. "Ponto."

<126> his] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "this."

<127> Sennet] Old eds. "Senit" and "Sonet". See note ||, p. 91.

"Sonnet] Variously written, SENNET, SIGNET, SIGNATE, &c.--A
particular set of notes on the trumpet, or cornet, different
from a flourish. See Nares's GLOSS. in V. SENNET.">

<128> be] So 4tos 1616, 1624.--2to 1631 "are."

<129> them to] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "them FORTH to."

<130> Archbishop.] Old eds. "Bish." and "Bishop" (and so afterwards).

<131> you] So 4tos 1616, 1631.--Not in 4to 1624.

<132> beholding] So 4to 1616 (see note †, p. 98).--2tos 1624,
1631, "beholden."

"beholding] i.e. beholden.">

<133> such] So 4tos 1616, 1631.--2to 1624 "this."

<134> it] So 4to 1616.--Not in 4tos 1624, 1631.

<135> his] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--2to 1616 "this."

<136> struck] Here the old eds. have "stroke" and "strooke:"
but in the next clause they all agree in having "strucke."

<137> on] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--Not in 4to 1616.

<138> same] So 4tos 1616, 1624.--Not in 4to 1631.

<139> at the hard heels] The modern editors, ignorant of the old
phraseology, thought that they corrected this passage in printing
"hard at the heels."

<140> Vintner] So all the old eds.; and presently Robin addresses
this person as "vintner:" yet Dick has just spoken of him as "the
Vintner's boy." See note ||, p. 93.

"Drawer] There is an inconsistency here: the Vintner cannot
properly be addressed as "Drawer." The later 4tos are also
inconsistent in the corresponding passage: Dick says, "THE
VINTNER'S BOY follows us at the hard heels," and immediately
the "VINTNER" enters.">

<141> your] So 4tos 1616, 1631.--Not in 4to 1624.

<142> much] Equivalent to--by no means, not at all. This ironical
exclamation is very common in our old dramatists. (Mr. Hunter,
--NEW ILLUST. OF SHAKESPEARE, ii. 56,--explains it very differently.)

<143> By lady] i.e. By our Lady.

<144> to] So 4tos 1616, 1624.--Not in 4to 1631.

<145> tester] i.e. sixpence.

<146> the state] i.e. the raised chair or throne, with a canopy.

<147> perfect] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--2to 1616 "warlike."

<148> rouse] i.e. bumper.

<149> a] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "ten."

<150> a] So 4tos 1616, 1624.--2to 1631 "the."

<151> renowm'd] Old eds. "renown'd"; but earlier, p. 109, first
col., 4to 1616 has "renowm'd": and see note ||, p. 11.

Great):

"renowmed] i.e. renowned.--So the 8vo.--The 4to "renowned."
--The form "RENOWMED" (Fr. RENOMME) occurs repeatedly
afterwards in this play, according to the 8vo. It is
occasionally found in writers posterior to Marlowe's
time. e.g.
"Of Constantines great towne RENOUM'D in vaine."
Verses to King James, prefixed to Lord Stirling's
MONARCHICKE TRAGEDIES, ed. 1607.">

<152> through] So 4tos 1616, 1624.--2to 1631 "thorow."

<153> These] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "Those."

<154> through] So 4tos 1616, 1624.--2to 1631 "thorow."

<155> a] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--Not in 4to 1616.

<156> this] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "the."

<157> demand] So 4tos 1616, 1631.--2to 1624 "demands."

<158> door] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--Not in 4to 1616.

<159> state] See note §, p. 122.--So 4tos 1616,
1631.--2to 1624 "seat."

<160> These] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "They."

<161> renowmed] Old eds. "renowned." See note ‡, p. 123.

<162> thoughts] So 4tos 1616, 1631.--2to 1624 "thought."

<163> whilst] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "while."

<164> I gain'd] So 4tos 1616, 1631.--2to 1624 "I HAD gain'd."

<165> at window] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "at THE window."

<166> is] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--Not in 4to 1616.

<167> this is] So 4to 1624 (and rightly, as the next line
proves).--2tos 1616, 1631, "is this."

<168> As] So 4to 1616.--2to 1624 "That."--2to 1631 "And."

<169> Belimoth....Asteroth] Old eds. here "Belimote (and "Belimot")
....Asterote": but see p. 126, first col.

"But wherefore do I dally my revenge?--
Asteroth, Belimoth, Mephistophilis?">

<170> has] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "hath."

<171> horns] So 4tos 1616, 1631.--2to 1624 "horne."

<172> sir] So 4tos 1616, 1631.--Not in 4to 1624.

<173> of] i.e. on.

<174> sway] So 4tos 1616, 1631.--2to 1624 "stay."

<175> this attempt against the conjurer] See note, * p. 95.

"Mephistophilis, transform him straight] According to THE
HISTORY OF DR. FAUSTUS, the knight was not present during
Faustus's "conference" with the Emperor; nor did he offer
the doctor any insult by doubting his skill in magic. We
are there told that Faustus happening to see the knight
asleep, "leaning out of a window of the great hall," fixed
a huge pair of hart's horns on his head; "and, as the knight
awaked, thinking to pull in his head, he hit his hornes
against the glasse, that the panes thereof flew about his
eares: thinke here how this good gentleman was vexed, for
he could neither get backward nor forward." After the emperor
and the courtiers, to their great amusement, had beheld the
poor knight in this condition, Faustus removed the horns.
When Faustus, having taken leave of the emperor, was a league
and a half from the city, he was attacked in a wood by the
knight and some of his companions: they were in armour, and
mounted on fair palfreys; but the doctor quickly overcame
them by turning all the bushes into horsemen, and "so
charmed them, that every one, knight and other, for the
space of a whole moneth, did weare a paire of goates
hornes on their browes, and every palfry a paire of oxe
hornes on his head; and this was their penance appointed
by Faustus." A second attempt of the knight to revenge
himself on Faustus proved equally unsuccessful. Sigs. G 2,
I 3, ed. 1648.">

<176> that] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "the."

<177> my] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "thy."

<178> that] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "the."

<179> an] So 4to 1616.--Not in 4tos 1624, 1631.

<180> boldly] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "brauely."

<181> heart's] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--2to 1616 "heart."

<182> that] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "the."

<183> the] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "that."

<184> now] so 4to 1616.--Not in 4tos 1624, 1631.

<185> art] Old eds. "heart" (which, after all, may be right).

<186> there] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--2to 1616 "here."

<187> his] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--Not in 3to 1616.

<188> pull] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--2to 1616 "put."

<189> all] Old eds. "call."

<190> through] So 4tos 1616, 1624.--2to 1631 "thorow."

<191> Amongst] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "Among."

<192> Enter the ambushed Soldiers] Here (though it seems that
Faustus does not quit the stage) a change of scene is supposed.

<193> these] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "the."

<194> the door] i.e. the stage-door,--the writer here addressing
himself to THE ACTOR only, for the scene lies in a wood.

<195> Zounds] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--2to 1616, "Zons."

<196> all are] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "are all."

<197> these] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--2to 1616 "this."

<198> escape] So 4tos 1616, 1631.--2to 1624 "scape."

<199> has] So 4tos 1616, 1624.--2to 1631 "hath."

<200> you] So 4to 1616.--Not in 4tos 1624, 1631.

<201> guess] A corruption of guests (very frequent in our early
dramatists) which occurs again at p. 130. first col. So 4to
1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "guests."

<202> thou] So 4to 1616.--Not in 4tos 1624, 1631.

<203> now] So 4to 1616.--Not in 4tos 1624, 1631.

<204> sir] Qy. "sirs"? but see the next speech of the Carter,
and the next speech but one of the Horse-courser, who, in his
narrative, uses both "sirs" and "sir."

<205> As I was going to Wittenberg, t'other day, &c.] See THE
HISTORY OF DOCTOR FAUSTUS, Chap. xxxv,--"How Doctor Faustus eat
a load of hay."--The Carter does not appear in the earlier play.

<206> my] So 4to 1616.--Not in 4tos 1624, 1631.

<207> cursen] i.e. christened.

<208> some quality] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "some RARE
quality."

<209> rid] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "ride."

<210> that enchanted castle in the air] This is not mentioned in
the earlier play: but see THE HISTORY OF DOCTOR FAUSTUS, Chap xl,
--"How Doctor Faustus through his charmes made a great Castle in
presence of the Duke of Anholt."

<211> delighted] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "delighteth."

<212> it pleaseth] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "it HATH PLEASED."

<213> come] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "came."

<214> these ripe grapes] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "these
grapes."

<215> The Clowns bounce, &c] 2to 1616 "The CLOWNE bounce." 2tos
1624, 1631, "The CLOWNE BOUNCETH." (In the next stage-direction
all the 4tos have "THEY knock again," &c.)

<216> for] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "to."

<217> pardons] So 4tos 1616, 1631.--2to 1624 "pardon."

<218> me] So 4to 1616.--Not in 4tos 1624, 1631.

<219> spake] So 4tos 1616, 1631.--2to 1624 "spoke."

<220> Dost hear him] So 4to 1616.--2to 1624 "dost THOU heare ME."
2to 1631 "dost THOU heare him."

<221> him] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--Not in 4to 1616.

<222> you] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--Not in 4to 1616 (but compare the
Carter's next speech).

<223> I] So 4to 1616.--Not in 4tos 1624, 1631.

<224> not I] So 4tos 1616, 1631.--2to 1624 "I not."

<225> Ha'] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "Haue."

<226> guess] See note §, p. 127. So 4to 1616.
--2tos 1624, 1631, "guests."

<227> beholding] So 4tos 1616, 1624, (see note †, p. 98).--2to
1631 "beholden."

"beholding] i.e. beholden.">

<228> sport] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "sports."

<229> I think my master, &c.] The alterations which this speech
has undergone will hardly admit of its arrangement as verse:
compare the earlier play, p. 98, first col.

"Enter WAGNER.

WAGNER. I think my master means to die shortly,
For he hath given to me all his goods:
And yet, methinks, if that death were near,
He would not banquet, and carouse, and swill
Amongst the students, as even now he doth,
Who are at supper with such belly-cheer
As Wagner ne'er beheld in all his life.
See, where they come! belike the feast is ended.
[Exit.]">

<230> goods] So 4tos 1616, 1631.--2to 1624 "good."

<231> ne'er] so 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "neuer."

<232> ended] so 4tos 1624, 1631, (and so 4to 1604).--2to 1616 "done."

<233> war] Old eds. "warres."

<234> wit] So 4tos 1616, 1624.--2to 1631 "will."

<235> Or envy of thee] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "Or OF enuie
TO thee."

<236> MEPHIST.] This and the next prefix are omitted in the old
eds.

<237> torments] So 4tos 1624, 1631 (and so 4to 1604).--2to 1616
"torment."

<238> I may afflict] So 4to 1616.--2to 1624 "I afflict."--2to
1631 "I CAN afflict."

<239> clean] So 4to 1604.--The later 4tos "clear."

<240> oath] So 4to 1604.--The later 4tos "vow."

<241> evening] So 4to 1604.--The later 4tos "euenings."

<242> azur'd] So 4to 1624 (a reading which I prefer only because
it is also that of 4to 1604.)--2tos 1616, 1631, "azure."

<243> shalt] See note *, p. 100.

"shalt] So all the 4tos; and so I believe Marlowe wrote,
though the grammar requires "shall."">

<244> his] So 4tos 1616, 1631.--Not in 4to 1624.

<245> Gramercy] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--2to 1616 "Gramercies."

<246> sir] So 4tos 1616, 1624.--Not in 4to 1631.

<247> of deadly] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "of A deadly."

<248> me] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--Not in 4to 1616.

<249> never] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "nere."

<250> 'tis] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "IT is."

<251> And led thine eye] A portion of this line has evidently
dropt out.

<252> Exit] It seems doubtful whether Lucifer and Belzebub should
also make their exeunt here, or whether they remain to witness
the catastrophe: see p. 132, first col.

"MEPHIST. And, this gloomy night,
Here, in this room, will wretched Faustus be.

BELZEBUB. And here we'll stay,
To mark him how he doth demean himself." etc.>

<253> hell-pains] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--2to 1616 "HELS paines."

<254> sit] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--2to 1616 "set."

<255> are open] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "IS READIE."

<256> boil] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--2to 1616 "BROYLE."

<257> See, where Christ's blood streams in the firmament] So 4tos
1624, 1631.--Not in 4to 1616.

<258> an] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "and."

<259> hath] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "haue."

<260> yon] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "your."

<261> you, &c.] See note *, p. 101.

"That, when you, &c.] So all the old eds.; and it is certain
that awkward changes of person are sometimes found in passages
of our early poets: but qy.,--
"That, when THEY vomit forth into the air,
My limbs may issue from THEIR smoky mouths," &c.?">

<262> 0, if, &c.] 2to 1604, in the corresponding passage, has
"Oh, GOD, if," &c. (see p. 101, sec. col.), and that reading
seems necessary for the sense.

"Ah, half the hour is past! 'twill all be past anon
O God,
If thou wilt not have mercy on my soul,
Yet for Christ's sake, whose blood hath ransom'd me,
Impose some end to my incessant pain;" etc.>

<263> at last] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "at THE last."

<264> Enter Scholars] Here, of course, a change of scene is
supposed. (This is not in the earlier play.)

<265> heaven] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "heauens."

<266> devils . . . . have] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631,
"DIUELL . . . . HATH."

<267> self] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "same."

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