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Chocolate and Cocoa Recipes and Home Made Candy Recipes by Miss Parloa

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[Illustration: CHOCOLATE PEANUT CLUSTERS.]

Shell a quart of freshly-roasted peanuts and remove the skins. Drop the
peanuts, one by one, into the center of a dish of "Dot" Chocolate made
ready for use; lift out onto oil cloth with a dipping fork (a wire fork
comes for the purpose, but a silver oyster fork answers nicely) to make
groups of three nuts,--two below, side by side, and one above and
between the others.

CHOCOLATE COATED ALMONDS

[Illustration: CHOCOLATE COATED ALMONDS.]

Select nuts that are plump at the ends. Use them without blanching.
Brush, to remove dust. Melt "Dot" Chocolate and when cooled properly
drop the nuts, one at a time, into the center of it; push the nuts under
with the fork, then drop onto waxed paper or oil cloth. In removing the
fork make a design on the top of each nut. These are easily prepared and
are particularly good.

PLAIN AND CHOCOLATE DIPPED PARISIAN SWEETS

[Illustration: CHOCOLATE DIPPED PARISIAN SWEETS.]

1/2 a cup of Sultana raisins,
5 figs,
1 cup of dates,
2 ounces citron,
2/3 a cup of nut meats, (almonds, filberts, pecans or walnuts, one
variety or a mixture),
1-1/2 ounces of Baker's Chocolate,
1/3 a cup of confectioner's sugar,
1/4 a teaspoonful of salt,
Chocolate Fondant or
Baker's "Dot" Chocolate.

Pour boiling water over the figs and dates, let boil up once, then drain
as dry as possible; remove stones from the dates, the stem ends from the
figs; chop the fruit and nut meats (almonds should be blanched) in a
food chopper; add the salt; and the sugar and work the whole to a smooth
paste; add the chocolate, melted, and work it evenly through the mass.
Add more sugar if it is needed and roll the mixture into a sheet
one-fourth an inch thick. Cut into strips an inch wide. Cut the strips
into diamond-shaped pieces (or squares); roll these in confectioner's
sugar or dip them in chocolate fondant or in Baker's "Dot" Chocolate,
and sprinkle a little fine-chopped pistachio nut meats on the top of the
dipped pieces. When rolling the mixture use confectioner's sugar on
board and rolling pin.

STUFFED DATES, CHOCOLATE DIPPED

[Illustration: STUFFED DATES, CHOCOLATE DIPPED.]

Cut choice dates open on one side and remove the seeds. Fill the open
space in the dates with a strip of preserved ginger or pineapple,
chopped nuts or chopped nuts mixed with white or chocolate fondant;
press the dates into a compact form to keep in the filling, then dip
them, one by one, in "Dot" Chocolate.

CHOCOLATE OYSTERETTES, PLAIN AND WITH CHOPPED FIGS

[Illustration: CHOCOLATE OYSTERETTES.]

Oyster crackers, salted preferred, fine-chopped, roasted peanuts or
raisins or 3 or 4 basket figs or a little French fruit cut in
very small bits,
1/2 a pound or more of Baker's "Dot" Chocolate.

Select fresh-baked crackers free from crumbs. Dip in "Dot" Chocolate,
made ready as in previous recipes, and dispose on oil cloth or waxed
paper. For a change add figs or other fruit, cut very fine, or chopped
nuts to the chocolate ready for dipping.

TURKISH PASTE WITH FRENCH FRUIT, CHOCOLATE FLAVORED

[Illustration: TURKISH PASTE WITH FRENCH FRUIT.]

3 level tablespoonfuls of granulated gelatine,
1/2 a cup of cold water,
2 cups of sugar,
2/3 a cup of cold water,
1 teaspoonful of ground cinnamon,
2 squares of Baker's Chocolate,
1 teaspoonful of vanilla extract,
1 cup of French candied fruit, cherries, angelica, citron, etc.,
chopped fine.

Let the gelatine stand in the half cup of cold water until it has taken
up all of the water. Stir the sugar and the two-thirds a cup of cold
water over the fire until the sugar is dissolved and the syrup is
boiling, then add the gelatine and let cook twenty minutes; add the
cinnamon, the chocolate, melted over hot water, and beat all together,
then add the vanilla and the fruit; let stand in a cool place for a
time, then when it thickens a little turn into an _un_buttered bread pan
and set aside until the next day. To unmold separate the paste from the
pan--at the edge--with a sharp-pointed knife. Sift confectioner's sugar
over the top, then with the tips of the fingers gently pull the paste
from the pan to a board dredged with confectioner's sugar; cut into
strips, then into small squares. Roll each square in confectioner's
sugar. In cutting keep sugar between the knife and the paste.

CHOICE CHOCOLATE PECAN PRALINES

[Illustration: CHOCOLATE PECAN PRALINES.]

3 cups of granulated sugar,
1 cup of cream,
1 cup of sugar cooked to caramel,
2 squares of Baker's Chocolate,
3 cups of pecan nut meats.

Stir the sugar and cream over the fire until the sugar is melted, then
let boil to the soft ball degree, or to 236 deg. F. Add the chocolate,
melted or shaved fine, and beat it in, then pour the mixture onto the
cup of sugar cooked to caramel; let the mixture boil up once, then
remove from the fire; add the nut meats and beat until the mass begins
to thicken. When cold enough to hold its shape drop onto an oil cloth or
marble, a teaspoonful in a place, and at once set a half nut meat on
each. Two persons are needed to make these pralines, one to drop the
mixture, the other to decorate with the halves of the nuts. The mixture
becomes smooth and firm almost instantly. Maple or brown sugar may be
used in place of all or a part of the quantity of granulated sugar
designated.

VASSAR FUDGE

[Illustration: VASSAR FUDGE.]

2 cups of white granulated sugar,
1 cup of cream,
1 tablespoonful of butter,
1/4 a cake of Baker's Premium No. 1 Chocolate.

Put in the sugar and cream, and when this becomes hot put in the
chocolate, broken up into fine pieces. Stir vigorously and constantly.
Put in butter when it begins to boil. Stir until it creams when beaten
on a saucer. Then remove and beat until quite cool and pour into
buttered tins. When cold cut in diamond-shaped pieces.

SMITH COLLEGE FUDGE

[Illustration: SMITH COLLEGE FUDGE.]

Melt one-quarter cup of butter. Mix together in a separate dish one cup
of white sugar, one cup of brown sugar, one-quarter cup of molasses and
one-half cup of cream. Add this to the butter, and after it has been
brought to a boil continue boiling for two and one-half minutes,
stirring rapidly. Then add two squares of Baker's Premium No. 1
Chocolate, scraped fine. Boil this five minutes, stirring it first
rapidly, and then more slowly towards the end. After it has been taken
from the fire, add one and one-half teaspoonfuls of vanilla. Then stir
constantly until the mass thickens. Pour into buttered pan and set in a
cool place.

WELLESLEY MARSHMALLOW FUDGE

[Illustration: WELLESLEY MARSHMALLOW FUDGE.]

Heat two cups of granulated sugar and one cup of rich milk (cream is
better). Add two squares of Baker's Chocolate, and boil until it hardens
in cold water. Just before it is done add a small piece of butter, then
begin to stir in marshmallows, crushing and beating them with a spoon.
Continue to stir in marshmallows, after the fudge has been taken from
the fire, until half a pound has been stirred into the fudge. Cool in
sheets three-quarters of an inch thick, and cut in cubes.

DOUBLE FUDGE

[Illustration: DOUBLE FUDGE.]

2 cups of granulated sugar,
2 squares of Baker's Chocolate,
1/2 a cup of cream,
1 tablespoonful of butter.

Boil seven minutes; then beat and spread in buttered tin to cool.

2 cups of brown sugar,
1/2 a cup of cream,
1 teaspoonful of vanilla extract,
1 cup of walnut meats, chopped fine,
Butter size of a walnut.

Boil ten minutes; then beat and pour on top of fudge already in pan.
When cool, cut in squares.

MARBLED FUDGE

[Illustration: MARBLED FUDGE.]

2 cups of granulated sugar,
1/4 a cup of glucose (pure corn syrup),
1-1/2 cups of cream,
1 tablespoonful of butter,
2 squares of Baker's Chocolate, scraped fine or melted,
2 teaspoonfuls of vanilla.

Stir the sugar, glucose and cream over a slack fire until the sugar is
melted; move the saucepan to a hotter part of the range and continue
stirring until the mixture boils, then let boil, stirring every three or
four minutes very gently, until the thermometer registers 236 deg. F., or,
till a soft ball can be formed in cold water. Remove from the fire and
pour one-half of the mixture over the chocolate. Set both dishes on a
cake rack, or on something that will allow the air to circulate below
the dishes. When the mixture cools a little, get some one to beat one
dish of the fudge; add a teaspoonful of vanilla to each dish, and beat
until thick and slightly grainy, then put the mixture in a pan, lined
with waxed paper, first a little of one and then of the other, to give a
marbled effect. When nearly cold turn from the pan, peel off the paper
and cut into cubes.

FUDGE HEARTS OR ROUNDS

[Illustration: FUDGE HEARTS OR ROUNDS.]

2 cups of granulated sugar,
1/3 a cup of condensed milk,
1/3 a cup of water,
1/4 a cup of butter,
1-1/2 squares of Baker's Chocolate,
1 teaspoonful of vanilla extract.

Boil the sugar, milk and water to 236 deg. F., or to the "soft ball" degree;
stir gently every few minutes; add the butter and let boil up
vigorously, then remove from the fire and add the chocolate; let stand
undisturbed until cool, then add the vanilla and beat the candy until it
thickens and begins to sugar. Pour into a pan lined with paper to stand
until cooled somewhat; turn from the mold and with a French cutter or a
sharp edged tube cut into symmetrical shapes.

MARSHMALLOW FUDGE

[Illustration: MARSHMALLOW FUDGE.]

1st BATCH

2 cups of granulated sugar,
1 cup of cream,
1/4 a teaspoonful of salt,
1 tablespoonful of butter,
2 squares of Baker's Chocolate,
1 teaspoonful of vanilla,
Nearly half a pound of marshmallows, split in halves.

2nd BATCH

2 cups of granulated sugar,
1 cup of cream,
1/4 a teaspoonful of salt,
1 tablespoonful of butter,
2 squares of Baker's Chocolate,
1 teaspoonful of vanilla.

Start with the first batch and when this is nearly boiled enough, set
the second batch to cook, preparing it in the same manner as the first.
Stir the sugar and cream, over a rather slack fire, until the sugar is
melted, when the sugar boils wash down the sides of the pan as in making
fondant, set in the thermometer and cook over a quick fire, without
stirring, to the soft ball degree, 236 deg. F.; add the butter, salt and
chocolate, melted or shaved fine, and let boil up vigorously, then
remove to a cake cooler (or two spoon handles to allow a circulation of
air below the pan). In the meantime the second batch should be cooking
and the marshmallows be gotten ready. When the first batch is about cold
add the vanilla and beat the candy vigorously until it begins to
thicken, then turn it into a pan lined with waxed paper. At once dispose
the halves of marshmallows close together upon the top of the fudge.
Soon the other dish of fudge will be ready; set it into cold water and
when nearly cold, add the vanilla and beat as in the first batch, then
pour it over the marshmallows. When the whole is about cold turn it onto
a marble, or hardwood board, pull off the paper and cut into cubes. If
one is able to work very quickly, but one batch need be prepared, half
of it being spread over the marshmallows.

CHOCOLATE DIPPED FRUIT FUDGE

[Illustration: CHOCOLATE DIPPED FRUIT FUDGE.]

FRUIT FUDGE

1-1/2 cups of granulated sugar,
1 cup of Maple Syrup,
1-1/2 cups of glucose (pure corn syrup),
1/2 a cup of thick cream, or
1/3 a cup of milk and 1/4 a cup of butter,
3/4 a cup of fruit, figs, and candied cherries and apricots, cut in
small pieces.

CHOCOLATE FOR DIPPING

1/2 a cake or more of Baker's "Dot" Chocolate.

Stir the sugar, syrup, glucose and cream until the sugar is melted,
cover and let boil three or four minutes, then uncover and let boil
stirring often but very gently until a soft ball may be formed in cold
water, or, until the thermometer registers 236 deg. F. Set the saucepan on a
cake cooler and when the mixture becomes cool, add the fruit and beat
until it becomes thick, then turn into pans lined with waxed paper. In
about fifteen minutes cut into squares. Coat these with the "Dot"
Chocolate.

CHOCOLATE COCOANUT CAKES

[Illustration: CHOCOLATE COCOANUT CAKES.]

2/3 a cup of granulated sugar,
1/4 a cup scant measure of water,
One cup, less one tablespoonful, of glucose,
1/2 a pound of dessicated cocoanut,
1/2 a pound or Baker's "Dot" Chocolate.

Heat the sugar, water and glucose to the boiling point, add the cocoanut
and stir constantly while cooking to the soft ball degree, or, until a
little of the candy dropped on a cold marble may be rolled into a ball.
Drop, by small teaspoonfuls, onto a marble or waxed paper, to make
small, thick, rather uneven rounds. When cold coat with "Dot" Chocolate
melted over hot water and cooled properly. These cakes are very easily
coated.

BAKER'S CHOCOLATE "DIVINITY"

[Illustration: BAKER'S CHOCOLATE "DIVINITY."]

1-1/2 cups of brown sugar,
1 cup of maple syrup,
1/2 a cup of glucose pure corn syrup,
1/2 a cup of water,
1/4 a teaspoonful of salt,
The whites of 2 eggs,
1 cup of nut meats, chopped fine,
2 squares of Baker's Chocolate, broken in pieces.

Let the sugar, syrup, glucose and water stand on the back of the range,
stirring occasionally, until the sugar is melted, then cover and let
boil five minutes. Remove the cover and let boil to soft crack, 287 deg. F.,
or, until when tested in water a ball that rattles in the cup will be
formed. Add the salt and chocolate and beat over the fire, until the
chocolate is melted, then pour in a fine stream onto the whites of eggs,
beaten dry, beating constantly meanwhile; add the nuts and pour into a
pan lined with waxed paper. In about fifteen minutes lift the candy from
the pan (by the ends of the paper left for the purpose) and cut it into
small oblongs or squares. The candy must be stirred constantly during
the last of the cooking. In cooking without a thermometer one is liable
to remove the candy from the fire too soon--if this happens, return, egg
whites and all, to the saucepan, set this into a dish of boiling water
and stir constantly until the mixture thickens, then pour into the pan
lined with paper. On no account let even a few drops of water boil into
the candy.

CHOCOLATE NOUGATINES

[Illustration: CHOCOLATE NOUGATINES.]

1 cup of granulated sugar,
1/2 a cup of glucose,
1/2 a cup of honey (strained),
Piece of paraffine size of a pea,
1/4 a cup of water,
1/4 a teaspoonful of salt,
The whites of 2 eggs, beaten dry,
1 cup of almond or English walnut meats, chopped fine,
1 teaspoonful of vanilla,
About 1/2 a pound of Baker's "Dot" Chocolate.

Put the sugar, glucose, honey, paraffine and water over the fire, stir
occasionally and let boil to the hard ball degree, about 248 deg. F. Add the
salt to the eggs before beating them, and gradually pour on part of the
syrup, beating constantly meanwhile with the egg beater; return the rest
of the syrup to the fire and let boil until it is brittle when tested in
cold water or to 290 deg. F. Then turn this gradually onto the eggs, beating
constantly meanwhile. Return the whole to the saucepan, set over the
fire on an asbestos mat and beat constantly until it becomes crisp when
tested in cold water. Pour into a buttered pan a little larger than an
ordinary bread pan and set aside to become cold. When cold cut into
pieces about an inch and a quarter long and three-eighths of an inch
wide and thick. Coat these with "Dot" Chocolate.

PLAIN CHOCOLATE CARAMELS

[Illustration: PLAIN CHOCOLATE CARAMELS.]

2-1/2 cups of sugar,
3/4 cup of glucose, (pure corn syrup),
1/2 a cup of butter,
1/8 a teaspoonful of cream of tartar,
2-1/2 cups of whole milk, (not skimmed),
2-1/2 squares of Baker's Chocolate,
1 teaspoonful of vanilla extract.

Put the sugar, glucose, butter, cream of tartar and one cup of the milk
over the fire, stir constantly, and when the mass has boiled a few
moments, gradually stir in the rest of the milk. Do not let the mixture
stop boiling while the milk is being added. Stir every few moments and
cook to 248 deg. F., or, until when tested in cold water, a hard ball may be
formed; add the chocolate and vanilla and beat them thoroughly through
the candy, then turn it into two bread pans. When nearly cold cut into
squares.

CHOCOLATE NUT CARAMELS

[Illustration: CHOCOLATE NUT CARAMELS.]

2 cups of granulated sugar,
1-1/2 cups of glucose (pure corn syrup),
2 cups of cream,
1 cup of butter,
3 or 4 squares of Baker's Chocolate,
1-1/2 cups of English walnut meats,
2 teaspoonfuls of vanilla extract.

Put the sugar, glucose, _one_ cup of the cream and the butter over the
fire; stir and cook until the mixture boils vigorously, then gradually
add the other cup of cream. Do not allow the mixture to stop boiling
while the cream is being added. Cook until the thermometer registers
250 deg. F., stirring gently--move the thermometer, to stir beneath
it--every four or five minutes. Without a thermometer boil until--when
tested by dropping a little in cold water--a hard ball may be formed in
the water. Remove from the fire, add the chocolate and nuts and beat
until the chocolate is melted; beat in the vanilla and turn into a
biscuit pan, nicely oiled or buttered, to make a sheet three-fourths an
inch thick. When nearly cold turn from the pan and cut into cubes.

RIBBON CARAMELS

[Illustration: RIBBON CARAMELS.]

CHOCOLATE LAYERS

1-1/4 cups of granulated sugar,
1/2 cup of glucose (pure corn syrup) _scant_ measure,
1/4 a cup of butter,
1/16 a teaspoonful of cream of tartar,
1-1/4 cups of rich milk,
1-1/4 squares of Baker's Premium Chocolate,
1 teaspoonful of vanilla extract.

WHITE LAYER

2/3 a cup of granulated sugar,
1/4 (scant) a cup of water,
1 cup, less one tablespoonful, of glucose (pure corn syrup),
1/3 a pound of dessicated cocoanut.

Put the sugar, glucose, butter, cream of tartar and the fourth a cup of
milk over the fire, stir until the mixture boils, then very gradually
stir in the rest of the milk. Let cook, stirring occasionally, to 248 deg.
F., or until, when tested in water or on a cold marble, a pretty firm
ball may be formed. Add the chocolate and vanilla, mix thoroughly and
turn into two well-buttered shallow pans. For the white layer, put the
sugar, water and glucose over the fire, stir until boiling, then add the
cocoanut and stir occasionally until a soft ball may be formed when a
little of the mixture is dropped upon a cold marble. Put this mixture
over the fire, to dissolve the sugar, but do not let it begin to boil
until the chocolate layers are turned into the pans. When the white
mixture is ready, turn enough of it onto one of the chocolate layers to
make a layer about one-third an inch thick. Have the other chocolate
layer cooled, by standing in cold water; remove it from the pan and
dispose above the cocoanut layer. Let stand until cold and firm, then
cut in cubes; wrap each cube in waxed paper.

FONDANT

4 cups of granulated sugar,
1-1/2 cups of cold water,
1/4 a teaspoonful of cream of tartar, or 3 drops of acetic acid.

Stir the sugar and water in a saucepan, set on the back part of the
range, until the sugar is melted, then draw the saucepan to a hotter
part of the range, and stir until the boiling point is reached; add the
cream of tartar or acid and, with the hand or a cloth wet repeatedly in
cold water, wash down the sides of the saucepan, to remove any grains of
sugar that have been thrown there. Cover the saucepan and let boil
rapidly three or four minutes. Remove the cover, set in the
thermometer--if one is to be used--and let cook very rapidly to 240 deg. F.,
or the soft ball degree. Wet the hand in cold water and with it dampen a
marble slab or a large platter, then without jarring the syrup turn it
onto the marble or platter. Do not scrape out the saucepan or allow the
last of the syrup to drip from it, as sugary portions will spoil the
fondant by making it grainy. When the syrup is cold, with a metal
scraper or a wooden spatula, turn the edges of the mass towards the
center, and continue turning the edges in until the mass begins to
thicken and grow white, then work it up into a ball, scraping all the
sugar from the marble onto the mass; knead slightly, then cover closely
with a heavy piece of cotton cloth wrung out of cold water. Let the
sugar stand for an hour or longer to ripen, then remove the damp cloth
and cut the mass into pieces; press these closely into a kitchen bowl,
cover with a cloth wrung out of water (this cloth must not touch the
fondant) and then with heavy paper. The fondant may be used the next
day, but is in better condition after several days, and may be kept
almost indefinitely, if the cloth covering it be wrung out of cold water
and replaced once in five or six days. Fondant may be used, white or
delicately colored with vegetable color-pastes or with chocolate, as
frosting for small cakes, or eclairs or for making candy "centers," to
be coated with chocolate or with some of the same fondant tinted and
flavored appropriately.

ALMOND CHOCOLATE CREAMS

CENTERS

1/4 a cup of blanched almonds, chopped fine,
1/2 a cup of fondant,
1/4 a teaspoonful of vanilla,
Confectioner's sugar for kneading and shaping.

CHOCOLATE COATING

About 1 cup of fondant,
2 squares of Baker's Chocolate,
1 teaspoonful of vanilla extract,
Few drops of water, as needed,
Halves of blanched almonds.

Mix the chopped almonds with the fondant and vanilla; add confectioner's
sugar, a little at a time, and knead the mass thoroughly, on a marble or
large platter; shape into a long roll, then cut into small pieces of the
same size. Shape these into balls a generous half inch in diameter and
leave them about an hour to harden on the outside. Put the fondant for
the coating and the chocolate (shaved or broken in pieces) in a double
boiler (with hot water in the lower receptacle); add the vanilla and the
water and heat until melted; take out the spoon and put in a dipping
fork (a wire fork costing about ten cents) beat the fondant, to keep it
from crusting and drop in a "center;" with the fork cover it with
fondant; put the fork under it and lift it out, scrape the fork lightly
on the edge of the dish, to remove superfluous candy, turn the fork over
and drop the bon-bon onto waxed paper. Make a design with the fork in
taking it from the candy. At once press half of a blanched almond on the
top of the candy, or the design made with the fork will suffice. If at
any time the coating be too thick, add a few drops of water. If any be
left over, use it to coat whole nuts or cherries.

[Illustration: ALMOND AND CHERRY CHOCOLATE CREAMS.]

CHERRY CHOCOLATE CREAMS

CENTERS

1/4 a cup of candied cherries, chopped fine,
1/2 a cup of fondant.

CHOCOLATE COATING

About one cup of fondant,
2 squares of Baker's Chocolate,
1 teaspoonful of vanilla extract,
Bits of cherry.

Prepare the centers and coat in the same manner as the almond creams.

CHOCOLATE PEPPERMINTS

[Illustration: CHOCOLATE PEPPERMINTS.]

Melt a little fondant and flavor it to taste with essence of peppermint;
leave the mixture white or tint very delicately with green or pink
color-paste. With a teaspoon drop the mixture onto waxed paper to make
rounds of the same size--about one inch and a quarter in diameter--let
these stand in a cool place about one hour. Put about a cup of fondant
in a double boiler, add two ounces of chocolate and a teaspoonful of
boiling water, then stir (over hot water) until the fondant and
chocolate are melted and evenly mixed together; then drop the
peppermints, one by one, into the chocolate mixture, and remove them
with the fork to a piece of oil cloth; let stand until the chocolate is
set, when they are ready to use.

FIG-AND-NUT CHOCOLATES

[Illustration: FIG AND NUT CHOCOLATES.]

5 figs,
3 or 4 tablespoonfuls of water or sherry wine,
1/2 a cup of English walnut meats,
Powdered sugar,
Fondant,
3 or 4 ounces of Baker's Chocolate,
1 teaspoonful of vanilla.

Remove the stem and hard place around the blossom end of the figs, and
let steam, with the water or wine, in a double boiler until softened,
then add the nuts and chop very fine. Add powdered sugar as is needed to
shape the mixture into balls. Melt the chocolate, using enough to secure
the shade of brown desired in the coating and add to the fondant with
the vanilla. Coat the fig-and-nut balls and drop them with the fork onto
a piece of oil cloth or waxed paper in the same manner as the cherry
bon-bons. These may be dipped in "Dot" Chocolate instead of fondant.

CHOCOLATE MARSHMALLOWS

[Illustration: CHOCOLATE MARSHMALLOWS.]

Cut the marshmallows in halves, and put them, one by one, cut side down,
in chocolate fondant (as prepared for almond and cherry chocolate
creams), melted over hot water and flavored to taste with vanilla. Beat
the chocolate with the fork, that it may not crust over, lift out the
marshmallow, turn it and, in removing the fork, leave its imprint in the
chocolate; sprinkle at once with a little fine-chopped pistachio nut
meat. To prepare the nuts, set them over the fire in tepid water to
cover, heat to the boiling point, drain, cover with cold water, then
take them up, one by one, and with the thumb and finger push the meat
from the skin.

MAPLE FONDANT ACORNS

[Illustration: MAPLE FONDANT ACORNS.]

2 cups of maple syrup,
1-3/4 cups of granulated sugar,
3/4 a cup of cold water,
Confectioner's sugar,
2 or more squares of Baker's Chocolate,
1 teaspoon of vanilla,
About 1/4 a cup of fine-chopped almonds, browned in the oven.

Make fondant of the syrup, granulated sugar and cold water, following
the directions given for fondant made of granulated sugar (cream of
tartar or other acid is not required in maple fondant). Work some of the
fondant, adding confectioner's sugar as needed, into cone shapes; let
these stand an hour or longer to harden upon the outside. Put a little
of the fondant in a dish over hot water; add Baker's Chocolate and
vanilla as desired and beat till the chocolate is evenly mixed through
the fondant, then dip the cones in the chocolate and set them on a piece
of oil cloth or waxed paper. When all are dipped, lift the first one
dipped from the paper and dip the base again in the chocolate, and then
in the chopped-and-browned almonds. Continue until all have been dipped.

CHOCOLATE ALMOND BARS

[Illustration: CHOCOLATE ALMOND BARS.]

1/2 a cup of sugar,
3/4 a cup of glucose,
1/2 a cup of water,
(1/4 an ounce of paraffine at discretion),
1/2 a cup of blanched almonds, chopped fine,
1/3 the recipe for fondant,
3 or 4 ozs. of Baker's Chocolate,
1 teaspoonful of vanilla.

Melt the sugar in the water and glucose and let boil to about 252 deg. F.,
or between a soft and a hard ball. Without the paraffine cook a little
higher than with it. Add the almonds and the vanilla, mix thoroughly and
turn onto a marble or platter over which powdered sugar has been sifted.
Turn out the candy in such a way that it will take a rectangular shape
on the marble. When cool enough score it in strips about an inch and a
quarter wide, and, as it grows cooler, lift the strips, one by one, to a
board and cut them in pieces half or three-quarters of an inch wide.
When cold, drop them, sugar side down, in chocolate fondant prepared for
"dipping." With the fork push them below the fondant, lift out, drain as
much as possible, and set onto oil cloth. These improve upon keeping.

ALMOND FONDANT STICKS

[Illustration: ALMOND FONDANT STICKS.]

2-1/2 cups of coffee A or granulated sugar,
1/4 a cup of glucose,
1/2 a cup of water,
1/4 a pound of almond paste,
1/4 a pound of Baker's Premium Chocolate,
1 teaspoonful of vanilla extract,
1/2 a pound of Baker's "Dot" Chocolate.

Put the sugar, glucose and water over the fire. Stir until the sugar is
dissolved. Wash down the sides of the kettle as in making fondant. Let
boil to the soft ball degree or to 238 deg. F. Add the almond paste, cut
into small, thin pieces, let boil up vigorously, then turn onto a damp
marble. When nearly cold turn to a cream with a wooden spatula. It will
take considerable time to turn this mixture to fondant. Cover and let
stand half an hour. Add the Baker's Premium Chocolate, melted over hot
water, and knead it in thoroughly. Add at the same time the vanilla. The
chocolate must be added warm. At once cut off a portion of the fondant
and knead it into a round ball; then roll it lightly under the fingers
into a long strip the shape and size of a lead pencil; form as many of
these strips as desired; cut the strips into two-inch lengths and let
stand to become firm. Have ready the "Dot" Chocolate melted over hot
water and in this coat the prepared sticks leaving the surface a little
rough.

ALMOND FONDANT BALLS

[Illustration: ALMOND FONDANT BALLS.]

Roll part of the almond fondant into small balls. Some of the "Dot"
Chocolate will be left after dipping the almond chocolate sticks. Remelt
this over hot water, and in it coat the balls lightly. As each ball is
coated with the chocolate drop it onto a plate of chopped pistachio nut
meats or of chopped cocoanut (fresh or dessicated). With a spoon
sprinkle the chopped material over the balls.

WALNUT CREAM-CHOCOLATES

[Illustration: WALNUT CREAM CHOCOLATES.]

2-1/2 cups of granulated sugar,
1/2 a cup of condensed milk,
1/2 a cup of water,
3 or 4 tablespoonfuls of thick caramel syrup,
A little water,
1 teaspoonful of vanilla,
1/2 a pound of Baker's "Dot" Chocolate.

Put the sugar, condensed milk and water over the fire to boil, stir
gently but often, and let cook to the soft ball stage, or to 238 deg.F. Pour
on a damp marble and let stand undisturbed until cold; turn to a cream,
then gather into a compact mass; cover with a bowl and let stand for
thirty minutes; then knead the cream; put it into a double boiler; add
the caramel syrup and the vanilla; stir constantly while the mixture
becomes warm and thin; add a tablespoonful or two of water, if
necessary, and drop the cream mixture into impressions made in
cornstarch. Use two teaspoons to drop the cream. When the candy is cold,
pick it from the starch. With a small brush remove the starch that
sticks to the candy shapes. Coat each piece with "Dot" Chocolate. As
each piece is coated and dropped onto the oil cloth, set half an English
walnut meat upon the top.

TO MOLD CANDY IN STARCH IMPRESSIONS

Many candies, especially such as are of some variety of fondant, are
thin when warm and solidify on the outside when cold, so that they may
be "dipped" or coated with chocolate. To shape candy of this sort, fill
a low pan with cornstarch, making it smooth upon the top. Have ready
molds made of plaster paris, glued to a thin strip of wood, press these
into the cornstarch; lift from the starch and repeat the impressions as
many times as the space allows. If molds are not available a thimble,
round piece of wood, or the stopper of an oil or vinegar cruet will
answer the purpose, though the impressions must be made one at a time.

CHOCOLATE BUTTER CREAMS

[Illustration: CHOCOLATE BUTTER CREAMS.]

2-1/2 cups of sugar,
1/2 a cup of water,
1/4 a cup of glucose,
1/4 a cup of butter,
2-1/2 ozs of Baker's Premium Chocolate,
2 teaspoonfuls of vanilla,
1/2 a pound of Baker's "Dot" Chocolate.

Put the sugar, water, glucose and butter over the fire; stir until the
sugar is melted, then cook to the soft ball degree, or 236 deg. F.; pour on
a damp marble and leave until cold; then pour on the Premium Chocolate,
melted over hot water, and with a spatula turn to a cream. This process
is longer than with the ordinary fondant. Cover the chocolate fondant
with a bowl and let stand for thirty minutes; knead well and set over
the fire in a double boiler; add the vanilla and stir until melted. The
mixture is now ready to be dropped into small impressions in starch;
when cold and brushed free of starch dip in "Dot" Chocolate. When
dropping the chocolate mixture into the starch it should be just soft
enough to run level on the top. If too soft it will not hold its shape
in coating.

FONDANT FOR SOFT CHOCOLATE CREAMS

2-1/2 cups of sugar,
1/3 a cup of glucose (pure corn syrup),
1 cup of water.

Put the sugar, glucose and water over the fire and stir until boiling,
then wash down the sides of the saucepan, cover and finish cooking as in
making ordinary fondant. Let cook to 238 deg. F. Turn the syrup onto a damp
marble or platter and _before it becomes cold_ turn to a cream with a
wooden spatula. When the fondant begins to stiffen, scrape at once into
a bowl and cover with a damp cloth, but do not let the cloth touch the
fondant. Use this fondant in the following recipes.

ROSE CHOCOLATE CREAMS

Fondant,
Damask rose color-paste,
1/2 to 1 whole teaspoonful of rose extract,
1/2 a pound of Baker's "Dot" Chocolate.

Put a part or the whole of the fondant into a double boiler over boiling
water. With the point of a toothpick take up a little of the color-paste
and add to the fondant; add the extract and stir until the mixture is
hot, thin and evenly tinted. With two teaspoons drop the mixture into
impressions made in starch; it should be hot and thin enough to run
level on top. When the shapes are cold, remove from the starch, brush
carefully and coat with "Dot" Chocolate.

[Illustration: ROSE AND PISTACHIO CHOCOLATE CREAMS.]

PISTACHIO CHOCOLATE CREAMS

Fondant,
Green color-paste,
1 teaspoonful of vanilla extract,
1/8 a teaspoonful of almond extract,
Pistachio nuts in slices and halves,
1/2 a pound of Baker's "Dot" Chocolate.

Using green color-paste, vanilla and almond extract mold the fondant in
long shapes. Put a bit of nut in each impression, before filling it with
fondant. When firm coat with "Dot" Chocolate and set half a pistachio
nut on top.

SURPRISE CHOCOLATE CREAMS

[Illustration: SURPRISE CHOCOLATE CREAMS.]

Fondant,
Candied or Maraschino cherries,
Flavoring of almond or vanilla,
Chopped peanuts,
1/2 a pound of Baker's "Dot" Chocolate.

Melt the fondant over hot water and add the flavoring. Put a bit of
cherry in the bottom of each starch impression, then turn in the melted
fondant, to fill the impressions and have them level on the top. Let the
chocolate, broken in bits, be melted over warm water, then add as many
chopped peanuts as can be well stirred into it; let cool to about 80 deg. F.
and in it drop the creams, one at a time; as coated dispose them on
table oil cloth or waxed paper.

CHOCOLATE PEANUT BRITTLE

[Illustration: CHOCOLATE PEANUT BRITTLE.]

1-1/2 cups of sugar,
2/3 a cup of water,
1/2 a cup of glucose (pure corn syrup),
2 level tablespoonfuls of butter,
1/2 a pound of _raw_ shelled peanuts,
1 teaspoonful of vanilla extract,
1 level teaspoonful of soda,
1 tablespoonful of cold water,
1/2 a pound or more of Baker's "Dot" Chocolate.

Put the sugar, water and glucose over the fire; stir till the sugar is
dissolved; wash down the sides of the saucepan with a cloth or the
fingers dipped in cold water, cover and let boil three or four minutes,
then uncover and let cook to 275 deg. F. (when a little is cooled and chewed
it clings but does not stick to the teeth) add the butter and peanuts
and _stir constantly_ until the peanuts are nicely browned (or are of
the color of well roasted peanuts). Dissolve the soda in the cold water,
add the vanilla and the soda and stir vigorously. When the candy is
through foaming, turn it onto a warm and well-oiled marble or platter.
As soon as it has cooled a little on the edges, take hold of it at the
edge and pull out as thin as possible. Loosen it from the receptacle at
the center by running a spatula under it, then turn the whole sheet
upside down, and again pull as thin as possible. Break into small pieces
and when cold coat with "Dot" Chocolate prepared as in previous recipes.
Half of a roasted peanut may be set upon each piece as coated. Note that
the peanuts used in the brittle are raw. The small Spanish peanuts are
the best for this purpose. After the peanuts are shelled, cover them
with boiling water, let boil up once, then skim out and push off the
skin, when they are ready to use.

CHOCOLATE POP CORN BALLS

[Illustration: CHOCOLATE POP CORN BALLS.]

1-1/2 cups of sugar,
1/3 a cup of glucose,
2/3 a cup of water,
1/3 a cup of molasses,
3 tablespoonfuls of butter,
3 squares of Baker's Premium Chocolate,
1 teaspoonful of vanilla extract,
About 4 quarts of popped corn, well salted.

Set the sugar, glucose and water over the fire, stir until the sugar is
melted, then wash down the sides of the saucepan, cover and let boil
three or four minutes, then remove the cover and let cook without
stirring to the hard ball degree; add the molasses and butter and stir
constantly until brittle in cold water; remove from the fire and, as
soon as the bubbling ceases, add the chocolate, melted over hot water,
and the vanilla; stir, to mix the chocolate evenly through the candy,
then pour onto the popped corn, mixing the two together meanwhile. With
buttered hands lightly roll the mixture into small balls. Press the
mixture together only just enough to hold it in shape. Discard all the
hard kernels in the corn. Have the corn warm and in a warm bowl.

CHOCOLATE MOLASSES KISSES

[Illustration: CHOCOLATE MOLASSES KISSES.]

2 cups of coffee A sugar,
1/3 a cup of glucose, (pure corn syrup),
2/3 a cup of water,
1 cup of molasses,
2 tablespoonfuls of butter,
1/4 a teaspoonful of salt,
4 ounces of Baker's Premium Chocolate,
1 tablespoonful of vanilla extract, or
1 teaspoonful of essence of peppermint.

Put all the ingredients, save the salt, chocolate and flavoring, over
the fire; let boil rapidly to 260 deg.F., or until brittle when tested in
cold water. During the last of the cooking the candy must be stirred
constantly. Pour onto an oiled platter or marble; pour the chocolate,
melted over hot water, above the candy; as the candy cools on the edges,
with a spatula or the fingers, turn the edges towards the center;
continue this until the candy is cold enough to pull; pull over a hook
until cold; add the flavoring, a little at a time, during the pulling,
cut in short lengths and wrap in waxed paper.

WALTER BAKER & CO., Ltd.

ESTABLISHED 1780

This House has grown to be the largest of its kind in the world and it
has achieved that result by always maintaining the highest standard in
the quality of its cocoa and chocolate preparations and selling them at
the lowest price for which unadulterated articles of high grade can be
put upon the market. Under cover of a similarity in name, trade-mark,
label or wrapper, a number of unscrupulous concerns have, within recent
years, made attempts to get possession of the great market won by this
House, by trading on its good name--selling to unsuspecting consumers
goods of distinctly inferior quality by representing them to be the
products of the genuine "Baker's." The quantity of goods sold in this
way is not so much of an injury to us as the discredit cast upon our
manufactures by leading some consumers to believe that these fraudulent
articles are of our manufacture and that we have lowered the high
standard maintained for so many years. It is difficult to bring the
fraud home to all consumers, as those who are making use of it seek
out-of-the-way places where deception will the more easily pass.

We have letters from housekeepers who have used the genuine Baker goods
for years, expressing their indignation at the attempts of unscrupulous
dealers to foist upon them inferior and adulterated articles by
fraudulently representing them to be of our manufacture.

Statements in the press and in the reports of the Pure Food
Commissioners show that there are on the market at this time many cocoas
and chocolates which have been treated with adulterants, more or less
injurious to health, for the purpose of cheapening the cost and giving a
fictitious appearance of richness and strength. The safest course for
consumers, therefore, is to buy goods bearing the name and trade-mark of
a well-known and reputable manufacturer, and to make sure by a careful
examination that they are getting what they order.

Our Cocoa and Chocolate Preparations are ABSOLUTELY PURE--free
from coloring matter, chemical solvents, or adulterants of any
kind, and are therefore in full conformity to the requirements of
all National and State Pure Food Laws.

We have behind us one hundred and twenty-nine years of successful
manufacture, and fifty-two highest awards from the great industrial
exhibitions in Europe and America.

We ask the cooperation of all consumers who want to get what they order
and what they pay for to help us--as much in their own interest as
ours--in checking these frauds.

WALTER BAKER & CO., Ltd.

Our registered guarantee under National Pure Food Laws is Serial No.
90.

WALTER BAKER & Co.'s Cocoa and Chocolate Preparations

* * * * *

BAKER'S BREAKFAST COCOA

[Illustration: Walker Baker & Co's. BREAKFAST COCOA
FAC-SIMILE OF 1/2 LB. CAN.]

In 1-5 lb., 1-4 lb., 1-2 lb., 1 lb. and 5 lb. tins

This admirable preparation is made from selected cocoa, from which the
excess of oil has been removed. It is _absolutely pure_, and it is
_soluble_. It has _more than three times the strength_ of cocoa mixed
with starch, arrowroot or sugar, and is, therefore, far more economical,
_costing less than one cent a cup_. It is delicious, nourishing,
strengthening, _easily digested_, and admirably adapted for invalids as
well as for persons in health.

_No alkalies or other chemicals or dyes are used in its preparation._

Trade-Mark on every package

* * * * *

BAKER'S CHOCOLATE

[Illustration: WALTER BAKER & CO'S. PREMIUM NO. 1
FAC-SIMILE OF 1/2 LB. PACKAGE.]

In 1-4 and 1-2 lb. cakes, 1 lb. packages, blue wrapper, yellow label

It is the pure product of carefully selected cocoa beans, to which
nothing has been added and from which nothing has been taken away.
Unequalled for smoothness, delicacy and natural flavor. Celebrated for
more than a century as a nutritious, delicious and flesh-forming
beverage. The high reputation and constantly increasing sales of this
article have led to imitations on a very extensive scale. To distinguish
their product from these imitations Walter Baker & Co., Ltd., have
enclosed their cakes and pound packages in a new envelope or case of
stiff paper, different from any other package. The color of the case is
the same shade of deep blue heretofore used on the Baker packages, and
no change has been made in the color (yellow) and design of the label.
On the outside of the case, the name of the manufacturer is prominently
printed in white letters. On the back of every package a colored
lithograph of the trade-mark, "La Belle Chocolatiere" sometimes called
the Chocolate Girl, is printed. Vigorous proceedings will be taken
against anyone imitating the package.

Trade-mark on every package

* * * * *

BAKER'S VANILLA CHOCOLATE

In 1-2 lb. and 1-6 lb. cakes and 5c and 10c packages,

is guaranteed to consist solely of choice cocoa and sugar, flavored with
pure vanilla beans. Particular care is taken in its preparation, and a
trial will convince one that it is really a delicious article for eating
or drinking. It is the best sweet chocolate in the market. Used at
receptions and evening parties in place of tea or coffee. The small
cakes form the most convenient, palatable and healthful article of food
that can be carried by bicyclists, tourists and students.

Trade-mark on every package

* * * * *

CARACAS CHOCOLATE

[Illustration: WALTER BAKER & CO'S. CARACAS SWEET CHOCOLATE
FAC-SIMILE 1/4 LB. PACKAGE.]

In 1-8 and 1-4 lb. packages

A delicious article. Good to eat and good to drink. It is one of the
finest and most popular sweet chocolates on the market, and has a
constantly increasing sale in all parts of the country. If you do not
find it at your grocer's, we will send a quarter-pound cake by mail,
prepaid, on receipt of 10 cents in stamps or money.

Trade-mark on every package

* * * * *

CENTURY CHOCOLATE

In 1-4 lb. packages

A fine vanilla chocolate for eating or drinking. Put up in very artistic
wrappers.

Trade-mark on every package

* * * * *

AUTO-SWEET CHOCOLATE

In 1-6 lb. packages

A fine eating chocolate, enclosed in an attractive wrapper with an
embossed representation of an automobile in colors.

Trade-mark on every package

* * * * *

GERMAN SWEET CHOCOLATE

[Illustration: WALTER BAKER & CO'S. GERMAN SWEET CHOCOLATE
FAC-SIMILE 1/4 LB. PACKAGE.]

In 1-4 lb. and 1-8 lb. packages

is one of the most popular sweet chocolates sold anywhere. It is
palatable, nutritious and healthful and is a great favorite with
children.

_Beware of imitations. The genuine is stamped: "S. German, Dorchester,
Mass."_

Trade-mark (La Belle Chocolatiere) on every package

* * * * *

DOT CHOCOLATE

In 1-2 lb. cakes; 12 lb. boxes

A high grade chocolate specially prepared for home-made candies, and for
sportsmen's use. If you do not find it at your grocer's write to us and
we will put you in the way of getting it.

In "The Way of the Woods--A Manual for Sportsmen" Edward Breck, the
author, says:

"Chocolate is now regarded as a very high-class food on account of its
nutritive qualities. * * * * * A half cake will keep a man's strength up
for a day without any other food. I never strike off from camp by myself
without a piece of chocolate in my pocket. Do not, however, have
anything to do with the mawkishly sweet chocolates of the candy shops or
the imported milk chocolate, which are not suited for the purpose. We
have something better here in America in Walter Baker & Co.'s "Dot"
brand, which is slightly sweetened."

* * * * *

CRACKED COCOA OR COCOA NIBS

In 1-2 lb. and 1 lb. packages, and in 6 lb. and 10 lb. bags

This is the freshly roasted bean cracked into small pieces. It contains
no admixture, and presents the full flavor of the cocoa-bean in all its
natural fragrance and purity. When properly prepared, it is one of the
most economical drinks. Dr. Lankester says cocoa contains as much
flesh-forming matter as beef.

Trade-mark on every package

* * * * *

SOLUBLE COCOA

This is a preparation for the special use of druggists and others in
making hot or cold soda. It forms the basis for a delicious, refreshing,
nourishing and strengthening drink.

It is perfectly soluble. It is absolutely pure. It is easily made. It
possesses the full strength and natural flavor of the cocoa-bean. No
chemicals are used in its preparation.

_The directions for making one gallon of syrup are as follows:_

8 ounces of soluble cocoa,
8-1/2 pounds of white sugar,
2-1/2 quarts of water.

Thoroughly dissolve the cocoa in hot water, then add the sugar, and heat
until the mixture boils. Strain while hot. After it has become cool,
sugar may be added if desired.

The Trade is supplied with 1, 4 or 10 lb. decorated canisters.

Trade-mark on every package

* * * * *

CHOCOLATE FOR CONFECTIONERS' USE

_Liquid Chocolates_--plain, sweet, light, medium and dark.

_Soluble Cocoa_--for hot or cold soda.

_Absolutely Pure--free from coloring matter, chemical solvents, or
adulterants of any kind, and therefore in full conformity to the
requirements of all National and State Pure Food Laws._

* * * * *

VANILLA TABLETS

These are small pieces of chocolate, made from the finest beans, and
done up in fancy foil. The packages are tied with colored ribbons, and
are very attractive in form and delicious in substance. They are much
used for desserts and collations, and at picnics and entertainments for
young people. They are strongly recommended by physicians as a healthy
and nutritious confection for children.

Trade-mark on every package

* * * * *

COCOA-BUTTER

In 1-2 lb. and 1-5 lb. cakes, and in metal boxes for toilet uses

One-half the weight of the cocoa-bean consists of a fat called
"cocoa-butter," from its resemblance to ordinary butter. It is
considered of great value as a nutritious, strengthening tonic, being
preferred to cod-liver oil and other nauseous fats so often used in
pulmonary complaints. As a soothing application to chapped hands and
lips, and all irritated surfaces, cocoa-butter has no equal, making the
skin remarkably soft and smooth. Many who have used it say they would
not for any consideration be without it. It is almost a necessary
article for every household.

Trade-mark on every package

* * * * *

COCOA-SHELLS

In 1 lb. and 1-2 lb. packages

Cocoa-shells are the thin outer covering of the beans. They have a
flavor similar to but milder than cocoa. Their very low price places
them within the reach of all; and as furnishing a pleasant and healthy
drink, they are considered superior to tea and coffee.

Packed _only_ in 1 lb. and 1/2 lb. papers, with our label and name on
them.

Trade-mark on every package

* * * * *

CACAO DES AZTEQUES

In boxes, 6 lbs. each; 1-2 lb. bottles

A compound formerly known as _Racabout des Arabes_; a most nutritious
preparation; indispensable as an article of diet for children,
convalescents, ladies, and delicate or aged persons. It is composed of
the best nutritive and restoring substances, suitable for the most
delicate system. It is now a _favorite breakfast beverage for ladies and
young persons_, to whom it gives freshness and _embonpoint_. It has
solved the problem of medicine by imparting something which is easily
digestible and at the same time _free from the exciting qualities_ of
coffee and tea, thus making it especially desirable for nervous persons
or those afflicted with weak stomachs.

It has a very agreeable flavor, is easily prepared, and has received the
_commendation of eminent physicians_ as being the best article known for
convalescents and all persons desiring a _light, digestible, nourishing
and strengthening food_.

[Illustration]

INDEX TO RECIPES

MISS PARLOA'S:

Plain Chocolate (For Drinking)
Chocolate, Vienna Style
Breakfast Cocoa
Chocolate Layer Cake
" Cake
" Marble Cake
" Glace Cake
" Glace
" Biscuit
" Wafers
Cinderella Cakes
Chocolate Eclairs
" Cookies
" Gingerbread
Vanilla Icing
Chocolate Icing
" Profiteroles
" Ice-cream
" Cream Pies
" Mousse
" Charlotte
" Bavarian Cream
" Cream
" Blanc-mange
" Cream Renversee
Baked Chocolate Custard
Chocolate Souffle
" Pudding
" Meringue Pudding
Milton Pudding
Snow Pudding
Chocolate Sauce
" Candy
Cream Chocolate Caramels
Sugar " "
Chocolate Creams, No. 1
" " No. 2
" Cones
Genesee Bonbons
Chocolate Syrup
Refreshing Drinks for Summer

* * * * *

MISS BURR'S:

Cracked Cocoa
For Three Gallons Breakfast Cocoa
Vanilla Chocolate with Whipped Cream
Chocolate Cream Pie
" Filling
Meringue
Cocoa Sticks
" Frosting
" Sauce
" Cake
" Meringue Pudding
Chocolate Almonds
" Coatings
Hot Chocolate Sauce
Cocoa Sponge Cake
Chocolate Frosting
" Cake; or, Devil's Food
" Ice-cream
" Whip
Cocoa Marble Cake
Chocolate Marble Cake
" Jelly
Cottage Pudding
Vanilla Sauce
Cocoanut Souffle
Chocolate Sauce
Cocoa Biscuit
" Fudge

* * * * *

MISS ROBINSON'S:

Plain Chocolate 1 quart
Cocoa Sponge Cake
" Marble "
" Doughnuts
" Buns

* * * * *

MRS. RORER'S:

Chocolate Cake

* * * * *

MRS. LINCOLN'S:

Chocolate Caramels

* * * * *

MISS FARMER'S:

Chocolate Nougat Cake
" Cream Candy

* * * * *

MRS. ARMSTRONG'S:

Chocolate Pudding
" Charlotte
Chocolate Jelly with Crystallized Green Gages

* * * * *

MRS. BEDFORD'S:

Chocolate Crullers
Hot Cocoa Sauce for Ice-cream
Chocolate Macaroons

* * * * *

MRS. EWING'S:

Creamy Cocoa
" Chocolate

* * * * *

MRS. HILL'S:

Cocoa Frappe
Chocolate Puffs

* * * * *

MRS. SALZBACHER'S:

Chocolate Hearts

* * * * *

Cocoa Charlotte
Chocolate Fudge with Fruit
" Macaroons

* * * * *

Petits Four
Potato Cake
Spanish Chocolate Cake

* * * * *

MRS. HILL'S CANDY RECIPES:

Peppermints, Chocolate Mints, etc.
Chocolate Caramel Walnuts
"Dot" Chocolate Coatings
Chocolate Dipped Peppermints
Ginger, Cherry, Apricot and Nut Chocolates
Chocolate Peanut Clusters
" Coated Almonds
" Dipped Parisian Sweets
Stuffed Dates, Chocolate Dipped
Chocolate Oysterettes
Turkish Paste with French Fruit
Chocolate Pecan Pralines
Vassar Fudge
Smith College Fudge
Wellesley Marshmallow Fudge
Double Fudge
Marbled Fudge
Fudge Hearts or Rounds
Marshmallow Fudge
Chocolate Dipped Fruit Fudge
Chocolate Cocoanut Cakes
Baker's Chocolate "Divinity"
Chocolate Nougatines
Plain Chocolate Caramels
Chocolate Nut Caramels
Ribbon Caramels
Fondant
Almond Chocolate Creams
Cherry Chocolate Creams
Chocolate Peppermints
Fig and Nut Chocolates
Chocolate Marshmallows
Maple Fondant Acorns
Chocolate Almond Bars
Almond Fondant Sticks
Almond Fondant Balls
Walnut Cream Chocolates
To Mold Candy for Dipping
Chocolate Butter Creams
Fondant for Soft Chocolate Creams
Rose Chocolate Creams
Pistachio Chocolate Creams
Surprise Chocolate Creams
Chocolate Peanut Brittle
Chocolate Pop Corn Balls
Chocolate Molasses Kisses

* * * * *

[Illustration]

NO OTHER FOOD PRODUCT HAS A LIKE RECORD.

[Illustration]

WALTER BAKER & CO. LTD.

ESTABLISHED 1780.

52 HIGHEST AWARDS.

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