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Beggars Bush by Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher

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_Hig._ We stand here, for an Epilogue;
Ladies, your bounties first; the rest will follow;
For womens favours are a leading alms,
If you be pleas'd look cheerly, throw your eyes
Out at your masks.

_Prig._ And let your beauties sparkle.

_Hig._ So may you ne'er want dressings, Jewels, gowns
Still i' the fashion.

_Prig._ Nor the men you love,
Wealth nor discourse to please you.

_Hig._ May you Gentlemen,
Never want good fresh suits nor liberty.

_Prig._ May every Merchant here see safe his ventures.

_Hig._ And every honest Citizen his debts in.

_Prig._ The Lawyers again good Clyents.

_Hig._ And the Clyents good Counsel.

_Prig._ All the Gamesters here good fortune.

_Hig._ The Drunkards too good wine.

_Prig._ The eaters meat
Fit for their tastes and palats.

_Hig._ The good wives kind Husbands.

_Prig._ The young maids choyce of Sutors.

_Hig._ The Midwives merry hearts.

_Prig._ And all good cheer.

_Hig._ As you are kind unto us and our Bush,
We are the Beggars and your daily Beadsmen,
And have your mony, but the Alms we ask
And live by, is your Grace, give that, and then
We'l boldly say our word is, _Come again_.


p. 194,
l. 1. A] God e'n then.
l. 28. C _misprints_] secrely.
l. 30. A and B] tipple in wine.

p. 195,
l. 3. A _omits_] ye.
l. 11. A _repeats_] Ile swinge you.
l. 15. A] utter, will all.
l. 35. A and B] any devotions.

p. 196,
l. 2. B] with torch.
l. 18. A _misprints_] _Short_ for _Wid_.

p. 197,
l. 2. A] and a vertuous.
l. 3. A] hay him up.
l. 13. B] a your.

p. 198,
l. 2. A] take.
l. 3. A _omits_] a.
l. 25. A] No armes, no armes.
l. 27. A and B] hang 'tis.
l. 33. A _omits_] a.

p. 199,
l. 5. B] An here.
l. 10. A] his Nleson.
l. 37. A _omits_] have.

p. 200,
l. 3. A] pound.
l. 10. A _omits_] you.
l. 20. B] such knell.
ll 23 and 24. A] to raise.

p. 201,
l. 5. A] regements.
l. 30. A and B] yond.

p. 202,
l. 2. B] sees yon.
l. 3. A and B] thy Torch.
l. 13. A] hay, but.
l. 26. A and B] shall a Lady.

p. 203,
l. 10. A] their recompences.
l. 20. A and B _add_] Exeunt.

p. 204,
l. 2. B _omits_] us.
l. 4. A and B] this 'tis to.
l. 12. A _omits_] put.
l. 28. A and B] too.

p. 205,
l. 10 A] they are. B] they 'are.

p. 207,
l. 21. A and B _add_] Finis.


(A) The First Folio, 1647.

(B) The | Beggars | Bush. | Written by | Francis Beaumont, And John
Fletcher, Gentlemen. | [wood-cut] London, | Printed for Humphrey Robinson,
and Anne Mosely, | at the three Pigeons, and at the Princes Arms | in
Saint Pauls Church-yard, 1661.

Another issue of the above, dated 1661, has a fresh title-page and bears
the following notice:--'You may speedily expect those other Playes, which
| Kirkman, and his Hawkers have deceived the | buyers withall, selling
them at treble the value, that | this and the rest will be sold for, which
are the | onely Originall and corrected copies, as they | were first
purchased by us at no mean | rate, and since printed by us.'

B prints the Prologue and Epilogue to _The Captaine_ as though they
belonged to _Beggars Bush_, apparently treating the last page of _The
Captain_ in A as though it were the first page of _Beggars Bush_.

(C) The Second Folio.

p. 208. A _omits_], A Comedy ... The Scene Flanders.
ll. 2-4. B] Dramatis Personae. _These are as follows_:

Drammatis Personae.

_Goswin_ a young Merchant of _Bruges_,
viz. _Florez_ the right Earl of _Flanders_
_Woolfort_, Usurper of the Earldome,
_Clause_ King of Beggars,
viz. _Gerrard_ Father to _Florez_,
_Hubert_ disguised like a Huntsman, A Lord of Flaunders
_Hemskirk_, A Favourite of the Usurper.
Lord _Arnold_)
Lord _Costin_) Two Lords of _Flaunders_ disguis'd like Beggars
_Jaqueline_, Daughter to _Gerrard_.
_Bertha_, Heir of Brabant.
_Van-dunck_ Burgomaster of _Bruges_
Merchants, Saylor, &c.
_Higgen, Ferret, Prig, Snap_, and others, Beggars.
Young Merchants, and others, Guests at _Goswins_ Wedding.
_Margaret_, Wife to _Vandunck_
Boy with a Song.
The Scene BRUGES.
p. 209,
ll. 6 and 27. A and B] Countess.
l. 34. C _misprints_] houour.

p. 210,
l. 9. B _omits_] that.
l. 34. A] On mine.

p. 211,
l. 37. A and B] loyalty so suspected.

p. 212,
l. 15. A and B] answers.
l. 22. C _misprints_] their.

p. 214,
l. 2. A and B for _Goswin read_] _Florez_ and so throughout the play.

p. 215,
l. 30. A _and some copies of_ B] Or the dear.

p. 216,
l. 10. A and B] him only.
l. 25. A and B] Suck him.
l. 35. A and B] near my price.

p. 217,
l. 6. C _misprints_] farily.

p. 218,
l. 18. A and B] Quitchineel.

p. 219,
l. 3. A and B] God a mercy.
l. 15. A here and often later prints _Ger._ for _Clau._

p. 221,
l. 18. A and B _omit_] I.
l. 27. A and B] his call.
l. 30. A and B] To whom that.
l. 36. B] this man.

p. 222,
l. 20. B] Thou that art.

p. 223,
l. 12. A and B] all hem'd out.
l. 34. A and B] bene whids.

p. 224,
l. 3. A and B] their true pass-ports.
l. 23. A and B] _Offices_.
l. 24. A and B] _penny ceast_.
l. 27. B _omits_] _and_.
l. 28. A and B _omit_] comes.

p. 225,
l. 4. A and B] Ger.
l. 25. A and B _omit_] _Exit_.
l. 33. A _omits_] is.
B] 'Tis.

p. 226,
l. 4. A and B] she says.
l. 9. A and B] O the.
l. 24. A] skuys.
B] scuce.

p. 227,
ll. 7 and 18. A and B _omit_] Exit.
l. 9. B] ruine.
l. 26. A and B] against.
l. 35. A and B] _Meg._ some wine.

p. 228,
l. 15. A and B] _Mage_, fill out.
l. 32. A _by error prints this line twice_.
l. 35. C _misprints_] with.

p. 229,
l. 17. B] to admit.

p. 230,
l. 6. A] makes this trade.
l. 18. A and B] rate's at more.
l. 21. C _misprints_] Hab.

p. 231,
l. 10. B] these.
l. 13. A and B] your errour.
l. 25. B _omits_] doth.

p. 232,
l. 3. A and B _omit_] _Strikes him_.
ll. 5 and 6. A and B _omit_] _He gets ... the head_.
l. 7. A and B here and later often print _Ber._ for _Ger._
l. 39. B _omits_] you.

p. 233,
l. 4. A and B _omit_] _and_ Ger.

p. 234,
l. 18. A and B] Start beer.
l. 33. A] to high, etc.

p. 235,
l. 3. B] _any branches_.
l. 28. B] _To make up_.

p. 236,
A and B _omit the whole of Song_.
l. 21. B _omits_] There sweet Sow-Gelder.

p. 238,
l. 17. B] Come away fair Maids, put your ware away.
l. 18. B _omits the entire line_.
l. 24. B _omits the fourth_ fill.

p. 239,
l. 9. A and B] o' their Prestoes.
l. 35. C] commands.

p. 240,
l. 4. B _omits_] a.

p. 241,
l. 7. A and B] is toss'd too.
l. 18. B] Aa's.

p. 242,
l. 12. B] thy honour.

p. 243,
l. 7. A and B _omit_] Sir, I must not leave ye.
l. 8. A and B] I must not.
l. 25. A and B] That's all.

p. 244,
l. 1. B] men that have.
l. 3. A and B _omit_] on.
l. 25. A and B] as they please.

p. 246,
l. 32. A and B _omit_] _Beat one another_.

p. 248,
l. 23. A] Reimald.
ll. 35 and 38. A and B _omit_] aside.

p. 249,
l. 1. A and B _omit_] with.
l. 15. A] I have.
l. 38. A and B, _in 2 lines_] Yes, venson, | Or if I want-- |

p. 250,
l. 1. A and B] shall learn.
l. 4. A and B] Yes if I.
l. 5. A and B arrange the rest of the Scene thus]

_Ger_. Now sweare him.

_Hig_. You are welcom Brother.

_All_. Welcom, welcom, welcom, but who shall have the keeping
Of this fellow?

_Hub_. Thank ye friends,
And I beseech ye, if you dare but trust me;
For if I have kept wilde doggs and beastes for wonder,
And made 'em tame too: give into my custody
This roaring rascal I shall hamper him,
With all his knacks and knaveryes, and I feare me
Discover yet a further villany in him;
O he smells ranck 'oth rascall.

_Ger_. Take him to thee,
But if he scape--

_Hub_. Let me be ev'n hang'd for him,
Roome Sir, I'le tye ye to my leash.

_Hem_. Away Rascall.

_Hub_. Be not so stubborne: I shall swindge ye soundly,
And ye play tricks with me.

_Ger_. Now sweare him.

_Hig_. I crowne thy nab, with a gag of benbouse,
And stall thee by the salmon into the clowes,
To mand on the pad, and strike all the cheates;
To mill from the Ruffmans, commision and slates,
Twang dell's, i'the stiromell, and let the Quire Cuffin:
And Herman Beck strine, and trine to the Ruffin.

_Ger_. Now interpret this unto him.

_Hig_. I poure on thy pate a pot of good ale,
And by the Rogues oth a Rogue thee install:
To beg on the way, to rob all thou meetes;
To steale from the hedge, both the shirt and the sheets:
And lye with thy wench in the straw till she twang,
Let the Constable, Justice, and Divell go hang.

_Ger_. So, now come in,
But ever have an eye Sir, to your prisoner.

_Hub_. He must blinde both mine eyes, if he get from me.

_Ger_. Go, get some victualls, and some drink, some good drink
For this day weele keep holly to good fortune,
Come and be frollick with us.

_Hig_. Ye are a stanger. _Exeunt_.

p. 250,
l. 14. C] o' th'.

p. 251,
ll. 12 and 37 and often elsewhere. A and B] _Jertred_.

p. 252,
l. 16. A and B] what ayle ye.
l. 35. A] Despise me.

p. 253,
l. 7. A and B] wind or.
l. 11. A and B] no lying here.

p. 254,
l. 13. A] Porter.
l. 34. B] we daily get.

p. 255,
l 13. A and B] confess it.
A and B _omit stage direction_.
l. 18. A and B _omit_] for.

p. 256,
l. 28. A and B] Here in bosome, and.
C] my bosom.

p. 257,
l. 5. A and B] it would.

p. 258,
l. 15. A] This ye are I.
B] This year I.

p. 260,
l. 5. C _misprints_] righty.
l. 35. A and B] your letting free.

p. 261,
l. 7. C _misprints_] Hem.

p. 262,
l. 17. A and B] baldrick, what a.
l. 28. C] pertious.

p. 263,
l. 16. A and B] stands.
l. 27. A and B] that whorson.
l. 28. A] baster'd bullions.
B] bastar'd bullions.
l. 30. A and B] and change a.
l. 32. A and B] mangy soul.
l. 35. A and B] keep this in.

p. 264,
l. 1. A and B] We be monstrous out.

p. 265,
l. 26. A _omits_] the.

p. 267,
l. 6. C _misprints_] Heaveu.
l. 9. B _omits_] design.

p. 268,
l. 10. A and B] nor sorrow; Oh me.
l. 11. A and B _omit_] Ah me.
l. 33. A and B _omit_] me.

p. 269,
l. 11. A and B] left ham.
l. 19. A and B _omit_] strange.

p. 270,
l. 26. B] whipt.
l. 29. B _omits one_] 'tis she.
l. 39. A and B] Merchants shop.

p. 271,
l. 6. A _and some copies of_ B _expand Ger.'s speech as follows_]

_Ber_. O I am miserably lost, thus falne
Into my uncles hands from all my hopes,
Can I not thinke away my selfe and dye?
O I am miserably lost; thus fallen
Into my uncles hands, from all my hopes:
No matter now, where thou be false or no,
_Goswin_, whether thou love an other better;
Or me alone; or where thou keep thy vow,
And word, or that thou come, or stay: for I
To thee from henceforth, must be ever absent,
And thou to me: no more shall we come neere,
To tell our selves, how bright each other [B others] eyes were,
How soft our language, and how sweet our kisses,
Whil'st we made one our food, th'other our feast,
Not mix our soules by sight, or by a letter
Hereafter, but as small relation have,
As two new gon to in habiting a grave:
Can I not thinke away my selfe and dye?

l. 23. A and B] or a.
l. 29. A and B] alone for any Farmers.
l. 38. A and B] Will ye.

p. 272,
l. 17. A _and_ B _give from_ That's well _to Hub._ (_Char._).
l. 27. B] to ye will.

p. 273,
l. 32. B] those speciall.

p. 274,
l. 12. A and B] your story.
l. 33. A and B] Use my.

p. 275,
l. 37. A and B] For your.

p. 276,
l. 2. B] marrying her Sir.
B _omits at end of line_] Sir.

p. 277,
l. 19. A and B] to end my.
l. 31. B _omits_] have.

p. 279,
l. 11. A and B] follow me.

p. 280,
l. 26. A and B] gain.
l. 40. B _adds_] Finis.


(A) The First Folio.
(B) The Second Folio.
(C) The Manuscript dated Novemb. 27. 1625.
This MS. is a beatiful specimen of Ralph Crane's caligraphy. It is bound
in vellum, with gilt lines and gilt design on the cover. The following
particulars are written on a leaf before the title-page:--

'K Digby Margrit

This manuscript beloged to the celebrated
Sir Kenelm Digby. His grand-daughter
(one of the daughters & co-heireses of his eldest
son, John Digby) was married to Richard Mostyn Esq.
of Penbedw in Denbighshire, & their daughter
& coheiress to Richard Williams Esq. my Great Grandfather.
Thro' this connection of my family with
that of Digby, several of Sir Kenelm's books
& Manuscripts have come into my possession.
Wm W. E. Wynne.
given by W.W.E Wynne Esq. to me
W. Ormsby Gore
April 8. 1837.

The title-page is as follows:--
a pleasant Comedie
Written by
John Fletcher gent.'

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