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A Heap O' Livin', by Edgar A. Guest

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A youngster's sweet repose,
And always on my form I kept
My flannel underclothes.
Then I was roused by sudden shock
Though still to sleep I strove,
I knew that it was seven o'clock
When father shook the stove.

I never heard him quit his bed
Or his alarm clock ring;
I never heard his gentle tread,
Or his attempts to sing;
The sun that found my window pane
On me was wholly lost,
Though many a sunbeam tried in vain
To penetrate the frost.
To human voice I never stirred,
But deeper down I dove
Beneath the covers, when I heard
My father shake the stove.

To-day it all comes back to me
And I can hear it still;
He seemed to take a special glee
In shaking with a will.
He flung the noisy dampers back,
Then rattled steel on steel,
Until the force of his attack
The building seemed to feel.
Though I'd a youngster's heavy eyes
All sleep from them he drove;
It seemed to me the dead must rise
When father shook the stove.

Now radiators thump and pound
And every room is warm,
And modern men new ways have found
To shield us from the storm.
The window panes are seldom glossed
The way they used to be;
The pictures left by old Jack Frost
Our children never see.
And now that he has gone to rest
In God's great slumber grove,
I often think those days were best
When father shook the stove.

HOUSE-HUNTING

Time was when spring returned we went
To find another home to rent;
We wanted fresher, cleaner walls,
And bigger rooms and wider halls,
And open plumbing and the dome
That made the fashionable home.

But now with spring we want to sell,
And seek a finer place to dwell.
Our thoughts have turned from dens and domes;
We want the latest thing in homes;
To life we'll not be reconciled
Until we have a bathroom tiled.

A butler's pantry we desire,
Although no butler do we hire;
Nell's life will be one round of gloom
Without a closet for the broom,
And mine will dreary be and sour
Unless the bathroom has a shower.

For months and months we've sat and dreamed
Of paneled walls and ceilings beamed
And built-in cases for the books,
An attic room to be the cook's.
No house will she consent to view
Unless it has a sun room, too.

There must be wash bowls here and there
To save much climbing of the stair;
A sleeping porch we both demand --
This fad has swept throughout the land --
And, Oh, 'twill give her heart a wrench
Not to possess a few doors, French.

I want to dig and walk around
At least full fifty feet of ground;
She wants the latest style in tubs;
I want more room for trees and shrubs,
And a garage, with light and heat,
That can be entered from the street.

The trouble is the things we seek
Cannot be bought for ten-a-week.
And all the joys for which we sigh
Are just too rich for us to buy.
We have the taste to cut a dash:
The thing we're lacking most is cash.

AN EASY WORLD

It's an easy world to live in if you choose to
make it so;
You never need to suffer, save the griefs that
all must know;
If you'll stay upon the level and will do the
best you can
You will never lack the friendship of a kindly
fellow man.

Life's an easy road to travel if you'll only walk
it straight;
When the clouds begin to gather and your hopes
begin to fade,
If you've only toiled in honor you won't have
to call for aid.

But if you've bartered friendship and the faith
on which it rests
For a temporary winning; if you've cheated in
the tests,
If with promises you've broken, you have chilled
the hearts of men;
It is vain to look for friendship for it will not
come again.

Oh, the world is full of kindness, thronged with
men who want to be
Of some service to their neighbors and they'll
run to you or me
When we're needing their assistance if we've
lived upon the square,
But they'll spurn us in our trouble if we've
always been unfair.

It's an easy world to live in; all you really need
to do
Is the decent thing and proper and then friends
will flock to you;
But let dishonor trail you and some stormy day
you'll find
To your heart's supremest sorrow that you've
made the world unkind.

THE STATES

There is no star within the flag
That's brighter than its brothers,
And when of Michigan I brag,
I'm boasting of the others.
Just which is which no man can say --
One star for every state
Gleams brightly on our flag to-day,
And every one is great.

The stars that gem the skies at night
May differ in degree,
And some are pale and some are bright,
But in our flag we see
A sky of blue wherein the stars
Are equal in design;
Each has the radiance of Mars
And all are yours and mine.

The glory that is Michigan's
Is Colorado's too;
The same sky Minnesota spans,
The same sun warms it through;
And all are one beneath the flag,
A common hope is ours;
Our country is the mountain crag,
The valley and its flowers.

The land we love lies far away
As well as close at hand;
He has no vision who would say:
_This_ state's my native land.
Though sweet the charms he knows the best,
Deep down within his heart
The farthest east, the farthest west
Of him must be a part.

There is no star within the flag
That's brighter than its brothers;
So when of Michigan I brag
I'm boasting of the others.
We share alike one purpose true;
One common end awaits;
We must in all we dream or do
Remain _United_ States.

THE OBLIGATION OF FRIENDSHIP

You ought to be fine for the sake of the folks
Who think you are fine.
If others have faith in you doubly you're bound
To stick to the line.
It's not only on you that dishonor descends:
You can't hurt yourself without hurting your
friends.

You ought to be true for the sake of the folks
Who believe you are true.
You never should stoop to a deed that your
friends
Think you wouldn't do.
If you're false to yourself, be the blemish but
small,
You have injured your friends; you've been false
to them all.

For friendship, my boy, is a bond between men
That is founded on truth:
It believes in the best of the ones that it loves,
Whether old man or youth;
And the stern rule it lays down for me and for
you
Is to be what our friends think we are, through
and through.

UNDER THE SKIN OF MEN

Did you ever sit down and talk with men
In a serious sort of a way,
On their views of life and ponder then
On all that they have to say?
If not, you should in some quiet hour;
It's a glorious thing to do:
For you'll find that back of the pomp and power
Most men have a goal in view.

They'll tell you then that their aim is not
The clink of the yellow gold;
That not in the worldly things they've got
Would they have their stories told.
They'll say the joys that they treasure most
Are their good friends, tried and true,
And an honest name for their own to boast
And peace when the day is through.

I've talked with men and I think I know
What's under the toughened skin.
I've seen their eyes grow bright and glow
With the fire that burns within.
And back of the gold and back of the fame
And back of the selfish strife,
In most men's breasts you'll find the flame
Of the nobler things of life.

THE FINER THOUGHT

How fine it is at night to say:
"I have not wronged a soul to-day.
I have not by a word or deed,
In any breast sowed anger's seed,
Or caused a fellow being pain;
Nor is there on my crest a stain
That shame has left. In honor's way,
With head erect, I've lived this day."

When night slips down and day departs
And rest returns to weary hearts,
How fine it is to close the book
Of records for the day, and look
Once more along the traveled mile
And find that all has been worth while;
To say: "In honor I have toiled;
My plume is spotless and unsoiled."

Yet cold and stern a man may be
Retaining his integrity;
And he may pass from day to day
A spirit dead, in living clay,
Observing strictly morals, laws,
Yet serving but a selfish cause;
So it is not enough to say:
"I have not stooped to shame to-day!"

It is a finer, nobler thought
When day is done and night has brought
The contemplative hours and sweet,
And rest to weary hearts and feet,
If man can stand in truth and say:
"I have been useful here to-day.
Back there is one I chanced to see
With hope newborn because of me.

"This day in honor I have toiled;
My shining crest is still unsoiled;
But on the mile I leave behind
Is one who says that I was kind;
And someone hums a cheerful song
Because I chanced to come along."
Sweet rest at night that man shall own
Who has not lived his day alone.

STUCK

I'm up against it day by day,
My ignorance is distressing;
The things I don't know on the way
I'm busily confessing.
Time was I used to think I knew
Some useful bits of knowledge
And could be sure of one or two
Real facts I'd gleaned in college.
But I'm unfitted for the task
Of answering things my boy can ask.

Now, who can answer queries queer
That four-year-olds can think up?
And tell in simple phrase and clear
Why fishes do not drink up
The water in the streams and lakes,
Or where the wind is going,
And tell exactly how God makes
The roses that are growing?
I'm sure I cannot satisfy
Each little when, and how, and why.

Had I the wisdom of a sage
Possessed of all the learning
That can be gleaned from printed page
From bookworm's closest turning,
That eager knowledge-seeking lad
That questions me so gayly
Could still go round and boast he had
With queries floored me daily.
He'll stick, I'll bet, in less than five
Brief minutes any man alive.

ETERNAL FRIENDSHIP

Who once has had a friend has found
The link 'twixt mortal and divine;
Though now he sleeps in hallowed ground,
He lives in memory's sacret shrine;
And there he freely moves about,
A spirit that has quit the clay,
And in the times of stress and doubt
Sustains his friend throughout the day.

No friend we love can ever die;
The outward form but disappears;
I know that all my friends are nigh
Whenever I am moved to tears.
And when my strength and hope are gone,
The friends, no more, that once I knew,
Return to cheer and urge me on
Just as they always used to do.

They whisper to me in the dark
Kind words of counsel and of cheer;
When hope has flickered to a spark
I feel their gentle spirits near.
And Oh! because of them I strive
With all the strength that I can call
To keep their friendship still alive
And to be worthy of them all.

Death does not end our friendships true;
We all are debtors to the dead;
There, wait on everything we do
The splendid souls who've gone ahead.
To them I hold that we are bound
By double pledges to be fine.
Who once has had a friend has found
The link 'twixt mortal and divine.

FAITH

I believe in the world and its bigness and
splendor:
That most of the hearts beating round us are
tender;
That days are but footsteps and years are but
miles
That lead us to beauty and singing and smiles:
That roses that blossom and toilers that plod
Are filled with the glorious spirit of God.

I believe in the purpose of everything living:
That taking is but the forerunner of giving;
That strangers are friends that we some day
may meet;
And not all the bitter can equal the sweet;
That creeds are but colors, and no man has
said
That God loves the yellow rose more than the
red.

I believe in the path that to-day I am treading,
That I shall come safe through the dangers I'm
dreading;
That even the scoffer shall turn from his ways
And some day be won back to trust and to
praise;
That the leaf on the tree and the thing we call
Man
Are sharing alike in His infinite plan.

I believe that all things that are living and
breathing
Some richness of beauty to earth are bequeath-
ing;
That all that goes out of this world leaves
behind
Some duty accomplished for mortals to find;
That the humblest of creatures our praise is
deserving,
For it, with the wisest, the Master is serving.

I

Nobody hates me more than I;
No enemy have I to-day
That I so bravely must defy;
There are no foes along my way,
However bitter they may be,
So powerful to injure me
As I am, nor as quick to spoil
The beauty of my bit of toil.

Nobody harms me more than I;
No one is meaner unto me;
Of all the foes that pass me by
I am the worst one that I see.
I am the dangerous man to fear;
I am the cause of sorrow here;
Of all men 'gainst my hopes inclined
I am myself the most unkind.

I do more harmful things to me
Than all the men who seem to hate;
I am the fellow that should be
More dreaded than the works of fate.
I am the one that I must fight
With all my will and all my might;
My foes are better friends to me
Than I have ever proved to be.

I am the careless foe and mean;
I am the selfish rival too;
My enmity to me is seen
In almost everything I do.
More courage it requires to beat
Myself, than all the foes I meet;
I am more traitorous to me
Than other men could ever be.

In every struggle I have lost
I am the one that was to blame;
My weaknesses cannot be glossed
By glib excuses. I was lame.
I that would dare for fame or pelf
Am far less daring with myself.
I care not who my foes may be,
I am my own worst enemy.

THE THINGS THAT HAVEN'T BEEN
DONE BEFORE

The things that haven't been done before,
Those are the things to try;
Columbus dreamed of an unknown shore
At the rim of the far-flung sky,
And his heart was bold and his faith was strong
As he ventured in dangers new,
And he paid no heed to the jeering throng
Or the fears of the doubting crew.

The many will follow the beaten track
With guideposts on the way,
They live and have lived for ages back
With a chart for every day.
Someone has told them it's safe to go
On the road he has traveled o'er.
And all that they ever strive to know
Are the things that were known before.

A few strike out, without map or chart,
Where never a man has been,
From the beaten paths they draw apart
To see what no man has seen.
There are deeds they hunger alone to do;
Though battered and bruised and sore,
They blaze the path for the many, who
Do nothing not done before.

The things that haven't been done before,
Are the tasks worth while to-day;
Are you one of the flock that follows, or
Are you one that shall lead the way?
Are you one of the timid souls that quail
At the jeers of a doubting crew,
Or dare you, whether you win or fail,
Strike out for a goal that's new?

REVENGE

If I had hatred in my heart toward my fellow
man,
If I were pressed to do him ill, to conjure up a
plan
To wound him sorely and to rob his days of all
their joy,
I'd wish his wife would go away and take their
little boy.

I'd waste no time on curses vague, nor try to
take his gold,
Nor seek to shatter any plan that he might
dearly hold.
A crueler revenge than that for him I would
bespeak:
I'd wish his wife and little one might leave him
for a week.

I'd wish him all the loneliness that comes with
loss of those
Who fill his life with laughter and contentment
and repose.
I'd wish him empty rooms at night and mocking
stairs to squeak
That neither wife nor little boy will greet him
for a week.

If I despised my fellow man, I'd make my
hatred known
By wishing him a week or two of living all
alone;
I'd let him know the torture that is mine to
bear to-day,
For Buddy and his mother now are miles and
miles away.

PROMOTION

Promotion comes to him who sticks
Unto his work and never kicks,
Who watches neither clock nor sun
To tell him when his task is done;
Who toils not by a stated chart,
Defining to a jot his part,
But gladly does a little more
Than he's remunerated for.
The man, in factory or shop,
Who rises quickly to the top,
Is he who gives what can't be bought:
Intelligent and careful thought.

No one can say just when begins
The service that promotion wins,
Or when it ends; 'tis not defined
By certain hours or any kind
Of system that has been devised;
Merit cannot be systemized.
It is at work when it's at play;
It serves each minute of the day;
'Tis always at its post, to see
New ways of help and use to be.
Merit from duty never slinks,
Its cardinal virtue is -- it thinks!

Promotion comes to him who tries
Not solely for a selfish prize,
But day by day and year by year
Holds his employer's interests dear.
Who measures not by what he earns
The sum of labor he returns,
Nor counts his day of toiling through
Till he's done all that he can do.
His strength is not of muscle bred,
But of the heart and of the head.
The man who would the top attain
Must demonstrate he has a brain.

EXPECTATION

Most folks, as I've noticed, in pleasure an'
strife,
Are always expecting too much out of life.
They wail an' they fret
Just because they don't get
The best o' the sunshine, the fairest o' flowers,
The finest o' features, the strongest o' powers;
They whine an' they whimper an' curse an'
condemn,
Coz life isn't always being' partial to them.

Notwithstandin' the pain an' the sufferin' they
see,
They cling to the notion that they should go
free:
That they shouldn't share
In life's trouble an' care
But should always be happy an' never perplexed,
An' never discouraged or beaten or vexed.
When life treats 'em roughly an' jolts 'em with
care,
They seem to imagine it's bein' unfair.

It's a curious notion folks hold in their pride,
That their souls should never be tested or tried;
That others must mourn
An' be sick an' forlorn
An' stand by the biers of their loved ones an'
weep,
But life from such sorrows their bosoms must
keep.
Oh, they mustn't know what it means to be sad,
Or they'll wail that the treatment they're gettin'
is bad.

Now life as I view it means pleasure an' pain,
An' laughter an' weepin' an' sunshine an' rain,
An' takin' an' givin';
An' all who are livin'
Must face it an' bear it the best that they can
Believin' great Wisdom is workin' the plan.
An' no one should ever complain it's unfair
Because at the moment he's tastin' despair.

HARD WORK

One day, in ages dark and dim,
A toiler, weary, worn and faint,
Who found his task too much for him,
Gave voice unto a sad complaint.
And seeking emphasis to give
Unto his trials (day-starred!)
Coupled to "work" this adjective,
This little word of terror: _Hard_.

And from that day to this has work
Its frightening description worn;
'Tis spoken daily by the shirk,
The first cloud on the sky at morn.
To-day when there are tasks to do,
Save that we keep ourselves on guard
With fearful doubtings them we view,
And think and speak of them as hard.

That little but ill-chosen word
Has wrought great havoc with men's souls,
Has chilled the hearts ambition stirred
And held the pass to splendid goals.
Great dreams have faded and been lost,
Fine youth by it been sadly marred
As plants beneath a withering frost,
Because men thought and whispered: "Hard."

Let's think of work in terms of hope
And speak of it with words of praise,
And tell the joy it is to grope
Along the new, untrodden ways!
Let's break this habit of despair
And cheerfully our task regard;
The road to happiness lies there:
Why think or speak of it as hard?

GRATITUDE

Be grateful for the kindly friends that walk
along your way;
Be grateful for the skies of blue that smile
from day to day;
Be grateful for the health you own, the work
you find to do,
For round about you there are men less fortu-
nate than you.

Be grateful for the growing trees, the roses
soon to bloom,
The tenderness of kindly hearts that shared your
days of gloom;
Be grateful for the morning dew, the grass
beneath your feet,
The soft caresses of your babes and all their
laughter sweet.

Acquire the grateful habit, learn to see how blest
you are,
How much there is to gladden life, how little
life to mar!
And what if rain shall fall to-day and you with
grief are sad;
Be grateful that you can recall the joys that
you have had.

A REAL MAN

Men are of two kinds, and he
Was of the kind I'd like to be.
Some preach their virtues, and a few
Express their lives by what they do.
That sort was he. No flowery phrase
Or glibly spoken words of praise
Won friends for him. He wasn't cheap
Or shallow, but his course ran deep,
And it was pure. You know the kind.
Not many in a life you find
Whose deeds outrun their words so far
That more than what they seem they are.

There are two kinds of lies as well:
The kind you live, the ones you tell.
Back through his years from age to youth
He never acted one untruth.
Out in the open light he fought
And didn't care what others thought
Nor what they said about his fight
If he believed that he was right.
The only deeds he ever hid
Were acts of kindness that he did.

What speech he had was plain and blunt.
His was an unattractive front.
Yet children loved him; babe and boy
Played with the strength he could employ,
Without one fear, and they are fleet
To sense injustice and deceit.
No back door gossip linked his name
With any shady tale of shame.
He did not have to compromise
With evil-doers, shrewd and wise,
And let them ply their vicious trade
Because of some past escapade.

Men are of two kinds, and he
Was of the kind I'd like to be.
No door at which he ever knocked
Against his manly form was locked.
If ever man on earth was free
And independent, it was he.
No broken pledge lost him respect,
He met all men with head erect,
And when he passed I think there went
A soul to yonder firmament
So white, so splendid and so fine
It came almost to God's design.

THE NEIGHBORLY MAN

Some are eager to be famous, some are striving
to be great,
Some are toiling to be leaders of their nation
or their state,
And in every man's ambition, if we only under-
stood,
There is much that's fine and splendid; every
hope is mostly good.
So I cling unto the notion that contented I
will be
If the men upon life's pathway find a needed
friend in me.

I rather like to putter 'round the walks and
yards of life,
To spray at night the roses that are burned and
browned with strife;
To eat a frugal dinner, but always to have a
chair
For the unexpected stranger that my simple
meal would share.
I don't care to be a traveler, I would rather be
the one
Sitting calmly by the roadside helping weary
travelers on.

I'd like to be a neighbor in the good old-fash-
ioned way,
Finding much to do for others, but not over
much to say.
I like to read the papers, but I do not yearn
to see
What the journal of the morning has been
moved to say of me;
In the silences and shadows I would live my
life and die
And depend for fond remembrance on some
grateful passers-by.

I guess I wasn't fashioned for the brilliant
things of earth,
Wasn't gifted much with talent or designed for
special worth,
But was just sent here to putter with life's little
odds and ends
And keep a simple corner where the stirring
highway bends,
And if folks should chance to linger, worn and
weary through the day,
To do some needed service and to cheer them
on their way.

ROSES

When God first viewed the rose He'd made
He smiled, and thought it passing fair;
Upon the bloom His hands He laid,
And gently blessed each petal there.
He summoned in His artists then
And bade them paint, as ne'er before,
Each petal, so that earthly men
Might love the rose for evermore.

With Heavenly brushes they began
And one with red limned every leaf,
To signify the love of man;
The first rose, white, betokened grief;
"My rose shall deck the bride," one said
And so in pink he dipped his brush,
"And it shall smile beside the dead
To typify the faded blush."

And then they came unto His throne
And laid the roses at His feet,
The crimson bud, the bloom full blown,
Filling the air with fragrance sweet.
"Well done, well done!" the Master spake;
"Henceforth the rose shall bloom on earth:
One fairer blossom I will make,"
And then a little babe had birth.

On earth a loving mother lay
Within a rose-decked room and smiled,
But from the blossoms turned away
To gently kiss her little child,
And then she murmured soft and low,
"For beauty, here, a mother seeks.
None but the Master made, I know,
The roses in a baby's cheeks."

THE JUNK BOX

My father often used to say:
"My boy don't throw a thing away:
You'll find a use for it some day."

So in a box he stored up things,
Bent nails, old washers, pipes and rings,
And bolts and nuts and rusty springs.

Despite each blemish and each flaw,
Some use for everything he saw;
With things material, this was law.

And often when he'd work to do,
He searched the junk box through and through
And found old stuff as good as new.

And I have often thought since then,
That father did the same with men;
He knew he'd need their help again.

It seems to me he understood
That men, as well as iron and wood,
May broken be and still be good.

Despite the vices he'd display
He never threw a man away,
But kept him for another day.

A human junk box is this earth
And into it we're tossed at birth,
To wait the day we'll be of worth.

Though bent and twisted, weak of will,
And full of flaws and lacking skill,
Some service each can render still.

THE BOY THAT WAS

When the hair about the temples starts to show
the signs of gray,
And a fellow realizes that he's wandering far
away
From the pleasures of his boyhood and his
youth, and never more
Will know the joy of laughter as he did in days
of yore,
Oh, it's then he starts to thinking of a stubby
little lad
With a face as brown as berries and a soul
supremely glad.

When a gray-haired dreamer wanders down the
lanes of memory
And forgets the living present for the time of
"used-to-be,"
He takes off his shoes and stockings, and he
throws his coat away,
And he's free from all restrictions, save the rules
of manly play.
He may be in richest garments, but bareheaded
in the sun
He forgets his proud successes and the riches
he has won.

Oh, there's not a man alive but that would give
his all to be
The stubby little fellow that in dreamland he
can see,
And the splendors that surround him and the
joys about him spread
Only seem to rise to taunt him with the boyhood
that has fled.
When the hair about the temples starts to show
Time's silver stain,
Then the richest man that's living yearns to be
a boy again.

AS FALL THE LEAVES

As fall the leaves, so drop the days
In silence from the tree of life;
Born for a little while to blaze
In action in the heat of strife,
And then to shrivel with Time's blast
And fade forever in the past.

In beauty once the leaf was seen;
To all it offered gentle shade;
Men knew the splendor of its green
That cheered them so, would quickly fade:
And quickly, too, must pass away
All that is splendid of to-day.

To try to keep the leaves were vain:
Men understand that they must fall;
Why should they bitterly complain
When sorrows come to one and all?
Why should they mourn the passing day
That must depart along the way?

INDEX

Answering Him....................... 126
Apple Tree, The..................... 68
As Fall the Leaves.................. 188
At the Door......................... 132
Autumn at the Orchard............... 136

Be a Friend......................... 97
Bear Story, A....................... 134
Boy That Was, The................... 186
Breakfast Time, At.................. 50
Bumps and Bruises Doctor, The....... 107

Canning Time........................ 66
Can't............................... 52
Care-Free Youth..................... 78
Challenge........................... 145
Courage............................. 72

Defeat.............................. 111
Division............................ 141
Dull Road, The...................... 67
Duty................................ 133
Duty to Our Flag, Our............... 58

Easy World, An...................... 158
Epicure, The........................ 74
Eternal Friendship.................. 167
Expectation......................... 176

Failures............................ 83
Faith............................... 168
Father.............................. 46
Father and Son...................... 128
Fishing Cure, The................... 102
Finer Thought, The.................. 164
Finest Age, The..................... 76
Folks............................... 36
Friend's Greeting, A................ 32

Gentle Gardener, The................ 75
Going Home for Christmas, On........ 24
Gratitude........................... 179
Greatness........................... 73
Guessing Time....................... 148

Happiest Days, The.................. 88
Happy Slow Thinker, The............. 103
Hard Knocks......................... 43
Hard Work........................... 177
Home................................ 28
Homesick............................ 117
Home Town, The...................... 70
House-Hunting....................... 156
How Do You Tackle Your Work?........ 62
Hunter, The......................... 59

I................................... 170
It Isn't Costly..................... 14
It's September...................... 60

James Whitcomb Riley................ 54
Joy of a Dog, The................... 116
June Couple, The.................... 130
Junk Box, The....................... 185

Laddies............................. 48
Lady in the Electric, To the........ 122
Life................................ 63
Life's Tests........................ 85
Little Master Mischievous........... 38
Living Beauties, The................ 49

Ma and Her Check Book............... 100
Ma and the Auto..................... 22
Man, A.............................. 142
Man, A Real......................... 180
Man Who Couldn't Save, The.......... 124
Mother.............................. 19
Mother's Day........................ 140
Mother's Glasses.................... 94
My Creed............................ 15
My Paw Said So...................... 80

Neighborly Man, The................. 182
No Place to Go...................... 110

Obligation of Friendship, The....... 162
Old Friends......................... 34
Only a Dad.......................... 42
Opportunity......................... 39
Other Fellow, The................... 57
Out-of-Doors........................ 104

Path That Leads to Home, The........ 30
Patriotic Wish, A................... 112
Peace............................... 109
Peaceful Warriors, The.............. 82
People Liked Him.................... 152
Perfect Dinner Table, The........... 118
Prayer, A........................... 121
Preparedness........................ 81
Price of Joy, The................... 113
Princess Pat's, The................. 96
Promotion........................... 174
Purpose............................. 93

Raisin Pie.......................... 84
Ready Artists, The.................. 86
Real Bait, The...................... 90
Real Singing........................ 106
Results and Roses................... 56
Revenge............................. 173
Rich................................ 21
Roses............................... 184
Rough Little Rascal, The............ 13

Selfish............................. 20
Song, A............................. 33
Sorrow Tugs, The.................... 40
Spring in the Trenches.............. 44
States, The......................... 160
Story Telling....................... 64
Stuck............................... 166
Success and Failure................. 77
Sugar Camp, At...................... 26
Sulkers, The........................ 92

Take Home a Smile................... 71
Thanksgiving........................ 98
Things That Haven't Been Done Before 172
Things That Make Soldier Great, The. 114
Toast to Happiness, A............... 146
To-morrow........................... 120
Treasures........................... 144
True Nobility....................... 91

Understanding....................... 150
Under the Skin of Men............... 163

Vow, A.............................. 143

Wish, A............................. 16
What a Baby Costs................... 18
When Father Shook the Stove......... 154
When Pa Comes Home.................. 138
When Pa Counts...................... 108
When You Know a Fellow.............. 11

INDEX OF FIRST LINES

A man doesn't whine at his losses............. 142
A man must earn his hour of peace............. 109
Are you fond of your wife and your children... 57
As fall the leaves, so drop the days.......... 188
A smudge on his nose and a smear on his
cheek....................................... 13
A table cloth that slightly soiled............ 118
A touch of the plain and the prairie.......... 96
At Sugar Camp the cook is kind................ 26

Be a friend. You don't need money............. 97
Before we take an auto ride Pa says to Ma..... 22
Be grateful for the kindly friends............ 179
Be more than his dad.......................... 128

Can't is the worst word that's written........ 52
Cheek that is tanned by the wind of the north. 59
Courage isn't a brilliant dash................ 72

Did you ever sit down and talk with men....... 163
Does the grouch get richer quicker............ 14

Foxes can talk if you know how to listen...... 80
Full many a time a thought has come........... 103

Gentle hands that never weary................. 140
God grant me kindly thought................... 121

He little knew the sorrow that was in his
vacant chair................................ 24
He spent what he made, or he gave it away..... 124
He was going to be all that a mortal should... 120
He wiped his shoes before his door............ 132
How do you tackle your work each day.......... 62
How fine it is at night to say................ 164
"How much do babies cost?" said he............ 18

I am selfish in my wishin' every sort o' joy.. 20
I believe in the world........................ 168
I'd like to be a boy again.................... 16
I'd like to be the sort of friend............. 32
I'd like to be the sort of man................ 112
I'd like to leave but daffodills.............. 75
I do not say new friends are not considerate.. 34
I do not think all failure's undeserved....... 77
If I had hatred in my heart................... 173
If never a sorrow came to us.................. 85
I might not ever scale the mountain heights... 143
I'm not the man to say that failure's sweet... 43
I'm the bumps and bruises doctor.............. 107
I'm up against it day by day.................. 166
I never knew, until they went................. 49
It's an easy world to live in if you choose... 158
It's coming time for planting................. 44
It's guessing time at our house............... 148
It's September, and the orchards are afire.... 60
It's the dull road that leads to the gay road. 67
It's tough when you are homesick.............. 117
It takes a heap o' livin' in a house to make
it home..................................... 28
I've sipped a rich man's sparkling wine....... 74
I've told about the times that Ma can't find
her pocketbook.............................. 94

Lady in the show case carriage................ 122
Less hate and greed........................... 58
Let others sing their songs of war............ 82
Life is a challenge to the bold............... 145
Life is a gift to be used every day........... 63
Little Master Mischievous, that's the name.... 38

Ma has a dandy little book.................... 100
Ma says no, it's too much care................ 116
Men are of two kind, and he................... 180
Most every night when they're in bed.......... 64
Most folks, as I've noticed, in pleasure an'
strife...................................... 176
My father often used to say................... 185
My Pa he eats his breakfast................... 50

Never a sigh for the cares that she bore...... 19
Nobody hates me more than I................... 170
None knows the day that friends must part..... 33
No one is beat till he quits.................. 111
Not for the sake of the gold.................. 93

One day, in ages dim and dark................. 177
Only a dad with a tired face.................. 42

Pa's not so very big or brave................. 108
People liked him, not because................. 152
Promotion comes to him who sticks............. 174

Right must not live in idleness............... 85

She is fair to see and sweet.................. 130
So long as men shall be on earth.............. 39
Some are eager to be famous................... 182
Some folks leave home for money............... 70
Some folks I know, when friends drop in....... 144

Take home a smile; forget the petty cares..... 71
Thankful for the glory of the old Red, White
and Blue.................................... 98
The happiest nights........................... 110
The green is in the meadow.................... 86
The kids are out-of-doors once more........... 104
The little path that leads to home............ 30
The man who wants a garden fair............... 56
There is no star within the flag.............. 160
There must be great rejoicin' on the Golden
Shore to-day................................ 54
There's a heap of pent-up goodness............ 84
There's a lot of joy in the smiling world..... 40
There's a wondrous smell of spices............ 66
There's nothing that builds up a toil-weary
soul........................................ 102
There was a bear -- his name was Jim.......... 134
The skies are blue and the sun is out......... 78
The sumac's flaming scarlet................... 136
The things that haven't been done before...... 172
The things that make a soldier great.......... 114
The world's too busy now to pause............. 92
'Tis better to have tried in vain............. 83
To do your little bit of toil................. 133
To gentle ways I am inclined.................. 90
To happiness I raise my glass................. 146
To live as gently as I can.................... 15
Time was when spring returned we went......... 156
'Twas not so many years ago................... 154

Used to wonder just why father................ 46

We can be great by helping one another........ 73
We was speakin' of folks, jes' common folks... 36
When an apple tree is ready for the world..... 68
When God first viewed the rose He'd made...... 184
When he was only nine months old.............. 76
When I was young and frivolous................ 150
When Pa comes home, I'm at the door........... 138
"When shall I be a man?" he said.............. 126
When the hair about the temples starts to
show the signs of gray...................... 186
When you get to know a fellow................. 11
Who does his task from day to day............. 91
Who has a troop of romping youth.............. 21
Who once has had a friend has found........... 167

You cannot gather every rose.................. 141
You can talk about your music................. 106
You do not know it, little man................ 88
You don't begrudge the labor.................. 113
You ought to be fine for the sake of the folks 162

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