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A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents by James D. Richardson

Part 8 out of 9

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That the President of the United States be, and he is hereby,
requested, if in his opinion it be not incompatible with the public
interest, to communicate to the Senate a historical statement
concerning the public policy of the executive department of the
Confederate States during the late War of the Rebellion, reported
to have been lately filed in the War Department by General William
T. Sherman.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 20, 1885_.

_To the Senate:_

In response to the resolution of the Senate passed December 16, 1884,
I transmit herewith a letter of the Secretary of State of the 19th
instant, submitting a report containing certain information in the
Department of State in relation to the foreign trade of Mexico, Central
and South America, the Spanish West Indies, Hayti, and Santo Domingo,
and also in relation to the share of the United States to the trade
in question.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 23, 1885_.

_To the Senate of the United States:_

I transmit herewith, in answer to a resolution of the Senate dated
January 5, 1885, a report of the Secretary of State and accompanying
copies of such treaties and conventions between the United States and
foreign powers as are requested by the resolution.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 23, 1885_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith a communication of the 20th instant from the
Secretary of the Interior, presenting, with accompanying papers, a draft
of proposed legislation providing for the settlement of certain claims
of Omaha Indians in Nebraska against the Winnebago Indians on account of
horses stolen by members of the latter tribe from the Omahas.

The subject is commended to the favorable consideration and action of
the Congress.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 23, 1885_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith a report of the Secretary of State of the 22d
instant, respecting an estimate of an appropriation to enable the
Department of State to cause a preliminary search to be made of the
records of the French prize courts from 1792 to 1801, inclusive, to
ascertain whether any evidence or documents relating to the claims in
question still exist, and, if so, the nature and character thereof;
said preliminary search being intended to aid the Department of State
to carry out the requirements of section 5 of the act approved January
20, 1885, to provide for the ascertainment of the claims of American
citizens for spoliations committed by the French prior to the 31st
of July, 1801.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 27, 1885_.

_To the House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith, as desired by the House resolution of the 9th
instant, a report, with accompanying papers, from the Secretary of
State, in relation to the arrest and the imprisonment of Thomas R.
Monahan by the authorities of Mexico.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 27, 1885_.

_To the House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith a preliminary report of the Secretary of State
of the 26th instant, in response to a resolution of the House of
Representatives passed on the 9th day of January, 1885, calling for
copies of accounts and vouchers of the disbursing officers of the French
and American Claims Commission and certain other information in relation
to the transactions of said commission.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 27, 1885_.

_To the Senate of the United States:_

I have carefully considered the provisions of Senate bill No. 862,
entitled "An act for the relief of Uriel Crocker."

The general statute provides for relief in case of the destruction of
coupon bonds.

In my opinion this provision of law is sufficiently liberal to meet all
cases of missing coupon bonds worthy of favorable action, and I do not
deem it advisable to encourage this class of legislation.

The bill is not, however, so flagrantly inexpedient as to call for my
formal disapproval, and I have allowed it to become a law under the
constitutional provision, contenting myself with communicating to the
Senate, in which the bill originated, my disapproval of special
legislation of this character.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, January 27, 1885_.

_To the Senate of the United States:_

I transmit to the Senate, for its consideration with a view to
ratification, an additional article, signed on the 23d of June last, to
the treaty of friendship, commerce, and navigation which was concluded
between the United States and the Argentine Confederation July 27, 1853.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 27, 1885_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith a letter from the Secretary of State, concerning the
awards made against Venezuela by the mixed commission under the
convention of April 25, 1866.

I earnestly invite the attention of Congress to this communication and
the accompanying documents.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 27, 1885_.

_To the Senate of the United States:_

I transmit herewith a report of the Secretary of State and accompanying
papers, furnished in response to a resolution of the Senate of May 2,
1884, calling for information relative to the landing of foreign
telegraphic cables upon the shores of the United States.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 27, 1885_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives:_

I have the honor to transmit communications from the Secretary of the
Navy, recommending certain action by the Government in recognition of
the services, official and personal, extended in Russia to the survivors
of the arctic exploring steamer _Jeannette_ and to the search
parties subsequently sent to Siberia.

The authority of Congress is requested for extending the specific
rewards mentioned in the paper accompanying one of the communications of
the Secretary. The suggestion concerning the thanks of Congress is also
submitted for consideration.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 27, 1885_.

_To the Senate of the United States:_

In response to the resolution of the Senate of the 22d instant, setting
forth that--

Whereas the United States, in 1866, acquired from the Creek and
Seminole Indians by treaty certain lands situate in the Indian
Territory, a portion of which have remained unoccupied until the
present time; and

Whereas a widely extended belief exists that such unoccupied lands are
public lands of the United States, and as such subject to homestead and
preemption settlement, and pursuant to such belief a large number of
citizens of the United States have gone upon them claiming the right
to settle and acquire title thereto under the general land laws of the
United States; and

Whereas it is understood that the President of the United States does
not regard said lands as open to settlement and believes it to be his
duty to remove all persons who go upon the same claiming the right to
settle thereon, and for that purpose has directed the expulsion of the
persons now on said lands by the use of military force, and there seems
to be a probability of a conflict growing out of the attempt to expel
said persons so claiming right and attempting to settle: Therefore,

_Resolved_, That the President be requested to advise the Senate as
to the status of the lands in question as viewed by the Executive, the
action taken, if any, to expel persons seeking to settle thereon, and
the reasons for the same, together with any other information in his
possession bearing upon the existing controversy--

I have the honor to state that the matter was referred to the
Secretaries of War and the Interior and to transmit herewith their
respective reports thereon, dated the 26th instant.

The report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs accompanying that
of the Secretary of the Interior recites fully the provisions of the
treaties made with the Indian tribes ceding the lands in question to
the United States, showing the condition and purposes expressed in
said treaties regarding said lands, as well as the action taken with
reference thereto, from which it will be seen that they are not open
to settlement under any laws of the United States.

The report of the Secretary of War shows the action of the military
authorities at the request of the Interior Department under section 2147
of the Revised Statutes.

The status of these lands was considered by my predecessor, President
Hayes, who on the 26th day of April, 1879, issued a proclamation[25]
warning all persons intending to go upon said lands without proper
permission of the Interior Department that they would be speedily and
immediately removed therefrom according to the laws made and provided,
and that if necessary the aid and assistance of the military forces of
the United States would be invoked to carry into proper execution the
laws of the United States referring thereto. A similar proclamation[26]
was issued by President Hayes on the 12th day of February, 1880. On the
1st day of July, 1884, I considered it to be my duty to issue a
proclamation[27] of like import.

These several proclamations were at the request of the Secretary of the
Interior.

As will be seen by the report of the Secretary of War, the military
forces of the United States have been repeatedly employed to remove
intruders from the lands in question, and that notwithstanding such
removals and in disregard of law and the Executive proclamations a large
body of intruders is now within the territory in question, and that an
adequate force of troops has been ordered to remove the intruders and is
now being concentrated for that purpose.

None of the land or general laws of the United States have been extended
over these lands except as to the punishment for crimes and other
provisions contained in the intercourse act which relate to trade and
the introduction of spirituous liquors and arms among Indians, and do
not sanction settlement. It is clear that no authorized settlement can
be made by any person in the territory in question.

Until the existing status of these lands shall have been changed by
agreement with the Indians interested, or in some other manner as may be
determined by Congress, the treaties heretofore made with the Indians
should be maintained and the power of the Government to the extent
necessary should be exercised to keep off intruders and all unauthorized
persons.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

[Footnote 25: See Vol. VII, pp. 547-548.]

[Footnote 26: See Vol. VII, pp. 598-599.]

[Footnote 27: See pp. 224-225.]

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 29, 1885_.

_To the House of Representatives:_

In response to the resolution of the House of Representatives of the 5th
of January, 1885, calling for information as to the Kongo conference at
Berlin, I transmit herewith a report of the Secretary of State of the
28th instant, in relation to the subject.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 29, 1885_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith a communication of 27th instant, with inclosures,
from the Secretary of the Interior, in relation to objections on the
part of the Creek Nation of Indians to pending legislation providing for
the opening up to homestead settlement of certain lands in the Indian
Territory.

The matter is presented to the consideration of the Congress.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 29, 1885_.

_To the House of Representatives:_

In compliance with a resolution of the House of Representatives (which
was concurred in by the Senate) of January 28, 1885, I return herewith
the bill (H.R. 1017) relative to the Inspector-General's Department of
the Army.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 30, 1885_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives:_

When the expedition for the relief of Lieutenant Greely and his party
was being prepared, in the early part of the year 1884, and a search for
suitable vessels was being made, the _Alert_, then the property of
Great Britain, and which had been the advance ship of the expedition
under Sir George Nares, was found to be peculiarly fitted for the
intended service, and this Government immediately offered to purchase
that vessel, upon which Her Majesty's Government generously presented
her to the United States, refusing to accept any pay whatever for the
vessel. The _Alert_ rendered important and timely service in the
expedition for the relief of Lieutenant Greely and party, which in its
results proved so satisfactory to the Government and people of this
country.

I am of the opinion that the _Alert_ should now be returned to Her
Majesty's Government, with suitable acknowledgments for its generous and
graceful acts of courtesy in so promptly putting the vessel at the
service of the United States, and I therefore recommend that authority
be given me by Congress to carry out this purpose.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 30, 1885_.

_To the House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith, in response to a resolution of the House of
Representatives of the 28th of January, 1885, a report by the Secretary
of State, in relation to the case of Julio R. Santos, an American
citizen imprisoned in Ecuador.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 30, 1885_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:_

I herewith transmit a communication from the Secretary of State, in
regard to the desire of the Government of Korea to obtain the services
of one or more officers of the United States as military instructors
in that country, and recommend the adoption of a joint resolution
authorizing such officers as may be conveniently spared, and who may be
selected for that duty, to proceed to Korea for the purpose indicated.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _February 2, 1885_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:_

I transmit herewith to the Senate a communication from the Secretary of
State, submitting, at the request of a delegate from the United States
to the Third International Conference of the Red Cross, held in
September, 1884, a copy of the preliminary report of that conference.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _February 2, 1885_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith, for the consideration of Congress, the report of
the National Board of Health for the year 1884.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, February 2, 1885_.

_To the Senate of the United States of America:_

With reference to the resolution of the Senate of the 12th of June,
1884, declining to advise and consent to the ratification of an
accession of the United States to an international convention for the
protection of industrial property, signed at Paris March 20, 1883,
I now return the proposed instrument of accession to the Senate for
reconsideration in connection with the views and recommendations
contained in the accompanying report of the Secretary of State, dated
January 29, 1885.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _February 2, 1885_.

_To the House of Representatives:_

In response to the resolution of the House of Representatives of January
28, 1885, "that the President be respectfully requested to transmit to
this House a copy of the recent appeal of Fitz John Porter, together
with the accompanying papers," I transmit herewith a copy of a
communication from Fitz John Porter, addressed to the President from
Morristown, N.J., under date of October 14, 1884, together with copies
of the accompanying papers.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _February 3, 1885_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives:_

I take especial pleasure in laying before Congress the generous offer
made by Mrs. Grant to give to the Government, in perpetual trust, the
swords and military (and civil) testimonials lately belonging to General
Grant. A copy of the deed of trust and of a letter addressed to me by
Mr. William H. Vanderbilt, which I transmit herewith, will explain the
nature and motives of this offer.

Appreciation of General Grant's achievements and recognition of his just
fame have in part taken the shape of numerous mementoes and gifts which,
while dear to him, possess for the nation an exceptional interest.

These relics, of great historical value, have passed into the hands of
another, whose considerate action has restored the collection to Mrs.
Grant as a life trust, on the condition that at the death of General
Grant, or sooner, at Mrs. Grant's option, it should become the property
of the Government, as set forth in the accompanying papers. In the
exercise of the option thus given her Mrs. Grant elects that the trust
shall forthwith determine, and asks that the Government designate a
suitable place of deposit and a responsible custodian for the
collection.

The nature of this gift and the value of the relics which the generosity
of a private citizen, joined to the high sense of public regard which
animates Mrs. Grant, have thus placed at the disposal of the Government,
demand full and signal recognition on behalf of the nation at the hands
of its representatives. I therefore ask Congress to take suitable action
to accept the trust and to provide for its secure custody, at the same
time recording the appreciative gratitude of the people of the United
States to the donors.

In this connection I may pertinently advert to the pending legislation
of the Senate and House of Representatives looking to a national
recognition of General Grant's eminent services by providing the means
for his restoration to the Army on the retired list. That Congress, by
taking such action, will give expression to the almost universal desire
of the people of this nation is evident, and I earnestly urge the
passage of an act similar to Senate bill No. 2530, which, while not
interfering with the constitutional prerogative of appointment, will
enable the President in his discretion to nominate General Grant as
general upon the retired list.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

DEED OF TRUST.

Whereas I, William H. Vanderbilt, of the city of New York, by virtue of
a sale made under a judgment in a suit to foreclose a chattel mortgage
in the supreme court of this State, in which I was plaintiff and Ulysses
S. Grant defendant, which judgment was entered on the 6th day of
December, 1884, and under an execution in another suit in said court
between the same parties upon a judgment entered December 9, 1884, have
become the owner of the property and the articles described in the
schedule hereto annexed, formerly the property of Ulysses S. Grant:

Now, therefore, to carry out a purpose formed by me, and in
consideration of $1 to me paid, I do hereby transfer and convey each and
every one of the articles mentioned and itemized in the said schedule to
Julia Dent Grant, to have and hold the same to her, her executors and
administrators, upon the trust and agreement, nevertheless, hereby
accepted and made by her, that on the death of the said Ulysses S.
Grant, or previously thereto, at her or their option, the same shall
become and be the property of the nation and shall be taken to
Washington and transferred and conveyed by her and them to the United
States of America.

In witness whereof the said William H. Vanderbilt and Julia Dent Grant
have executed these presents, this 10th day of January, A.D. 1885.

Sealed and delivered in presence of--

W.H. VANDERBILT.
JULIA DENT GRANT.

_Schedule of swords and medals, paintings, bronzes, portraits,
commissions and addresses, and objects of value and art presented by
various governments in the world to General Ulysses S. Grant_.

Mexican onyx cabinet, presented to General Grant by the people of
Puebla, Mexico.

Aerolite, part of which passed over Mexico in 1871.

Bronze vases, presented to General Grant by the Japanese citizens of
Yokohama, Japan.

Marble bust and pedestal, presented by workingmen of Philadelphia.

General Grant and family, painted by Coggswell.

Large elephant tusks, presented by the King of Siam.

Small elephant tusks, from the Maharajah of Johore.

Picture of General Scott, by Page, presented by gentlemen of New York.

Crackleware bowls (very old), presented by Prince Koon, of China.

Cloisonne jars (old), presented by Li Hung Chang.

Chinese porcelain jars (old), presented by Prince Koon, of China.

Arabian Bible.

Coptic Bible, presented by Lord Napier, who captured it with King
Theodore, of Abyssinia.

Sporting rifle.

Sword of Donelson, presented to General Grant after the fall of Fort
Donelson, by officers of the Army, and used by him until the end of the
war.

New York sword, voted to General Grant by the citizens of New York at
the fair held in New York.

Sword of Chattanooga, presented to General Grant by the citizens of Jo
Daviess County, Ill. (Galena), after the battle of Chattanooga.

Roman mug and pitcher.

Silver menu and card, farewell dinner of San Francisco, Cal.

Silver menu of Paris dinner.

Horn and silver snuff box.

Silver match box, used by General Grant.

Gold table, modeled after the table in Mr. McLean's house on which
General R.E. Lee signed the articles of surrender. This was presented to
General Grant by ex-Confederate soldiers.

Gold cigar case (enameled), presented by the Celestial King of Siam.

Gold cigar case (plain), presented by the Second King of Siam.

Gold-handled knife, presented by miners of Idaho Territory.

Nine pieces of jade stone, presented by Prince Koon, of China.

Silver trowel, used by General Grant in laying the corner stone of the
American Museum of Natural History, New York.

Knife, made at Sheffield for General Grant.

Gold pen, General Grant's.

Embroidered picture (cock and hen), presented to General Grant by
citizens of Japan.

Field glasses, used by General Grant during the war.

Iron-headed cane, made from the rebel ram _Merrimac_.

Silver-headed cane, made from wood used in the defense of Fort Sumter.

Gold-headed cane, made out of wood from old Fort Du Quesne, Pa.

Gold-headed cane, presented to General Grant as a tribute of regard for
his humane treatment of the soldiers and kind consideration of those who
ministered to the sick and wounded during the war.

Gold-headed cane, used by General Lafayette, and presented to General
Grant by the ladies of Baltimore, Md.

Carved wood cane, from the estate of Sir Walter Scott.

Uniform as general of the United States Army.

Fifteen buttons, cut from the coats during the war by Mrs. Grant after
the different battles.

Hat ornament, used at Belmont.

Hat ornament, used at Fort Donelson.

Shoulder straps (brigadier-general), worn by General Grant at Belmont,
Fort Donelson, and Shiloh.

Shoulder straps (lieutenant-general), cut from the coat used by General
Grant in the campaigns against Richmond and Petersburg and Lee's army.

Shoulder straps (lieutenant-general), cut from General Grant's coat.

Pair of shoulder straps (general), cut from a coat General Grant used
after the war.

Medal from the American Congress (gold) for opening the Mississippi.

Gold medal, from Philadelphia.

Twenty-one medals (gold, silver, and bronze), badges of armies and
corps.

Ten medals (silver and bronze), sent to General Grant at different
times.

Fourteen medals (bronze), in memory of events.

Silk paper (Louisville Commercial), printed for General Grant.

Silk paper (Daily Chronicle), printed for General Grant.

Silk paper (Burlington Hawkeye), printed for General Grant.

Collection of coin (Japanese). This is the only complete set, except one
which is in the Japanese treasury. Seven of these pieces cost $5,000.
This set was presented by the Government of Japan.

Warrant as cadet at West Point.

Commission, brevet second lieutenant (missing).

Commission, second lieutenant (missing).

Commission, brevet first lieutenant (missing).

Commission as first lieutenant, United States Army.

Commission as brevet captain, United States Army.

Commission as captain, United States Army.

Commission as colonel of volunteers.

Commission as brigadier-general.

Commission as major-general.

Commission as major-general, United States Army.

Commission as lieutenant-general, United States Army.

Commission as general, United States Army.

Commission as honorary member of M.L.A., San Francisco.

Commission as member of Sacramento Society of Pioneers.

Commission as honorary member Royal Historical Society.

Commission as Military Order of Loyal Legion.

Commission as member of the Aztec Club.

Certificate of election President of the United States.

Certificate of reelection President of the United States.

Certificate of honorary membership Territorial Pioneers of California.

Certificate of honorary membership St. Andrew's Society.

Certificate of election LL. D., Harvard College.

Certificate of election honorary membership of the Sacramento Society.

Certificate of Pioneers of California.

Certificate of election honorary member Mercantile Library, San
Francisco.

Freedom of the city of Dublin, Ireland.

Freedom of the city of Stratford-on-Avon.

Freedom of the city of London, England.

Freedom of the city of Glasgow, Scotland.

Freedom of the city of Edinburgh, Scotland.

Freedom of the city of Ayr, Scotland.

Freedom of the burgh of Inverness, Scotland.

Freedom of the city of Oakland, America.

Freedom of the city of San Francisco, America.

Freedom of the city of Londonderry, Ireland.

The freedom of many other cities.

Address to General Grant from the Chamber of Commerce,
Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 1877.

Address to General Grant from the mayor, aldermen, and citizens of the
city of Manchester, England, May 13, 1877.

Address to General Grant by the workingmen of Birmingham, England,
October 16, 1877.

Address to General Grant from the Chamber of Commerce and Board of
Trade, San Francisco, Cal., September, 1879.

Address to General Grant by mayor, aldermen, and burgesses of the
borough of Gateshead, England.

Address to General Grant by the mayor, aldermen, magistrates, aldermen,
and councilors of the borough of Leicester, England.

Address to General Grant by the Americans of Shanghai, China, May 19,
1879.

Address to General Grant by the Calumet Club, of Chicago, Ill.

Address to General Grant from the Society of Friends in Great Britain.

Address to General Grant from Chamber of Commerce of Penang.

Address to General Grant by the mayor, aldermen, and burgesses of the
borough of Southampton, England.

Address to General Grant by the provost, magistrates, and town council
of the royal borough of Stirling.

Address to General Grant by the mayor, aldermen, and burgesses of
Tynemouth, England.

Address to General Grant by the mayor and town council of Sunderland.

Address to General Grant by the trade and friendly societies of
Sunderland.

Address to General Grant by the public schools of Louisville, Ky.

Address to General Grant by the colored men of Louisville, Ky.

Address to General Grant by ex-Confederate soldiers.

Address to General Grant by the State of Louisiana.

Address to General Grant by the Chamber of Commerce and Board of Trade
of San Francisco, Cal.

Address to General Grant by the British workmen of London, England.

Address to General Grant by the North Shields Shipowners' Society,
England.

Address to General Grant by the Chamber of Commerce, Sheffield, England.

Address to General Grant from mayor, aldermen, and burgesses of borough
of Royal Leamington Spa, England.

Address to General Grant by the mayor, aldermen, and burgesses of
Sheffield, England.

Address to General Grant by wardens, etc., and commonalty of the town of
Sheffield, England.

Address to General Grant from the provost, magistrates, and town council
of the city and royal burgh of Elgin, Scotland.

Address to General Grant from the mayor, aldermen, and burgesses of the
borough of Folkestone, England.

Address to General Grant by the mayor, aldermen, and burgesses of the
borough of Jarrow, England.

Address to General Grant by the mayor, aldermen, and burgesses of
Gateshead, England.

Address to General Grant from the Carpenters' Company.

Address to General Grant from the citizens of Cincinnati, congratulating
him on his second election as President of the United States.

Address to General Grant from the citizens of Nagasaki, Japan.

Resolutions of the Territorial Pioneers, admitting General Grant to
membership.

Resolution of the Caledonian Club, of San Francisco, enrolling General
Grant as an honorary member.

Resolutions of the citizens of Jo Daviess County, presenting a sword to
General Grant (sword of Chattanooga).

Resolutions of the Washington Camp, of Brooklyn, Long Island.

First resolutions of thanks of the Congress of the United States.

First resolutions inviting General Grant to visit the house of
representatives of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Second resolutions of thanks from the Congress of the United States.

Letter from citizens of Jersey City thanking General Grant for his Des
Moines, Iowa, speech on the question of public schools.

Presentation of a silver medal by the Union League Club, of
Philadelphia, for gallantry and distinguished services.

Vote of thanks by Congress to General U.S. Grant, etc.

Other resolutions, addresses, votes of thanks, and freedom of cities.

640 FIFTH AVENUE, _January 20, 1885_.

His Excellency CHESTER A. ARTHUR,

_President of the United States_.

DEAR SIR: I purchased the articles of historical interest belonging
to General Grant and gave them to Mrs. Grant in trust to hold during
the lifetime of the General, and at his death, or sooner, at her
option, they to become the property of the Government. They consist of
his swords, memorials of his victories from the United States, States,
and cities, and tributes to his fame and achievements from governments
all over the world. In their proper place at Washington they will
always be secure and will afford pleasure and instruction to succeeding
generations. This trust has been accepted by Mrs. Grant, and the
disposition of the articles is in conformity to the wishes of the
General. I transmit to you herewith the deed of trust. Mrs. Grant
informs me that she prefers to close the trust at once and send the
memorials to Washington. May I ask, therefore, that you will designate
some official, representing the proper Department, to receive them, and
direct him to notify Mrs. Grant of the arrangements necessary to perfect
the transfer and deposit in such of the Government buildings as may be
most suitable?

Yours, respectfully,

W.H. VANDERBILT.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _February 5, 1885_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:_

I herewith transmit a communication from the Secretary of State,
relative to the Japanese Government's offer to donate a valuable piece
of land to the United States in fee simple for legation purposes, and
earnestly recommend that the Executive may be immediately authorized to
accept the gift in the name of the United States and to tender to his
Imperial Japanese Majesty's Government a suitable expression of this
Government's thanks for the generosity which prompted the presentation
of so desirable a site of ground.

I deem it unnecessary to enlarge upon the statement of the Secretary of
State. I feel certain, however, that a perusal of his communication will
at once commend itself to the favorable attention of Congress, and doubt
not that the necessary authorization of Congress will be immediately
given for the acceptance of the gift, as well as insure early action
looking to the erection on the premises of suitable public buildings for
the use of the legation of the United States at Tokyo. This step can not
but be favorable to the United States in every honorable way, while the
disinterested motives of a friendly foreign government deserve from us
a proper and just recognition.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _February 11, 1885_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives:_

In compliance with the act of Congress approved January 16, 1883,
entitled "An act to regulate and improve the civil service of the United
States," the Civil Service Commission has made to the President its
second annual report.

That report is herewith transmitted.

The Commission is in the second year of its existence. The President
congratulates the country upon the success of its labors, commends the
subject to the favorable consideration of Congress, and asks for an
appropriation to continue the work.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _February 12, 1885_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith a copy of the report of the board of management of
the World's Industrial and Cotton Centennial Exposition, dated February
2, 1885, requesting an additional appropriation to extinguish a deficit
in its accounts, and asking authority to reopen the exhibition during
the winter of 1885-86.

A failure on the part of the management to carry out the original intent
in regard to the exposition might reflect upon the honor of the United
States Government, since twenty-one foreign nations and forty-six States
and Territories have joined in the enterprise through faith in the
sanction of the Government. In view of this fact and in consideration
of the value of the exposition to the cause of material progress and
general education, I respectfully submit the report mentioned for the
favorable consideration of Congress.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _February 13, 1885_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives:_

I herewith transmit, as desired by the act of Congress approved July 7,
1884, a letter from the Secretary of State, with accompanying report
from the Central and South American commissioners.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _February 17, 1885_.

_To the House of Representatives:_

In response to the resolution of the House of Representatives of the 9th
of January, 1885, calling for certain correspondence concerning the
transactions of the late French and American Commission, I transmit
herewith a report of the Secretary of State of the 16th instant, in
relation to the subject.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

WASHINGTON, _February 17, 1885_.

_To the Senate of the United States:_

Referring your honorable body to the message of December 1, 1884, by
which I transmitted to the Senate, with a view to ratification, a treaty
negotiated with Belgium touching the succession to and acquirement of
real property, etc., by the citizens or subjects of the one Government
in the domain of the other, I now address you in order to recall the
treaty thus transmitted for reexamination.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _February 17, 1885_.

_To the Senate of the United States:_

Referring to my message of the 13th instant, concerning the report of
the Central and South American commissioners, I have the honor to inform
the Senate that the report therein stated as accompanying the message
was transmitted with a like message to the House of Representatives.

A note of explanation to this effect was inadvertently omitted from the
former message.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _February 19, 1885_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith a report of the Secretary of State of the 19th
instant, recommending the enactment of a law for the protection of
submarine cables in pursuance of our treaty obligations under the
international convention in relation to the subject signed at Paris
on the 14th day of March, 1884.

I commend the matter to the favorable consideration of Congress.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _February 19, 1885_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith a communication of the 16th instant from the
Secretary of the Interior, submitting, with accompanying papers, a draft
of a bill "to accept and ratify an agreement with the confederated
tribes and bands of Indians occupying the Yakima Reservation in the
Territory of Washington for the extinguishment of their title to so much
of said reservation as is required for the use of the Northern Pacific
Railroad, and to make the necessary appropriation for carrying out the
same."

The matter is presented for the consideration and action of the Congress.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _February 19, 1885_.

_To the House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith, in response to a resolution of the House of
Representatives of the 5th instant, requesting copies of all the
communications which have been received respecting the Kongo conference,
and especially copies of the text of the commissions or powers sent by
this Government to each of the three American plenipotentiaries or
agents, a report of the Secretary of State.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _February 19, 1885_.

_To the House of Representatives:_

With reference to my communication of the 27th ultimo, transmitting to
the House of Representatives a preliminary report of the Secretary of
State, dated the 26th of January, 1885, in response to the resolution
of the House of the 9th of January, 1885, calling for copies of the
accounts and vouchers of the disbursing officers of the French-American
Claims Commission and containing other information in relation to the
transactions of said commission, I now transmit herewith a further
report on the subject by the Secretary of State, dated the 17th instant,
which is accompanied by the desired copies of the accounts and vouchers
in question.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _February 25, 1885_.

_To the House of Representatives:_

In answer to the resolution of the House of Representatives of the 13th
instant, requesting me to inform that body, if not incompatible with
the public interest, what were the reasons which moved me to appoint
commissioners to examine and report upon the California and Oregon
Railroad from Reading northwardly, I transmit herewith a communication
on that subject addressed to me on the 24th instant by the Secretary of
the Interior, setting forth the practice under which my action was
taken.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _February 26, 1885_.

_To the Senate of the United States:_

I transmit to the Senate, for its consideration with a view to
ratification, a provisional article of agreement modifying the latter
clause of Article XXVI of the pending commercial treaty between the
United States and Spain, concluded November 18, 1884, so as to extend
the time for the approval of the laws necessary to carry the said treaty
into operation if ratified.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., February 26, 1885_.

_To the Senate of the United States:_

I herewith transmit, for the consideration of the Senate with a view
to ratification, an additional article, signed by the Secretary of
State and the minister of Mexico here, on behalf of their respective
Governments, the 25th instant, providing for the extension of the time
for the approval of the necessary legislation in order to carry into
effect the commercial reciprocity treaty between the United States and
Mexico of January 20, 1883.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, February 28, 1885_.

_To the Senate of the United States:_

Referring to my message to the Senate of the 25th instant, by which I
transmitted, with a view to ratification, an additional article to the
commercial treaty with Spain concluded November 18, 1884, I now have the
honor to request the return of that instrument.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, March 2, 1885_.

_To the Senate of the United States:_

I herewith transmit to the Senate, with a view to examination and
sanction by that body, a treaty signed in this city to-day by the
Secretary of State and the Spanish minister, consisting of four
supplementary articles amendatory of the commercial treaty of November
18, 1884, between the United States and Spain, which is now pending in
the Senate. The accompanying report of the Secretary of State recites
the particulars of the modifications which have been made in deference
to the representations made on behalf of important commercial interests
of the United States, whereby it is believed all well-founded objections
on their part to the ratification of that treaty are obviated.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _March 2, 1885_.

_To the Senate of the United States:_

I transmit herewith, for the consideration of the Senate with a view to
its ratification, a convention concluded February 20, 1885, between the
United States of America and the United States of Mexico, for the
extradition of criminals. A report of the Secretary of State, touching
the negotiation of the convention, is also transmitted.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _March 3, 1885_.

_To the Senate of the United States:_

I nominate Ulysses S. Grant, formerly commanding the armies of the
United States, to be general on the retired list of the Army, with the
full pay of such rank.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

PROCLAMATIONS.

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas the treaty concluded between the United States of America
and Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain and Ireland, concluded at
Washington on the 8th day of May, 1871, contains among other articles
the following, viz:

ARTICLE XVIII.

It is agreed by the high contracting parties that, in addition to
the liberty secured to the United States fishermen by the convention
between the United States and Great Britain signed at London on the
20th day of October, 1818, of taking, curing, and drying fish on
certain coasts of the British North American colonies therein defined,
the inhabitants of the United States shall have, in common with the
subjects of Her Britannic Majesty, the liberty, for the term of years
mentioned in Article XXXIII of this treaty, to take fish of every
kind, except shellfish, on the seacoasts and shores and in the bays,
harbors, and creeks of the Provinces of Quebec, Nova Scotia, and New
Brunswick, and the colony of Prince Edwards Island, and of the several
islands thereunto adjacent, without being restricted to any distance
from the shore, with permission to land upon the said coasts and
shores and islands, and also upon the Magdalen Islands, for the
purpose of drying their nets and curing their fish; provided that in
so doing they do not interfere with the rights of private property or
with British fishermen in the peaceable use of any part of the said
coasts in their occupancy for the same purpose.

It is understood that the above-mentioned liberty applies solely to
the sea fishery, and that the salmon and shad fisheries, and all other
fisheries in rivers and the mouths of rivers, are hereby reserved
exclusively for British fishermen.

ARTICLE XIX.

It is agreed by the high contracting parties that British subjects
shall have, in common with the citizens of the United States, the
liberty, for the term of years mentioned in Article XXXIII of this
treaty, to take fish of every kind, except shellfish, on the eastern
seacoasts and shores of the United States north of the thirty-ninth
parallel of north latitude, and on the shores of the several islands
thereunto adjacent, and in the bays, harbors, and creeks of the said
seacoasts and shores of the United States and of the said islands,
without being restricted to any distance from the shore, with
permission to land upon the said coasts of the United States and of
the islands aforesaid, for the purpose of drying their nets and curing
their fish; provided that in so doing they do not interfere with the
rights of private property or with the fishermen of the United States
in the peaceable use of any part of the said coasts in their occupancy
for the same purpose.

It is understood that the above-mentioned liberty applies solely to
the sea fishery; and that salmon and shad fisheries, and all other
fisheries in rivers and mouths of rivers, are hereby reserved
exclusively for fishermen of the United States.

ARTICLE XX.

It is agreed that the places designated by the commissioners appointed
under the first article of the treaty between the United States and
Great Britain concluded at Washington on the 5th of June, 1854, upon
the coasts of Her Britannic Majesty's dominions and the United States,
as places reserved from the common right of fishing under that treaty,
shall be regarded as in like manner reserved from the common right of
fishing under the preceding articles. In case any question should
arise between the Governments of the United States and of Her
Britannic Majesty as to the common right of fishing in places not thus
designated as reserved, it is agreed that a commission shall be
appointed to designate such places, and shall be constituted in the
same manner and have the same powers, duties, and authority as the
commission appointed under the said first article of the treaty of the
5th of June, 1854.

ARTICLE XXI.

It is agreed that for the term of years mentioned in Article XXXIII of
this treaty fish oil and fish of all kinds (except fish of the inland
lakes and of the rivers falling into them, and except fish preserved
in oil), being the produce of the fisheries of the United States, or
of the Dominion of Canada, or of Prince Edwards Island, shall be
admitted into each country, respectively, free of duty.

ARTICLE XXII.

Inasmuch as it is asserted by the Government of Her Britannic Majesty
that the privileges accorded to the citizens of the United States
under Article XVIII of this treaty are of greater value than those
accorded by Articles XIX and XXI of this treaty to the subjects of Her
Britannic Majesty, and this assertion is not admitted by the
Government of the United States, it is further agreed that
commissioners shall be appointed to determine, having regard to the
privileges accorded by the United States to the subjects of Her
Britannic Majesty, as stated in Articles XIX and XXI of this treaty,
the amount of any compensation which in their opinion ought to be paid
by the Government of the United States to the Government of Her
Britannic Majesty in return for the privileges accorded to the
citizens of the United States under Article XVIII of this treaty; and
that any sum of money which the said commissioners may so award shall
be paid by the United States Government, in a gross sum, within twelve
months after such award shall have been given.

ARTICLE XXIII.

The commissioners referred to in the preceding article shall be
appointed in the following manner; that is to say: One commissioner
shall be named by the President of the United States, one by Her
Britannic Majesty, and a third by the President of the United States
and Her Britannic Majesty conjointly; and in case the third
commissioner shall not have been so named within a period of three
months from the date when this article shall take effect, then the
third commissioner shall be named by the representative at London of
His Majesty the Emperor of Austria and King of Hungary. In case of the
death, absence, or incapacity of any commissioner, or in the event of
any commissioner omitting or ceasing to act, the vacancy shall be
filled in the manner hereinbefore provided for making the original
appointment, the period of three months in case of such substitution
being calculated from the date of the happening of the vacancy.

The commissioners so named shall meet in the city of Halifax, in the
Province of Nova Scotia, at the earliest convenient period after they
have been respectively named, and shall before proceeding to any
business make and subscribe a solemn declaration that they will
impartially and carefully examine and decide the matters referred
to them to the best of their judgment and according to justice and
equity; and such declaration shall be entered on the record of their
proceedings.

Each of the high contracting parties shall also name one person to
attend the commission as its agent, to represent it generally in all
matters connected with the commission.

ARTICLE XXIV.

The proceedings shall be conducted in such order as the commissioners
appointed under Articles XXII and XXIII of this treaty shall
determine. They shall be bound to receive such oral or written
testimony as either Government may present. If either party shall
offer oral testimony, the other party shall have the right of
cross-examination, under such rules as the commissioners shall
prescribe.

If in the case submitted to the commissioners either party shall have
specified or alluded to any report or document in its own exclusive
possession, without annexing a copy, such party shall be bound, if the
other party thinks proper to apply for it, to furnish that party with
a copy thereof; and either party may call upon the other, through the
commissioners, to produce the originals or certified copies of any
papers adduced as evidence, giving in each instance such reasonable
notice as the commissioners may require.

The case on either side shall be closed within a period of six
months from the date of the organization of the commission, and
the commissioners shall be requested to give their award as soon
as possible thereafter. The aforesaid period of six months may be
extended for three months in case of a vacancy occurring among the
commissioners under the circumstances contemplated in Article XXIII
of this treaty.

ARTICLE XXV.

The commissioners shall keep an accurate record and correct minutes
or notes of all their proceedings, with the dates thereof, and may
appoint and employ a secretary and any other necessary officer or
officers to assist them in the transaction of the business which may
come before them.

Each of the high contracting parties shall pay its own commissioner
and agent or counsel; all other expenses shall be defrayed by the two
Governments in equal moieties.

ARTICLE XXX.

It is agreed that for the term of years mentioned in Article XXXIII of
this treaty subjects of Her Britannic Majesty may carry in British
vessels, without payment of duty, goods, wares, or merchandise from
one port or place within the territory of the United States upon the
St. Lawrence, the Great Lakes, and the rivers connecting the same, to
another port or place within the territory of the United States as
aforesaid: _Provided_, That a portion of such transportation is
made through the Dominion of Canada by land carriage and in bond,
under such rules and regulations as may be agreed upon between the
Government of Her Britannic Majesty and the Government of the United
States.

Citizens of the United States may for the like period carry in United
States vessels, without payment of duty, goods, wares, or merchandise
from one port or place within the possessions of Her Britannic Majesty
in North America to another port or place within the said possessions:
_Provided_, That a portion of such transportation is made through
the territory of the United States by land carriage and in bond, under
such rules and regulations as may be agreed upon between the
Government of the United States and the Government of Her Britannic
Majesty.

The Government of the United States further engages not to impose
any export duties on goods, wares, or merchandise carried under this
article through the territory of the United States; and Her Majesty's
Government engages to urge the parliament of the Dominion of Canada
and the legislatures of the other colonies not to impose any export
duties on goods, wares, or merchandise carried under this article; and
the Government of the United States may, in case such export duties
are imposed by the Dominion of Canada, suspend during the period that
such duties are imposed the right of carrying granted under this
article in favor of the subjects of Her Britannic Majesty.

The Government of the United States may suspend the right of carrying
granted in favor of the subjects of Her Britannic Majesty under this
article in case the Dominion of Canada should at any time deprive the
citizens of the United States of the use of the canals in the said
Dominion on terms of equality with the inhabitants of the Dominion,
as provided in Article XXVII.

ARTICLE XXXII.

It is further agreed that the provisions and stipulations of Articles
XVIII to XXV of this treaty, inclusive, shall extend to the colony
of Newfoundland, so far as they are applicable. But if the Imperial
Parliament, the legislature of Newfoundland, or the Congress of the
United States shall not embrace the colony of Newfoundland in their
laws enacted for carrying the foregoing articles into effect, then
this article shall be of no effect; but the omission to make provision
by law to give it effect by either of the legislative bodies aforesaid
shall not in any way impair any other articles of this treaty.

And whereas, pursuant to the provisions of Article XXXIII of said
treaty, due notice has been given to the Government of Her Britannic
Majesty of the intention of the Government of the United States of
America to terminate the above-recited articles of the treaty in
question on the 1st day of July, 1885; and

Whereas, pursuant to the terms of said treaty and of the notice given
thereunder by the Government of the United States of America to that
of Her Britannic Majesty, the above-recited articles of the treaty of
Washington, concluded May 8, 1871, will expire and terminate on the
1st day of July, 1885:

Now, therefore, I, Chester A. Arthur, President of the United States of
America, do hereby give public notice that Articles XVIII, XIX, XX, XXI,
XXII, XXIII, XXIV, XXV, XXX, and XXXII of the treaty of Washington,
concluded May 8, 1871, will expire and terminate on the 1st day of July,
1885, and all citizens of the United States are hereby warned that none
of the privileges secured by the above-recited articles of the treaty in
question will exist after the 1st day of July next. All American
fishermen should govern themselves accordingly.

Done at the city of Washington, this 31st day of January, A.D. 1885, and
of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and
ninth.

[SEAL.]

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

By the President:
FREDK. T. FRELINGHUYSEN,
_Secretary of State_.

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas satisfactory evidence has been received by me that upon vessels
of the United States arriving in ports of the Province of Ontario, in
the Dominion of Canada, or arriving at any port in the island of
Monserrat, in the West Indies, or at Panama or Aspinwall, United States
of Colombia, or at the ports of San Juan and Mayaguez, in the island of
Puerto Rico, no duty is imposed by the ton as tonnage tax or as light
money, and that no other equivalent tax on vessels of the United States
is imposed at said ports by the governments to which said ports are
immediately subject; and

Whereas by the provisions of section 14 of an act approved June 26,
1884, "to remove certain burdens on the American merchant marine and
encourage the American foreign carrying trade, and for other purposes,"
the President of the United States is authorized to suspend the
collection in ports of the United States from vessels arriving from any
port in the Dominion of Canada, Newfoundland, the Bahama Islands, the
Bermuda Islands, the West India Islands, Mexico, and Central America
down to and including Aspinwall and Panama of so much of the duty at
the rate of 3 cents per ton as may be in excess of the tonnage and
light-house dues, or other equivalent tax or taxes, imposed on American
vessels by the government of the foreign country in which such port
is situated:

Now, therefore, I, Chester A. Arthur, President of the United States of
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the act and section
hereinbefore mentioned, do hereby declare and proclaim that on and after
the first Tuesday in February, 1885, the collection of said tonnage duty
of 3 cents per ton shall be suspended as regards all vessels arriving in
any port of the United States from any port in the Province of Ontario,
in the Dominion of Canada, or from a port in the island of Monserrat, in
the West Indies, or from the ports of Panama and Aspinwall, or the ports
of San Juan and Mayaguez, in the island of Puerto Rico.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

Done at the city of Washington, this 31st day of January, 1885, and of
the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and
ninth.

[SEAL.]

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

By the President:
FREDK. T. FRELINGHUYSEN,
_Secretary of State_.

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas satisfactory evidence has been received by me that upon
vessels of the United States arriving at the port of San Juan del Norte
(Greytown), Nicaragua, no duty is imposed by the ton as tonnage tax or
as light money, and that no other equivalent tax on vessels of the
United States is imposed at said port by the Government of Nicaragua;
and

Whereas, by the provisions of section 14 of an act approved June 26,
1884, "to remove certain burdens on the American merchant marine and
encourage the American foreign carrying trade, and for other purposes,"
the President of the United States is authorized to suspend the
collection in ports of the United States from vessels arriving from any
port in the Dominion of Canada, Newfoundland, the Bahama Islands, the
Bermuda Islands, the West India Islands, Mexico, and Central America
down to and including Aspinwall and Panama of so much of the duty
at the rate of 3 cents per ton as may be in excess of the tonnage and
light-house dues, or other equivalent tax or taxes, imposed on American
vessels by the government of the foreign country in which such port is
situated:

Now, therefore, I, Chester A. Arthur, President of the United States of
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the act and section
hereinbefore mentioned, do hereby declare and proclaim that on and after
the first Tuesday in March, 1885, the collection of said tonnage duty of
3 cents per ton shall be suspended as regards all vessels arriving in
any port of the United States from the port of San Juan del Norte
(Greytown), Nicaragua.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

Done at the city of Washington, this 26th day of February, 1885, and of
the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and
ninth.

[SEAL.]

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

By the President:
FREDK. T. FRELINGHUYSEN,
_Secretary of State_.

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas objects of interest to the United States require that the Senate
should be convened at 12 o'clock on the 4th day of March next to receive
and act upon such communications as may be made to it on the part of the
Executive:

Now, therefore, I, Chester A. Arthur, President of the United States,
have considered it to be my duty to issue this my proclamation,
declaring that an extraordinary occasion requires the Senate of the
United States to convene for the transaction of business at the Capitol,
in the city of Washington, on the 4th day of March next, at 12 o'clock
at noon on that day, of which all who shall at that time be entitled to
act as members of that body are hereby required to take notice.

Given under my hand and the seal of the United States, at Washington,
the 27th day of February, A.D. 1885, and of the Independence of the
United States of America the one hundred and ninth.

[SEAL.]

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

By the President:
FREDK. T. FRELINGHUYSEN,
_Secretary of State_.

EXECUTIVE ORDERS.

In the exercise of the power vested in the President by the
Constitution, and by virtue of the seventeen hundred and fifty-third
section of the Revised Statutes and of the civil-service act approved
January 16, 1883, the following rules for the regulation and improvement
of the executive civil service are hereby amended and promulgated, as
follows:

RULE V.

There shall be three branches of the service classified under the
civil-service act (not including laborers or workmen or officers
required to be confirmed by the Senate), as follows:

1. Those classified in the Departments at Washington shall be designated
"The classified departmental service."

2. Those classified under any collector, naval officer, surveyor, or
appraiser in any customs district shall be designated "The classified
customs service."

3. Those classified under any postmaster at any post-office, including
that at Washington, shall be designated "The classified postal service."

4. The classified customs service shall embrace the several customs
districts where the officials are as many as fifty, now the following:
New York City, N.Y.; Boston, Mass.; Philadelphia, Pa.; San Francisco,
Cal.; Baltimore, Md.; New Orleans, La.; Chicago, Ill.; Burlington, Vt.;
Portland, Me.; Detroit, Mich.; Port Huron, Mich.

5. The classified postal service shall embrace the several post-offices
where the officials are as many as fifty, now the following: Albany,
N.Y.; Baltimore, Md.; Boston, Mass.; Brooklyn, N.Y.; Buffalo, N.Y.;
Chicago, Ill.; Cincinnati, Ohio; Cleveland, Ohio; Detroit, Mich.;
Indianapolis, Ind.; Jersey City, N.J.; Kansas City, Mo.; Louisville,
Ky.; Milwaukee, Wis.; Minneapolis, Minn.; Newark, N.J.; New Orleans,
La.; New York City, N.Y.; Philadelphia, Pa.; Pittsburg, Pa.; Providence,
R.I.; Rochester, N.Y.; St. Louis, Mo.; St. Paul, Minn.; San Francisco,
Cal.; Washington, D.C.

RULE VII.

1. The general examinations under the first clause of Rule VI for
admission to the service shall be limited to the following subjects:
(1) Orthography, penmanship, and copying; (2) arithmetic--fundamental
rules, fractions, and percentage; (3) interest, discount, and elements
of bookkeeping and of accounts; (4) elements of the English language,
letter writing, and the proper construction of sentences; (5) elements
of the geography, history, and government of the United States.

2. Proficiency in any subject upon which an examination shall be held
shall be credited in grading the standing of the persons examined in
proportion to the value of a knowledge of such subject in the branch or
part of the service which the applicant seeks to enter.

3. No one shall be entitled to be certified for appointment whose
standing upon a just grading in the general examination shall be less
than 65 per cent of complete proficiency in the first three subjects
mentioned in this rule, and that measure of proficiency shall be deemed
adequate.

4. For places in which a lower degree of education will suffice the
Commission may limit the examinations to less than the five subjects
above mentioned; but no person shall be certified for appointment under
this clause whose grading shall be less than an average of 65 per cent
on such of the first three subjects or parts thereof as the examination
may embrace.

5. The Commission may also order examinations upon other subjects
of a technical or special character to test the capacity which may be
needed in any part of the classified service which requires peculiar
information or skill. Examinations hereunder may be competitive or
noncompetitive, and the maximum limitations of age contained in the
twelfth rule shall not apply to applicants for the same. The application
for and notice of these special examinations, the records thereof,
and the certification of those found competent shall be such as the
Commission may provide for. After consulting the head of any Department
or office the Commission may from time to time designate, subject to the
approval of the President, the positions therein for which applicants
may be required to pass the special examination.

RULE XI.

1. Every application, in order to entitle the applicant to appear for
examination or to be examined, must state under oath the facts on the
following subjects: (1) Full name, residence, and post-office address;
(2) citizenship; (3) age; (4) place of birth; (5) health and physical
capacity for the public service; (6) right of preference by reason
of military or naval service; (7) previous employment in the public
service; (8) business or employment and residence for the previous five
years; (9) education. Such other information shall be furnished as the
Commission may reasonably require touching the applicant's fitness for
the public service. The applicant must also state the number of members
of his family in the public service and where employed, and must also
assert that he is not disqualified under section 8 of the civil-service
act, which is as follows:

"That no person habitually using intoxicating beverages to excess shall
be appointed to or retained in any office, appointment, or employment to
which the provisions of this act are applicable."

No person dismissed from the public service for misconduct shall be
admitted to examination within two years thereafter.

2. No person under enlistment in the Army or Navy of the United States
shall be examined under these rules except for some place in the
Department under which he is enlisted requiring special qualifications,
and with the consent in writing of the head of such Department.

3. The Commission may by regulations, subject to change at any time
by the President, declare the kind and measure of ill health, physical
incapacity, misrepresentation, and bad faith which may properly exclude
any person from the right of examination, grading, or certification
under these rules. It may also provide for medical certificates of
physical capacity in the following cases, and for the appropriate
certification of persons so defective in sight, speech, hearing, or
otherwise as to be apparently disqualified for some of the duties of
the part of the service which they seek to enter.

RULE XVI.

1. Whenever any officer having the power of appointment or employment
shall so request, there shall be certified to him by the Commission or
the proper examining board four names for the vacancy specified, to be
taken from those graded highest on the proper register of those in his
branch of the service and remaining eligible, regard being had to any
right of preference and to the apportionment of appointments to States
and Territories; and from the said four a selection shall be made for
the vacancy. But if a person is on both a general and special register
he need be certified from the former only, at the discretion of the
Commission, until he has remained two months upon the latter.

2. These certifications for the service at Washington shall be made
in such order as to apportion, as nearly as may be practicable, the
original appointments thereto among the States and Territories and the
District of Columbia upon the basis of population as ascertained at the
last preceding census.

3. In case the request for any such certification or any law or
regulation shall call for those of either sex, persons of that sex shall
be certified; otherwise sex shall be disregarded in such certification.

4. No person upon any register shall be certified more than four times
to the same officer in the customs or postal service or more than twice
to any Department at Washington, unless upon request of the appointing
officer; nor shall anyone remain eligible more than one year upon any
register; but these restrictions shall not extend to examinations under
clause 5 of Rule VII. No person while remaining eligible on any register
shall be admitted to a new examination, and no person having failed upon
any examination shall within six months thereafter be admitted to
another examination without the consent of the Commission.

5. Any person appointed to or employed in any part of the classified
service, after due certification for the same under these rules, who
shall be dismissed or separated therefrom without cause or delinquency
on his part may be reappointed or reemployed in the same part or grade
of such service at the same office, within eight months next following
such dismissal or separation, without further examination.

RULE XVII.

1. Every original appointment or employment in said classified service
shall be for the probationary period of six months, at the end of which
time, if the conduct and capacity of the person appointed have been
found satisfactory, the probationer shall be absolutely appointed or
employed, but otherwise be deemed out of the service.

2. Every officer under whom any probationer shall serve during any part
of the probation provided for by these rules shall carefully observe the
quality and value of the service rendered by such probationer, and shall
report to the proper appointing officer, in writing, the facts observed
by him, showing the character and qualifications of such probationer and
of the service performed by him; and such report shall be preserved on
file.

3. Every false statement knowingly made by any person in his application
for examination, and every connivance by him at any false statement made
in any certificate which may accompany his application, and every
deception or fraud practiced by him or by any person in his behalf and
with his knowledge to influence his examination, certification, or
appointment, shall be regarded as good cause for the removal or
discharge of such person during his probation or thereafter.

RULE XXI.

1. No person, unless excepted under Rule XIX, shall be admitted into the
classified civil service from any place not within said service without
an examination and certification under the rules; nor shall any person
who has passed only a limited examination under clause 4 of Rule VII for
the lower classes or grades in the departmental or customs service be
appointed, or be promoted within two years after appointment, to any
position giving a salary of $1,000 or upward without first passing an
examination under clause I of said rule; and such examination shall not
be allowed within the first year after appointment.

2. But a person who has passed the examination under said clause I and
has accepted a position giving a salary of $900 or less shall have the
same right of promotion as if originally appointed to a position giving
a salary of $1,000 or more.

3. The Commission may at any time certify for a $900 or any lower place
in the classified service any person upon the register who has passed
the examination under clause I of Rule VII, if such person does not
object before such certification is made.

RULE XXII.

Any person who has been in the classified departmental service for one
year or more immediately previous may, when the needs of the service
require it, be transferred or appointed to any other place therein upon
producing a certificate from the Civil Service Commission that such
person has passed at the required grade one or more examinations which
are together equal to that necessary for original entrance to the place
which would be secured by the transfer or appointment.

RULE XXIII.

The Civil Service Commission will make appropriate regulations for
carrying these rules into effect.

RULE XXIV.

Every violation by any officer in the executive civil service of these
rules, or of the eleventh, twelfth, thirteenth, or fourteenth sections
of the civil-service act, relating to political assessments, shall be
good cause for removal.

Approved, December 5, 1884.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

In the exercise of the power vested in the President by the
Constitution, and by virtue of the seventeen hundred and fifty-third
section of the Revised Statutes and of the civil-service act approved
January 16, 1883, the following rules for the regulation and improvement
of the executive civil service are hereby amended and promulgated, as
follows:

RULE V.

There shall be three branches of the service classified under the
civil-service act (not including laborers or workmen or officers
required to be confirmed by the Senate), as follows:

1. Those classified in the Departments at Washington shall be designated
"The classified departmental service."

2. Those classified under any collector, naval officer, surveyor, or
appraiser in any customs district shall be designated "The classified
customs service."

3. Those classified under any postmaster at any post-office, including
that at Washington, shall be designated "The classified postal service."

4. The classified customs service shall embrace the several customs
districts where the officials are as many as fifty, now the following:
New York City, N.Y.; Boston, Mass.; Philadelphia, Pa.; San Francisco,
Cal.; Baltimore, Md.; New Orleans, La.; Chicago, Ill.; Burlington, Vt.;
Portland, Me.; Detroit, Mich.; Port Huron, Mich.

5. The classified postal service shall embrace the several post-offices
where the officials are as many as fifty, now the following: Albany,
N.Y.; Baltimore, Md.; Boston, Mass.; Brooklyn, N.Y.; Buffalo, N.Y.;
Chicago, Ill.; Cincinnati, Ohio; Cleveland, Ohio; Detroit, Mich.;
Indianapolis, Ind.; Jersey City, N.J.; Kansas City, Mo.; Louisville,
Ky.; Milwaukee, Wis.; Minneapolis, Minn.; Newark, N.J.; New Haven,
Conn.; New Orleans, La.; New York City, N.Y.; Philadelphia, Pa.;
Pittsburg, Pa.; Providence, R.I.; Rochester, N.Y.; St. Louis, Mo.;
St. Paul, Minn.; San Francisco, Cal.; Washington, D.C.

6. Whenever within the meaning of said act the clerks and persons
employed by the collector, naval officer, surveyor, and appraisers, or
either of them, in any customs district shall be as many as fifty, any
existing classification for the customs service shall apply thereto, and
when the number of clerks and persons employed at any post-office shall
be as many as fifty any existing classification of those in the postal
service shall apply thereto; and thereafter the Commission will provide
for examinations for filling the vacancies at said offices, and the
rules will be applicable thereto.

RULE XIII

1. The date of the reception of all regular applications for the
classified departmental service shall be entered of record by the
Commission, and of all other regular applications by the proper
examining boards of the district or office for which they are made; and
applicants, when in excess of the number that can be examined at a
single examination, shall, subject to the needs of apportionment, be
notified to appear in their order on the respective records. But any
applicants in the several States and Territories for appointment in the
classified departmental service may be notified to appear for
examination at any place at which an examination is to be held, whether
in any State or Territory or in Washington, which shall be deemed most
convenient for them.

2. The Commission is authorized, in aid of the apportionment among the
States and Territories, to hold examinations at places convenient for
applicants from different States and Territories, or for those
examination districts which it may designate and which the President
shall approve.

3. The Commission may by regulation provide for dropping from any record
the applicants whose names have remained thereon for six months or more
without having been reached in due course for notification to be
examined.

RULE XVI.

1. Whenever any officer having the power of appointment or employment
shall so request, there shall be certified to him by the Commission or
the proper examining board four names for the vacancy specified, to be
taken from those graded highest on the proper register of those in his
branch of the service and remaining eligible, regard being had to any
right of preference and to the apportionment of appointments to States
and Territories; and from the said four a selection shall be made for
the vacancy. But if a person is on both a general and a special register
he need be certified from the former only, at the discretion of the
Commission, until he has remained two months upon the latter.

2. These certifications for the service at Washington shall be made
in such order as to apportion, as nearly as may be practicable, the
original appointments thereto among the States and Territories and the
District of Columbia upon the basis of population as ascertained at
the last preceding census.

3. In case the request for any such certification or any law or
regulation shall call for those of either sex, persons of that sex shall
be certified; otherwise sex shall be disregarded in such certification.

4. No person upon any register shall be certified more than four times
to the same officer in the customs or postal service or more than three
times to any Department at Washington, unless upon request of the
appointing officer; nor shall anyone remain eligible more than one
year upon any register; but these restrictions shall not extend to
examinations under clause 5 of Rule VII. No person while remaining
eligible on any register shall be admitted to a new examination, and
no person having failed upon any examination shall within six months
thereafter be admitted to another examination without the consent of
the Commission.

5. Any person appointed to or employed in any part of the classified
service, after due certification for the same under these rules, who
shall be dismissed or separated therefrom without fault or delinquency
on his part, may be reappointed or reemployed in the same part or grade
of such service in the same Department or office within one year next
following such dismissal or separation, without further examination,
on such certification as the Commission may provide.

Approved, January 24, 1885.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

In the exercise of the power vested in the President by the
Constitution, and by virtue of the seventeen hundred and fifty-third
section of the Revised Statutes and of the civil-service act approved
January 16, 1883, the following rule for the regulation and improvement
of the executive civil service is hereby amended and promulgated, as
follows:

RULE XVI.

1. Whenever any officer having the power of appointment or employment
shall so request, there shall be certified to him by the Commission or
the proper examining board four names for the vacancy specified, to be
taken from those graded highest on the proper register of those in his
branch of the service and remaining eligible, regard being had to any
right of preference and to the apportionment of appointments to States
and Territories; and from the said four a selection shall be made for
the vacancy. But if a person is on both a general and a special register
he need be certified from the former only, at the discretion of the
Commission, until he has remained two months upon the latter.

2. These certifications for the service at Washington shall be made
in such order as to apportion, as nearly as may be practicable, the
original appointments thereto among the States and Territories and the
District of Columbia upon the basis of population as ascertained at the
last preceding census.

3. In case the request for any such certification or any law or
regulation shall call for those of either sex, persons of that sex shall
be certified; otherwise sex shall be disregarded in such certification.

4. No person upon any register shall be certified more than four times
to the same officer in the customs or postal service or more than three
times to any Department at Washington, unless upon request of the
appointing officer; nor shall anyone remain eligible more than one
year upon any register; but these restrictions shall not extend to
examinations under clause 5 of Rule VII. No person while remaining
eligible on any register shall be admitted to a new examination, and
no person having failed upon any examination shall within six months
thereafter be admitted to another examination without the consent of
the Commission.

5. Any person appointed to or employed in any part of the classified
service, after due certification for the same under these rules, who
shall be dismissed or separated therefrom without fault or delinquency
on his part, may be reappointed or reemployed in the same part or grade
of such service in the same Department or office within one year next
following such dismissal or separation, without further examination,
on such certification as the Commission may provide.

Approved, February 11, 1885.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, _February 11, 1885_.

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