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defense is the responsibility of the UK

:Glorioso Islands Geography

Total area:
5 km2
Land area:
5 km2; includes Ile Glorieuse, Ile du Lys, Verte Rocks, Wreck Rock, and
South Rock
Comparative area:
about 8.5 times the size of the Mall in Washington, DC
Land boundaries:
none
Coastline:
35.2 km
Maritime claims:
Contiguous zone:
12 nm
Exclusive economic zone:
200 nm
Territorial sea:
12 nm
Disputes:
claimed by Madagascar
Climate:
tropical
Terrain:
undetermined
Natural resources:
guano, coconuts
Land use:
arable land 0%; permanent crops 0%; meadows and pastures 0%; forest and
woodland 0%; other - lush vegetation and coconut palms 100%
Environment:
subject to periodic cyclones
Note:
located in the Indian Ocean just north of the Mozambique Channel between
Africa and Madagascar

:Glorioso Islands People

Population:
uninhabited

:Glorioso Islands Government

Long-form name:
none
Type:
French possession administered by Commissioner of the Republic Jacques
DEWATRE, resident in Reunion
Capital:
none; administered by France from Reunion

:Glorioso Islands Economy

Overview:
no economic activity

:Glorioso Islands Communications

Ports:
none; offshore anchorage only
Airports:
1 with runways 1,220-2,439 m

:Glorioso Islands Defense Forces

Note:
defense is the responsibility of France

:Greece Geography

Total area:
131,940 km2
Land area:
130,800 km2
Comparative area:
slightly smaller than Alabama
Land boundaries:
1,210 km; Albania 282 km, Bulgaria 494 km, Turkey 206 km, Macedonia 228 km
Coastline:
13,676 km
Maritime claims:
Continental shelf:
200 m (depth) or to depth of exploitation
Territorial sea:
6 nm, but Greece has threatened to claim 12 nm
Disputes:
air, continental shelf, and territorial water disputes with Turkey in Aegean
Sea; Cyprus question
Climate:
temperate; mild, wet winters; hot, dry summers
Terrain:
mostly mountains with ranges extending into sea as peninsulas or chains of
islands
Natural resources:
bauxite, lignite, magnesite, crude oil, marble
Land use:
arable land 23%; permanent crops 8%; meadows and pastures 40%; forest and
woodland 20%; other 9%; includes irrigated 7%
Environment:
subject to severe earthquakes; air pollution; archipelago of 2,000 islands
Note:
strategic location dominating the Aegean Sea and southern approach to
Turkish Straits

:Greece People

Population:
10,064,250 (July 1992), growth rate 0.2% (1992)
Birth rate:
11 births/1,000 population (1992)
Death rate:
9 deaths/1,000 population (1992)
Net migration rate:
0 migrants/1,000 population (1992)
Infant mortality rate:
10 deaths/1,000 live births (1992)
Life expectancy at birth:
75 years male, 81 years female (1992)
Total fertility rate:
1.5 children born/woman (1992)
Nationality:
noun - Greek(s); adjective - Greek
Ethnic divisions:
Greek 98%, other 2%; note - the Greek Government states there are no ethnic
divisions in Greece
Religions:
Greek Orthodox 98%, Muslim 1.3%, other 0.7%
Languages:
Greek (official); English and French widely understood
Literacy:
93% (male 98%, female 89%) age 15 and over can read and write (1990 est.)
Labor force:
3,657,000; services 44%, agriculture 27%, manufacturing and mining 20%,
construction 6% (1988)
Organized labor:
10-15% of total labor force, 20-25% of urban labor force

:Greece Government

Long-form name:
Hellenic Republic
Type:
presidential parliamentary government; monarchy rejected by referendum 8
December 1974
Capital:
Athens
Administrative divisions:
52 departments (nomoi, singular - nomos); Aitolia kai Akarnania, Akhaia,
Argolis, Arkadhia, Arta, Attiki, Dhodhekanisos, Dhrama, Evritania, Evros,
Evvoia, Florina, Fokis, Fthiotis, Grevena, Ilia, Imathia, Ioannina,
Iraklion, Kardhitsa, Kastoria, Kavala, Kefallinia, Kerkira, Khalkidhiki,
Khania, Khios, Kikladhes, Kilkis, Korinthia, Kozani, Lakonia, Larisa,
Lasithi, Lesvos, Levkas, Magnisia, Messinia, Pella, Pieria, Piraievs,
Preveza, Rethimni, Rodhopi, Samos, Serrai, Thesprotia, Thessaloniki,
Trikala, Voiotia, Xanthi, Zakinthos, autonomous region: Agios Oros (Mt.
Athos)
Independence:
1829 (from the Ottoman Empire)
Constitution:
11 June 1975
Legal system:
based on codified Roman law; judiciary divided into civil, criminal, and
administrative courts
National holiday:
Independence Day (proclamation of the war of independence), 25 March (1821)
Executive branch:
president, prime minister, Cabinet
Legislative branch:
unicameral Greek Chamber of Deputies (Vouli ton Ellinon)
Judicial branch:
Supreme Court
Leaders:
Chief of State:
President Konstantinos KARAMANLIS (since 5 May 1990); -
Head of Government:
Prime Minister Konstantinos MITSOTAKIS (since 11 April 1990)
Political parties and leaders:
New Democracy (ND; conservative), Konstantinos MITSOTAKIS; Panhellenic
Socialist Movement (PASOK), Andreas PAPANDREOU; Left Alliance, Maria
DAMANAKI; Democratic Renewal (DEANA), Konstantinos STEFANOPOULOS; Communist
Party (KKE), Aleka PAPARIGA; Ecologist-Alternative List, leader rotates
Suffrage:
universal and compulsory at age 18
Elections:
Chamber of Deputies:
last held 8 April 1990 (next to be held April 1994); results - ND 46.89%,
PASOK 38.62%, Left Alliance 10.27%, PASOK/Left Alliance 1.02%,
Ecologist-Alternative List 0.77%, DEANA 0.67%, Muslim independents 0.5%;
seats - (300 total) ND 150, PASOK 123, Left Alliance 19, PASOK-Left Alliance
4, Muslim independents 2, DEANA 1, Ecologist-Alternative List 1; note - one
DEANA deputy joined ND in July, giving ND 151 seats; in November, a special
electoral court ruled in favor of ND on a contested seat, at PASOK'S
expense; PASOK and the Left Alliance divided their four joint mandates
evenly, and the seven KKE deputies split off from the Left Alliance; new
configuration: ND 152, PASOK 124, Left Alliance 14, KKE 7, others unchanged
President:
last held 4 May 1990 (next to be held May 1995); results - Konstantinos
KARAMANLIS was elected by Parliament

:Greece Government

Communists:
an estimated 60,000 members and sympathizers
Member of:
AG, BIS, CCC, CE, CERN, COCOM, CSCE, EBRD, EC, ECE, EIB, FAO, G-6, GATT,
IAEA, IBRD, ICAO, ICC, ICFTU, IDA, IEA, IFAD, IFC, ILO, IMF, IMO, INMARSAT,
INTELSAT, INTERPOL, IOC, IOM, ISO, ITU, LORCS, NACC, NAM (guest), NATO, NEA,
NSG, OAS (observer), OECD, PCA, UN, UNCTAD, UNESCO, UNHCR, UNIDO, UPU, WHO,
WIPO, WMO, WTO, ZC
Diplomatic representation:
Ambassador Christos ZACHARAKIS; Chancery at 2221 Massachusetts Avenue NW,
Washington, DC 20008; telephone (202) 939-5800; there are Greek Consulates
General in Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, New York, and San
Francisco, and a Consulate in New Orleans
US:
Ambassador Michael G. SOTIRHOS; Embassy at 91 Vasilissis Sophias Boulevard,
10160 Athens (mailing address is APO AE 09842; telephone [30] (1) 721-2951
or 721-8401; there is a US Consulate General in Thessaloniki
Flag:
nine equal horizontal stripes of blue alternating with white; there is a
blue square in the upper hoist-side corner bearing a white cross; the cross
symbolizes Greek Orthodoxy, the established religion of the country

:Greece Economy

Overview:
Greece has a mixed capitalistic economy with the basic entrepreneurial
system overlaid in 1981-89 by a socialist government that enlarged the
public sector from 55% of GDP in 1981 to about 70% when Prime Minister
Mitsotakis took office. Tourism continues as a major industry, and
agriculture - although handicapped by geographic limitations and fragmented,
small farms - is self-sufficient except for meat, dairy products, and animal
feedstuffs. The Mitsotakis government inherited several severe economic
problems from the preceding socialist and caretaker administrations, which
had neglected the runaway budget deficit, a ballooning current account
deficit, and accelerating inflation. In early 1991, the government secured a
$2.5 billion assistance package from the EC under the strictest terms yet
imposed on a member country, as the EC finally ran out of patience with
Greece's failure to put its financial affairs in order. Over the next three
years, Athens must bring inflation down to 7%, cut the current account
deficit and central government borrowing as a percentage of GDP, slash
public-sector employment by 10%, curb public-sector pay raises, and broaden
the tax base.
GDP:
purchasing power equivalent - $77.6 billion, per capita $7,730; real growth
rate 1.0% (1991)
Inflation rate (consumer prices):
17.8% (1991)
Unemployment rate:
8.6% (1991)
Budget:
revenues $24.0 billion; expenditures $33.0 billion, including capital
expenditures of $3.3 billion (1991)
Exports:
$6.4 billion (f.o.b., 1990)
commodities:
manufactured goods 48%, food and beverages 22%, fuels and lubricants 6%
partners:
Germany 22%, Italy 17%, France 10%, UK 7%, US 6%
Imports:
$18.7 billion (c.i.f., 1990)
commodities:
consumer goods 33%, machinery 17%, foodstuffs 12%, fuels and lubricants 8%
partners:
Germany 21%, Italy 15%, Netherlands 11%, France 8%, UK 5%
External debt:
$25.5 billion (1990)
Industrial production:
growth rate - 2.4% (1990); accounts for 22% of GDP
Electricity:
10,500,000 kW capacity; 36,420 million kWh produced, 3,630 kWh per capita
(1991)
Industries:
food and tobacco processing, textiles, chemicals, metal products, tourism,
mining, petroleum
Agriculture:
including fishing and forestry, accounts for 17% of GDP and 27% of the labor
force; principal products - wheat, corn, barley, sugar beets, olives,
tomatoes, wine, tobacco, potatoes; self-sufficient in food except meat,
dairy products, and animal feedstuffs; fish catch of 115,000 metric tons in
1988
Economic aid:
US commitments, including Ex-Im (FY70-81), $525 million; Western (non-US)
countries, ODA and OOF bilateral commitments (1970-89), $1,390 million

:Greece Economy

Currency:
drachma (plural - drachmas); 1 drachma (Dr) = 100 lepta
Exchange rates:
drachma (Dr) per US$1 - 182.33 (January 1992), 182.27 (1991), 158.51 (1990),
162.42 (1989), 141.86 (1988), 135.43 (1987)
Fiscal year:
calendar year

:Greece Communications

Railroads:
2,479 km total; 1,565 km 1.435-meter standard gauge, of which 36 km
electrified and 100 km double track, 892 km 1.000-meter gauge; 22 km
0.750-meter narrow gauge; all government owned
Highways:
38,938 km total; 16,090 km paved, 13,676 km crushed stone and gravel, 5,632
km improved earth, 3,540 km unimproved earth
Inland waterways:
80 km; system consists of three coastal canals and three unconnected rivers
Pipelines:
crude oil 26 km; petroleum products 547 km
Ports:
Piraievs, Thessaloniki
Merchant marine:
977 ships (1,000 GRT or over) totaling 23,450,910 GRT/42,934,863 DWT;
includes 15 passenger, 66 short-sea passenger, 2 passenger-cargo, 136 cargo,
24 container, 15 roll-on/roll-off cargo, 18 refrigerated cargo, 1 vehicle
carrier, 196 petroleum tanker, 18 chemical tanker, 9 liquefied gas, 37
combination ore/oil, 3 specialized tanker, 417 bulk, 19 combination bulk, 1
livestock carrier; note - ethnic Greeks also own large numbers of ships
under the registry of Liberia, Panama, Cyprus, Malta, and The Bahamas
Civil air:
39 major transport aircraft
Airports:
77 total, 77 usable; 77 with permanent-surface runways; none with runways
over 3,659 m; 19 with runways 2,440-3,659 m; 23 with runways 1,220-2,439 m
Telecommunications:
adequate, modern networks reach all areas; 4,080,000 telephones; microwave
carries most traffic; extensive open-wire network; submarine cables to
off-shore islands; broadcast stations - 29 AM, 17 (20 repeaters) FM, 361 TV;
tropospheric links, 8 submarine cables; 1 satellite earth station operating
in INTELSAT (1 Atlantic Ocean and 1 Indian Ocean antenna), and EUTELSAT
systems

:Greece Defense Forces

Branches:
Hellenic Army, Hellenic Navy, Hellenic Air Force, Police
Manpower availability:
males 15-49, 2,453,756; 1,883,152 fit for military service; 73,913 reach
military age (21) annually
Defense expenditures:
exchange rate conversion - $3.8 billion, 5.6% of GDP (1991)

:Greenland Geography

Total area:
2,175,600 km2
Land area:
341,700 km2 (ice free)
Comparative area:
slightly more than three times the size of Texas
Land boundaries:
none
Coastline:
44,087 km
Maritime claims:
Exclusive fishing zone:
200 nm
Territorial sea:
3 nm
Disputes:
Denmark has challenged Norway's maritime claims between Greenland and Jan
Mayen
Climate:
arctic to subarctic; cool summers, cold winters
Terrain:
flat to gradually sloping icecap covers all but a narrow, mountainous,
barren, rocky coast
Natural resources:
zinc, lead, iron ore, coal, molybdenum, cryolite, uranium, fish
Land use:
arable land 0%; permanent crops 0%; meadows and pastures 1%; forest and
woodland NEGL%; other 99%
Environment:
sparse population confined to small settlements along coast; continuous
permafrost over northern two-thirds of the island
Note:
dominates North Atlantic Ocean between North America and Europe

:Greenland People

Population:
57,407 (July 1992), growth rate 1.1% (1992)
Birth rate:
19 births/1,000 population (1992)
Death rate:
8 deaths/1,000 population (1992)
Net migration rate:
0 migrants/1,000 population (1992)
Infant mortality rate:
27 deaths/1,000 live births (1992)
Life expectancy at birth:
63 years male, 69 years female (1992)
Total fertility rate:
2.2 children born/woman (1992)
Nationality:
noun - Greenlander(s); adjective - Greenlandic
Ethnic divisions:
Greenlander (Eskimos and Greenland-born Caucasians) 86%, Danish 14%
Religions:
Evangelical Lutheran
Languages:
Eskimo dialects, Danish
Literacy:
NA% (male NA%, female NA%)
Labor force:
22,800; largely engaged in fishing, hunting, sheep breeding
Organized labor:
NA

:Greenland Government

Long-form name:
none
Type:
part of the Danish realm; self-governing overseas administrative division
Capital:
Nuuk (Godthab)
Administrative divisions:
3 municipalities (kommuner, - singular - kommun); - Nordgronland,
Ostgrnland, Vestgronland
Independence:
part of the Danish realm; self-governing overseas administrative division
Constitution:
Danish
Legal system:
Danish
National holiday:
Birthday of the Queen, 16 April (1940)
Executive branch:
Danish monarch, high commissioner, home rule chairman, prime minister,
Cabinet (Landsstyre)
Legislative branch:
unicameral Parliament (Landsting)
Judicial branch:
High Court (Landsret)
Leaders:
Chief of State:
Queen MARGRETHE II (since 14 January 1972), represented by High Commissioner
Bent KLINTE (since NA)
Head of Government:
Home Rule Chairman Lars Emil JOHANSEN (since 15 March 1991)
Political parties and leaders:
two-party ruling coalition - Siumut (a moderate socialist party that
advocates more distinct Greenlandic identity and greater autonomy from
Denmark), Lars Emil JOHANSEN, chairman; - Inuit - Ataqatigiit - (IA; - a -
Marxist-Leninist party that favors complete independence from Denmark rather
than home rule), leader NA; Atassut Party (a more conservative party that
favors continuing close relations with Denmark), leader NA; Polar Party
(conservative-Greenland nationalist), leader NA; Center Party (a new
nonsocialist protest party), leader NA
Suffrage:
universal at age 18
Elections:
Danish Folketing:
last held on 12 December 1990 (next to be held by December 1994); Greenland
elects two representatives to the Folketing; results - percent of vote by
party NA; seats - (2 total) Siumut 1, Atassut 1
Landsting:
last held on 5 March 1991 (next to be held 5 March 1995); results - percent
of vote by party NA; seats - (27 total) Siumut 11, Atassut Party 8, Inuit
Ataqatigiit 5, Center Party 2, Polar Party 1
Member of:
NC
Diplomatic representation:
none (self-governing overseas administrative division of Denmark)
Flag:
two equal horizontal bands of white (top) and red with a large disk slightly
to the hoist side of center - the top half of the disk is red, the bottom
half is white

:Greenland Economy

Overview:
Over the past 25 years, the economy has changed from one based on
subsistence whaling, hunting, and fishing to one dependent on foreign trade.
Fishing is still the most important industry, accounting for over 75% of
exports and about 25% of the population's income. Maintenance of a social
welfare system similar to Denmark's has given the public sector a dominant
role in the economy. In 1990, the economy became critically dependent on
shrimp exports and on an annual subsidy (now about $500 million) from the
Danish Government because cod exports dropped off and commercial mineral
production stopped. As of 1992, the government also has taken control of the
health sector from Denmark. The new Home Rule government installed in March
1991 has decided to end much of the central control of the economy and to
open it wider to competitive forces.
GNP:
purchasing power equivalent - $500 million, per capita $9,000; real growth
rate 5% (1988)
Inflation rate (consumer prices):
l.6% (1991)
Unemployment rate:
9% (1990 est.)
Budget:
revenues $381 million; expenditures $381 million, including capital
expenditures of $36 million (1989)
Exports:
$435 million (f.o.b., 1990 est.)
commodities:
fish and fish products 83%, metallic ores and concentrates 13%
partners:
Denmark 79%, Benelux 9%, Germany 5%
Imports:
$420 million (c.i.f., 1990 est.)
commodities:
manufactured goods 28%, machinery and transport equipment 24%, food and live
animals 12.4%, petroleum and petroleum products 12%
partners:
Denmark 65%, Norway 8.8%, US 4.6%, Germany 3.8%, Japan 3.8%, Sweden 2.4%
External debt:
$480 million (1990 est.)
Industrial production:
growth rate NA%
Electricity:
84,000 kW capacity; 176 million kWh produced, 3,180 kWh per capita (1991)
Industries:
fish processing (mainly shrimp), potential for platinum and gold mining,
handicrafts, shipyards
Agriculture:
sector dominated by fishing and sheep raising; crops limited to forage and
small garden vegetables; 1988 fish catch of 133,500 metric tons
Economic aid:
none
Currency:
Danish krone (plural - kroner); 1 Danish krone (DKr) = 100 re
Exchange rates:
Danish kroner (DKr) per US$1 - 6.447 (March 1992), 6.396 (1991), 6.189
(1990), 7.310 (1989), 6.732 (1988), 6.840 (1987)
Fiscal year:
calendar year

:Greenland Communications

Highways:
80 km
Ports:
Kangerluarsoruseq (Faeringehavn), Paamiut (Frederikshaab), Nuuk (Godthaab),
Sisimiut (Holsteinsborg), Julianehaab, Maarmorilik, North Star Bay
Merchant marine:
1 refrigerated cargo (1,000 GRT or over) totaling 1,021 GRT/1,778 DWT; note
- operates under the registry of Denmark
Civil air:
2 major transport aircraft
Airports:
11 total, 8 usable; 5 with permanent-surface runways; none with runways over
3,659 m; 2 with runways 2,440-3,659 m; 2 with runways 1,220-2,439 m
Telecommunications:
adequate domestic and international service provided by cables and
microwave; 17,900 telephones; broadcast stations - 5 AM, 7 (35 repeaters)
FM, 4 (9 repeaters) TV; 2 coaxial submarine cables; 1 Atlantic Ocean
INTELSAT earth station

:Greenland Defense Forces

Note:
defense is responsibility of Denmark

:Grenada Geography

Total area:
340 km2
Land area:
340 km2
Comparative area:
slightly less than twice the size of Washington, DC
Land boundaries:
none
Coastline:
121 km
Maritime claims:
Exclusive economic zone:
200 nm
Territorial sea:
12 nm
Disputes:
none
Climate:
tropical; tempered by northeast trade winds
Terrain:
volcanic in origin with central mountains
Natural resources:
timber, tropical fruit, deepwater harbors
Land use:
arable land 15%; permanent crops 26%; meadows and pastures 3%; forest and
woodland 9%; other 47%
Environment:
lies on edge of hurricane belt; hurricane season lasts from June to November
Note:
islands of the Grenadines group are divided politically with Saint Vincent
and the Grenadines

:Grenada People

Population:
83,556 (July 1992), growth rate - 0.3% (1992)
Birth rate:
34 births/1,000 population (1992)
Death rate:
7 deaths/1,000 population (1992)
Net migration rate:
- 30 migrants/1,000 population (1992)
Infant mortality rate:
28 deaths/1,000 live births (1992)
Life expectancy at birth:
69 years male, 74 years female (1992)
Total fertility rate:
4.6 children born/woman (1992)
Nationality:
noun - Grenadian(s); adjective - Grenadian
Ethnic divisions:
mainly of black African descent
Religions:
largely Roman Catholic; Anglican; other Protestant sects
Languages:
English (official); some French patois
Literacy:
98% (male 98%, female 98%) age 15 and over having ever attended school
(1970)
Labor force:
36,000; services 31%, agriculture 24%, construction 8%, manufacturing 5%,
other 32% (1985)
Organized labor:
20% of labor force

:Grenada Government

Long-form name:
none
Type:
parliamentary democracy
Capital:
Saint George's
Administrative divisions:
6 parishes and 1 dependency*; Carriacou and Little Martinique*, Saint
Andrew, Saint David, Saint George, Saint John, Saint Mark, Saint Patrick
Independence:
7 February 1974 (from UK)
Constitution:
19 December 1973
Legal system:
based on English common law
National holiday:
Independence Day, 7 February (1974)
Executive branch:
British monarch, governor general, prime minister, Ministers of Government
(cabinet)
Legislative branch:
bicameral Parliament consists of an upper house or Senate and a lower house
or House of Representatives
Judicial branch:
Supreme Court
Leaders:
Chief of State:
Queen ELIZABETH II (since 6 February 1952), represented by Governor General
Sir Paul SCOON (since 30 September 1978)
Head of Government:
Prime Minister Nicholas BRATHWAITE (since 13 March 1990)
Political parties and leaders:
National Democratic Congress (NDC), Nicholas BRATHWAITE; Grenada United
Labor Party (GULP), Sir Eric GAIRY; The National Party (TNP), Ben JONES; New
National Party (NNP), Keith MITCHELL; Maurice Bishop Patriotic Movement
(MBPM), Terrence MARRYSHOW; New Jewel Movement (NJM), Bernard COARD
Suffrage:
universal at age 18
Elections:
House of Representatives:
last held on 13 March 1990 (next to be held by NA March 1996); results -
percent of vote by party NA; seats - (15 total) NDC 8, GULP 3, TNP 2, NNP 2
Member of:
ACP, C, CARICOM, CDB, ECLAC, FAO, G-77, IBRD, ICAO, ICFTU, IDA, IFAD, IFC,
ILO, IMF, INTERPOL, IOC, ITU, LAES, LORCS, NAM, OAS, OECS, OPANAL, UN,
UNCTAD, UNESCO, UNIDO, UPU, WCL, WHO, WTO
Diplomatic representation:
Ambassador Denneth MODESTE; Chancery at 1701 New Hampshire Avenue NW,
Washington, DC 20009; telephone (202) 265-2561; there is a Grenadian
Consulate General in New York
US:
Charge d'Affaires Annette VELER; Embassy at Ross Point Inn, Saint George's
(mailing address is P. O. Box 54, Saint George's); telephone (809) 444-1173
through 1178

:Grenada Government

Flag:
a rectangle divided diagonally into yellow triangles (top and bottom) and
green triangles (hoist side and outer side) with a red border around the
flag; there are seven yellow five-pointed stars with three centered in the
top red border, three centered in the bottom red border, and one on a red
disk superimposed at the center of the flag; there is also a symbolic nutmeg
pod on the hoist-side triangle (Grenada is the world's second-largest
producer of nutmeg, after Indonesia); the seven stars represent the seven
administrative divisions

:Grenada Economy

Overview:
The economy is essentially agricultural and centers on the traditional
production of spices and tropical plants. Agriculture accounts for about 16%
of GDP and 80% of exports and employs 24% of the labor force. Tourism is the
leading foreign exchange earner, followed by agricultural exports.
Manufacturing remains relatively undeveloped, but is expected to grow, given
a more favorable private investment climate since 1983. Despite an
impressive average annual growth rate for the economy of 5.5% during the
period 1986-91, unemployment remains high at about 25%.
GDP:
purchasing power equivalent - $238 million, per capita $2,800 (1989); real
growth rate 5.2% (1990 est.)
Inflation rate (consumer prices):
7.0% (1990)
Unemployment rate:
25% (1990 est.)
Budget:
revenues $54.9 million; expenditures $77.6 million, including capital
expenditures of $16.6 million (1990 est.)
Exports:
$26.0 million (f.o.b., 1990 est.)
commodities:
nutmeg 36%, cocoa beans 9%, bananas 14%, mace 8%, textiles 5%
partners:
US 12%, UK, FRG, Netherlands, Trinidad and Tobago (1989)
Imports:
$105.0 million (f.o.b., 1989 est.)
commodities:
food 25%, manufactured goods 22%, machinery 20%, chemicals 10%, fuel 6%
(1989)
partners:
US 29%, UK, Trinidad and Tobago, Japan, Canada (1989)
External debt:
$90 million (1990 est.)
Industrial production:
growth rate 5.8% (1989 est.); accounts for 6% of GDP
Electricity:
12,500 kW capacity; 26 million kWh produced, 310 kWh per capita (1991)
Industries:
food and beverage, textile, light assembly operations, tourism, construction
Agriculture:
accounts for 16% of GDP and 80% of exports; bananas, cocoa, nutmeg, and mace
account for two-thirds of total crop production; world's second-largest
producer and fourth-largest exporter of nutmeg and mace; small-size farms
predominate, growing a variety of citrus fruits, avocados, root crops,
sugarcane, corn, and vegetables
Economic aid:
US commitments, including Ex-Im (FY84-89), $60 million; Western (non-US)
countries, ODA and OOF bilateral commitments (1970-89), $70 million;
Communist countries (1970-89), $32 million
Currency:
East Caribbean dollar (plural - dollars); 1 EC dollar (EC$) = 100 cents
Exchange rates:
East Caribbean dollars (EC$) per US$1 - 2.70 (fixed rate since 1976)
Fiscal year:
calendar year

:Grenada Communications

Highways:
1,000 km total; 600 km paved, 300 km otherwise improved; 100 km unimproved
Ports:
Saint George's
Civil air:
no major transport aircraft
Airports:
3 total, 3 usable; 2 with permanent-surface runways; none with runways over
3,659 m; 1 with runways 2,440-3,659 m; 1 with runways 1,220-2,439 m
Telecommunications:
automatic, islandwide telephone system with 5,650 telephones; new SHF radio
links to Trinidad and Tobago and Saint Vincent; VHF and UHF radio links to
Trinidad and Carriacou; broadcast stations - 1 AM, no FM, 1 TV

:Grenada Defense Forces

Branches:
Royal Grenada Police Force, Coast Guard
Manpower availability:
NA
Defense expenditures:
$NA, NA% of GDP

:Guadeloupe Geography

Total area:
1,780 km2
Land area:
1,760 km2
Comparative area:
10 times the size of Washington, DC
Land boundaries:
none
Coastline:
306 km
Maritime claims:
Continental shelf:
200 m (depth) or to depth of exploitation
Exclusive economic zone:
200 nm
Territorial sea:
12 nm
Disputes:
none
Climate:
subtropical tempered by trade winds; relatively high humidity
Terrain:
Basse-Terre is volcanic in origin with interior mountains; Grand-Terre is
low limestone formation
Natural resources:
cultivable land, beaches, and climate that foster tourism
Land use:
arable land 18%; permanent crops 5%; meadows and pastures 13%; forest and
woodland 40%; other 24%; includes irrigated 1%
Environment:
subject to hurricanes (June to October); La Soufriere is an active volcano
Note:
located 500 km southeast of Puerto Rico in the Caribbean Sea

:Guadeloupe People

Population:
409,132 (July 1992), growth rate 2.1% (1992)
Birth rate:
19 births/1,000 population (1992)
Death rate:
6 deaths/1,000 population (1992)
Net migration rate:
8 migrants/1,000 population (1992)
Infant mortality rate:
10 deaths/1,000 live births (1992)
Life expectancy at birth:
74 years male, 80 years female (1992)
Total fertility rate:
2.0 children born/woman (1992)
Nationality:
noun - Guadeloupian(s); adjective - Guadeloupe
Ethnic divisions:
black or mulatto 90%; white 5%; East Indian, Lebanese, Chinese less than 5%
Religions:
Roman Catholic 95%, Hindu and pagan African 5%
Languages:
French, creole patois
Literacy:
90% (male 90%, female 91%) age 15 and over can read and write (1982)
Labor force:
120,000; 53.0% services, government, and commerce, 25.8% industry, 21.2%
agriculture
Organized labor:
11% of labor force

:Guadeloupe Government

Long-form name:
Department of Guadeloupe
Type:
overseas department of France
Capital:
Basse-Terre
Administrative divisions:
none (overseas department of France)
Independence:
none (overseas department of France)
Constitution:
28 September 1958 (French Constitution)
Legal system:
French legal system
National holiday:
Taking of the Bastille, 14 July (1789)
Executive branch:
government commissioner
Legislative branch:
unicameral General Council and unicameral Regional Council
Judicial branch:
Court of Appeal (Cour d'Appel) with jurisdiction over Guadeloupe, French
Guiana, and Martinique
Leaders:
Chief of State:
President Francois MITTERRAND (since 21 May 1981)
Head of Government:
Commissioner of the Republic Jean-Paul PROUST (since November 1989)
Political parties and leaders:
Rally for the Republic (RPR), Marlene CAPTANT; Communist Party of Guadeloupe
(PCG), Christian Medard CELESTE; Socialist Party (PSG), Dominique LARIFLA;
Popular Union for the Liberation of Guadeloupe (UPLG); Independent
Republicans; Union for French Democracy (UDF); Union for a New Majority
(UNM)
Suffrage:
universal at age 18
Elections:
French National Assembly:
last held on 5 and 12 June 1988 (next to be held June 1994); Guadeloupe
elects four representatives; results - percent of vote by party NA; seats -
(4 total) PS 2 seats, RPR 1 seat, PCG 1 seat
French Senate:
last held on 5 and 12 June 1988 (next to be held June 1994); Guadeloupe
elects two representatives; results - percent of vote by party NA; seats -
(2 total) PCG 1, PS 1
General Council:
last held NA 1986 (next to be held by NA 1992); results - percent of vote by
party NA; seats - (42 total) number of seats by party NA
Regional Council:
last held on 16 March 1992 (next to be held by 16 March 1998); results - RPR
33.1%, PSG 28.7%, PCG 23.8%, UDF 10.7%, other 3.7%; seats - (41 total) RPR
15, PSG 12, PCG 10, UDF 4
Communists:
3,000 est.
Other political or pressure groups:
Popular Union for the Liberation of Guadeloupe (UPLG); Popular Movement for
Independent Guadeloupe (MPGI); General Union of Guadeloupe Workers (UGTG);
General Federation of Guadeloupe Workers (CGT-G); Christian Movement for the
Liberation of Guadeloupe (KLPG)

:Guadeloupe Government

Member of:
FZ, WCL
Diplomatic representation:
as an overseas department of France, the interests of Guadeloupe are
represented in the US by France
Flag:
the flag of France is used

:Guadeloupe Economy

Overview:
The economy depends on agriculture, tourism, light industry, and services.
It is also dependent upon France for large subsidies and imports. Tourism is
a key industry, with most tourists from the US. In addition, an increasingly
large number of cruise ships visit the islands. The traditionally important
sugarcane crop is slowly being replaced by other crops, such as bananas
(which now supply about 50% of export earnings), eggplant, and flowers.
Other vegetables and root crops are cultivated for local consumption,
although Guadeloupe is still dependent on imported food, which comes mainly
from France. Light industry consists mostly of sugar and rum production.
Most manufactured goods and fuel are imported. Unemployment is especially
high among the young.
GDP:
exchange rate conversion - $1.1 billion, per capita $3,300; real growth rate
NA% (1987)
Inflation rate (consumer prices):
2.3% (1988)
Unemployment rate:
38% (1987)
Budget:
revenues $254 million; expenditures $254 million, including capital
expenditures of NA (1989)
Exports:
$153 million (f.o.b., 1988)
commodities:
bananas, sugar, rum
partners:
France 68%, Martinique 22% (1987)
Imports:
$1.2 billion (c.i.f., 1988)
commodities:
vehicles, foodstuffs, clothing and other consumer goods, construction
materials, petroleum products
partners:
France 64%, Italy, FRG, US (1987)
External debt:
$NA
Industrial production:
growth rate NA%
Electricity:
171,500 kW capacity; 441 million kWh produced, 1,279 kWh per capita (1991)
Industries:
construction, cement, rum, sugar, tourism
Agriculture:
cash crops - bananas and sugarcane; other products include tropical fruits
and vegetables; livestock - cattle, pigs, and goats; not self-sufficient in
food
Economic aid:
US commitments, including Ex-Im (FY70-88), $4 million; Western (non-US)
countries, ODA and OOF bilateral commitments (1970-89), $8.235 billion
Currency:
French franc (plural - francs); 1 French franc (F) = 100 centimes
Exchange rates:
French francs (F) per US$1 - 5.6397 (March 1992), 5.6421 (1991), 5.4453
(1990), 6.3801 (1989), 5.9569 (1988), 6.0107 (1987)
Fiscal year:
calendar year

:Guadeloupe Communications

Railroads:
privately owned, narrow-gauge plantation lines
Highways:
1,940 km total; 1,600 km paved, 340 km gravel and earth
Ports:
Pointe-a-Pitre, Basse-Terre
Civil air:
2 major transport aircraft
Airports:
9 total, 9 usable, 8 with permanent-surface runways; none with runways over
3,659 m; 1 with runways 2,440-3,659 m; 1 with runways 1,220-2,439 m
Telecommunications:
domestic facilities inadequate; 57,300 telephones; interisland radio relay
to Antigua and Barbuda, Dominica, and Martinique; broadcast stations - 2 AM,
8 FM (30 private stations licensed to broadcast FM), 9 TV; 1 Atlantic Ocean
INTELSAT ground station

:Guadeloupe Defense Forces

Branches:
French Forces, Gendarmerie
Manpower availability:
males 15-49, 98,069; NA fit for military service
Note:
defense is responsibility of France

:Guam Geography

Total area:
541.3 km2
Land area:
541.3 km2
Comparative area:
slightly more than three times the size of Washington, DC
Land boundaries:
none
Coastline:
125.5 km
Maritime claims:
Contiguous zone:
12 nm
Continental shelf:
200 m (depth)
Exclusive economic zone:
200 nm
Territorial sea:
12 nm
Disputes:
none
Climate:
tropical marine; generally warm and humid, moderated by northeast trade
winds; dry season from January to June, rainy season from July to December;
little seasonal temperature variation
Terrain:
volcanic origin, surrounded by coral reefs; relatively flat coraline
limestone plateau (source of most fresh water) with steep coastal cliffs and
narrow coastal plains in north, low-rising hills in center, mountains in
south
Natural resources:
fishing (largely undeveloped), tourism (especially from Japan)
Land use:
arable land 11%; permanent crops 11%; meadows and pastures 15%; forest and
woodland 18%; other 45%
Environment:
frequent squalls during rainy season; subject to relatively rare, but
potentially very destructive typhoons (especially in August)
Note:
largest and southernmost island in the Mariana Islands archipelago;
strategic location in western North Pacific Ocean 5,955 km west-southwest of
Honolulu about three-quarters of the way between Hawaii and the Philippines

:Guam People

Population:
142,271 (July 1992), growth rate 2.6% (1992)
Birth rate:
27 births/1,000 population (1992)
Death rate:
4 deaths/1,000 population (1992)
Net migration rate:
3 migrants/1,000 population (1992)
Infant mortality rate:
15 deaths/1,000 live births (1992)
Life expectancy at birth:
72 years male, 76 years female (1992)
Total fertility rate:
2.5 children born/woman (1992)
Nationality:
noun - Guamanian(s); adjective - Guamanian; note - Guamanians are US
citizens
Ethnic divisions:
Chamorro 47%, Filipino 25%, Caucasian 10%, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and
other 18%
Religions:
Roman Catholic 98%, other 2%
Languages:
English and Chamorro, most residents bilingual; Japanese also widely spoken
Literacy:
96% (male 96%, female 96%) age 15 and over can read and write (1980)
Labor force:
46,930; federal and territorial government 40%, private 60% (trade 18%,
services 15.6%, construction 13.8%, other 12.6%) (1990)
Organized labor:
13% of labor force

:Guam Government

Long-form name:
Territory of Guam
Type:
organized, unincorporated territory of the US; policy relations between Guam
and the US are under the jurisdiction of the Office of Territorial and
International Affairs, US Department of the Interior
Capital:
Agana
Administrative divisions:
none (territory of the US)
Independence:
none (territory of the US)
Constitution:
Organic Act of 1 August 1950
Legal system:
NA
National holiday:
Guam Discovery Day (first Monday in March), Liberation Day (July 21), US
Government holidays
Executive branch:
President of the US, governor, lieutenant governor, Cabinet
Legislative branch:
unicameral Legislature
Judicial branch:
Federal District Court of Guam, Territorial Superior Court of Guam
Leaders:
Chief of State:
President George BUSH (since 20 January 1989)
Head of Government:
Governor Joseph A. ADA (since November 1986); Lieutenant Governor Frank F.
BLAS
Political parties and leaders:
Democratic Party (controls the legislature); Republican Party (party of the
Governor)
Suffrage:
universal at age 18; US citizens, but do not vote in US presidential
elections
Elections:
Governor:
last held on 6 November 1990 (next to be held November 1994); results -
Joseph F. ADA reelected
Legislature:
last held on 6 November 1990 (next to be held November 1992); a byelection
was held in April 1991 to replace a deceased legislator, results - percent
of vote by party NA; seats - (21 total) Democratic 11, Republican 10
US House of Representatives:
last held 6 November 1990 (next to be held 3 November 1992); Guam elects one
nonvoting delegate; results - Ben BLAZ was elected as the nonacting
delegate; seats - (1 total) Republican 1
Member of:
ESCAP (associate), IOC, SPC
Diplomatic representation:
none (territory of the US)
Flag:
territorial flag is dark blue with a narrow red border on all four sides;
centered is a red-bordered, pointed, vertical ellipse containing a beach
scene, outrigger canoe with sail, and a palm tree with the word GUAM
superimposed in bold red letters; US flag is the national flag

:Guam Economy

Overview:
The economy is based on US military spending and on revenues from tourism.
Over the past 20 years the tourist industry has grown rapidly, creating a
construction boom for new hotels and the expansion of older ones. Visitors
numbered about 900,000 in 1990. The small manufacturing sector includes
textiles and clothing, beverage, food, and watch production. About 60% of
the labor force works for the private sector and the rest for government.
Most food and industrial goods are imported, with about 75% from the US. In
1991 the unemployment rate was about 4.1%.
GNP:
purchasing power equivalent - $2.0 billion, per capita $14,000; real growth
rate NA% (1991 est.)
Inflation rate (consumer prices):
12.6% (1991)
Unemployment rate:
4.1% (1991 est.)
Budget:
revenues $525 million; expenditures $395 million, including capital
expenditures of $NA.
Exports:
$34 million (f.o.b., 1984)
commodities:
mostly transshipments of refined petroleum products, construction materials,
fish, food and beverage products
partners:
US 25%, Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands 63%, other 12%
Imports:
$493 million (c.i.f., 1984)
commodities:
petroleum and petroleum products, food, manufactured goods
partners:
US 23%, Japan 19%, other 58%
External debt:
$NA
Industrial production:
growth rate NA%
Electricity:
500,000 kW capacity; 2,300 million kWh produced, 16,300 kWh per capita
(1990)
Industries:
US military, tourism, construction, transshipment services, concrete
products, printing and publishing, food processing, textiles
Agriculture:
relatively undeveloped with most food imported; fruits, vegetables, eggs,
pork, poultry, beef, copra
Economic aid:
although Guam receives no foreign aid, it does receive large transfer
payments from the general revenues of the US Federal Treasury into which
Guamanians pay no income or excise taxes; under the provisions of a special
law of Congress, the Guamanian Treasury, rather than the US Treasury,
receives federal income taxes paid by military and civilian Federal
employees stationed in Guam
Currency:
US currency is used
Exchange rates:
US currency is used
Fiscal year:
1 October - 30 September

:Guam Communications

Highways:
674 km all-weather roads
Ports:
Apra Harbor
Airports:
5 total, 4 usable; 3 with permanent-surface runways; none with runways over
3,659 m; 3 with runways 2,440-3,659 m; none with runways 1,220-2,439 m
Telecommunications:
26,317 telephones (1989); broadcast stations - 3 AM, 3 FM, 3 TV; 2 Pacific
Ocean INTELSAT ground stations

:Guam Defense Forces

Note:
defense is the responsibility of the US

:Guatemala Geography

Total area:
108,890 km2
Land area:
108,430 km2
Comparative area:
slightly smaller than Tennessee
Land boundaries:
1,687 km; Belize 266 km, El Salvador 203 km, Honduras 256 km, Mexico 962 km
Coastline:
400 km
Maritime claims:
Continental shelf:
not specific
Exclusive economic zone:
200 nm
Territorial sea:
12 nm
Disputes:
claims Belize, but boundary negotiations to resolve the dispute have begun
Climate:
tropical; hot, humid in lowlands; cooler in highlands
Terrain:
mostly mountains with narrow coastal plains and rolling limestone plateau
(Peten)
Natural resources:
crude oil, nickel, rare woods, fish, chicle
Land use:
arable land 12%; permanent crops 4%; meadows and pastures 12%; forest and
woodland 40%; other 32%; includes irrigated 1%
Environment:
numerous volcanoes in mountains, with frequent violent earthquakes;
Caribbean coast subject to hurricanes and other tropical storms;
deforestation; soil erosion; water pollution
Note:
no natural harbors on west coast

:Guatemala People

Population:
9,784,275 (July 1992), growth rate 2.4% (1992)
Birth rate:
34 births/1,000 population (1992)
Death rate:
8 deaths/1,000 population (1992)
Net migration rate:
-2 migrants/1,000 population (1992)
Infant mortality rate:
56 deaths/1,000 live births (1992)
Life expectancy at birth:
61 years male, 66 years female (1992)
Total fertility rate:
4.6 children born/woman (1992)
Nationality:
noun - Guatemalan(s); adjective - Guatemalan
Ethnic divisions:
Ladino (mestizo - mixed Indian and European ancestry) 56%, Indian 44%
Religions:
predominantly Roman Catholic; also Protestant, traditional Mayan
Languages:
Spanish, but over 40% of the population speaks an Indian language as a
primary tongue (18 Indian dialects, including Quiche, Cakchiquel, Kekchi)
Literacy:
55% (male 63%, female 47%) age 15 and over can read and write (1990 est.)
Labor force:
2,500,000; agriculture 60%, services 13%, manufacturing 12%, commerce 7%,
construction 4%, transport 3%, utilities 0.8%, mining 0.4% (1985)
Organized labor:
8% of labor force (1988 est.)

:Guatemala Government

Long-form name:
Republic of Guatemala
Type:
republic
Capital:
Guatemala
Administrative divisions:
22 departments (departamentos, singular - departamento); Alta Verapaz, Baja
Verapaz, Chimaltenango, Chiquimula, El Progreso, Escuintla, Guatemala,
Huehuetenango, Izabal, Jalapa, Jutiapa, Peten, Quetzaltenango, Quiche,
Retalhuleu, Sacatepequez, San Marcos, Santa Rosa, Solola, Suchitepequez,
Totonicapan, Zacapa
Independence:
15 September 1821 (from Spain)
Constitution:
31 May 1985, effective 14 January 1986
Legal system:
civil law system; judicial review of legislative acts; has not accepted
compulsory ICJ jurisdiction
National holiday:
Independence Day, 15 September (1821)
Executive branch:
president, vice president, Council of Ministers (cabinet)
Legislative branch:
unicameral Congress of the Republic (Congreso de la Republica)
Judicial branch:
Supreme Court of Justice (Corte Suprema de Justicia)
Leaders:
Chief of State and Head of Government:
President Jorge SERRANO Elias (since 14 January 1991); Vice President
Gustavo ESPINA Salguero (since 14 January 1991)
Political parties and leaders:
National Centrist Union (UCN), Jorge CARPIO Nicolle; Solidarity Action
Movement (MAS), Jorge SERRANO Elias; Christian Democratic Party (DCG),
Alfonso CABRERA Hidalgo; National Advancement Party (PAN), Alvaro ARZU
Irigoyen; National Liberation Movement (MLN), Mario SANDOVAL Alarcon; Social
Democratic Party (PSD), Mario SOLARZANO Martinez; Popular Alliance 5 (AP-5),
Max ORLANDO Molina; Revolutionary Party (PR), Carlos CHAVARRIA; National
Authentic Center (CAN), Hector MAYORA Dawe; Democratic Institutional Party
(PID), Oscar RIVAS; Nationalist United Front (FUN), Gabriel GIRON;
Guatemalan Republican Front (FRG), Efrain RIOS Montt
Suffrage:
universal at age 18
Elections:
Congress:
last held on 11 November 1990 (next to be held 11 November 1995); results -
UCN 25.6%, MAS 24.3%, DCG 17. 5%, PAN 17.3%, MLN 4.8%, PSD/AP-5 3.6%, PR
2.1%; seats - (116 total) UCN 38, DCG 27, MAS 18, PAN 12, Pro - Rios Montt
10, MLN 4, PR 1, PSD/AP-5 1, independent 5
President:
runoff held on 11 January 1991 (next to be held 11 November 1995); results -
Jorge SERRANO Elias (MAS) 68.1%, Jorge CARPIO Nicolle (UCN) 31.9%
Communists:
Guatemalan Labor Party (PGT); main radical left guerrilla groups - Guerrilla
Army of the Poor (EGP), Revolutionary Organization of the People in Arms
(ORPA), Rebel Armed Forces (FAR), and PGT dissidents

:Guatemala Government

Other political or pressure groups:
Federated Chambers of Commerce and Industry (CACIF), Mutual Support Group
(GAM), Unity for Popular and Labor Action (UASP), Agrarian Owners Group
(UNAGRO), Committee for Campesino Unity (CUC)
Member of:
BCIE, CACM, CCC, ECLAC, FAO, G-24, G-77, GATT, IADB, IAEA, IBRD, ICAO,
ICFTU, IDA, IFAD, IFC, ILO, IMF, IMO, INTELSAT, INTERPOL, IOC, IOM, ITU,
LAES, LAIA, LORCS, OAS, OPANAL, PCA, UN, UNCTAD, UNESCO, UNIDO, UPU, WCL,
WFTU, WHO, WIPO, WMO
Diplomatic representation:
Ambassador Juan Jose CASO-FANJUL; Chancery at 2220 R Street NW, Washington,
DC 20008; telephone (202) 745-4952 through 4954; there are Guatemalan
Consulates General in Chicago, Houston, Los Angeles, Miami, New Orleans, New
York, and San Francisco
US:
Ambassador Thomas F. STROOCK; Embassy at 7-01 Avenida de la Reforma, Zone
10, Guatemala City (mailing address is APO AA 34024); telephone [502] (2)
31-15-41
Flag:
three equal vertical bands of light blue (hoist side), white, and light blue
with the coat of arms centered in the white band; the coat of arms includes
a green and red quetzal (the national bird) and a scroll bearing the
inscription LIBERTAD 15 DE SEPTIEMBRE DE 1821 (the original date of
independence from Spain) all superimposed on a pair of crossed rifles and a
pair of crossed swords and framed by a wreath

:Guatemala Economy

Overview:
The economy is based on family and corporate agriculture, which accounts for
26% of GDP, employs about 60% of the labor force, and supplies two-thirds of
exports. Manufacturing, predominantly in private hands, accounts for about
18% of GDP and 12% of the labor force. In both 1990 and 1991, the economy
grew by 3%, the fourth and fifth consecutive years of mild growth. Inflation
at 40% in 1990-91 was more than double the 1987-89 level.
GDP:
exchange rate conversion - $11.7 billion, per capita $1,260; real growth
rate 3% (1991 est.)
Inflation rate (consumer prices):
40% (1991 est.)
Unemployment rate:
6.7%, with 30-40% underemployment (1989 est.)
Budget:
revenues $1.05 billion; expenditures $1.3 billion, including capital
expenditures of $270 million (1989 est.)
Exports:
$1.16 billion (f.o.b., 1990)
commodities:
coffee 26%, sugar 13%, bananas 7%, beef 2%
partners:
US 39%, El Salvador, Costa Rica, Germany, Honduras
Imports:
$1.66 billion (c.i.f., 1990)
commodities:
fuel and petroleum products, machinery, grain, fertilizers, motor vehicles
partners:
US 40%, Mexico, Venezuela, Japan, Germany
External debt:
$2.6 billion (December 1990 est.)
Industrial production:
growth rate NA; accounts for 18% of GDP
Electricity:
802,600 kW capacity; 2,461 million kWh produced, 266 kWh per capita (1991)
Industries:
sugar, textiles and clothing, furniture, chemicals, petroleum, metals,
rubber, tourism
Agriculture:
accounts for 26% of GDP; most important sector of economy and contributes
two-thirds of export earnings; principal crops - sugarcane, corn, bananas,
coffee, beans, cardamom; livestock - cattle, sheep, pigs, chickens; food
importer
Illicit drugs:
illicit producer of opium poppy and cannabis for the international drug
trade; the government has an active eradication program for cannabis and
opium poppy; transit country for cocaine shipments
Economic aid:
US commitments, including Ex-Im (FY70-90), $1.1 billion; Western (non-US)
countries, ODA and OOF bilateral commitments (1970-89), $7.92 billion
Currency:
quetzal (plural - quetzales); 1 quetzal (Q) = 100 centavos
Exchange rates:
free market quetzales (Q) per US$1 - 5.0854 (January 1992), 5.0289 (1991),
2.8161 (1989), 2.6196 (1988), 2.500 (1987); note - black-market rate 2.800
(May 1989)
Fiscal year:
calendar year

:Guatemala Communications

Railroads:
884 km 0.914-meter gauge, single track; 782 km government owned, 102 km
privately owned
Highways:
26,429 km total; 2,868 km paved, 11,421 km gravel, and 12,140 unimproved
Inland waterways:
260 km navigable year round; additional 730 km navigable during high-water
season
Pipelines:
crude oil 275 km
Ports:
Puerto Barrios, Puerto Quetzal, Santo Tomas de Castilla
Merchant marine:
1 cargo ship (1,000 GRT or over) totaling 4,129 GRT/6,450 DWT
Civil air:
8 major transport aircraft
Airports:
448 total, 400 usable; 11 with permanent-surface runways; none with runways
over 3,659 m; 3 with runways 2,440-3,659 m; 19 with runways 1,220-2,439 m
Telecommunications:
fairly modern network centered in Guatemala [city]; 97,670 telephones;
broadcast stations - 91 AM, no FM, 25 TV, 15 shortwave; connection into
Central American Microwave System; 1 Atlantic Ocean INTELSAT earth station

:Guatemala Defense Forces

Branches:
Army, Navy, Air Force
Manpower availability:
males 15-49, 2,169,073; 1,420,116 fit for military service; 107,239 reach
military age (18) annually
Defense expenditures:
exchange rate conversion - $113 million, 1% of GDP (1990)

:Guernsey Geography

Total area:
194 km2
Land area:
194 km2; includes Alderney, Guernsey, Herm, Sark, and some other smaller
islands
Comparative area:
slightly larger than Washington, DC
Land boundaries:
none
Coastline:
50 km
Maritime claims:
Exclusive fishing zone:
200 nm
Territorial sea:
3 nm
Disputes:
none
Climate:
temperate with mild winters and cool summers; about 50% of days are overcast
Terrain:
mostly level with low hills in southwest
Natural resources:
cropland
Land use:
arable land NA%; permanent crops NA%; meadows and pastures NA%; forest and
woodland NA%; other NA%; cultivated about 50%
Environment:
large, deepwater harbor at Saint Peter Port
Note:
52 km west of France

:Guernsey People

Population:
57,949 (July 1992), growth rate 0.6% (1992)
Birth rate:
12 births/1,000 population (1992)
Death rate:
11 deaths/1,000 population (1992)
Net migration rate:
5 migrants/1,000 population (1992)
Infant mortality rate:
6 deaths/1,000 live births (1992)
Life expectancy at birth:
72 years male, 78 years female (1992)
Total fertility rate:
1.6 children born/woman (1992)
Nationality:
noun - Channel Islander(s); adjective - Channel Islander
Ethnic divisions:
UK and Norman-French descent
Religions:
Anglican, Roman Catholic, Presbyterian, Baptist, Congregational, Methodist
Languages:
English, French; Norman-French dialect spoken in country districts
Literacy:
NA% (male NA%, female NA%) but compulsory education age 5 to 16
Labor force:
NA
Organized labor:
NA

:Guernsey Government

Long-form name:
Bailiwick of Guernsey
Type:
British crown dependency
Capital:
Saint Peter Port
Administrative divisions:
none (British crown dependency)
Independence:
none (British crown dependency)
Constitution:
unwritten; partly statutes, partly common law and practice
Legal system:
English law and local statute; justice is administered by the Royal Court
National holiday:
Liberation Day, 9 May (1945)
Executive branch:
British monarch, lieutenant governor, bailiff, deputy bailiff
Legislative branch:
unicameral Assembly of the States
Judicial branch:
Royal Court
Leaders:
Chief of State:
Queen ELIZABETH II (since 6 February 1952)
Head of Government:
Lieutenant Governor Lt. Gen. Sir Michael WILKINS (since NA 1990); Bailiff
Mr. Graham Martyn DOREY (since February 1992)
Political parties and leaders:
none; all independents
Suffrage:
universal at age 18
Elections:
Assembly of the States:
last held NA (next to be held NA); results - no percent of vote by party
since all are independents; seats - (60 total, 33 elected), all independents
Member of:
none
Diplomatic representation:
none (British crown dependency)
Flag:
white with the red cross of Saint George (patron saint of England) extending
to the edges of the flag

:Guernsey Economy

Overview:
Tourism is a major source of revenue. Other economic activity includes
financial services, breeding the world-famous Guernsey cattle, and growing
tomatoes and flowers for export.
GDP:
$NA, per capita $NA; real growth rate 9% (1987)
Inflation rate (consumer prices):
7% (1988)
Unemployment rate:
NA%
Budget:
revenues $208.9 million; expenditures $173.9 million, including capital
expenditures of NA (1988)
Exports:
$NA
commodities:
tomatoes, flowers and ferns, sweet peppers, eggplant, other vegetables
partners:
UK (regarded as internal trade)
Imports:
$NA
commodities:
coal, gasoline, and oil
partners:
UK (regarded as internal trade)
External debt:
$NA
Industrial production:
growth rate NA%
Electricity:
173,000 kW capacity; 525 million kWh produced, 9,340 kWh per capita (1989)
Industries:
tourism, banking
Agriculture:
tomatoes, flowers (mostly grown in greenhouses), sweet peppers, eggplant,
other vegetables and fruit; Guernsey cattle
Economic aid:
none
Currency:
Guernsey pound (plural - pounds); 1 Guernsey (#G) pound = 100 pence
Exchange rates:
Guernsey pounds (#G) per US$1 - 0.5799 (March 1992), 0.5652 (1991), 0.5603
(1990), 0.6099 (1989), 0.5614 (1988), 0.6102 (1987); note - the Guernsey
pound is at par with the British pound
Fiscal year:
calendar year

:Guernsey Communications

Ports:
Saint Peter Port, Saint Sampson
Telecommunications:
broadcast stations - 1 AM, no FM, 1 TV; 41,900 telephones; 1 submarine cable

:Guernsey Defense Forces

Note:
defense is the responsibility of the UK

:Guinea Geography

Total area:
245,860 km2
Land area:
245,860 km2
Comparative area:
slightly smaller than Oregon
Land boundaries:
3,399 km; Guinea-Bissau 386 km, Ivory Coast 610 km, Liberia 563 km, Mali 858
km, Senegal 330 km, Sierra Leone 652 km
Coastline:
320 km
Maritime claims:
Exclusive economic zone:
200 nm
Territorial sea:
12 nm
Disputes:
none
Climate:
generally hot and humid; monsoonal-type rainy season (June to November) with
southwesterly winds; dry season (December to May) with northeasterly
harmattan winds
Terrain:
generally flat coastal plain, hilly to mountainous interior
Natural resources:
bauxite, iron ore, diamonds, gold, uranium, hydropower, fish
Land use:
arable land 6%; permanent crops NEGL%; meadows and pastures 12%; forest and
woodland 42%; other 40%; includes irrigated NEGL%
Environment:
hot, dry, dusty harmattan haze may reduce visibility during dry season;
deforestation

:Guinea People

Population:
7,783,926 (July 1992), growth rate - 1.5% (1992)
Birth rate:
46 births/1,000 population (1992)
Death rate:
21 deaths/1,000 population (1992)
Net migration rate:
-40 migrants/1,000 population (1992)
Infant mortality rate:
143 deaths/1,000 live births (1992)
Life expectancy at birth:
41 years male, 45 years female (1992)
Total fertility rate:
6.0 children born/woman (1992)
Nationality:
noun - Guinean(s); adjective - Guinean
Ethnic divisions:
Fulani 35%, Malinke 30%, Soussou 20%, small indigenous tribes 15%
Religions:
Muslim 85%, Christian 8%, indigenous beliefs 7%
Languages:
French (official); each tribe has its own language
Literacy:
24% (male 35%, female 13%) age 15 and over can read and write (1990 est.)
Labor force:
2,400,000 (1983); agriculture 82.0%, industry and commerce 11.0%, services
5.4%; 88,112 civil servants (1987); 52% of population of working age (1985)
Organized labor:
virtually 100% of wage earners loosely affiliated with the National
Confederation of Guinean Workers

:Guinea Government

Long-form name:
Republic of Guinea
Type:
republic
Capital:
Conakry
Administrative divisions:
33 administrative regions (regions administratives, singular - region
administrative); Beyla, Boffa, Boke, Conakry, Coyah, Dabola, Dalaba,
Dinguiraye, Faranah, Forecariah, Fria, Gaoual, Gueckedou, Kankan, Kerouane,
Kindia, Kissidougou, Koubia, Koundara, Kouroussa, Labe, Lelouma, Lola,
Macenta, Mali, Mamou, Mandiana, Nzerekore, Pita, Siguiri, Telimele, Tougue,
Yomou
Independence:
2 October 1958 (from France; formerly French Guinea)
Constitution:
23 December 1990 (Loi Fundamentale)
Legal system:
based on French civil law system, customary law, and decree; legal codes
currently being revised; has not accepted compulsory ICJ jurisdiction
National holiday:
Anniversary of the Second Republic, 3 April (1984)
Executive branch:
president, Transitional Committee for National Recovery (Comite
Transitionale de Redressement National or CTRN) replaced the Military
Committee for National Recovery (Comite Militaire de Redressement National
or CMRN); Council of Ministers (cabinet)
Legislative branch:
People's National Assembly (Assemblee Nationale Populaire) was dissolved
after the 3 April 1984 coup; note: framework for a new National Assembly
established in December 1991 (will have 114 seats)
Judicial branch:
Court of Appeal (Cour d'Appel)
Leaders:
Chief of State and Head of Government:
Gen. Lansana CONTE (since 5 April 1984)
Political parties and leaders:
none; following the 3 April 1984 coup, all political activity was banned
Suffrage:
none
Elections:
none
Member of:
ACCT, ACP, AfDB, CEAO, ECA, ECOWAS, FAO, FZ, G-77, IBRD, ICAO, IDA, IDB,
IFAD, IFC, ILO, IMF, IMO, INTELSAT, INTERPOL, IOC, ISO (correspondent), ITU,
LORCS, NAM, OAU, OIC, UN, UNCTAD, UNESCO, UNIDO, UPU, WCL, WHO, WIPO, WMO,
WTO
Diplomatic representation:
Ambassador (vacant); Charge d'Affaires ad interim Ansoumane CAMARA; Chancery
at 2112 Leroy Place NW, Washington, DC 20008; telephone (202) 483-9420
US:
Ambassador Dane F. SMITH, Jr.; Embassy at 2nd Boulevard and 9th Avenue,
Conakry (mailing address is B. P. 603, Conakry); telephone (224) 44-15-20
through 24
Flag:
three equal vertical bands of red (hoist side), yellow, and green; uses the
popular pan-African colors of Ethiopia; similar to the flag of Rwanda, which
has a large black letter R centered in the yellow band

:Guinea Economy

Overview:
Although possessing many natural resources and considerable potential for
agricultural development, Guinea is one of the poorest countries in the
world. The agricultural sector contributes about 40% to GDP and employs more
than 80% of the work force, while industry accounts for 27% of GDP. Guinea
possesses over 25% of the world's bauxite reserves; exports of bauxite and
alumina accounted for about 70% of total exports in 1989.
GDP:
exchange rate conversion - $3.0 billion, per capita $410; real growth rate
4.3% (1990 est.)
Inflation rate (consumer prices):
19.6% (1990 est.)
Unemployment rate:
NA%
Budget:
revenues $449 million; expenditures $708 million, including capital
expenditures of $361 million (1990 est.)
Exports:
$788 million (f.o.b., 1990 est.)
commodities:
alumina, bauxite, diamonds, coffee, pineapples, bananas, palm kernels
partners:
US 33%, EC 33%, USSR and Eastern Europe 20%, Canada
Imports:
$692 million (c.i.f., 1990 est.)
commodities:
petroleum products, metals, machinery, transport equipment, foodstuffs,
textiles, and other grain
partners:
US 16%, France, Brazil
External debt:
$2.6 billion (1990 est.)
Industrial production:
growth rate NA%; accounts for 27% of GDP
Electricity:
113,000 kW capacity; 300 million kWh produced, 40 kWh per capita (1989)
Industries:
bauxite mining, alumina, gold, diamond mining, light manufacturing and
agricultural processing industries
Agriculture:
accounts for 40% of GDP (includes fishing and forestry); mostly subsistence
farming; principal products - rice, coffee, pineapples, palm kernels,
cassava, bananas, sweet potatoes, timber; livestock - cattle, sheep and
goats; not self-sufficient in food grains
Economic aid:
US commitments, including Ex-Im (FY70-89), $227 million; Western (non-US)
countries, ODA and OOF bilateral commitments (1970-89), $1,465 million; OPEC
bilateral aid (1979-89), $120 million; Communist countries (1970-89), $446
million
Currency:
Guinean franc (plural - francs); 1 Guinean franc (FG) = 100 centimes
Exchange rates:
Guinean francs (FG) per US$1 - 675 (1990), 618 (1989), 515 (1988), 440
(1987), 383 (1986)
Fiscal year:
calendar year

:Guinea Communications

Railroads:
1,045 km; 806 km 1.000-meter gauge, 239 km 1.435-meter standard gauge
Highways:
30,100 km total; 1,145 km paved, 12,955 km gravel or laterite (of which
barely 4,500 km are currently all-weather roads), 16,000 km unimproved earth
(1987)
Inland waterways:
1,295 km navigable by shallow-draft native craft
Ports:
Conakry, Kamsar
Civil air:
10 major transport aircraft
Airports:
15 total, 15 usable; 4 with permanent-surface runways; none with runways
over 3,659 m; 3 with runways 2,440-3,659 m; 10 with runways 1,220-2,439 m
Telecommunications:
poor to fair system of open-wire lines, small radiocommunication stations,
and new radio relay system; 15,000 telephones; broadcast stations - 3 AM 1
FM, 1 TV; 65,000 TV sets; 200,000 radio receivers; 1 Atlantic Ocean INTELSAT
earth station

:Guinea Defense Forces

Branches:
Army, Navy (acts primarily as a coast guard), Air Force, Republican Guard,
paramilitary National Gendarmerie, National Police Force
Manpower availability:
males 15-49, 1,759,811; 888,968 fit for military service (1989)
Defense expenditures:
exchange rate conversion - $29 million, 1.2% of GDP (1988)

:Guinea-Bissau Geography

Total area:
36,120 km2
Land area:
28,000 km2
Comparative area:
slightly less than three times the size of Connecticut
Land boundaries:
724 km; Guinea 386, Senegal 338 km
Coastline:
350 km
Maritime claims:
Exclusive economic zone:
200 nm
Territorial sea:
12 nm
Disputes:
the International Court of Justice (ICJ) on 12 November 1991 rendered its
decision on the Guinea-Bissau/Senegal maritime boundary in favor of Senegal
Climate:
tropical; generally hot and humid; monsoon-type rainy season (June to
November) with southwesterly winds; dry season (December to May) with
northeasterly harmattan winds
Terrain:
mostly low coastal plain rising to savanna in east
Natural resources:
unexploited deposits of petroleum, bauxite, phosphates; fish, timber
Land use:
arable land 11%; permanent crops 1%; meadows and pastures 43%; forest and
woodland 38%; other 7%
Environment:
hot, dry, dusty harmattan haze may reduce visibility during dry season

:Guinea-Bissau People

Population:
1,047,137 (July 1992), growth rate 2.4% (1992)
Birth rate:
42 births/1,000 population (1992)
Death rate:
18 deaths/1,000 population (1992)
Net migration rate:
0 migrants/1,000 population (1992)
Infant mortality rate:
124 deaths/1,000 live births (1992)
Life expectancy at birth:
45 years male, 48 years female (1992)
Total fertility rate:
5.7 children born/woman (1992)
Nationality:
noun - Guinea-Bissauan(s); adjective - Guinea-Bissauan
Ethnic divisions:
African about 99% (Balanta 30%, Fula 20%, Manjaca 14%, Mandinga 13%, Papel
7%); European and mulatto less than 1%
Religions:
indigenous beliefs 65%, Muslim 30%, Christian 5%
Languages:
Portuguese (official); Criolo and numerous African languages
Literacy:
36% (male 50%, female 24%) age 15 and over can read and write (1990 est.)
Labor force:
403,000 (est.); agriculture 90%, industry, services, and commerce 5%,
government 5%; population of working age 53% (1983)
Organized labor:
only one trade union - the National Union of Workers of Guinea-Bissau (UNTG)

:Guinea-Bissau Government

Long-form name:
Republic of Guinea-Bissau
Type:
republic; highly centralized multiparty since mid-1991; the African Party
for the Independence of Guinea-Bissau and Cape Verde (PAIGC) held an
extraordinary party congress in December 1990 and established a two-year
transition program during which the constitution will be revised, allowing
for multiple political parties and a presidential election in 1993
Capital:
Bissau
Administrative divisions:
9 regions (regioes, singular - regiao); Bafata, Biombo, Bissau, Bolama,
Cacheu, Gabu, Oio, Quinara, Tombali
Independence:
10 September 1974 (from Portugal; formerly Portuguese Guinea)
Constitution:
16 May 1984
Legal system:
NA
National holiday:
Independence Day, 10 September (1974)
Executive branch:
president of the Council of State, vice presidents of the Council of State,
Council of State, Council of Ministers (cabinet)
Legislative branch:
unicameral National People's Assembly (Assembleia Nacional Popular)
Judicial branch:
none; there is a Ministry of Justice in the Council of Ministers
Leaders:
Chief of State and Head of Government:
President of the Council of State Brig. Gen. Joao Bernardo VIEIRA (assumed
power 14 November 1980 and elected President of Council of State on 16 May
1984)
Political parties and leaders:
3 parties - African Party for the Independence of Guinea-Bissau and Cape
Verde (PAIGC), President Joao Bernardo VIEIRA, leader; PAIGC is still the
major party and controls all aspects of the Government, but 2 opposition
parties registered in late 1991; Democratic Social Front (FDS), Rafael
BARBOSA, leader; Bafata Movement, Domingos Fernandes GARNER, leader;
Democratic Front, Aristides MENEZES, leader; other parties forming
Suffrage:
universal at age 15
Elections:
National People's Assembly:
last held 15 June 1989 (next to be held 15 June 1994); results - PAIGC is
the only party; seats - (150 total) PAIGC 150, appointed by Regional
Councils
President of Council of State:
last held 19 June 1989 (next to be held NA 1993); results - Brig. Gen. Joao
Bernardo VIEIRA was reelected without opposition by the National People's
Assembly
Member of:
ACCT (associate), ACP, AfDB, ECA, ECOWAS, FAO, G-77, IBRD, ICAO, IDA, IDB,
IFAD, IFC, ILO, IMF, IMO, IOM (observer), ITU, LORCS, NAM, OAU, OIC, UN,
UNCTAD, UNESCO, UNIDO, UPU, WFTU, WHO, WIPO, WMO
Diplomatic representation:
Ambassador Alfredo Lopes CABRAL; Chancery at 918 16th Street NW, Mezzanine
Suite, Washington, DC 20006; telephone (202) 872-4222,

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